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Batman: Arkham Asylum - Ein düsteres Haus in einer finsteren Welt

Batman: Arkham Asylum - Ein düsteres Haus in einer finsteren Welt

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Batman: Arkham Asylum - Ein düsteres Haus in einer finsteren Welt

Bewertungen:
3/5 (717 Bewertungen)
Länge:
129 Seiten
21 Minuten
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709447
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Arkham Asylum: ein düsteres Haus in einer finsteren Welt ist eine kompromisslose psychologische Horror-Geschichte, in der Batman auf fast alle Insassen des Arkham Asylum, der Anstalt für wahnsinnige Schwerverbrecher, trifft. Diese Insassen – Two-Face, Mad Hatter, Killer Croc, Clayface, Scarecrow und viele mehr – übernehmen die Kontrolle über die Anstalt und bringen deren Mitarbeiter in ihre Gewalt. Sie sind dazu bereit, die Geiseln freizulassen,doch nur, wenn eine Bedingung erfüllt wird: Man muss ihnen Batman ausliefern; er soll einer von ihnen werden.
Freigegeben:
Jan 28, 2020
ISBN:
9783736709447
Format:
Buch

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Batman - Grant Morrison

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3.0
717 Bewertungen / 33 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Sick shit! Love it!
  • (5/5)
    Best. Graphic novel. Ever.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty dense stuff. It's still clear that Batman is a rather ridiculous character to put into such a dark, psychological story, and Morrison's script notes in the back confirm that the artist, Dave McKean, felt this way. Speaking of whom, his art here is as good as ever, which is saying something. Even in the somewhat confusing/pretentious parts of the story, the gorgeous art pulls you through.
  • (4/5)
    Batman must descend into Arkham Asylum and, in so doing, face the darkness of his own psyche. Morrison is a natural choice to tell a story like this, and while Dave McKean's art isn't exactly to my taste, it does fit the tale well, and is striking and memorable besides--which is good, because under the poetry and atmospherics there isn't all that much story per se; it's mostly just Batman confronting various inmates as he gets lost in the asylum: Two-Face, the Mad Hatter, etc.--and of course the Joker.My biggest question is: where are the female inmates? Maybe there's a canonical answer; my main source for information is the 90's cartoon which had Harley and Ivy and some of the other female villains slumming it together in Arkham in at least one scene. But either way, their absence is not only conspicuous but sorely felt. There are some female characters--a nurse, a psychotherapist, and even mad old Mrs. Arkham herself--but it doesn't even come close to passing the Bechdel test, and the story suffers because of it: what should be a story about the dark madness that can strike at the human psyche ends up just being about men and thus male psychosis, with women being ancillary. It's hard not to see it as a symptom of the medium's pervasive gender myopia.
  • (4/5)
    It sure is gorgeous. Like the way Magic card art should be. And it's an interesting and important alternate take on the character - a Batman tormented by rage, pain and repressed homosexual impulses, who goes to Arkham and lets the Joker play him like a harp because part of him is convinced it's where he belongs. The thing is, Morrison doesn't really tell you that - he lets you figure it out on your own, and while that kind of adds impact, it also ruins some of the early scenes, at least your first readthrough, because you're all "Why's Batman acting like such a chump?" and "Come on, you're just using highfalutin references and impressionist art to disguise the fact that he has no motivation to do that - quite the reverse, in fact." But, you know, improves with subsequent readings. the script and glosses from Grant at the end have their points of interest, but come on - at least try to disguise that your referentialia are just there for the sake of referentialia.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first forray into the huge world of Batman. I'm still not entirely sure whether it was the ideal start, but one has to start somewhere; and after having read "The Dark Knight Returns" I'm really glad I chose this one to start with. And Batman or no Batman, this is an absolutely fantastic piece of art.First of all, it was good to start with something familiar - I've loved Dave McKean's work ever since I read "Sandman", obviously. And I don't think I've ever seen a comic where the art fit so well to the story like with this one.On April 1, Arkham Asylum is taken over by its inhabitants, and according to the Joker's demands, Batman has to go in there, alone, in order to save the hostages. The Joker wants to show him that this, rather than the "sane" world, is where Batman belongs. At the same time, we also learn about the history of the Asylum, and the result is a wonderfully twisted tale of the past and the present. I was genuinely creeped out by the story and the art and the lettering (the Joker especially comes to mind), and the atmosphere was really - well, creepy and uncanny. I love it when that happens, since I don't tend to scare that easily. It really pulled me in, and it truly felt like I was in Arkham Asylum with Batman and his adversaries.In this edition, there is also the script of the comic plus some notes by Grant Morrison. I found them rather helpful and really really interesting (I always love to read how comics come into existance - I still am such a novice to this world and it's fascinating to peek behind the curtain). I was rather confused by most of the villains, since I pretty much only knew the Joker and Two-Face, but even though I suspect a lot of things went over my head, it was still a really enjoyable read. And more than that. It became an instant favourite, and I cannot recommend it enough.
  • (4/5)
