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Instructional Unit Overview of Instructional Unit Unit title: Romeo and Juliet Unit focus: Content Areas: Language

Arts (Reading, Writing, and Speaking), Social Sciences (History), Theatre, Visual Arts, Technology Education Ninth Grade Unit length: 4 weeks This assignment is composed of five lessons drawn from a complete instructional unit on Romeo and Juliet. The lessons chosen are the key lessons that reflect major

elements of the play as a whole; it would be fleshed out with lessons specific to content related to Acts and scenes corresponding with the classs place in the reading. It is implicit that reading the play will occur within the time period of these lessons. The unit length noted is therefore longer than the combined time of the lessons submitted, and the End-of-Unit Examination will include much information from the play that is not covered in the lessons herein. Unit goals In this Unit, students will gain an appreciation for Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet both as a work of literature and a dramatic production. Students will understand the historical and cultural context of the play, and also how it continues to be relevant to modern life. Students will express their learning in a variety of forms using technology and creative elements.

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Students will improve their technology, presentation, communication, and collaborative skills.

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Lesson I: Shakespeare Webquest

Lesson Topic: Background of William Shakespeare, preparation for Romeo and Juliet Grade level: _9_ Length of lesson: 1 block period (99 minutes); .5 regular class period (55 min) for follow-up
Stage 1 Desired Results Content Standard(s): Colorado Content Standards Content Area: Reading and Writing Standard 5: Students read to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources. (CDE, 2011). Content Area: History

Standard 2: Students know how to use the processes and resources of historical inquiry (CDE, 2011).
National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) NETS Standard 3: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information (NETS, 2011). Understanding (s)/goals Essential Question(s): Students will understand: How does literature better help us understand our -How to research on the internet using appropriate sources. lives? -How to summarize and synthesize information How does understanding the authors background -How to give credit for others ideas and historical context help us understand the play?

Student objectives (outcomes): After a presentation of Shakespeare and Internet research, the student will be able to:

a. b. c. d. e.

Locate and choose an appropriate website Identify facts about Shakespeares life and works Correctly cite sources used in research Summarize and synthesize information found in research Create a works cited page using MLA format

On a web quest worksheet with 80% accuracy. Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Performance Task(s): Other Evidence: -Everyone completes a web quest about Shakespeares life Sematic Map exercise and works Class discussion about appropriate and valid web -Students will be required to use a different source for sites to check for understanding of appropriate every two questions sources with a short clicker quiz. -Students will write paragraphs in response to Student will take notes based on the discussion; questions on the webquest demonstrating analysis and teacher will review these notes to see if students synthesis of information on Shakespeares life and the have been recording information. importance of his historical context. Class discussion about how to find MLA citation -Students will generate a properly formatted Works Cited page format on the internet; check for understanding -The completed web quest will be turned in for evaluation. with thumbs up/thumbs down for students being -Some of the information will appear on the unit exam ready to proceed. During internet time, monitor

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students and check to see that all students have found an appropriate website. Provide assistance as needed. Stage 3 Learning Plan Learning Activities: Webquest. Instructional Sequence: Pre-activity (Building background) 1. Lead class in a brainstorming/semantic map activity. Write the word Shakespeare on the board, and ask students to come up 2 at a time and create connecting circles with the first words they think of that relate to the word. 2. Briefly discuss the importance of Shakespeare in the field of literature, and why knowing about the lives of important authors helps us understand their works. Instructions prior to the web quest: 1. PowerPoint Presentation 2. Teacher leads class discussion of what constitutes an academically appropriate website, making sure to cover why Wikipedia is not valid. 2. Teacher informs students where/how they can find MLA citation guides on the internet. -students take notes to use in the computer lab During the web quest: 1. Students and teacher go to the computer lab. 2. Web quest is handed out. 3. Students use the internet to find the answers to the web quest 4. Students must site all sources used to answer the questions 5. The teacher walks around to assist students and/or uses Synchroneyes software to interact with students. After the web quest: 1. After the web quest is graded and handed back teacher leads a class discussion to review important information, including a discussion of the authorship controversy. Materials: 1. PowerPoint Presentation 2. Copies of web quest 3. Computers with internet access Adaptations: 1. ELLs a. b. c. d. e. f.

Scaffold vocabulary as needed Supplementary materials (e.g., vocabulary and English cultural history information) as needed. Simplified language Modified worksheet (e.g., fewer items, simplified language) Change in response method respective of level of language acquisition (e.g., verbal, single-word, phrases). Ability to conduct search in native language (English learning will be facilitated by translating answers into English). g. A peer tutor system is used in this classroom; students with special needs will be paired with a partner. These partners rotate so as to encourage socialization. The system encourages positive relationships between general education students and those who can be marginalized. It also affords ELL students a chance to practice social language skills. They will be paired with a native-language peer if possible if they are in the early stages of language acquisition. 2. Special Education a. Modified worksheet respective of student need (e.g., simpler items, fewer items, larger print) b. Increased time for responses c. Increased teacher support d. Peer tutors

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3. Gifted a. Increased opportunity for creativity b. Opportunities to use areas of giftedness (e.g., more complex web searches for more information if gifted with computers, statistics/historical data if mathematically gifted, writing an essay if verbally gifted, creating an artistic representation of part of the material if artistically gifted.

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Shakespeare Web Quest


Find the answers to all of the following questions using the Internet. You must use three different sources, none of which can be Wikipedia! Document these sources in proper MLA format on a separate piece of paper that you will TYPE and attach to this Web Quest. If you Google MLA citations electronic you should have several sources that will show you how to do a Resources page. Multiple Choice: Circle the best answer. 1. Shakespeare was born in a. Paris b. Cambridge c. London 2. She married Shakespeare in 1582. a. Mary Arden b. Anne Hathaway Barrett Browning

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d. Stratford-upon-Avon c. Suzanna Williams d. Elizabeth

3. Shakespeare wrote _____ types of poems. a. 2 b. 3 c. 4 4. Two of Shakespeares narrative poems are titled a. Venus and Mars and 12th Night b. Troilus and Cressida and Pericles c. The Rape of Lucretius and Venus and Adonis d. Two Gentlemen of Verona and Pericles 5. Shakespeare wrote _____ sonnets. a. None b. 2 c. 54

d. 5

d. 154

True/False: Write out the ENTIRE word true or false _________6. Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeares most famous history plays. _________7. The Globe Theater burned down during the night, so luckily no one was hurt in the blaze since the theater was empty. _________ 8. Shakespeare was a talented playwright, poet, and actor. _________ 9. Shakespeares only son was named Hamlet. _________ 10. Shakespeares sonnets were written in iambic pentameter.

