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Y: The last Man - Bd. 1: Entmannt

Y: The last Man - Bd. 1: Entmannt

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Y: The last Man - Bd. 1: Entmannt

Bewertungen:
4/5 (1.369 Bewertungen)
Länge:
129 Seiten
41 Minuten
Freigegeben:
29. Dez. 2020
ISBN:
9783736712171
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Willkommen in der entmannten Welt Eine Seuche unbekannter Art vernichtet jedes Spermium, jeden Fötus und jedes lebende Säugetier mit einem Y-Chromosom – ausgenommen einen einzigen jungen Mann und sein ebenfalls männliches Haustier, ein Kapuzineräffchen. 48% der Erdbevölkerung werden ausgelöscht – 2,9 Milliarden Männer. In Begleitung der geheimnisvollen Agentin "355" begibt er sich auf eine gefährliche Odyssee quer durch ein Amerika, in dem Ex-Models mit Müllwagen Leichen einsammeln, die Ehefrauen verstorbener Politiker die Ämter ihrer Männer einfordern und Amazonen Frauen terrorisieren, die ihr "Glück" nicht erkennen wollen. Und Yorick stellt sich immer die gleiche Frage: Warum ist ausgerechnet er der letzte Überlebende? Y: THE LAST MAN – ENTMANNT ist ein neuer dramatischer Höhepunkt in Brian K. Vaughans und Pia Guerras sorgfältig inszenierter Geschichte einer entmannten Welt.
Freigegeben:
29. Dez. 2020
ISBN:
9783736712171
Format:
Buch

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Y - Brian K. Vaughan

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Was die anderen über Y denken

4.0
1369 Bewertungen / 45 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Brian K. Vaughan took an interesting idea that might have come up in an ordinary conversation, and turned it into an epic tale of adventure and philosophy. This book takes a stand on equality in a revolutionary and unprecedented way.
  • (2/5)
    I picked up the first two installments because this series is always on the "Best Of" lists. Idk, it just wasn't for me I guess. It was thin and cliched and told a different version of the same story that others have told much better. Also Yorick is really annoying. I'm usually a stickler about finishing a series once I start it, but I think I'm gonna skip it this time.
  • (4/5)
    Very cool book. Witty, fun writing. Great interpolation of events after a huge change to society. Cool mysterious hook. Beautifully painted covers. Did I mention the writing was awesome?Just ordered the 2nd book from the library - Can't wait.
  • (3/5)
    Truth of the matter is that I want to give this book four stars, but a couple things kept me from giving it the full measure.

    First, why I like it. The concept is intriguing and generally, I like the execution, too: every man and male animal on Earth dies in a single moment, all that is but one, the strangely named Yorick, and his male Capuchin monkey. What follows is the female dystopia as women inherit the Earth and Yorick goes underground to stay alive and find a way to save the species.

    Where I struggle is with how the author writes nearly every woman in the story (and, but for Yorick, they're ALL women) to carry a hatred for every man that they ever knew, despite them all being dead and gone.

    Despite the heavy handed feminism and occasional political message, it's an interesting concept, and I look forward to reading the sequels.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting premise. Every guy's dream is to be the last man on earth, and of course when you think about it, it's really a nightmare.

    Could've been a great story, but it suffers from the attempt at trying to be too clever. The literary references are ubiquitously known - an attempt at more subtlety would have gone a long way.

    Nevertheless, it wasn't a horrible story, and is enjoyable for an hour or so distraction.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not a big fan of graphic novels. I liked the Sandman series, but that was written by an excellent novelist. My husband, who likes graphic novels more than I do, didn't like this one. But Volume Ten is nominated for a Hugo award for 2008, so I wanted to read all of the Hugo nominated Graphic Novels and wanted to start with the first in the series. I liked this so much that I am ordering Volumes 2 - 9 to read the entire story.The tale is of a plague that destroys all mammals with a Y chromosome, except for one young man and his male monkey. We don't find out why he was spared, but we do find out some of the problems he would face being the only man left on Earth. He is not particularly smart or strong, but he does have some awesome allies, including his Congressperson mother. The story is told in flash backs that catch you up with the cover picture and move forward. The drawings are very descriptive and the dialogue is witty. I look forward to reading the rest of this series.
  • (4/5)
    So far living up to its super-awesome premise. I might be inclined to say something snarky about the Oedipal narrative - all the men in the world are dead, and a man is *still* our main character? - but of course there is no other way to tell the story, and there are lots of other POV characters running around showing us the bigger picture.

    The New Haven library only has #1 and #10 in the series - way to go guys - but I think it's a good candidate for ILL. (Although I also have to read the rest of Promethea, and Fables, and Buffy Season Eight.... Maybe this summer can be another Summer O' Comics?)
  • (4/5)
    As with many long series, this starts spectacularly and then bogs down a little, storywise. I specially had a problem trying to sympathize with the male character, right til just before the very end. .Good ending, though; and it's good to see women looking like REAL women. (This is about the whole series)
  • (5/5)
    An amazing concept complimented by the uncluttered and visually pleasant cartooning style.
  • (3/5)
    Maybe 3.5? Had some problems (like gratuitous boobies) but was definitely a page turner as well, have to admit I'm eager to p/up the next one. Some of the dialogue felt really natural to me & at other times very artificial - like Dr. Hamad's harangue (complete with statistics, always a pet peeve of mine!) about violence against Jordanian women...thanks for the lecture! :/ Some pretty funny bits. All in all worth a read, definitely aimed at a male audience. I even like boobies, but all the boobies were just too much, on ridiculously perfect bodies...that is SO damaging to the psyche of young girls i had trouble getting past it, yes that's a personal hang up of mine, I know.
  • (3/5)
    All the dudes in the world die at once, save for one guy and a monkey. No one knows why.

