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The Hundred Dresses

The Hundred Dresses

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The Hundred Dresses

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (69 Bewertungen)
Länge:
69 Seiten
32 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jun 24, 2014
ISBN:
9780547540450
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Eleanor Estes’s The Hundred Dresses won a Newbery Honor in 1945 and has never been out of print since. At the heart of the story is Wanda Petronski, a Polish girl in a Connecticut school who is ridiculed by her classmates for wearing the same faded blue dress every day. Wanda claims she has one hundred dresses at home, but everyone knows she doesn’t and bullies her mercilessly. The class feels terrible when Wanda is pulled out of the school, but by that time it’s too late for apologies. Maddie, one of Wanda’s classmates, ultimately decides that she is "never going to stand by and say nothing again."

Freigegeben:
Jun 24, 2014
ISBN:
9780547540450
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Eleanor Estes (1906-1988) grew up in West Haven, Connecticut, which she renamed Cranbury for her classic stories about the Moffat and Pye families. A children’s librarian for many years, she launched her writing career with the publication of The Moffats in 1941. Two of her outstanding books about the Moffats—Rufus M. and The Middle Moffat—were awarded Newbery Honors, as was her short novel The Hundred Dresses. She won the Newbery Medal for Ginger Pye.  

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The Hundred Dresses - Eleanor Estes

Media

Copyright 1944 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Copyright renewed 1972 by Eleanor Estes and Louis Slobodkin

Foreword copyright © 2004 by Helena Estes

All rights reserved. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to trade.permissions@hmhco.com or to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 3 Park Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, New York 10016.

hmhbooks.com

Cover illustrations © 1972 by Louis Slobodkin

First published 1944

The Library of Congress has cataloged the print edition as follows:

Estes, Eleanor, 1906–

The hundred dresses/Eleanor Estes; illustrated by Louis Slobodkin.

p. cm.

Newbery Honor Book, 1945.

Summary: In winning a medal she is no longer there to receive, a tight-lipped little Polish girl teaches her classmates a lesson. Includes a note from the author’s daughter, Helena Estes.

[1. Polish Americans—Fiction. 2. Friendship—Fiction.]

I. Slobodkin, Louis, 1903– ill. II. Title.

PZ7.E749Hu 2004

[Fic]—dc22 2003057037

ISBN 978-0-15-205170-9 hardcover

ISBN 978-0-15-205260-7 paperback

eISBN 978-0-547-54045-0

v3.1119

A Letter to Readers

When I am asked about my mother’s book The Hundred Dresses, I often wonder what to say. What more meaning could my words give to a book that, although written sixty years ago, continues to reach the hearts of children around the world? What answers could I give the children who still write letters of thanks and praise to my mother? Is this a true story? they ask. Did this happen to you? Well, most stories are based on both fact and fiction, and certainly this is true for The Hundred Dresses.

Years ago, I asked my mother why she had written the story. She told me about a classmate in her elementary school who had been taunted because she wore the same dress to school every day, and because her Polish name was unusual and difficult for many to pronounce. My mother was in school during World War I, and Polish names were uncommon then in the small town of West Haven, Connecticut, where my mother grew up and where the story takes place. Her classmate wore the same dress to school each day because it was the only one she had. This little girl moved away to New York City in the middle of the school year, and my mother, as sometimes happens in real life, did not have the opportunity to tell her she was sorry.

My mother never forgot the little girl who had been so badly treated. She herself knew what it was like to be poor as a child, to always