Instructional Unit Fill in the answers in the spaces provided. 1. Name three of Shakespeares history plays. 1. 2. 3. 2. Name three of Shakespeares comedy plays. 1. 2. 3. 3. Name three of Shakespeares tragedy plays. 1. 2. 3. Short answer: Write in complete sentences.

4. What is the complete date of Shakespeares birth and the complete date of his death? 5. What is the rhyme scheme of a Shakespearian sonnet? 6. What do you call the last two lines of a Shakespearian sonnet? 8. What is the epitaph at Shakespeares grave? 9. What does the epitaph mean? 10. What city is the Globe Theater located in?

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Label the following cities on the map: 1. Verona 2. Rome 3. Venice 4. Mantua Analysis and Synthesis questions:
1. What are some ways learning about Shakespeare and the time period in which he wrote might help you better understand the play? List three reasons and explain using specific information (analysis).

2. Write 3-5 sentences explaining the authorship controversy. Based on what you have learned about Shakespeares background, why do you think authorship might be questioned? (Synthesis). What is your opinion on the matter? Think critically and use your facts!

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Lesson II: Romeo and Juliet on Stage


Lesson Topic: Romeo and Juliet Grade level: _9___________ Length of lesson: 1 regular day (55 min); play field trip (outside school hours); 1 regular day.

Lesson II: Romeo and Juliet on Stage


Lesson Topic: Romeo and Juliet Grade level: _9___________ Length of lesson: 1 regular day (55 min); play field trip (outside school hours); 1 regular day for follow-up. Stage 1 Desired Results Content Standard(s): Colorado Standards:

Content Area: Language Arts STANDARD 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Content area: Theatre STANDARD 5: Students analyze and assess the characteristics, merits, and meanings of traditional and modern forms of dramatic expression.
(CDE, 2011) Understanding (s)/goals Students will: Understand the conventions of dramatic production of Shakespeares work. Analyze how viewing a play is different from reading it. Appreciate the differences between how the play was historically produced and how it is performed today. Essential Question(s): How do literature and drama relate? How a work of literature is different when read and performed? How can seeing a work of literature performed help us understand the work?

Student objectives (outcomes): After a lesson on dramatic elements and watching the play, Romeo and Juliet, the student will:

1. Identify at least 2 instances of major dramatic elements in the play. 2. Compare a modern production to how the play was performed in Shakespeares time. 3. Evaluate the differences between reading the play and viewing it. 4. Describe their experience and analyze whether its effect on their understanding of the play.

With a score of 3 or better on a 4 point rubric scale. Stage 2 Assessment Evidence

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Performance Task(s): Students will complete the Romeo and Juliet on Stage worksheet. Formal assessment will be on this component Other Evidence: Dramatic/Literary terms Clicker quiz before the play. Tracked discussion after the playstudents must participate, and amount of participation will be recorded. Minimum of two comments.

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Stage 3 Learning Plan Instructional Sequence Before the play:

1. The class period before the play students will have the lesson on dramatic conventions and will review literary terms. The literary terms sheet has been used throughout the course and students are familiar with the terms. a. Teacher asks students to consider that Romeo and Juliet is not a book, but a play; it was written to be performe b. Teacher will ask the class what some differences might be between the two. If you were writing, how would you indicate what was happing for people performing it? What sorts of things would you need to include? c. Teacher will write responses on the whiteboard. d. Teacher will present the literary terms; students will take notes (they have been instructed on this strategy) in the margins or on a separate piece of paper that help them clarify the definition. e. Teacher will demonstrate personally or provide short video clips that illustrate the various stage directions. 2. After the lesson, students will take a clicker quiz on the material. 3. The technology will give immediate feedback. The teacher will review any points on which students have demonstrated a lack of understanding. 4. Teacher will grade the written part of the quiz and return the next class period. 1. Students complete the first parts of the worksheet and take notes for the essay questions of the play. 1. Students will meet with the cast and director. They will take notes on this interaction. 2. The next class period, students will compose their essays. 3. A discussion go around is held as a debriefing. Each student will describe what they think the most important thing they learned that day. All students will comment at least once during follow-up discussion. 4. Students will later apply the knowledge of stage performance to a film performance of the play.

During the play:

After the play:

Materials: 1. Literary terms handout 2. Dramatic terms handout

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3. Romeo and Juliet on Stage worksheet 4. Parent letter: permission slip and volunteer request form 5. Spiral Notebook to record notes Possible Adaptations ELLs

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Gifted

Native-language editions of the play(As Romeo and Juliet is such a prominent text, translations are available in most major languages) Increased emphasis on demonstration/video illustrations of terms in content presentation Pictorial representation of vocabulary where applicable, especially of action drama terms Response to written components adjusted for proficiency level (e.g., verbally, in a few words, in outline form). Seeing play performance will serve to enhance comprehension of the play for the rest of the unit. Increased wait time in discussion. See vocabulary and response methods above: as appropriate to language/cognitive abilities of the student. Graphic organizers/plot outlines to follow during the play. Peer support buddies for outing. Different from peer tutor to encourage socialization. Increased opportunity for analysis and synthesis; encourage them to record any questions or points of interest before discussion with cast/director and to feel free to explore these in depth. Opportunity to expound on assignment in the mode of their choice Encourage further research and exploration.

Special Education

Resources: Community Resource: Denver Center Theatre Company in conjunction with the National Endowment for the Arts (n.d). The Denver Center Theatre Company produces a Shakespeare play each year as a part of the National Endowment for the Arts Shakespeare in American Communities project. Eleven schools in the area are selected to participate. These schools receive teacher training, including interactive exercises that focus on play's themes, structure, scansion, and verse; in-school participatory workshops based on the theater's dramatic-learning and living-history models; matinee tickets; study guides; and pre- and post-performance discussions. Students and teachers also go backstage and speak with the cast and director. (These materials are not available to the public, but an effort was made to include materials and lessons that might have corresponded to them in this Instructional Unit). Parent Involvement Strategy: Volunteering (Epstein, n.d.) Volunteering is an effort to enlist parent support. Anyone who supports school goals and children's learning or development in any way, at any place, and at any time -- not just during the school day and at the school buildingis a volunteer (Epstein, n.d.). A letter requesting volunteers to staff the field trip with be included with the permission slip. Volunteers will be coordinated through email and phone communication. A meeting will be held prior to the trip to discuss and assign roles.

