Sie sind auf Seite 1von 19

SINGAPORE STANDARD

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001
(ICS 35.240.1 0)

CODE OF PRACTICE FOR

Construction computer-aided design (CAD)


Part 5 :Colour and linetype

Published by SPRING Singapore 2 Bukit Merah Central Singapore 159835 SPRING Singapore Website: www.spring.gov.sg Standards Website: www.standards.org.sg

SPRING s ngapore r

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Contents
Page
Foreword
6

CODE OF PRACTICE Scope Purpose Definitions Concept Existing standards New colour standard Linetype standard Layer, colour and linetype standard

ANNEXES A B C List of layers, colours and linetype in alphabetical order Colour numbers for CAD file formats Additional layer names 13 19 20

TABLES Example of colours based on CP 6 Colours used by Approving Authorities The 8 basic colours in CAD software Basic and alternate colours New colours for Approving Authorities Colours for architectural and C & S Colours for M & E Linetype standard

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Foreword
This code of practice was prepared by the Technical Committee on Construction Industry IT Standard under the direction of the Information Technology Standards Committee. As in most aspects of CAD drawing, the current usage of colour and linetype in CAD drawings is very much related to the manual drafting methods. Manual drawings are almost entirely created in monochrome with different line widths while CAD drawings make use of different colours to denote different line widths. With the availability of 256 or more colours in CAD programs and 2 dozen or more linetypes, and the non-uniformity of different CAD software in handling colours and linetypes, CAD drawings are complicated and hence non-productive. This code aims to simplify the use of colour and linetype in the process of creating CAD drawings. This code also lists the additional layers to cater to the requirements of M & E users. Several of the important layer names which had not been defined in CP 83 : Part 1 surfaced during the course of developing this code and are now covered under Annex C of this code. This code was prepared with reference to following Singapore Standards: 1. 2. CP 6 : 1978 CP 83 : Code of practice for building drawings Code of practice for computer-aided design (CAD) Part 1 : 2000 Organisation and naming of CAD layers

NOTE 1. Singapore Standards are subject to periodic review to keep abreast of technological changes and new technical developments. The revisions of Singapore Standards are announced through the issue of either amendment slips or revised editions. Compliance with a Singapore Standard does not exempt users from legal obligations.

*.

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Code of practice for construction computer-aided design (CAD) Part 5 : Colour and linetype
1 Scope

This code is to establish the general principles and formats for usage of colour and linetype for construction computer-aided design (CAD) files.

Purpose

The purpose of this code is to enhance uniformity in CAD files for the construction industry in Singapore by recommending a set of colour and linetype standards for different disciplines.

Definitions

For the purposes of this code, the following definitions shall apply:

3.1

CAD file

CAD file is a digital file containing CAD models or related information.

3.2

Originator

Originator is the individual/company/organisation responsible for creating the CAD file.

3.3

Layer name

Layer name refers to the layer names as specified in CP 83 : Part 1

3.4

Colour

Colour refers to the colour used for entities in a CAD drawing.

3.5

Linetype

Linetype refers to the linetype used for entities in a CAD drawing. This consists primarily of only dashes and/or dots.

3.6

DWG format

The file format commonly used by the majority of CAD software particularly for exchange of information.

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Concept

The concept adopted in simplifying the use of colour and linetype in the process of creating CAD drawings is to mimic the approach taken in the heydays of drafting practice where a good draftsperson can get around with 4 pen widths and half a dozen or less of linetypes. Beyond going back to basics, there is a need to look at the eventuality where CAD drawings will be used digitally instead of having to be transformed in hard copies. This is indeed the ultimate goal of CAD - going digital all the way. For this, there is a need to look at usage of colour in CAD beyond line widths for hardcopy output purposes. One of the answers is to use colour in CAD for visual checking - so that decision can be made quickly, qualitatively and quantitatively by merely looking at the colours of graphical entities on-screen.

