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Batman: Joker

Batman: Joker

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Batman: Joker

Bewertungen:
4/5 (14 Bewertungen)
Länge:
128 Seiten
23 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709980
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Jokers rechte Hand! Der Joker wird aus der Irrenanstalt entlassen und hat trotzdem keinen Grund zum Lachen. Seine werten Mitschurken haben sich nämlich in der Zwischenzeit seine Besitztümer angeeignet und sein Revier unter sich aufgeteilt, da sie dachten, sie wären ihn für immer los. Doch nun ist der Joker zurück und begierig darauf, Gotham bluten zu lassen, wie es noch nie zuvor geblutet hat. Allerdings braucht dazu er einen neuen Helfer… Dieser Band enthält als deutsche Erstveröffentlichung die abgeschlossene Graphic Novel Joker, geschrieben von Brian Azzarello und gezeichnet von Lee Bermejo
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709980
Format:
Buch

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Batman - Lee Bermejo

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Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Batman denken

4.1
14 Bewertungen / 14 Rezensionen
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Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Joker is a sort of alt-universe look at Batman, with a hyper-realistic version of the characters not unlike the Nolanverse Batman. Killer Croc is just a muscular guy with a skin condition, riddler and penguin and just skinny and short criminals respectively, and so on. The story focuses primarily on Joker, who is drawn to clearly resemble Heath Ledger's portrayal (though he doesn't speak like him), as he is released from Arkham and tries to get back the resources that he had before being locked up. He is working with a driver, who is the narrator for the story.

    The book is engaging and well-illustrated, but not without flaws. I love realistic universes in comic books, so this one was appealing to me, but ultimately the plot is quite weak, with a story that never really seems to go anywhere. As with most isolated Batman comics, we're given thin excuses to re-meet classic characters, but the runway show of villains doesn't do much to sustain the book. It ends far too quickly, with Batman being out of the picture for so long that you start to wonder if he's even part of this continuity, only to have him show up at the very end and end the book suddenly.

    I also found myself highly annoyed at Harley Quinn. Now she's a stripper, and she has not a single line in the entire book. This kind of crap is why people think comic books are for horny idiot boys, people.

    Overall, worth a read, but a bit disappointing.
  • (5/5)
    The perilous life of a Joker henchman.
  • (4/5)
    Brian Azzarello portrays the Joker as a drug abusing schizophrenic crime boss in this organized crime inspired stand-alone tale.The over-arching plot is fairly mundane. Freshly released from Arkham Asylum the Joker sets out to reestablish his alpha criminal status amongst the rogues gallery of Gotham City. What makes this story truly compelling is that it is largely told through the character of Johnny Frost, a hired lackey and small time criminal that acts as the Joker's chauffeur. Additionally, Azzarello and Bermejo's reinterpretation of classic Gotham villains such as Killer Croc, Two-Face, the Penguin, and the Riddler compliment the gritty crime-noir tone of the story. The villains unique pathologies are preserved and even more disturbing in Azzarellos more mundane depiction of Gotham City. Gone are the brightly colored outlandish outfits and comical gags and gadgets. What you get in this story are characters depicted as regular people with serious mental disorders that place them in the ranks of the criminally insane.
  • (4/5)
    A one shot graphic novel after the Joker is proclaimed sane and let out of Arkam Asylum. Jonny Frost is sent to pick him up and quickly gets drawn into his world which clearly is not sane! Since his stink in Arkam the city has been split between the various mobsters and crime bosses and the Joker has nothing. He has returned to claim what is his and he isn’t of the mind to ask nicely.A whole host of villains turn up in the story including Harlequin, Penguin, Riddler and Two Face/Harvey Dent. Batman is always in the background and only appears at the very end. The Joker makes comment though that he is always watching from the shadows. He leaves behind him a wake of death and destruction and Jonny who narrates the tale gets sucked further and further in to the madness. Dark and very well drawn. Excellent story and I loved the twisted ending which I won’t spoil here. A classic and you don’t need to be a Batman fan or have read any of the other graphic novels to enjoy this. Although perhaps, enjoy is not the right word…
  • (5/5)
    An episode with the Joker, inexplicably released from Arkham, told through the eyes of the thug who is sent by his old gang to pick him up. Joker goes on a rampage to take back his part of Gotham, crossing paths with Penguin, Killer Croc, Riddler and Two-Face. This is as penetrating a look into Joker's psyche as I have seen, at once opening new doors of perception and leaving all as much a mystery as ever. The Joker here, both in appearance and character, is much like the one portrayed in the movie with Heath Ledger, "The Dark Knight Returns". Batman does not appear until the final pages, and his appearance is both climax and anticlimax. A masterful story from Azzarello, a talent worth following.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this one, especially the artwork. The Joker is unexpectedly released from Arkham Asylum, and sets off on a killing spree to reclaim what has been lost to other villains like Penguin, Riddler, and Two-face.
    While on the surface, it seems that Joker is simply a serial killer in this story, it's the interaction and dialogue he has with Jonny Jonny Frost that drives the story and reveals the depth of Joker's insanity.
  • (5/5)
    Oh man, this is a great graphic novel. The story line is really nice, as are the very iconic character descriptions. The art is absolutely amazing. Loved it.
  • (4/5)
    The premise: ganked from BN.com: The Joker has been mysteriously released from Arkham Asylum, and he's none to happy about what's happened to his Gotham City rackets while he's been "away." What follows is a harrowing night of revenge, murder and manic crime as only The Joker can deliver it, as he brutally takes back his stolen assets from The Penguin, The Riddler, Two-Face, Killer Croc and others. My RatingWorth the Cash: As far as I can tell, this is only available in hardcover, but even if you're a kind of casual yet knowledgeable-enough-to-be-dangerous fan like I am, I think you'll be quite pleased with this story. It's dark and it's compelling, as we see sides of the Joker we've not seen before (I shouldn't say "we," because really, it's me), and it's a dark, gritty, violent tale that makes you wonder whether or not the Joker's really sane or just faking it for a larger purpose. A good read, with art that appealed to me very much. Azzarello's storytelling has me wanting to seek out his other work, and reading this particular tale of the Joker has me wanting to read (and re-read) more Batman-related comics.Cover Commentary: Well, it certainly fits the character! The cover I've got isn't quite as bright and bold as the image used in this review, but at least the least used in this review shows more. The font choice is a good one, so is placement. And hey, it's the Joker's bloody-looking mouth. There's not much more of a trademark than that, the Joker's frightening grin. It's guaranteed to catch the eye of any fan of the franchise, and I really like its gritty feel, the lack of clean, cartoony lines.Review style: I'm not wholly comfortable reviewing graphic novels or comics, but I will talk about my response to the art as well as the story itself and how it strikes me given the gigantically spiraling and oftentimes contradictory Batman canon that's out there. In this case, there's really no such thing as spoilers, so if you're interested, feel free to read the full review at my LJ. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.REVIEW: Brian Azzarello's JOKERHappy Reading!
  • (5/5)
    Love this. Joker is by far my favourite villain ever.
    The art is just fantastic too.