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Lesson II: Student Handouts Stage Directions and Drama Terms


Act: One of the main divisions of a play. Shakespeare's plays each have five acts. Each act is subdivided into scenes. An act generally focuses on one major aspect of the plot or theme. Between acts, stagehands may change scenery, and the setting may shift to another locale. Alarum: Stage direction indicating the coming of a battle; a call to arms Aside: Words an actor speaks to the audience which other actors on the stage cannot hear. Sometimes the actor cups his mouth toward the audience or turns away from the other actors. An aside serves to reveal a character's thoughts or concerns to the audience without revealing them to other characters in a play. Near the end of Hamlet, Queen Gertrude raises a cup of wine to her lips during the fencing match between Hamlet and Laertes. King Claudius had poisoned the wine and intended it for Hamlet. In an aside, Claudiusunwilling to warn Gertrude in an effort to preserve his innocencesays, "It is the poison'd cup: it is too late." Chorus: The chorus was a single person who recited a prologue before Act I (and sometimes a passage between acts) in Henry V, Henry VIII, Troilus and Cressida, and Romeo and Juliet. Generally, the chorus informed the audience of action offstage or outside the time frame of the play. Dramatis Personae: List of the characters in a play. Such a list is found at the beginning of each Shakespeare play. Enter: Stage direction indicating the entrance onto the stage of a character or characters. Epilogue: Short address spoken by an actor at the end of a play that comments on the meaning of the events in the play or looks ahead to expected events; an afterword in any literary work. Exeunt: Stage direction indicating the departure of two or more characters from the stage. Exit: Stage direction indicating the departure of a character from the stage. Flourish: Music usually introducing the entrance or exit of a king or another important person. The music may consist of a short trumpet passage. Gallery: Roofed seating area of a theatre, such as the Globe, that resembled the grandstand of a baseball park. The Globe had three galleries that could accommodate 2,000 to 3,000 playgoers. Hautboys: Stage direction indicating that entering characters are playing hautboys (OH bwah), which are Elizabethan oboes. Induction: Preface or prelude to a play. The Taming of the Shrew contains an induction that precedes the main plot. Prologue: Introduction of a play. In Henry V, a chorus (one person) speaks a prologue that encourages the audience members to use their imaginations to create what an Elizabethan stage cannot: battlefields, clashing swords, the might of warriors. Shakespeare writes, "Think when we talk of horses, that you see them printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth." Re-Enter: Stage direction indicating the re-entrance onto the stage of a character or characters.

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Scene: (1) Time and place of the action in a play; (2) part of an act in a play that usually takes place in one location. Soliloquy: Long passage in which a character reveals his thoughts to the audience but not to other characters. Hamlet's famous "To be or not to be" speech is an example. Solus: Stage direction indicating a character is alone on the stage. Tiring House: Dressing rooms of actors behind a wall at the back of the stage. To tire means to dressthat is, to attire one. Sometimes, the wall of the tiring house could stand as the wall of a fortress under siege. Torches: Stage direction indicating that entering characters are carrying lit torches. Within: Stage direction indicating that a person speaking or being spoken to is behind a door or inside a room.

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Lesson II Quiz Romeo and Juliet on Stage Quiz


Answer the following using your clickers. We will discuss the results when you finish the quiz.

1.

A soliloquy is: a. Long passage in which a character reveals his thoughts to the audience but not to other characters; actor is usually alone of the stage. b. Any time the character is on stage alone c. A kind of character d. A stage direction (tells characters what to do)

2. An aside is: a. Long passage in which a character reveals his thoughts to the audience but not to other characters. b. A stage direction that tells characters to move aside for other characters. c. Words an actor speaks to the audience which other actors on the stage cannot hear; other actors are on the stage.

3. Dramatis Personae means: a. Really dramatic characters b. A list of all characters in the play c. People who like drama d. The people who create the characters

4. A scene is: a. Part of an act in a play that usually takes place in one location. b. Another word for the setting of the play c. When a character causes a disruption d. Both A and B

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5. A pun is: a. A play on words. b. Words that create an image c. Words characters use to indicate how they are feeling d. A stage direction
True/False Enter a for true, b for false

6. _____An act is a main division of the play that generally focuses on one major aspect of the plot or theme. 7. _____ A metaphor compares things that are similar. 8. ______Romeo and Juliet is written in Sonnets 9. ______The play is a comedy. 10. ______Figurative Language refers to language that describes literal figures in the play.
Short answer Using your best critical thinking skills, answer the following question in a few sentences for each component. I will grade this and return it to you next class period.

1. Compare writing and reading a play and a novel. How are they similar? How are they different? List three things for each. In your analysis, what is the most important?

Answer Key

1. a

2. b 3. c 4. d 5. a 6. a-T 7. b-F

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8. a-T 9. a-T 10. b-F

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Short answer: Answers will vary. Teacher will review based on evidence and argument. This assessment is to provide information for formative purposes and is not graded, so no rubric is provided.

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Lesson II: Play Worksheet Romeo and Juliet on Stage

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Keep your Literary Terms and Definitions and Stage and Drama notes handy. Keep track of at least one time you observe:

1. An aside 2. Figurative Language3. A pun 4. A metaphor 5. Rising Action 6. A soliloquy


Describe the following aspects as portrayed in the production. How did the director create these effects? SettingCharactersScene changesTake notes for the following essays; you will write the full draft when we return to class.

1. What do you think might be different about how the play is produced now compared to how it was performed in Shakespeares time? 2. How is seeing the play different than reading it?

3. What have you gained from this experience? List three new things you learned today, either from the play or from speaking with the actors and director. Explain how with enhances your understanding of Shakespeare and the play.

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Criteria Identifying Terms 25% Describing Setting, Character, Scene transitions 25% ESSAY: Analysis and examples 25% Organization 15%

Romeo and Juliet on Stage Worksheet Rubric 1: Beginning 2: Developing 3: Accomplished There are no examples noted. The presentation does not include a video clip. There are a few examples noted The presentation includes a video clip but it is not related to the theme. There is a little critical analysis and a few examples. The content is somewhat wellorganized. There are several example noted. The presentation includes a video clip that is somewhat related to the theme. There is some evidence critical analysis and a several examples. The content is well-organized.

4: Mastered There are good examples noted of all terms. The presentation includes a video clip that is strongly related to the theme. There is strong evidence of critical analysis and many supporting examples. The content is very well-organized; the essay flows well, with the points in order and leading to a coherent thesis. There are no mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

There is not critical analysis or supporting examples. The content is not well-organized.