Existing standards

The CAD colour and linetypes practices found in the industry today is largely influenced by CP 6 which is meant for manual drafting. It makes use of:
Table 1 Colour

Example of colours based on CP 6 Usage

Green

Concrete products

I Red I yellow
Light blue Grey Brown Light grey Light green Dark green Red Light blue

I Brickwork I SprayrTrowel artificial products


Glass products Cement products Timber and timber products Paving, footway Communal open space Tree planting Septic tank or sewerage treatment plant Swimming Pool

On the other hand, the approving authorities also have a requirement that makes use of 3 colours for alteration and addition works or amendments to approved drawings:

Table 2

Colours used by Approving Authorities

I ~olour
Red Blue Yellow
NOTE

I Usage
Proposed elements

I Deleted elements

Existing elements

For certain applications, no colour or black is used to denote "existing elements"

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

New colour standard

While different CAD packages use different colour numbers to represent actual on-screen colours, 8 basic colours are generally similar. These 8 basic colours are: Table 3

The 8 basic colours in CAD software

I Colour no. I Colour name


1 2 3 4 5
6

Red Yellow Green Cyan Blue Magenta White G rev

7
8

For the purpose of this code, colours 7 and 8 will be classified as "neutral colours" as they are not exactly "colours" in the correct sense of the word. Because of their "neutral" quality, they do not compete with the rest of the colours visually. These 2 neutral colours are hence recommended for the majority of the layers in the code. In addition to the 6 basic colours, there is a need to have alternate colours in a darker tone. This is especially useful for M & E engineers where a basic colour is used to denote elements like piping while a corresponding darker version of the same colour is used for the symbols related to the element. The 6 alternate colours are listed in Table 4 below. Please refer to Annex B for a list of compatible colours in DGN format. Table 4 - Basic and alternate colours Colour name Alternate colour no. Colour name

r2
I 3 4 5
6

Red yellow Green Cyan Blue Magenta White Grey

I
1

1 1 1

14 54 94 134 174 214

1 I

Medium Red Medium Yellow Medium Cyan Medium Blue Medium Magenta

( Medium Green

I 1 1

7 8

6.1

Colours for visual checking

CP 83 : Part 1 - "Organisation and naming of CAD layers" has been developed to organise CAD entities into predefined layers. CP 83 : Part 5 aims at complementing Part 1 by using colours for visual checking. This should enable users to quickly check their drawings by looking at the on-screen colours.

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001
This aspect of visual checking is perhaps most important for submissions to authorities where certain colours have been specified for "proposed", "existing" and "deleted" elements. The current standard is shown in Table 2. In order to improve this, a colour standard is required so that it would not conflict with existing practice shown in Table 3. Instead of Red, Blue and Yellow, the new colour standard is Magenta, Cyan and Yellow:
Table 5 - New colours for Approving Authorities

I Magenta I cyan I yellow

I Proposed elements I Existing elements

Deleted elements

I 1 I

Red has been swapped to Magenta while Blue has been swapped to Cyan. The reason for this is obvious, both Magenta and Cyan are "brighter" than Red and Blue. Yellow is retained because it is already a "bright" colour. All these 3 bright colours enable these important elements to stand out in a CAD drawing.

6.2

Colour standard overview

Based on the standards described in the earlier clauses, the colour standard for Architectural and C & S is as follows:
Table 6 - Colours for architectural and C & S Colour Remarks

Red Yellow Green Cyan Blue Maaenta White Grey Medium Red Medium Yellow Medium Green Medium Cyan Medium Blue Medium Magenta

Non-structural space-enclosing elements in plan 1 section e.g. walls


Authorities - deleted elements

Structural elements in plan 1 section e.g. columns, beams, major reinforcement


Authorities - existing elements

Elements in elevation e.g. sanitary


Authorities - proposed elements

Elements in plan, elevation e.g. annotation, minor reinforcements Non-building elements, fine lines e.g. dimensions, hatch, path, etc Alternate colour Alternate colour Alternate colour Alternate colour Alternate colour Alternate colour

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001
Since M & E engineering works are different from that for Architectural and C & S, a different colour standard is used as follows:
Table 7

Colours for M & E

Remarks

Piping, ducting, wiring


Authorities - deleted elements

Piping, ducting, wiring


Authorities - existing elements

Piping, ducting, wiring


Authorities - proposed elements

Structural elements and annotation


8. 14. 54. 94.