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4.3
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  • (4/5)
    Book- The Hundred Dresses
    Author- Eleanor Estes
    Illustrated by Louis Slobodkin
    Publisher- @hmhkids
    Genre- Children's Book
    My Rating- 4.25⭐
    Read on @scribd
    A beautiful middle school level book that explores bullying, friendship, being different etc. School days are especially difficult for those who don't conform. They are either idolised or bullied. Why do children pick on such kids? Is conformity that hard wired into us?
  • (4/5)
    This is a story about a girl who is bullied for being different from her classmates, and how she proves herself and shows her talent through art. It would be a good book for any classroom during bullying awareness weeks, to teach your students that bullying is never the answer. Too often we ignore the fact that everyone has a life, a story, that we will never fully know. This book is a beautiful reminder of that.
  • (4/5)
    The Hundred Dresses is about a poor girl named Wanda who is mostly ignored by her classmates until one day when she tells them that she owns one hundred dresses. Because she dresses so poorly the other girls find this hilarious and tease her about it, continually asking about her dresses. Eventually Wanda and her family move away to get away from all of the bullying that she and the rest of her family have endured for being different. I found this book to be interesting, and I'm not quite sure what to make of it. It felt rather simplified and old fashioned. It did have an important message, but it was presented in such a way that it seemed pretty obvious (at least to me) and was teetering on the edge of being preachy. That’s not to say that it was a bad book, it was just very predictable. On the other hand, I think some of the details about bullying really got glossed over. Other than Wanda basically disappearing, the book never shows the consequences of the bullies' actions, and it's not clear if the girls truly realize the extent of what they did. The characters aren’t stereotypes or anything, but they also aren’t super unique or unlike any other characters before. There are girls acting like typical girls, it’s an interesting story, and it teaches a lesson that is very common with children even today. Though there are some sad moments, in the end everything works out and all are forgiven. I'm not sure if this is a good thing or not. It might be worth pointing out that this book doesn't make much of an impression with me (and also with children today) because there are other books and stories about much worse bullying situations. After hearing about hate crimes or children that commit suicide because they've been picked on so mercilessly, it's hard to make a huge deal out of a girl who is indirectly teased for saying she has a lot of dresses. But it's important to point out that bullying like that can also be hugely damaging to a child. Also, I love the illustrations in this book. They are simple, sketchy illustrations, and there aren’t that many of them, but they are gorgeous – the colors are incredible and color is an important element of the story, so that really works.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book that pulls at your heart strings. Girls can be mean to each other. This girl learns that you can't judge a girl by her cover. Every young girl should be required to read this book.
  • (5/5)
    This magnificently illustrated more-than-a-picture book manages to squeeze a story of cruelty, exclusion, talent, guilt, and empathy into 81-odd pages. Slobodkin's colored pencil illustrations are amazing, blurred yet clear, with color bringing out important scenes and details. Maddie and Peggy, and the other girls tease Wanda because of her Polish last name, the one dress she wears every day, and the fact that she lives out of town. She stands up for herself, claiming to have 100 dresses at home. Maddie always feels nervous, as she too is poor and the cruelty bothers her--but she also fears losing her social standing as popular girl Peggy's best friend. After Wanda moves to the city, they find she did have 100 amazing dresses, drawn by herself. And Maddie learns that Peggy feels badly also.
  • (3/5)
    Age Appropriateness: ElementaryGenre: This book is realistic fiction because it is contains fictional characters but the plot and theme can be seen in real life.Characterization: Maddie. Maddie is a dynamic and flat character. We don't know much about ehr and she changes during the book. Maddie goes along with her best friend (Peggy). Peggy at the beginning of the book makes fun of a girl and Maddie goes alnog with it and doesn't say anything. At the end of the book Maddie feels terrible she never said anything to Peggy about stop making fun of the girl, so in the end her attitude and actions toward this girl change.
  • (4/5)
    In the book, a young Polish girl is bullied in school after moving to Connecticut because she is constantly wearing only one dress. The other girls in her class mock her because of this and the fact that she has a funny last name. The Polish girl, Wanda, tells the other girls that she actually has one hundred dresses at home, which almost makes her get bullied more. After Wanda and her family move away, after winning a drawing contest at school, because she was bullied so much, the school receives a letter explaining why Wanda and her family moved. The girls learned that Wanda moved because people were being so unkind to her, and unfortunately they did not have a chance to apologize and ask for forgiveness. This book is written in a simple way that readers from all ages are able to understand. The message in the story is still veery relevant today, that it is not nice to bully people because of what they wear and that you cannot wait to apologize and make things right after it is too late.
  • (4/5)
    Jolie histoire llustrée qui permet aux jeunes adolescents de réfléchir à leur comportement envers leurs camarades. On reste toutefois un peu sur notre fin quant à l'orgine des 100 robes mais cela aiguise notre imagination!
  • (4/5)
    This book is realistic fiction. It is about a girl that claims she has 100 dresses. None of the other girls believe her though, because she appears to be very poor. They make fun of her for it, ann asks her about it every day. The girl never complains and just takes it. There is an art contest about designing dresses, and the girl submits 100 drawings of dresses. She wins! Everyone is surprised. But before they can tell her that she won, she moves away. So they mail her a letter and tell her that she won. She writes back and says that some of the dress drawings are for certain people. It ends up being drawings of all of the girls that bullied her. They are humbled by this and learn a lesson.
  • (1/5)
    This book is about a girl named Wanda who wishes she was wealthier than the other girls. This takes place most of the time at school where Wanda goes to school. In the begging Maddie and Peggy and other kids pick on her. They tease her and Wanda says she has a hundred dresses. Wanda leaves and Maddie and Peggy try to make her come back and be nice. I did not like this book because Wanda never came back and it did not have a great story. I would recommend you to not read this book because it also was not very exiting from my point of view.
  • (5/5)