Mechanics 10%

There are many mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation (10 or more)

There are some mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (5-9)

There are few mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (1-4)

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Lesson II: Parent Letter The following will be sent home with students regarding their participation in the Shakespeare in American Communities field trip. It is a permission slip and request for volunteers. Volunteering, or recruiting and organizing parent support is Type Three of the strategies recommended in Epsteins Framework of Six Types of Involvement (Epstein, n.d.). Dear Parents, I am excited to announce that our school was one of those chosen to participate in the National Endowment for the Arts Shakespeare in American Communities project. This wonderful opportunity allows schools to watch and participate in the Denver Theatres production of William Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet free of charge. Not only that, but they will meet with the cast and director for questions and discussion after the play! Signing this permission slip will allow your child to participate what is sure to be a wonderful and educational experience. Second, I am looking for volunteer support for the field trip. If you are willing to help staff this outing, please let me know. We need 5 volunteers to ride the bus and attend the performance, the time contribution will be 4 hours. You will be able to participate in all the fun! Please check the box if you would be interested in volunteering and I will provide details. If you are unsure, check maybe, and feel free to contact me with any questions about volunteer commitments. Sincerely, Tara Wilkins 9th Grade Language Arts Monarch High School

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Student Permission Form Students name___________________________has my permission, as his or her legal guardian, to attend the Shakespeare in American Communities project on April 15, 2011. Signature___________________________________ Date_________________________ I would be interested in volunteering to staff this field trip:
o o o Yes No Maybe

Reason: I need to check my schedule I need more information Other_____________________ Contact Information: Phone: Email:

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Lesson III: Themes of Romeo and Juliet on our World Presentation and Socratic Discussion Lesson Topic: Romeo and Juliet Grade level:_9 Length of lesson: 1 block day, 1.5 regular days for student presentations and class discussion. Stage 1 Desired Results

Colorado Content Standards Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Listening Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature (American and world literature) to understand important universal themes and the human experience. Standard 3: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences. Standard 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. (CDE, 2011) Content Area: Visual Arts Standard 1: Students recognize and use the visual arts as a form of communication. NETS Standards Standard 1. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. (ISTE, 2011)
Understanding (s)/goals Students will:

Identify evidence of the themes of Romeo and Juliet in the real world. Locate modern visual media that represent these themes Respond to a text with support and make connections to their lives. Respond to a text and articulate how it is a reflection of human nature, even today.

Essential Question(s): How does literature better help us understand our lives? How is classic literature still a reflection of human nature today?

Student objectives (outcomes): Following the lesson on the themes in Romeo and Juliet, students will be able to:

A. Individually analyze aspects of their world that reflect the themes in paragraph form. B. Cooperatively create an original presentation that illustrates these themes using modern terms. C. Listen, speak, and conduct themselves appropriately for an academic discourse.

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D. Respond to literature using ideas and details from the text to support their ideas with a minimum of one comment per topic. With a score of 3 or better on a 4 point rubric scale.
Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence: Notes on the various themes in Romeo and Juliet Students will independently write from previous lessons/reading will be reviewed at a paragraph analyzing how these same time as the paragraph. themes relate to their lives Paragraph-student must have a paragraph or (informally assessed). modified written analysis. Paragraph is not graded but not having it completed will result in 5 point deduction from presentation/discussion grade. Students will be evenly divided Tracked discussion students must participate, into theme groups. Groups will and amount of participation will be recorded create a short presentation (10 minimum of one comment per topic. min) using Prezi which ties in 1 Questions on themes will be represented on the Unit Exam visual representation, 1 video

Performance Task(s):

clip, 1 song, and 1 movie title that express the theme in popular culture.
Stage 3 Learning Plan Learning Activities: Before discussion:

1. Themes have been discussed throughout the reading of the play. 2. PowerPoint presentation: Teacher will briefly review these themes then ask students ways that the themes present themselves in their lives. Guiding questions: Do these themes show up in your lives? How? Can you find evidence of these themes in todays world? How do they show up in our culture?

3. The students have been taking notes on the different themes during discussion and throughout the reading of Romeo and Juliet. They are required to bring these notes to class. 4. Students are given time to write a personal paragraph relating to each theme to their lives, using one example. Instructions will be posted on the whiteboard. 5. Students are divided into groups to cooperatively create presentations incorporating a variety of media that illustrate the themes in the modern world. 6. Teacher reviews appropriate seminar behaviors. During discussion/presentations: 1. Students present their presentations to the class. 2. Teacher comes with leading questions based on the themes. 3. Once the teacher asks a question, the discussion is up to the students. 4. Students must use evidence from the text and presentations to support their responses (these will be reflected in their paragraph and notes).

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Sample questions: How much are Romeo and Juliets parents responsible for the death of the lovers? How do parents act like this today? How much are Romeo and Juliet themselves responsible for what happened? What types of experiences do teenagers have today that are similar to those in the play? How much is the friar responsible? The nurse? What role did the family feud play in the deaths of Romeo and Juliet? Which support ideas presented in the text? After the seminar: 1. A Socratic seminar go around is held as a debriefing. 2. Students will have an essay question on the unit exam that relates to the seminar discussion. Materials:

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1. Themes of Romeo and Juliet in our World PowerPoint Presentation

2. Copies of presentation performance assessment instructions and rubric 3. Copies of the play 4. Notebook paper to take notes during the discussion 5. Class roster for teacher to track number of student responses
Possible Adaptations English Language Learners (ELLs)


Gifted:

Students will be placed in groups where they can contribute to their ability level and will be given roles within the group that do not rely as heavily on verbal components; they might be given tasks related to visual imagery, for instance. They will be paired with a peer tutor in that group, preferably someone who speaks their native language if possible. Students will be encouraged to share with the group and the class on how the themes relate to their culture. Multi-cultural elements will be included in the presentation. Focus on visual response/presentation elements in assessment rather than verbal aspect. Encourage to participate in discussion, allowing adequate wait time. Students will be placed in groups where they can contribute to their ability level Students will be given roles that are appropriate to their needs; for example, a student who is dyslexic can take on more of the presentation design Peer tutors and increased adult support will be provided. Students will have the freedom to extend the assignment as they wish within the group in ways that complement their areas of giftedness. They might do more complex design on the presentation, develop an original image, or do more indepth research and summaries.