Grey Medium Red Medium Yellow Medium Green

Architectural elements 1 Base drawing Symbols Symbols Symbols Symbols Symbols

134. Medium Cyan 174. Medium Blue

1 214. 1 Medium Magenta

1 Symbols

While the colour standards in Tables 6 and 7 appear different, they both share common characteristics: a) b) c) The colours for Authorities requirements are the same. Alternate colours are used to supplement the basic colours. The detailed colour standard is listed in Annex A.

Linetype standard

This code only covers the standard linetypes such as "hidden", "dashed" linetypes commonly used in CAD drawings. Complex linetypes such as piping runs, fencing, etc are covered in CP 83 : Part 4 : 2001 - "CAD drafting conventions" As with colours and line widths, the number of linetypes should be kept to a minimum. Other than the most commonly used continuous linetype, 4 other linetypes can also be used:
Table 8 - Linetype standard Name

I Code I Appearance

I Usage
-

I Grid lines, centre lines


I Deleted elements

I Dashed

I Hidden

ID
(H

I
I

I Hidden lines

I Phantom

Ip

I Site boundary

I I I I

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Layer, colour and linetype standard

Layer names from CP 83 : Part 1 : 2000 are listed in Annex A. Only the 3 major disciplines architecture, civil & structural and mechanical & electrical are listed in this code. Other disciplines will be added as this code and also that for layer names (CP 83 : Part 1) matures. Additional layer names are required particularly for the M & E profession. recommended supplementary layer names and their colour standards. Annex C lists the

While this code attempts to cover all aspects of the layer standard using only 14 colours, it is widely acknowledged that some users will still use their own in-house standards. In such cases, the usual practice is for the authors of such drawings to provide a clear legend to document their colour usage. The important aspect to note is that the purpose of this code and also that for CP 83 : Part 1 is to facilitate digital submissions. Hence, for all drawings to be submitted to the Approving Authorities, it is recommended that the 3 basic colours found in Table 5 be used for the following: a) b) c) Additions and alterations; Amendments to approved plans; New erections and developments where service lines, elements, etc need to be repositioned or proposed e.g. sewer lines, inspection chambers, landscape, etc.

However, if necessary, the users may also use the 3 basic colours for other purposes in drawings not for submission to the Authorities. Under such circumstances, the users are to document the usage of the 3 basic colours clearly.

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Annex A List of layers, colours and linetype in alphabetical order


This annex lists in alphabetical order the layer names as specified in CP 83 : Part 1 and the corresponding colours and linetypes. Please refer to Clause 6 for the coding for colours and Clause 7 for the linetype coding. All linetypes are deemed to be continuous unless specified otherwise.
A -Architecture CIS - Civil & Structural MIE - Mechanical & Electrical

I aver name

CIS

I MIE I Descri~tion elements I remarks of


Air-conditioning including heating and related ventilation system Air-conditioning system supply air duct Air-conditioning system fresh air duct Air-conditioning system return air duct Air-conditioning system equipment Air-conditioning exhaust air system 5 3
6

