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The Undefeated

The Undefeated

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The Undefeated

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (14 Bewertungen)
Länge:
43 Seiten
58 Minuten
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 2, 2019
ISBN:
9780358057611
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Written by Scribd Editors

Kwame Alexander's brilliant poem The Undefeated is brought to life by artist Kadir Nelson in this ode to Blackness in America. A 2020 Newbery Honor book and winner of both the 2020 Caldecott Medal and 2020 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award, The Undefeated takes readers through love, through loss, and through endurance.

Waxing poetic on the ways of the tireless civil rights leaders and the horrifying traumas of slavery, Alexander's poem references the sayings of writers like Gwendolyn Brooks, Martin Luther King, Jr., Langston Hughes, and other great figures who made it through and out.

Nelson's illustrations add a depth to the poem and bring not just Alexander's spirit to life, but that of all those he quotes, references, and draws upon. This work is a love letter to Black survival. The book also contains further historical readings for those interested.

This poem is intensely readable for adults, children, and anyone in between.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 2, 2019
ISBN:
9780358057611
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Kwame Alexander is a poet, educator, and the New York Times best-selling author of more than thirty-five books, including Rebound, the follow-up to his Newbery medal–winning middle grade novel, The Crossover. Some of his other works include Booked, which was longlisted for the National Book Award, The Playbook: 52 Rules to Help You Aim, Shoot, and Score in this Game of Life, Swing, and the picture books Out of Wonder and The Undefeated, which was longlisted for the National Book Award and won the Caldecott Medal, a Newbery Honor, and the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award. He is a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition, currently serving as their poet ambassador. He lives with his family in the UK. Visit his website at www.kwamealexander.com or find him on Twitter and Instagram @kwamealexander.

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The Undefeated - Kwame Alexander

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über The Undefeated denken

4.6
14 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Alexander has an amazing gift for word choice. The continued use of words beginning with 'un-' gives a sense of unity and continuity to the poem. In addition, the matching of illustration to word choice makes each word and page more impactful.

    At the end, the author gives short descriptions of the people and things brought up in the poem. Which makes learning and understanding about these things even more assessable to any who pick this book up. As well as, giving deeper context.

    When I first saw the cover, the realistic style illustrations didn't draw me in, but, after reading the poem, I think it complimented the poem better than another style would have.
  • (5/5)
    It’s hard to surpass the amount of talent that is represented by this combination of author (Kwame Alexander) and illustrator (Kadir Nelson). Together they have created a wonderful paean to African American heroes and heroines.The magnficent oils by Nelson are mesmerizing by themselves, but the free verse by poet Alexander is stirring and inspirational.It begins:“This is for the unforgettable.The swift and sweet onesWho hurdled historyAnd opened a world Of possible.""The ones who survivedAmericaby any means necessary.And the ones who didn’t.”The poem, couched as a dedication, continues to pay tribute to people of color and the roles they played in American history. The final spread shows the faces of young black girls and boys with the words, “This is for us.”It’s difficult to resist quoting the whole book - the poem is that good. In an Afterword, Alexander writes that he began this poem in 2008, the year his second daughter was born and Barack Obama became the first African American president. He says: “This poem was my tribute to both.” He notes that he wanted his daughters “to know how we got to this historic moment, or as the famous Mahalia Jackson spiritual says, ‘You know my soul look back and wonder / How did I make it over.’”He also wanted his daughters, “all of you,” and even himself to be reminded:“… never, ever give up, because, as Maya Angelou wrote, ‘We may encounter many defeats, but we must not be defeated.”Following the Afterword there is a delineation of “Historical Figures and Events Featured in The Undefeated.”Kadir Nelson offsets his outstanding paintings of notable African Americans on blank white pages, putting them in startling relief. The strength conveyed in his realistic oils are a fitting complement to the gravity and dignity conveyed in the book.Evaluation: Both the poetry and the illustrations are magnificent. This is a must read, not only for Black History Month, but for any month.
  • (4/5)
    A poem that celebrates Black America and its enduring resilience, passion, and imagination. Accessible, dramatic, confident; a poem that is ode to history. Back matter has brief bios of all the celebrated faces that appear in the book.
  • (5/5)
    This new book is an illustrated poem the author wrote for his daughter after Obama was elected President. The poem is great on it’s own, the illustrations make it amazing. In my review I can not do justice to this work of art, but I can say I love it!#BBRC #AtoZ
  • (4/5)
    Celebrated poet and author Kwame Alexander, whose children's novel in verse, The Crossover, was awarded the Newbery Medal in 2015, presents a "love letter to black America" in this new picture-book, published as part of his new "Versify" imprint with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. His poem, which highlights many heroic and noteworthy people of African-American descent - people from many different professions, who lived in different times - is an ode to "the dreamers and doers" that have left the community undefeated, despite the many injustices they have endured, and challenges they have faced. Alexander's simple words are paired with illustrator Kadir Nelson's gorgeous illustrations, while an extensive afterword profiles all of the people depicted in the artwork.Although quite aware of Kwame Alexander's work, The Undefeated is the first of his books I have picked up. Kadir Nelson, on the other hand, is someone whose beautiful illustrations I have experienced many times. Given Alexander's reputation, and my love of everything Nelson does, I was surprised to find that, despite the worthy aim of the book, and my great appreciation for the visuals, I was mostly unmoved by the poem itself. I appreciate the message, and certainly agree that there are many outstanding people in African-American history, people who have broken barriers of all kinds and confronted injustices great and small, but the text here just didn't speak to me. It felt almost like a list of statements, strung together. The reader's reaction to poetry is tricky of course, and highly idiosyncratic, so what I found pedestrian (despite the poignant topic), others might find very powerful. My favorite part of the book, textually speaking, was the detailed afterword, which gave information about all of the many people depicted in Kadir Nelson's artwork. That said, I did wonder a bit at Alexander's contention in his afterword that the subject(s) of his poem had been left out of American history, given the wealth of children's books published, just in the last few years alone, about the general historic themes of the book, and some of the specific people profiled. Of the subjects covered, and the people profiled, probably the only ones that are relatively unknown and/or neglected are the visual artists and painters. Everything else is well-trodden ground.Despite my lackluster reaction to the text here, I did find The Undefeated a powerful reading experience, due to Kadir Nelson's gorgeous artwork, done in oil paint. Visually beautiful, emotionally expressive, immensely well-designed, the illustrative choices made here were brilliant. The choice to have a blank two-page spread, when mentioning those who did not survive, makes a powerful statement. Sometimes less is more. The final spread, showing today's young African-American children, is particularly beautiful, but all of the illustrations are lovely. This is one I would recommend wholeheartedly to Nelson fans, and, with the proviso that I didn't care for the poem itself, to anyone looking for picture-books which grapple with the African-American experience.
  • (5/5)
    When Kwame Alexander and Kadir Nelson come together to celebrate black excellence, you find yourself exposed to a gorgeous piece of art. The Undefeated contains powerful verse and beautiful paintings. The back of the book includes brief descriptions of the images within. Suitable for ages 6 to 9, this poem would be an amazing kickoff to an exploration of black history, be it in a classroom or at home.
  • (3/5)
    Goodreads Choice Awards Project: Read as many of the Best Picture Book nominees as possible. 3 to go!I'm not a fan of poetry, and this one fell flat the first time through reading it myself. I tried the free audio download offered online and was much more impressed. The art is gorgeous, and short bios of the prominent African Americans featured in it are in the end matter. It may be a bit of a heavy read for young children, but is obviously a good way to introduce some huge topics when they are ready.