Special Education Students:

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Lesson III: Themes of Romeo and Juliet in My World Presentation and Rubric Presentation: Your goal is to show how the themes of Shakespeares day are still reflected in the modern world. Using the Internet, locate two visual images, one short video clip (it can be a trailer from them movie, a news article, an advertisement, or any other video medium), one movie, and one song that illustrate these themes. Consider your favorite songs and movies. Can you find the themes within them? We will present our themes and presentations on Thursday. You can bring the music from home, find the lyrics online, or both. Give a brief description of the movies plot and how the themes are expressed. You might want to divide the tasks between you, use your cooperative skills. Be creative, and have fun! Note: Your paragraph is not formally graded so is not part of the rubric, BUT you must have it written and reviewed. Not doing so will result in a 5 point deduction from your grade. You will need the essay to do well in the discussion! Criteria 1: Beginning 2: Developing 3: Accomplished 4: Mastered Identifying Terms 20% Describing Setting, Characters, Scene transitions 20% Movie 20% There are no examples noted. The presentation does not include a video clip. There are a few examples noted The presentation includes a video clip but it is not related to the theme. The presentation includes a movie but it does not relate to the theme. The presentation includes a song but it is not related to the theme. The theme has a few aesthetic elements and is somewhat wellorganized. Student behaved appropriate some of the time and contributed 2 comments to several questions There are several example noted. The presentation includes a video clip that is somewhat related to the theme. The presentation includes a movie that somewhat relates to the theme. The presentation includes a song that is somewhat related to the theme. The theme has several aesthetic elements and is mostly wellorganized. Student mostly behaved appropriately and contributed to comments to most of the questions There are good examples noted of all terms. The presentation includes a video clip that is strongly related to the theme. The presentation includes a video clip that strongly relates to the theme. The presentation includes a song that is strongly related to the theme. The theme has many aesthetic elements and it very well organized. Student behaved appropriately and contributed 2 comments for every question

There is not a movie described.

Song 20%

There is not a song included.

Aesthetics /organization 10% Participation in discussion: 10%

The presentation does not have aesthetic elements and is not well-organized Student did not behave appropriately and/or did not contribute to discussion to the best of their ability.

Instructional Unit Lesson IV: Romeo and Juliet on Film


Lesson Topic: Romeo and Juliet (99 min), 1 regular day (55 min). Grade level: 9

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Length of lesson: 2 days-1 block day

Stage 1 Desired Results Content Standard(s): Colorado Content Standards Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Communicating Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature (American and world literature) to understand important universal themes and the human experience (CDE, 2011).

Standard 4: Students apply thinking skills to their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Content area: Theatre Standard 5: Students analyze and assess the characteristics, merits, and meanings of traditional and modern forms of dramatic expression. Standard 4: Students understand and relate the role of theatre arts to culture and history.
(CDE, 2011) Understanding (s)/goals Students will compare the similarities and differences in film and stage production and analyze the different processes that go into dramatic productions in these mediums. Students will recognize and analyze creative elements of the film. Students will evaluate how the elements add to or detract from the authors message, and how they affect their ability to relate to the story. Student objectives (outcomes): Essential Question(s): How does literature better help us understand our lives? How is classic literature still a reflection of human nature today?

After viewing the a stage performance of Romeo and Juliet and Romeo + Juliet, and completing the reading of the play, the student will:
A. Identify examples of in a modern film representation of Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet of:

a. How the play was modernized (3 examples) b. How the play was made more accessible to the mainstream public (3 examples) c. Creative elements of set design, casting, interpretation of characters, and wardrobe/fashion (2 of each) with at least 80% accuracy. B. Compose essays which: a. Evaluate artistic elements in Romeo + Juliet and how these affect the original work. b. Analyze--compare and contrastthe processes for film and stage production of the play With a minimum score of 3 or better on a 4 point rubric scale.
Performance Task(s): Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

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Movie worksheet: Students will answer questions pertaining the presentation aspects of Romeo + Juliet Students will respond to essay questions.

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Post-movie/assessment discussion Tracked discussion: Each student must contribute at least twice.

Stage 3 Learning Plan Pre-movie activity (Building background) 3. PowerPoint presentation: overview of film (building background). 4. Short discussions-ask students if they have seen the film, and for those who have not, generate 3 predictions as a class based on the information in the presentation. During the movie: After the movie:

1. Students complete the Romeo + Juliet worksheet. 1. Students will use their notes to complete the essays on the film. 2. Follow-up discussion, seminar format. Each student must contribute twice. 3. Teacher will ask prompting questions and facilitate discussion, but it will primarily be student-led.

Materials:

1. Romeo + Juliet PowerPoint Presentation 2. Baz Lurhmanns Romeo + Juliet DVD 3. Audiovisual equipment for viewing 4. Notes from Romeo and Juliet on Stage 5. Copies of the play 6. Romeo + Juliet worksheet and Rubric 7. Roster for tracking participation

Possible Adaptations: English Language Learners (ELLs)

Movie shown with subtitles in native language if possible. Supplementary background knowledge on the setting and cultural elements of the movie to build lacking background. Students in early stages of language production will be provided with a picture outline of the movie, characters, settings, and major events (similar to the format of the presentation, but more detailed). Modified response format (e.g., verbally, in a few words, using a graphic organizer in place of an essay).

Special Education Students:

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Gifted:
Students will have creative license with the essay/analysis component; they can choose to add to the essay with more information from research on the movie industry, for example, or locate visual images, or create a presentation for extra. This will be offered to all students so as not to single them out, but is particularly a modification that allows students to differentiate their own instruction in a self-directed manner.

Students will be provided with a picture outline Students have the option of responding to the compare/contrast question using a Venn Diagram graphic organizer rather than writing an essay. Extra teacher/adult support as needed.

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Lesson IV:

Romeo + Juliet Movie Worksheet


Directions: As you watch the movie, jot down notes on the following questions. After the movie, answer the essays portion using these supporting details with one paragraph for each of the sub-questions. The more evidence you record, the easier the essays will be! And a hint-we will have a follow-up assignment for which these notes will be very helpful.

1. List at least 3 ways that the play was modernized:

2. List at least 3 ways the content was made more relevant to the mainstream public:

3. List creative elements of set design, casting, interpretation of characters, and wardrobe/fashion (at least two of each):

Follow-up essays (after the movie):


4. How do these elements add to Shakespeares play? Do you think they improved the play? Did they interfere with the meaning and the authors intention? 5. Compare the stage production of Romeo and Juliet with the movie, Romeo + Juliet. Use at least three pieces of evidence. How is a play performed differently on stage and on film? (Consider aspects such as scenes, settings, transitions, and blocking). Which do you think is more difficult for the director? Which did you find it easier to relate to?