    Saving fuller review until I've read a little more of it, but so far I'm not sure if it's meant to be a feminist statement or an exploration of the author's misogyny. [not a ton of evidence for that either way; just a vibe I get so far.]
  • (5/5)
    Great start to a series that has great graphics and an even better plot. I like the variety of reactions shown to the virus and the situations that arise.
  • (4/5)
    While there are plenty of stories revolving around the idea of being the last survivor or group of survivors of some cataclysmic event, Brian K. Vaughan's story is a little different. What if you weren't the last human, but the last MAN? In this first volume of the series, Yorick Brown finds himself in just such a predicament (along with the only other known male survivor of any species, his pet monkey Ampersand).

    This first volume sets up the series and the immediate aftermath of the death of all the males. There are a LOT of angry women. Some Republican Senatorial widows attempt to storm the White House in an attempt to take over their husbands' now vacant seats. The Amazons are reborn. And there is a supermodel/actress driving a garbage truck. Somehow through it all, Yorick, whose mother just now happens to be POTUS, cares only about finding his girlfriend...

    An intriguing beginning to the series. Am interested to see where it leads...
  • (3/5)
    Maybe a little rushed--some plot points and post-apocalyptic scenarios are just given as standard, when they could have been fleshed out as narrative. The time-jumping narrative is greatly effective, though. Not blown away by the art, but I especially like a few of the quiet moments.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting concept and fun characters make for breezy dystopian fun. The hero Yorick reminded me a bit of Peter Parker with his light humor amid some pretty dark stuff (all the other men are dead!)

    I'm intrigued enough to read more!
  • (4/5)
    Seems like the start of a very good series. The ideas are smart, the writing mostly good, with some shaky spots. Excellent art - clear, expressive, and modern without any trace of that annoying computer-y feel. Too bad there's no complete collection yet.
  • (4/5)
    A fun read with an interesting premise. I'm looking forward to reading the others!
  • (2/5)
    Disappointing -- This was all set up, no actual plot or story. It wasn't enough to capture my attention or make me want to read the next one.
  • (3/5)
    Enjoyable but not very impressive. The main character is likable enough but so far nobody else is. The premise is certainly interesting.For a series with a premise that will obviously have a wealth of feminist and gender commentary, I'm not sure why the author felt the need to open with male characters acting sexist and condescending towards the women. The messages in this first volume are overt to say the least.The political commentary borders on ridiculous. The first appearance of the Republicans almost made me put down the book and leave it there.
  • (4/5)
    very interesting premise
  • (5/5)
    A plague destroys the entire male population of Earth, except for a wise-assed, out of work practicing magician named Yorick Brown and his in-training helper monkey Ampersand. And if that doesn't make you immediately want to pick up this book, then I can't really help you.Fun, funny, and fast-paced. Really a fun read. I've been a fan of Vaughan for a while, so this was a natural grab for me. Can't wait to keep reading this series.
  • (4/5)
    As with many long series, this starts spectacularly and then bogs down a little, storywise. I specially had a problem trying to sympathize with the male character, right til just before the very end. .Good ending, though; and it's good to see women looking like REAL women. (This is about the whole series)
  • (4/5)
    (Alas poor) escape artist Yorick and his foster monkey, Ampersand, emerge from his apartment to discover that some mysterious force has messily slain all other carriers of the Y chromosome. Road trip ensues with many more issues to come...
  • (2/5)

    A mysterious plague kills all the men in the world - except one.

  • (5/5)
    I originally read this in the form of individual comic books as they came out, back in the day. I had access to them through someone I knew who purchased each issue as it was published, but I didn't get through the entire series, which is now available as a ten volume compilation in graphic novel format. This is the first volume, and the story is even better than I remember it. Far from being fodder for man-hating lesbians (or bisexuals, such as myself), the creators truly attempt to realistically imagine what it would be like for the last man on Earth. The characters are dynamic, the dialogue is interesting, the plot is complex, and who doesn't like a protagonist with a pet monkey named Ampersand?
  • (3/5)
    When a 'plague' wipes out every male mammal on the planet almost instantaneously, there are two exceptions - New York loser Yorick and his capuchin monkey.Vaughn's script manages to rise above the typical nerd misogyny that pervades such 'last man' stories to deliver believable characters struggling to cope with a world that suddenly and inexplicably lost half its population.
  • (3/5)
    I've been wanting to read this comic for a long time, but never really had the chance until a few weeks ago when I found almost the entire collection of volumes at the thrift store. I started reading them tonight and sadly it wasn't not as good as I was expecting. It was actually kind of boring and I don't really like Yorick's character. Hopefully it gets better in later volumes
  • (5/5)
    A phenomenon causes all men on the planet to die, except one. Yorick Brown, son of an English professor and a congresswoman, and his monkey Ampersand are apparently the last males living of any species. Nobody knows why. But maybe they can keep the human race from dying out - as long as none of the crazy gangs kill Yorick first.I thought this set up a great "what if," and had a convincing way of exploring what could happen if most males died. Yorick is an interesting guy - escape artist, English major, and surprisingly well-adjusted for being named after a skull in a play. For you other Lost fans out there, this is the comic that Hurley brings on Flight 316. Recommended for fans of science fiction; I would rate it R, primarily for language and violence.
  • (5/5)
    Though I'm not a regular reader of comics, I do so love apocalyptic fiction, and this series opener does not disappoint! It's mysterious, violent (definitely for "mature audiences"), creepy and full of intriguing characters. Yorick, the last man is likable, but has flaws, which I find much more fascinating than those out-and-out, "can do no wrong" types. I look forward to the next in the series!
  • (5/5)
    This is genius. I will definitely complete the series. With the success of The Walking Dead TV series, I'm sure it is just a matter of time before we see this adapted for TV.