    This really wouldn't have made any sense without the script and notes after the original book. Now it makes some kind of sense.
  • (5/5)
    Both Grant Morrison and Dave McKean are both geniuses. The combination of their work is a haunting experiance that leaves the reader sympathizing (and identifying) with the arch villians. I love Morrison's casting of the Joker as psychotic wise man and initiator, and McKean's detritus aesthetic helps pull the story into the dusty corners of the mind leaving an augural impression.
  • (3/5)
    I've read it once and it did not impress me a whole lot. I do intend to give it another shot. At the very least the artwork is top notch.
  • (3/5)
    Great Art, story okay. He uses a lot of imagery but I wouldn't have noticed if I didn't read his afterword.
  • (4/5)
    It's April Fool's Day, and the inmates have taken over the asylum. Their final demand: Batman.Batman himself journeys through the asylum and through his own mind. This story is interspersed with the tale of the asylum's founder, until both stories merge for the finale.
  • (4/5)
    I am very glad that I finally got around to reading this graphic novel. I wasn't even planning on buying it (I was going to rent it from the library) but when I picked it up at Powell's I just had to have it. Even if just for the art alone. When I opened the book to flip through the pages, I was blown away at how awesome the artwork was. I am a sucker for some beautiful art, so there was no way I was leaving the store without this book. I mean, look at it! It's hauntingly beautiful!The artwork was actually a major reason this book even worked. While the story itself is creepy, the art just helped accentuate the insanity within Arkham Asylum and its inhabitants. It also does a great job of depicting the troubled mind that Batman works so hard to hide.While Batman is often portrayed as someone with at least of modicum control over his emotions this novel reveals just how troubled Batman really is and how the Joker has known the whole time, even if Batman denies it. This is a story about another plot created by the Joker to get Batman, but rather than trying to kill him/get him killed, he wants Batman to reveal the insanity the lies within him, always threatening to come to the surface.Running alongside Batman's struggle to keep his sanity is the parallel story of Amadeus Arkham, the founder of Arkham Asylum, and his descent into madness after years of surrounding himself with those who have lost all contact with reality. In fact, Amadeus shows some similarities to Batman in that for years he had attempted to control the madness that was inside him while it slowly consumed him. In this graphic novel, we get to see how Batman shares this with Amadeus as he struggles to keep his shaky grasp on sanity in a place filled with insane people and at times, almost loses.The only issue I had with this novel was that I felt the ending was little rushed. I thought there was more that could be done with it. This is not saying the ending was bad. I still enjoyed what they did with it. I just think I could have been a little better.In the end, this was a great Batman graphic novel with amazing art and a thought provoking and intense story. It's not your average action packed Batman novel but is instead a psychological thriller that will send chills down your spine. I highly recommend it for those more interested in looking into the depths of Batman and his inner turmoils, which let's face it, is why we love Batman.
  • (5/5)
    Grant Morrison + Dave McKean + Batman = unbelievably awesome.It's just true. This is a gorgeous, compelling, badass, deep, poignant, creepy, dark, riveting, and wickedly delightful graphic novel.The Joker and the other inmates at Arkham have taken control of the asylum, holding the staff hostage. Their demand? That Batman enter the asylum, alone. During his sojourn with the criminal lunatics therein, he discovers a great deal about his own dark secrets. Intercut with the history of Arkham and its builder, this is just the most awesome thing EVER.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not sure this has aged altogether that well, due in part to excessive pretentiousness, but at the time of its first publication, it had a kind of high seriousness in its intent that seemed exciting. In terms of its impact on comics, specifically on the character of Batman, it's an important book for that reason. It established new conceptual frameworks for most of Batman's antagonists, a new psychological texture to a lot of Batman stories.
  • (5/5)
    Dave McKean and Grant Morrison were born to work together. The story is dark, creepy, and just a tad confusing.
  • (3/5)
    Arkham Asylum is where many of the criminals who fought Batman ended up. This story backs up and follows Amadeus Arkham, who took his family's home and used it to create the Asylum. A parallel story, set 80 years later, has Batman coming to the Asylum to face the Joker and others. It was ok. My edition (15th anniversary edition) had the full script with notes from the author, Grant Morrison. I really appreciated that. I missed a heck of a lot of stuff as I read the man portion of the book! Yes, I expect to miss any symbolism/imagery and such, but I missed a lot more than that. It was nice to have the illustrations written out in text as Morrison envisioned them. It filled in a lot of the stuff I missed. There was also thumbnails drawn by Morrison to show how he pictured it before the eventual illustrator, Dave McKean did the final illustrations. I liked Morrison's thumbnails, as I thought they were clearer, and I wonder if I would have missed less had the actual illustrations been closer to Morrison's original vision of it. I also found some of the lettering difficult to read. So, overall: ok.
  • (4/5)
    Grim, stylishly creepy Batman graphic novel.. The back story will curl your hair, and the illustrations perfectly evoke a nightmare. First rate of its kind.
  • (3/5)