    This Newberry Honor book was first published in 1944 it's timeless themes bring light to the guilt and harm that occurs when making judgements on others. It is a book perfect for creating an anti -bullying identity safe classroom that both boys as well as girls will come to love in intermediate grades.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked the way that this book paints the picture of a school bullying situation in a way that shows the complexities of each role, the perpetrator, the victim and the bystander. I love that parallels are drawn between both the bystander and the perpetrator as well as the bystander and the victim to show that each of these roles is complex in nature. Also, for Maddie the bystander, her friend's bullying of Wanda weighs heavily on her conscience as she recognizes and is troubles by these parallels. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I think it could be a really great read for upper elementary school kids, especially girls, in order to have them think about the ways their actions effect others prior to entering middle school. I also enjoyed the illustrations and the fact that, within these illustrations, all of the characters are kept faceless to show that anyone can be in any of the roles portrayed.
  • (4/5)
    Everyone reviews 100 Dresses as a story about poor, shy, Polish-American Wanda Petronski but I see 100 Dresses as being about a girl named Maddie, torn between doing the right thing and being friends with the most popular girl in school. Wanda is a central character, I agree. With her strange name and quiet ways, she is the subject of ridicule when she announces she owns 100 dresses. This is obviously a lie when she wears the same faded, and frayed blue dress to school everyday. Right away this makes her a target. Maddie's best friend Peggy attacks this lie by asking detailed questions about the fictional dresses intentionally making Wanda squirm. Meanwhile Maddie stands by, witness to the taunting but says nothing. She doesn't dare stand up for Wanda for fear of putting herself in Peggy's cross hairs. She understands her friendship with Peggy to be conditional. Maddie knows that the bullying is wrong but can't stand up for Wanda. In the end Wanda's father moves the family away to avoid more ridicule. While this wouldn't happen in today's society (I believe most parents would tell their child to "get over it") the bullying is as real as ever.
  • (5/5)
    Madeline (Maddie) is in Miss Mason’s Room 13 at school, along with her best friend, Peggy, who is the most popular girl in school. Another girl in class is Wanda Petronski, who lives in Boggins Heights, the “bad section” of town, is very quiet, and seems to have difficulty reading. Wanda wears the same faded blue dress that doesn’t hang right to school every day. Once when someone asked her if that was the only dress she had, she replied that she had a hundred dresses hanging in her closet. After that, Peggy began teasing her by asking her every day how many dresses she had, and even Maddie, while she somehow feels uncomfortable about it, joins in the teasing. They’re really not intending to be mean or cruel. Then one day Wanda isn’t in school. Peggy and Maddie have waited outside to tease her again, and when she doesn’t come they are a little late. In fact, Wanda is missing for several days. However, a picture that she has drawn for the school’s coloring contest wins a medal. Maddie and Peggy even climb up the hill to the Petronski house in Boggins Heights on a cold, rainy day to see if Wanda is there. Were there really a hundred dresses? How does Maddie feel when the class receives a letter telling them that Wanda, her father, and her brother Jake have moved from their house in Boggins Heights to another city where there will be no more teasing about their funny name. And what can Maddie do to assuage her feelings of guilt? The author’s daughter says that during World War I her mother went to elementary school with a poor classmate who was taunted because she wore the same dress to school every day and her Polish name was unusual. The little girl moved away to New York City in the middle of the school year, and Eleanor Estes never had the opportunity to tell her that she was sorry. Helena Estes writes, “Was the character Maddie based on my mother? Probably.” This tender and touching story, which won a Newbery Honor Award in 1945, teaches children some very important lessons. Some might tend to focus on the negatives of bullying, racism, and ethnic stereotypes, but the real value of the book is in illustrating the meaning of kindness, generosity, compassion, and understanding. I highly recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    For this book I rated it a five. I rated it this because it is a book that I feel children could really relate to in terms of one of my students that might be going through some type of bulling or maybe I could reach the bullier. A personal connection that I received when reading this book was the fact that I was once bullied and to actually read about a young girl that went through the same thing would have gave me some hope when I was in school. The best part of the story was the fact that the little girl that had the hundred dresses still loved the girls who tormented her so and that I feel will send out a really good message to my students. I would use it in my classroom for content area instruction to teach my students about maybe word recognition because since this book is an older book some words are different from what we use today.
  • (4/5)
    This short novel is a good one for getting kids to think about how they make others feel. We may not be trying to be mean and yet we are thoughtless or afraid to speak up.
  • (5/5)
    A quiet, unassuming little story that packs a powerful emotional punch. Both the storytelling and Slobodkin's illustrations are absolutely lovely
  • (4/5)
    Decided to read some "kids" books/young adult this year.
    Read as much as I could in grade school, but don't think there were as many books or as many lists to choose from in those days. Missed too many, so it's time to catch up a bit.
    This book is so hauntingly current for today. Not overly wrought, but one that doesn't leave you and can be put into so many young and adult situations.
    There's a play - not sure where I can find it - would like to.
  • (5/5)
    The Hundred Dresses was a touching story about a girl that wears the same dress to school everyday, but claims to have a hundred different ones in her closet at home. The story follows how she is teased by the girls at school and one girl begins to regret it. I really enjoyed this book and the interesting plot twist at the end.
  • (5/5)
    This book is fantastic. It is about a young polish girl, Wanda whose family is very poor so she wear the same dress everyday to school, but says she has a hundred dresses at home because of this the other girls make fun of her. The story goes on to show the regret of one of the girls who had teased Wanda, after Wanda moves away. I think that in the right setting this book can be used to approach the subject of bullying and standing up for other people. A class discussion on the topic could easily begin after a read aloud and I think it would be especially good for young girls. Also, an art project can come from this book, something along the lines of "a hundred... dresses, cats, hats, etc." Something that allows students to create and design! This was a great book that really had an insightful and meaningful message.
  • (4/5)
    Wanda Petoski is a weird little girl who says she has 100 dresses all lined up in her closet. soon every on learns tat she really does have one hundred dresses all lined up in her closet. Wanda submits her dresses for the art contest because they where pictures.
  • (4/5)
    Considering the current buzz about bullying, one might think it is a current issue. Estes' book shows that it is not. Written in 1945, from the perspective of the flunky of the bully, it is a powerful tale about speaking up for others and not being silent. This is a worthwhile book to read to children (and frankly, I know adults who could benefit from this lesson as well). Highly recommend.
  • (3/5)
    Read this as a kid and wanted to remember the story. MY memory was Wanda's closet was large enough to hold 100 dresses...