Essay Rubric
Criteria 1: Beginning The essay demonstrates few elements of critical thinking and analysis. 2: Developing The essay shows some elements of critical thinking and analysis. 3: Accomplished The essay shows many elements of critical thinking and analysis. 4: Mastered The essay shows substantial elements of critical thinking and analysis.

Analysis 35 %

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Use of source material 35% Organization 15% The essay uses no supporting evidence from the text. The content is not well-organized. The essay uses 1 piece of evidence from the text. The content is somewhat wellorganized. The essay uses 2 pieces of evidence from the text. The content is well-organized.

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Mechanics 15%

There are many mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation (10 or more)

There are some mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (5-9)

There are few mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (1-4)

The essay uses 3 or more pieces of evidence from the text. The content is very well-organized; the essay flows well, with the points in order and leading to a coherent thesis. There are no mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

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Lesson V: Translating Shakespeare for the Modern World


Lesson Topic: Romeo and Juliet Grade level: 9 Length of lesson: 3 days-1 block day (99 min), 2 regular days (55 min). Stage 1 Desired Results Content Standard(s): Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Communicating Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature (American and world literature) to understand important universal themes and the human experience (CDE, 2011). Content Area: Theatre

Standard 1: Students develop interpersonal skills and problem-solving capabilities through group interaction and artistic collaboration. Standard 2: Students understand and apply the creative process to skills of storytelling, playwriting, acting, and directing. (CDE, 2011).
Understanding (s)/goals The student will infer the meaning of the play Romeo and Juliet and express this meaning using modern language and settings. Essential Question(s): How does literature better help us understand our lives? How is classic literature still a reflection of human nature today?

Student objectives (outcomes): After viewing the film on Romeo + Juliet, and completing the reading of the play, the student will: C. Accurately and substantively answer questions pertaining to characters and their motives, themes, plot, purpose of the scene, and literary devices in a scene from Romeo and Juliet with a score of 3 or more on a 4 point rubric scale. D. Write an original screenplay based on a scene from Romeo and Juliet which: 1. Demonstrates an understanding of the themes of the play and applies them to a modern context. 2. Represents the plot, characters, and purpose of the scene to the plays development. 3. Incorporates appropriate literary devices and analysis 4. Infers the meaning dialogue and expresses it in an original voice 5. Exhibits elements of creative thinking 6. Demonstrate effective writing skills and proper writing mechanics. With an average score of 3 or better on a 4 point rubric scale. Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Performance Task(s): Other Evidence: Primary: Students will cooperatively perform the Playing Shakespeare translated pre-performance Shakespeare performance assessment. This is a cumulative assessment activity worksheet unit assessment and will be considered in the same way as Discussion tracking following presentation of the summative unit exam. screenplay: all students must contribute at least once to discussion following each presentation. Stage 3 Learning Plan Before performance assessment: 1. Teacher will lead a discussion review on elements of drama, themes of the play in the real world, and modernization of the play in the movie Romeo + Juliet. 2. Students will perform the Shakespeare Translated Activity

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3. Students share their translations 4. Performance assessment is handed out. Teacher explains instructions and answers any questions. 5. Students are assigned to their groups (Teacher will create these groups based on learning needs, student personalities, and building skills in advance. She will try to create groups that balance abilities and different strengths). 6. Students will decide on an act and brainstorm ideas on the first day. 7. Students will have an additional 3 days plus tutor time/learning lab to complete their assessment. 8. Students will present their projects to the class After the presentations: 1. Group seminar format for discussion after each presentation. Teacher will track participation. Materials: 4. Student notes from previous lessons 5. Shakespeare Translated Activity 1. Playing Shakespeare Performance Assessment and Rubric 2. Class roster for teacher to track number of student responses Possible Adaptations English Language Learners (ELLs)

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Students will be placed in groups where they can contribute to their ability level and will be given roles within the group that do not rely as heavily on verbal components; they might be given a task of locating pictures of characters , costumes, or settings to use for examples. They will be paired with a peer tutor in that group, preferably someone who speaks their native language if possible. Extra teacher/adult support as needed. Students will be placed in groups where they can contribute to their ability level and given roles within the group that emphasize their strengths. If modified grading is appropriate scores will be based on participation. Peer tutors and increased adult support will be provided. Extra teacher/adult support as needed. Students will be allowed to extend the assignment in ways that interest them and suit their areas of giftedness, such as creating a visual representation, a full production screenplay, or computer-generated project. The teacher will discuss ideas and approve in advance; as this is part of the final unit assessment, they will be given considerable options and encouraged to fully apply their skills. The student has the option of working independently on this extension as long as he or she contributes substantively to the main group project. All students will be given the option to expound for extra credit, not just gifted students.

Special Education Students:

Gifted:

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Shakespeare Translated Activity


SCENE II. Friar Laurence's cell. Enter FRIAR JOHN FRIAR JOHN Holy Franciscan friar! brother, ho! Enter FRIAR LAURENCE FRIAR LAURENCE This same should be the voice of Friar John. Welcome from Mantua: what says Romeo? Or, if his mind be writ, give me his letter. FRIAR JOHN Going to find a bare-foot brother out One of our order, to associate me, Here in this city visiting the sick, And finding him, the searchers of the town, Suspecting that we both were in a house Where the infectious pestilence did reign, Seal'd up the doors, and would not let us forth; So that my speed to Mantua there was stay'd. FRIAR LAURENCE Who bare my letter, then, to Romeo? FRIAR JOHN I could not send it,--here it is again,-Nor get a messenger to bring it thee, So fearful were they of infection. FRIAR LAURENCE Unhappy fortune! by my brotherhood, The letter was not nice but full of charge Of dear import, and the neglecting it May do much danger. Friar John, go hence; Get me an iron crow, and bring it straight Unto my cell. FRIAR JOHN Brother, I'll go and bring it thee. Exit FRIAR LAURENCE

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Now must I to the monument alone; Within three hours will fair Juliet wake: She will beshrew me much that Romeo Hath had no notice of these accidents; But I will write again to Mantua, And keep her at my cell till Romeo come; Poor living corse, closed in a dead man's tomb!

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Romeo and Juliet: Playing Shakespeare Assignment Task: Heres a chance to try your hand at being William Shakespeare. You have been asked to write an original screenplay of a new modern Romeo and Juliet. The director wants the same basic story, but with a modern flair (thinkbut dont copy!Baz Lurhmanns Romeo + Juliet). Choose one scene from

Shakespeares version and rewrite it using your own language. Your task is to preserve the action and meaning of the play, but make the themes and plot relevant to todays world and the modern human experience, using vocabulary thats more accessible to the general public. Phase 1 (3 days): Creating your framework To get you started, answer the following questions and use them to guide your writing.

