Genießen Sie von Millionen von eBooks, Hörbüchern, Zeitschriften und mehr - mit einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Rausch der Verwandlung
Rausch der Verwandlung
Rausch der Verwandlung
eBook344 Seiten5 Stunden

Rausch der Verwandlung

Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen

4/5

()

Vorschau lesen

Über dieses E-Book

"Rausch der Verwandlung" ist ein in den dreißiger Jahren entstandenes Romanfragment von Stefan Zweig, das 1982 aus dem Nachlass herausgegeben wurde. Der Roman spielt im Sommer 1926. Hauptfigur ist Christine Hoflehner, eine junge Postassistentin in einem österreichischen Dorf. Eines Tages wird sie von Verwandten per Telegramm in ein feudales Hotel in Pontresina eingeladen, wo sie vorgibt, die reiche Nichte Christiane van Boolen zu sein, und das gesellschaftliche Leben genießt. Durch eine Intrige wird schließlich ihre wahre Identität bekannt…
SpracheDeutsch
Herausgeberepubli
Erscheinungsdatum10. Aug. 2018
ISBN9783746749952
Vorschau lesen
Autor

Stefan Zweig

Stefan Zweig (1981-1942) was the most widely translated writer of the 1920s and 1930s. A Jewish pacifist, he was driven by the Nazis into exile, first in London, then in Brazil, where he committed suicide in a pact with his wife. The manuscript for The Post Office Girl was found among his papers. Zweig's other novels include Beware of Pity and Chess Story.

Ähnlich wie Rausch der Verwandlung

Ähnliche E-Books

Ähnliche Artikel

Verwandte Kategorien

Rezensionen für Rausch der Verwandlung

Bewertung: 4.153846153846154 von 5 Sternen
4/5

26 Bewertungen12 Rezensionen

Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?

Zum Bewerten, tippen

Die Rezension muss mindestens 10 Wörter umfassen

  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Frankly I was disappointed with Zweig's last, unfinished novel as I had read a number of glowing reviews of it and most of the NYRB books I have read have been highly satisfying. This one not so much.Zweig paints a compelling picture of a lost generation in post-WWI Austria contrasted with the luxurious life enjoyed by the wealthy in a glamourous Swiss resort. However, the main characters, Christl and her suitor Ferdinand, are self-pitying and hapless. I don't know what Zweig had in store for them, but I don't really care.My Kindle version did not have the Afterword mentioned in some of the reviews.I own one other book by Zweig, Balzac: A Biography which I will give a chance, but it will have to be much more engaging than this one for me to look for any more of his work.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Vivid portrayal of life in Austria after WWI. Read for my NYU course. Very Germanic in its attitudes and certainly shows how Hitler could have come to power. Depressing characters.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    The first page had me hooked. I thought I was going to get a classic modernist take on Germany between the wars. Thereafter, however, the writing was leaden, the narrative dull.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Ends too soon, but still a well-written book. A lot of familiar themes, small town girl goes to a posh resort, and hijinks ensues.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    One of Zweig’s books that became the influence for The Grand Budapest Hotel, this is Zweig’s posthumous unfinished novel. Its story, of a poor clerk working in a rural Austrian post office, and her swift decline into bitterness and post-war ressentiment following a brief taste of upper class life. The plot is unfinished, and even sadder for it. Zweig expresses the anger of the post-recession disenfranchised in a way that helps to understand Brexit and Corbyn.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    An extremely well written book - Zweig captures people's emotions and feelings so simply and yet accurately. The storyline is described rather overtly on the NYRB backcover. I wonder if Zweig intended a third part ? and the second half rather foreshadows his own life in Brazil.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    A well-written and engaging novel. But am I really supposed to believe this presents an anti-capitalist sentiment? Am I supposed to pity the circumstances of the characters? On the contrary I pitied their snobbery and their dreams of living a vapid consumerist life. I found it depressing, and hoped Christine would snap out of it. But in the end it becomes clear that Zweig wanted us to feel sympathetic to these wealth addicts, to support them in their final decision. I found it very bizarre, and a bit hard to believe. But it does begin to make sense when you realize that the author was an aristocrat himself, born to a family of wealthy bankers and textile manufacturers.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    As I read this novel by Stefan Zweig, the image of a roller coaster ride surfaced in my mind repeatedly. You know the way the car climbs slowly to the summit of each curve then shoots down the slope at high speed, then repeats the pattern again and again? This novel follows that pattern. Zweig's writing is brilliant! He juxtaposes long descriptive, contemplative passages with mind-boggling pivotal moments in the lives of the characters. The small roller coaster is the string of post WWI experiences of the protagonist, Christine, and eventually with Ferdinand as well. The meta-roller coaster is the sense of loss, lack of meaning, and search for meaning experienced by all who were touched by the war. Zweig's use of language, his characters, and his plot make this a memorable read!
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    It’s post World War I Austria. Christine works in a provincial post office. She is only in her mid-20s but is all-ready feeling the weight and dreariness of the middle-aged. She’s unmarried and shares a gloomy hovel with her disabled mother. She has no friends and no social life. One day, she receives a telegram from her wealthy Aunt. An invitation to join them in a mountain resort in Switzerland. Christine accepts and finds herself transformed, thrown into a world of luxury, romance and opulence. Unfortunately, this only lasts a short time and she suddenly finds herself disgraced and sent back home, where her life will never be the same again.This is the second book I’ve read by Zweig, who died tragically, nearly seventy years ago and what an amazing find he is. His prose is vibrant and impassioned, leaving the reader yearning for more. Highly recommended.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Started kind of slow, but soon I was totally enthralled by this little story. It actually even hit close to home a bit. Grew up in a small, unimportant town and faced with adversity at every turn. Went away, had a great job and a magical life for a few years before it was suddenly snatched away - forcing me to return to my hometown to live with my parents. It was serendipitous to be reading this book when I was just facing my own disgust at my re-introduced provincial life. That anger is normal. Christine finds a person who understands the misery she has of experiencing respite from a hopeless life then being shipped back before she even fully realized what happened, and they manage to find a way to end their (separate but equal) suffering together. It's at once a fairy tale and a grim reminder of misery, suffering and the lengths a human will take to make it go away.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Zweig's novel starts off quite well, with a gripping portrayal of the shame and humiliation that come with being poor. The reader really gets to like his character and then like her less and less as the book goes on. About two-thirds of the way through the book the plot seems to run out of gas, and the ending was rather disappointing.