    Six out of ten. CBR format.

    The inmates have taken over the asylum. Arkham Asylum. They want Batman. Batman has to take on many of his usual foes as he battles to escape. The book also includes the origins of Arkham Asylum.Quite a dark book with a lot of flashbacks and strange happenings.

  • (3/5)
    Really liked the story and the artwork. The downside was that because of the artwork and stylized font used, it was hard for me to read what the Joker was saying.
  • (5/5)
    A very scary version of Joker in this graphic novel!
  • (2/5)
    This was terrible to try and understand without the script. The art though interesting left you confused. I didn't know who I was looking at or why until I read the script. The ending was the worst part but I won't ruin it here. Play Arkham Asylum the game its better even though it is an adaptaion of this comic.
  • (4/5)
    Supremely creepy, dark and visually arresting. I admit I checked it out at the library simply because Arkham was in the title; I thought it was a graphic rendering of a Lovecraft story, and was surprised to find I'd brought a Batman comic home. It was a fantastic read though; not at all what I expected from a "big name" comic hero. I tend to favor comics and graphic novels that don't have superheros in them, but I might have to re-think that stance. Batman as a flawed hero, conflicted and strange and dark, has been explored well in movies I think, but this was another great rendering of a man with serious problems and issues who somehow thrives in spite of, or because of, them. The artwork is amazing and feels multi-media and textural, and does a good job enhancing the dialogue and story. It was really just a great read; I would recommend this book to anyone with even a passing interest in comics.
  • (2/5)
    A classic one shot by a great comics writer (Morrison) and a great comics artist (McKean). Well, it is what it is and unfortunately, what it is has been done to death in the years since its original publication--the psychology of Batman. This edition is worth picking up for the inclusion of Morrison's original script.
  • (2/5)
    I had heard such wonderful reports about this book and was very disappointed when I eventually bought it. I found the story weak and tedious and the artwork ugly and claustrophobic. Truth be told, I love Graphic novels but only if they use the ligne Claire style – as in the Long Halloween, my favourite Batman book.Arkham Asylum is the place of legends, Batman legends, housing such greats as Two Face aka Harvey Dent, Clayface, The Mad Hatter and, of course, Batter’s nemesis, The Joker. In this substandard story the inmates take over the Asylum and Batman hands himself over when the Joker threatens to blind a young nurse. The Asylum is haunted by its founder, a mad doctor, and the story deteriorates into an acid trip or fever dream – all well and good for those who enjoy that sort of thing, but I hated it.I had heard such wonderful reports about this book and was very disappointed when I eventually bought it. I found the story weak and tedious and the artwork ugly and claustrophobic. Truth be told, I love Graphic novels but only if they use the ligne Claire style – as in the Long Halloween, my favourite Batman book.Arkham Asylum is the place of legends, Batman legends, housing such greats as Two Face aka Harvey Dent, Clayface, The Mad Hatter and, of course, Batter’s nemesis, The Joker. In this substandard story the inmates take over the Asylum and Batman hands himself over when the Joker threatens to blind a young nurse. The Asylum is haunted by its founder, a mad doctor, and the story deteriorates into an acid trip or fever dream – all well and good for those who enjoy that sort of thing, but I hated it.
  • (2/5)
    Batman is alerted that the inmates of Arkham Asylum have taken over the premises. If this isn't dangerous enough, they're threatening to murder everyone in the facility unless Batman agrees to a face to face meeting.