1. Who are the characters? What are their motives and how are they expressed? 2. What is the action taking place? 3. Which of the plays themesthe power of love, the inevitability of fate, the individual versus societyare found in this scene? How are they expressed? 4. What is Shakespeares intent with this scene (e.g., how does it fit into the larger scheme of the play: advance the plot line, develop characters, reinforce a theme, add to the drama, etc.)? 5. What literary devices does he use to create that effect? How might you use them?
Phase 2 (10 days): Original Script

6. Now, using your framework as your basis, become the bard and write your own masterpiece. Stay true to the source material regarding the following elements: a) The themes of the play

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b) The characters in the scene

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c) The basic action that takes place (you can add small details, but dont change the story) d) The meaning of the dialogue.
There are many opportunities for creativity. Here are some suggestions:

a) Setting: You can set your play anywhere in the present or the future. b) Characters: How can you make your characters come to life? Consider accents, professions, hairdos, etc. c) Props and costumes d) Stage directions: What can you have your characters do? How do they act?
Include a description of any props, costumes, and, if appropriate, the actors you would have play each character. EXTRA CREDIT:

1. Include drawings, pictures, or other visual representations of your characters, costumes, props, setting, etc. 2. Dress like a character from your scene on the day you present your scene to the class.
Phase 3 (2 days): Sharing and peer review An opportunity to show off to your friends: We will use the last two days to share your completed manuscripts with your classmates. We will fill complete feedback forms using the attached rubric, and discuss your comments. Averaged peer review scores will account for 10% of your grade.

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Romeo and Juliet: Playing Shakespeare Teachers Rubric (90%) Criteria 1: Beginning Description of characteristics that display basic levels of performance Most framework questions are not answered substantively and accurately, and do not reflect an understanding of source material. The screenplay does not accurately represent the source material. The screenplay is not very original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains no creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors). The content is not well-written (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure). 2: Developing Description of characteristics that show more development and skill Some framework questions are answered substantively and accurately, reflecting basic understanding of source material. The screenplay accurately represents some aspects of the source material The screenplay is somewhat original (i.e., is different than other versions of the play) and contains a few creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors). The content is somewhat wellwritten (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure). 3: Accomplished Description of characteristics that display mastery of skills with few errors Most framework questions are answered substantively and accurately, reflecting good understanding of source material. The screenplay accurately represents most aspects of the source material. 4: Mastered Description of skills that reflect the highest levels of mastery of stated criteria All framework questions are answered substantively and accurately, reflecting excellent understanding of source material. The screenplay accurately represents the source material (plot, themes, characters, meaning of dialogue). The screenplay is mostly original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains very creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors)

State objective or performance Framework Questions 10%

Representati on of Source Material 25% Creativity 25%

The screenplay is mostly original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains several creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors) The content is mostly wellwritten (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure).

Content 25%

The content is very well-written (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure).

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Mechanics 10% There are many mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation (10 or more) There are some mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (5-9) There are few mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (1-4)

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There are no mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

Romeo and Juliet: Playing Shakespeare Peer Evaluation Form (10%) Criteria 1: Beginning Description of characteristics that display basic levels of performance The screenplay does not accurately represent the source material. The screenplay is not very original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains no creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors). The content is not well-written (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure). 2: Developing Description of characteristics that show more development and skill The screenplay accurately represents some aspects of the source material The screenplay is somewhat original (i.e., is different than other versions of the play) and contains a few creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors). The content is somewhat wellwritten (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure). 3: Accomplished Description of characteristics that display mastery of skills with few errors The screenplay accurately represents most aspects of the source material. 4: Mastered Description of skills that reflect the highest levels of mastery of stated criteria The screenplay accurately represents the source material (plot, themes, characters, meaning of dialogue). The screenplay is mostly original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains very creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors)

State objective or performance Representati on of Source Material

Creativity

The screenplay is mostly original (i.e., different than other versions of the play) and contains several creative elements (e.g., setting, props, costumes, character descriptions, choice of actors) The content is mostly wellwritten (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure).

Content

The content is very well-written (i.e., clear, descriptive, using effective language and good sentence structure).

Score for Representation of Source Material__________ Comments:

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Score for Creativity____________ Comments:

Score for Content:______________ Comments:

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End-of-Unit Examination: Romeo and Juliet I. Goal: The student will infer the meaning of the play Romeo and Juliet. II. State Standard: Content Area: Reading, Writing, and Communicating Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes Prepared Graduates:

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Read a wide range of literature (American and world literature) to understand important universal themes and the human experience Grade Level Expectation: Ninth Grade Concepts and skills students master: 1. Increasingly complex literary elements in traditional and contemporary works of literature require scrutiny and comparison (CDE, 2011 p. 64). III. Learning Objective: After concluding the unit on Romeo and Juliet, students will: 1. Identify main characters of the play 2. Recall elements and sequencing of plot 3. Interpret the meaning of key passage 4. Recognize themes in the play 5. Utilize appropriate literary terminology with a cumulative accuracy of 80% or greater accuracy on an objective assessment.

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Name______________________________Class__________________Date_________

Romeo and Juliet: Unit Exam


Directions: Answer parts A-D using your clickers. You can see your results when you have completed this section. Optional essays are available for extra-credit points. PART A: Fill-in-the-blank Complete the following sentences with the correct word or words. 1. In the prologue, Romeo and Juliet are referred to as ________________, meaning they are destined for a bad fate. 2. Because it is a serious drama describing a conflict between protagonists and a superior force with a sorrowful or disastrous conclusion, Romeo and Juliet is categorized as a________________. 3. _________________agrees to marry the Romeo and Juliet because he feels it would force peace between the two houses. 4. Juliet is _______years-old in the play. 5. Romeo and Juliet meet at the_____________feast, to which Romeo was not invited.

6. The subplot that underlies Romeo and Juliet is the feud between the houses of ______________ and __________________. 7. Shakespeare was born in__________________.