    I liked the lesson the book teaches and can understand how Maddie felt as she did about not wanting to bring attention to herself.
  • (5/5)
    Although some of the language in this book is somewhat dated the story itself is timeless. A young girl is bullied by her classmates and is believed to be telling fibs about her hundred dresses. As it turns out she delivers on her claim of having a hundred dresses in an unexpected way. Through this experience students learn about kindness and acceptance. This is a classic tale and one I will read with my grade 2 group of advance readers as an enrichment activity. Adrienne Gear also recommends this book for grade 2-3 readers.
  • (4/5)
    This is a compelling read about girls in a school that tease the new student because of her dress. The new girl came to town wearing an old, worn dress and speaks a little differently. One day, she says she has 100 dresses and then gets teased by the most popular girl at school. The other girls at the school continue to tease her because of her appearance and accent. This book shows the effect of judging people and how differences in culture and taste should be embraced not ostracized. The way the story shows how the girl actually does have 100 dresses, just not the type she can wear shows how if the girls would have given her a chance, they could have appreciated her story much more. There are also some pictures in the book that are very simple, black and pink only.
  • (5/5)
    My first favorite book. My mom read it to me when I was little. I loved the illustrations and the story of this picked-on poor artist girl. When I grew up I forgot the story.A professor mentioned it years ago in a composition class. I asked to borrow a copy, and the next week she brought one for me to borrow. The illustrations were so instantly familiar that they took my breath away. I did not quite find the story I remembered.This book has become a defining feature in my adulthood. The Hundred Dresses is more than a children's book about a girl who is poor. It is about social violence and immigration and what we do when we're under pressure. It makes my heart pound a little harder when I think about it.
  • (5/5)
    I can remember reading this when I wasa little girl. I remember feeling sosad for Wanda, wearing her same fadedblue dress to school every day, whoboasted that she had a hundred dressesat home. I also remember the endingand loved how Wanda really did havea hundred dresses. The consolationsof the imagination.
  • (4/5)
    The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes was originally published in 1944, and stands the test of time as it is still pertinent today. This children’s book, with illustrations by Louis Slobodkin tells of a young immigrant Polish girl named Wanda Petronski who arrives at school every day wearing the same dress. She is ridiculed over this and one day she claims that she has 100 dresses at home in her closet. This statement causes Wanda to become even more of an outsider as she is constantly teased about these dresses. When the much anticipated drawing contest winner is declared to be Wanda with her entry of beautiful drawings of 100 dresses the class looks to congratulate her, but she isn’t there to accept her prize as her family has moved to the city in the hopes of fitting in there.One of Wanda’s classmates, Maddie, had always been uncomfortable with the teasing but felt afraid to say anything in case her classmates turned on her. Feeling bad and disappointed in herself because she didn’t support Wanda, she now vows to never stand aside and watch someone being bullied again. This small book packs a big punch with it’s sensitively handled message about how hurtful heedless intolerance can be, and how bowing to peer pressure can lead to regrets and missed opportunities.
  • (4/5)
    Depressingly insightful
  • (3/5)
    Beautifully told. I enjoyed the portrayal of the nice girls as the bullies and I wonder how many nice kids tease others without realizing how much their words effect others.