    I understand that a lot of people can appreciate the style in which both Morrison and McKean approached Batman, however this just wasn't for me. Maybe I like my stuff a little more.. focused? I have no idea if that's the right word. I feel like I'm almost speaking a form of blasphemy here by not loving this book.

    That being said, I certainly do not want to take anything away from Dave McKean - the guy is crazy talented. I just question whether or not this really works within the constraints of a comic book. I thought the scenes were unfocused and hard for me as a reader to follow. I guess when it came down to it, I had a lot of trouble grasping exactly what I was looking at. I'll give McKean credit for trying something outside-the-box but I feel like the whole presentation was lost on me. Also, a lot of the dialogue contained some strange choices. In particular, Morrison having Batman scream, "Jesus!" felt weird and awkward to me.

    Before you jump down my throat, it wasn't all bad. I'll say that I liked the idea of giving each character their own specific font when they spoke. Joker's sharp words cutting through the atmosphere gave his madness that extra intensity. Apparently, this is something that is considered an industry standard today but it all began with Gaspar Saladino's superb lettering.

    I guess I appreciate what was attempted but I'm not sure I could bring myself to read it again or who exactly I'd recommend this to.

    Cross Posted @ Every Read Thing
  • (5/5)
    The art in here is awesome. I love it. It's so different and unexpected. Nothing like the typical comic book art you normally see. I just studied the pages forever.

    The story is great too. I love it. Everything about it is awesome.

    READ IT!
  • (2/5)
    Still don't get it. Lost up its own cleverness.
  • (4/5)
    I’ve said before that I think Batman stands a good chance of surviving as one of the big myths of the 20th century. The core story is so simple and effective, like an archetype, and the character has time again proved it lends itself to very different interpretations. Grant Morrison’s Arkham Asylum came out at a time when the dominant Batman image was one inspired by Frank Miller’s Dark Knight – an extremely violent, psychopathic vigilante who could just as easily be one of the villians he’s hunting. Morrison, as a reaction, with this album showed us a Batman who is insecure, defensive and controlled, full of secret doubt with himself and more scared of the likeness between himself and the Arkham population than anything. The story is simple enough. The patients at Arkham have taken hostages and demand Batman to be turned over to them. They believe he belongs there, with them. Paralel with this is told the story of Dr. Arkham himself, and the tragic events that led to him founding this hospital. All of it is told in Dave McKean’s exquisite style and Morrison’s rich, symbolic imagery.It’s a very good graphic novel, full of ambience, tension and goodies. But something is stopping me from calling it truly great. There’s something about the pacing that isn’t quite right to me, and McKean’s art, wonderful as it is, is sometimes a little static, seems posey rather than full of movement. This book really has nothing to do with action, that’s not what it’s about, but might have benefitted from a stronger sense of motion, tempo, danger, nevertheless. Still, I’ll read this many more times, for sure.
  • (3/5)
    The artwork saves this. It is really several interesting character ideas held together by a weak story line. Morrison tosses in his own quirkiness and obsessions.
  • (3/5)
    Grant Morrison at his best is totally awesome. At his worst, he's a pretentious ass. This isn't his worst, but it's not very good either.

    You know who else isn't very good? Dave McKean. Okay, I'm partly just saying that to piss you off, but seriously: just because it's crazy doesn't mean it's good.