PART B: Matching Write the letter of the name next to the correct description. _____8. Juliets father a. Romeo

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_____9. Man Juliet was supposed to marry _____10. The only son of Montague and Lady _____11. A Capulet, Juliets cousin _____12. Romeos closest friend _____13. A Montague, Romeos cousin and friend Montague b. Mercutio c. Tybalt

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d. Benvolio e. Paris f. Capulet

g. Friar Lawrence

PART C: Multiple-Choice Circle the correct answer 14. Friar Lawerences words to Romeo in Act II scene 5, These violent deaths have violent ends (9) are an example of: a. Foreshadowing b. Forewarning c. Foreboding

d. Forward thinking 15. Which of the following is NOT a theme found in Romeo and Juliet? a. Individual versus society b. The inevitability of fate c. Boy meets girl

d. Man versus nature

16. When Juliet says about Romeo, Deny thy father and refuse thy name (II.i76), she is suggesting he: a. Tell his father off b. Refuse to answer when called by name c. d. Cut his ties to his family Become a monk

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17. Over what period of time does the play take place? a. Days b. Weeks c. Months

d. Years

18. Which of the following happens LAST?: a. Romeo is exiled b. Tybalt kills Mercutio c. The lovers are secretly married

d. Romeo returns to Verona

19.

And I, for winking at your discords too, Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punishd. The best paraphrase of the above quote by the Prince is: a. The Montagues and Capulets are punished through the deaths of their children. b. Because he neglected to act sooner, the Prince has been punished with the deaths of two of his kinsmen. c. Friar Laurence will be punished for his role in the tragedy.

d. Romeo and Juliet were punished for their rebellion.

20. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun!" In these lines from Act II, scene 1 (44-45), which of the following best summarizes Romeos comparison of Juliet to the sun? a. Juliet is shiny

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b. Juliet is full of hot air c. Juliet lights up the night

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d. Juliet rises with the day

PART D: True-False Circle the correct answer. 21. T_____F 22. T_____F 23. T_____F 24. T_____F 25. T_____F 26. T_____F Romeo goes to the Capulet ball to see Juliet. Tybalt challenges Mercutio to a duel. In the first two scenes of the play, Romeo is in love with Juliet. Friar Lawrence gives Juliet poison. Romeo kills Paris. Romeos father wants to erect a golden statue of Juliet.

PART E: Short Answer Answer the following. 27. What is the purpose of the prologue?

28. Where is Romeo and Juliet set?

29. In what century was Romeo and Juliet written?

30. Why is Romeo exiled?

31. Why does Romeo commit suicide?

32. Who is the person who takes care of Juliet?

33. What is Juliet trying to accomplish by feigning death?

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34. What poetic device is used in Romeos description of the sun? Explain.

35. Analyze the Friars motivations in Act IV. Why is he willing to become involved in solving Romeo and Juliets marriage problems?

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PART F: Essay Choose one essay, answer on lined paper. Write at least 3 paragraphs and support your opinions using at minimum 3 pieces of supporting evidence from the text. You may choose to do an extra essay for 5 bonus points.

1. Discuss the relationships between parents and children in Romeo and Juliet. How do Romeo and Juliet interact with their parents? Are they rebellious, in the modern sense? How do their parents feel about them? 2. Who or what do you see as MOST responsible for the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet? Support your answer by giving specific references to the play. 3. How much are Romeo and Juliets parents responsible for the death of the lovers?
How do parents act like this today?

4. Choose one theme from the play, and elaborate on how it is expressed in terms of interactions and roles of characters, plot devices, imagery/symbolism, and structure of the play.

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SCORING KEY Romeo and Juliet: Unit Exam
A: Fill-in-the-blank 1. Star-crossed lovers 2. tragedy 3. Friar Lawrence 4. 13 5. Capulet 6. Montague and Capulet 7. Stratford on Avon B. Matching: 8. f 9. e 10. a 11. c 12. b 13. d C. Multiple Choices: 14. a 15. d 16. c 17. a 18. d 19. b 20. c D. True-False 21. False 22. False 23. False 24. False 25. True 26. True E. Short-Answer

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27. The prologue provides the audience with a plot expositiona preview of what will occur in the playby revealing the background of the two feuding families and prepares the audience for the tragic events to unfold. (Accepted answers: sets up the play and what will happen).
28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. Verona, Italy 16th century Because he killed Tybalt Because he thinks Juliet is dead The Nurse To sneak out of the city and join Romeo

34. Personification. Romeo describes the sun as peering forth, and far more fair than she, which is giving it human traits. 35. He performed the ceremony for them. He cannot legally wed Juliet to anyone else because he knows she is married to Romeo. He sees the wedding as a way to end the feud between the Montagues and Capulets (2 of 3).

Romeo and Juliet Essay Rubric

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Criteria 1: Beginning The essay demonstrates few elements of critical thinking and analysis. The essay uses no supporting evidence from the text. The content is not well-organized. 2: Developing The essay shows some elements of critical thinking and analysis. The essay uses 1 piece of evidence from the text. The content is somewhat wellorganized. 3: Accomplished The essay shows many elements of critical thinking and analysis. The essay uses 2 pieces of evidence from the text. The content is well-organized. 4: Mastered

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Analysis 35 % Use of source material 35% Organization 15%

Mechanics 15%

There are many mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation (10 or more)

There are some mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (5-9)

There are few mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation. (1-4)

The essay shows substantial elements of critical thinking and analysis. The essay uses 3 or more pieces of evidence from the text. The content is very well-organized; the essay flows well, with the points in order and leading to a coherent thesis. There are no mistakes in spelling, grammar, capitalization, and punctuation.

Instructional Unit Bibliography Bloom, Harold (ed.).William Shakespeares ROMEO AND JULIET. New York: Chelsea House, 2000. The Colorado Department of Education (2011). Colorado K-12 Academic Standards. Retrieved July 5, 2011 from http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeassess/documents/OSA/k12_standards.html Epstein, J. (n.d.) Epstein's Framework of Six Types of Involvement. Retrieved November 19, 2011 from http://ondemand.neaacademy.org/player/download/index.php? presentation_id=337&download_id=1041 International Society for Technology in Education (2011). National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S). Retrieved March 1, 2011 from

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http://www.iste.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NETS/ForStudents/2007Standards/NETS_fo r_Students_2007.htm Luhrman, B. (Director and producer) (1996). Romeo+Juliet [Film]. Los Angeles: MGM National Endowment for the Arts (n.d.) Shakespeare in American Communities. Retrieved March 1, 2012 from http://www.shakespeareinamericancommunities.org/theatercompanies/denver-center-theatre-company. Preswich House, Inc. (1999) Terms and Definitions. Romeo and Juliet Teaching Unit (p. 3). Clayton, DE: Preswich House, Inc.

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