  • (3/5)
    Not my favorite story - but the illustrations in this comic wowed the crap out of me. Dark, gritty, and impossible beautiful. To everyone's surprise the Joker has been released from Arkham Asylum and shit in Gotham is about to get dark. The Joker is none to pleased to learn that his turf has been taken over and his assets claimed so he wastes no time in setting his city back to the way it should rightfully be. He shakes down Killer Croc, the Penguin, the Riddler, and Two-Face and takes absolute delight in putting everyone back in their place. The Joker's insanity is his calling card and to him there is a method to his madness. Dark and gritty; but not my favorite.
  • (5/5)
    I was in awe of this book. A story told by one of joker's new hires if you will. It was a different perspective from what i'm use to reading when dealing with the joker, in my opinion a must read!
  • (3/5)
    BOOOOOOOOOOO! Expected, hoped for so much more. The art was alright, but the story didn't add anything to the Joker's history. It just didn't need to be told and wasn't that compelling.
  • (4/5)
    This book does a deep dive of the Joker's psyche via his getaway driver. It's about as twisted and violent as you'd expect from a Joker story in the 2000s. Like watching a living train wreck, this makes for pretty compelling reading.

    In this story we get the Joker looking like he does in the Chris Nolan film, The Dark Knight. I guess the release coincided with the movie? Regardless, it's a very stylized, well-drawn book, leaving little doubt that this a graphic novel.

    I'm withholding a fifth star on this one just because it doesn't quite reach the classic status of other Joker stories like the Joker fish, Soft Bullets or The Killing Joke. The Joker goes around blowing a lot of stuff up and killing a lot of people, but he's lacking that overarching diabolical/nonsensical scheme present in his best stories.

    Overall, a worthwhile read for Batman and Joker fans, but newcomers to the genre might want to start with one of the classics.
  • (4/5)
    After being inexplicably released from Arkham, the Joker goes on a rampage to reclaim what he believes to be his - the money, the criminal network, and the entire city of Gotham. Along the way, a small-time criminal named Jonny becomes one of Joker's henchmen, which he realizes isn't something he should have aspired to in the first place.The Joker here is dark and insane. There is plenty of murder, theft, and rape - too much for my taste, to be honest. Azzarello does a fairly good job of getting into the Joker's psyche, showing different facets of his personality. The art is the real seller for this book, in my opinion; it fits the story perfectly. I'd almost call it beautiful if it wasn't for the fact that it's depicting so much horror.