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Batman: Black Glove

Batman: Black Glove

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Batman: Black Glove

Bewertungen:
3/5 (78 Bewertungen)
Länge:
177 Seiten
33 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709775
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Die Entdeckung einer geheimnisvollen Verbrecherorganisation namens Black Glove führt einen zunehmend irrational agierenden Batman auf eine Reise durch sein Leben, die nur wenig später in seinem buchstäblichen Untergang enden wird! Der schottische Meisterautor Grant Morrison zieht alle Register seines Könnens, um skurrile Elemente des Silver Age in die Moderne zu transportieren und das erzählerische Grundgerüst zu Bruce Waynes epischem Schwanengesang Batman R.I.P. zu erschaffen. Dieser Band enthält in gesammelter Form die US-Ausgaben Batman 667 – 669 und 672-675, geschrieben von Grant Morrison und mit Zeichnungen von J. H. Williams III, Tony Daniel und Ryan Benjamin.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709775
Format:
Buch

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Batman - Grant Morrison

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Batman denken

3.0
78 Bewertungen / 5 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    It's entertaining and not too confusing like some of Morrison's work. As a paperback collection it's kind of all over the place. The first 3 issues deal with murders on a remote island. Then 3 more deal with replacement Batmen, including the future Azrael. The last one is about Bruce and his new girlfriend Jezebel Jet--got to love those alliterative names! I take it they're all part of an overall story, but like I said for a single book it's a little ragged. I'm just saying.
  • (3/5)
    The second installment of Grant Morrison's Batman epic jumps around a lot. After saving his mother from a torpedo in Batman and Son, we see Damian only twice: being treated for massive injuries (in what looks like a Lazarus Pit of sorts), and then later he's shooting a bow blindfolded and nailing the bull's eye (of course). Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne is trying to balance being Batman dating a socially conscious supermodel. Then there's the whole C-List superheroes club, a "bargain basement" of vigilantes, which is where the story starts: a reunion on some remote island.

    Batman totally spurned these "Batmen of all nations," who in turn are just jealous. Some rich guy who wanted to form a Justice League of Batmen pits these subpar superheroes against each other, and somehow this relates to a group called the Black Glove. Yadda, yadda, yadda, Batman wins and then we're back to Gotham, where the third of three ghosts of Batman is wrecking the scene at G.C.P.D. We learn Batman volunteered for isolation experiments and these ghosts of Batman were meant as a replacement in case ol' Bats bit the big one. There's the Bane-like one, the one who carries a gun and shot Joker in the face back in Batman and Son, and then the one that sold his soul to the devil. Batman barely escapes and is badly injured.

    That supermodel that Bruce has been seeing? She's totally about to break up with him for being distant and hiding "something dark," when low and behold they're attacked at a fancy dinner by a guy with nine fingers and tattooed eyeballs on his fingertips that he uses to see. Two guesses: he's either a member of the League of Assassins or part of this Black Glove. Bruce is forced to reveal his Batmanness by beating Mr. Eye-Fingers to pulp, and the supermodel is like ZOMG! You're Batman! The End.
  • (2/5)
    Rarely does a Batman book make me mad, but this probably the most inaccessible story I've read in a while. The first adventure is weird and depressing. It's clearly influenced by the Watchmen, but very difficult to follow. The second one is like a crazy acid trip for most of it, and actually references Batman comics from the '50s (Bat-Mite and the story "Robin Dies at Dawn") in a seemingly major subplot.

    Morrison is good when he's good, but this one is a little too much I think. Unless you've got to read 'em all, I'd skip it.
  • (2/5)
    I am not a fan of Grant Morrison's run at Batman. I get that many readers like me view Batman as an iconic character, while in reality Batman is is competition to sell comics each month. So this is part of an extreme attempt to capture readers, many of whom are 12 years old. But,... this story is a convoluted mess of flashbacks dreams and over the top silliness. To top it off Batman, the rock of the DC franchise, a character that despite lacking superpowers has plausibly been a force in a comic book universe by the force of his will, is now a basket case of insecurities easily preyed upon my manipulative villains. Thankfully another writer will one day retcon all of this mess away.
  • (2/5)
    Jumpy and not much continuity