I ACONDUCT
ACONDUCT ACONDUCT ACONEQPT ACONEXHA

l1 8 I1 8 l1 7 11
8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
8

I
1
I I

94 54

I ACONREDF I ACONSUDF
ANOT-----H-

1 1

8 8

1 1

8 8

1 Return air diffusers I 1 7 4 1 Supplyairdiffusers


214 Annotations for entire CAD sheet including texts, dimension and hatch ~atterns. Hatching - Proposed carriageway, drain texts, outer edge of carriageway 8

l7l7I7l
8

I ANOT-----HANOT-----HANOTENDO ANOTGRID-EANOTGRID-EANOTHCAP ANOTREVN

8 8 7
8C

4 94 7
8C

8 8 7
8C

1 Hatching - Existing carriageway, drain texts


Hatching -Verge Plan endorsement Grids- Lines Grids - Circle/text/dimension text Handicap symbols Revision notes

7 7 7

7 8 7

7 8 7

I ANOTSYBL I ANOTVPRT
AREABDBA AREABEDB AREACALC AREACOSA AREADEDC BAMS---

7 7* 8

7 7* 8

7 7* 8

1 Symbols
Title block - May use any colour other those reserved for the authorities View-ports of CAD file Building block area Area to be deducted from building coverage Area calculations Communal open space area Area to be deducted from communal open space Building automation management system

11 11 11 I1
6

2
6

4 2 8

I BEAM-----EI BEAM---El

I
1

7D 7

I
1

7D
7

I
1

7D
7

I Beams-

Plan layout

1 Beams-Elevations

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

CIS

MIE

Description of elements I remarks

1 1

7 8

Beams- Sections

1 Building

11

- -

Bridges - Columns, beams, steel screen, deck stairs Ceilings Columns - Plan layout Columns - Elevations Columns -Sections Compressed air system Cladding Car-parking lot and driveways Proposed car parking lot spot level Existing car parking lot spot level Document conveyor system Doors Fire rated doors

COLN-----ECOLN-----El COLN-----E2 COMA---CLAD---CPRK----

7 7 3 7 7
214

7 7
3
8

7 7 7 7
8

8
214
6

8
8 8

4
DCON---DOOR---DOORFIRE DWAT---DWATCOPI DWATEQPT DWATHOPI ESCR---ELEC---ELECBUSB
-

1
(

ELECCABT ELECCIRC ELECEMER ELECEQPT ELECSWIT ELECTRKG ELECUNDR EQPT---FANS---FCLTANCI FCLTAPCE

p78 1 ~ l e c t r i c a l a b l e 1 7 trays 1 7 1 8 1 7 1 Electricalcircuits


( 7
7

1 1

7 8 7 8 8 7 7 ) 8 7 8 8 7 7 8 7 8 7 3

7 8 7 7
1

1 Domestic hot and cold watersystem


Domestic cold water piping Domestic hot and cold water equipment

14

1
1 1

1 Domestic hot water piping


Escalators/people movers

7
1

I 1 1 1 1

1 crossing cable 1 Electricalpowerbus-bartrunking

Electrical power system, elect (services), road

8
8
8

1 1

1 T
1

7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

1
1

8 1 8 1 7 8 7 8 1 7 8 r-7 3 7 8 7

7 ( Emergency power supply 7 Electrical equipment 7 Electrical switchboards 7 1 Electricaltrunkina

1 Electrical underground conduit

1 Equipment

1 Electricalfans

I Facilities (for inspection)


Fire hydrants, bollards Air pollution control equipment Food outlets Market Location of swimming pool

==-I+
FCLTMRKT FCLTPOOL

8
8

8 8 8

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Layer name FCLTPRCS FCLTRCDS FCLTSEWR FCLTTOIL

A 7 7 7 7

CIS 8

MIE 7 7 7 8
14
14

I Description of elements Iremarks


Location of industrial processes Refuse collection disposal system

8
7
8

1 Seweraae facilitv 1 Public toilets

1 Fire

system

Fire alarms Fire dampers Fire protection dry risers Fire engine access ways

FIREDAMP

1 7 1 8

14
6

8 7
14

7 7 7 7
1

1 Fire enaine hard-standina 1 Fire protection equipment 1 Fire ~rotection detectors heat 1 Fire protection hose reels

1 Fire hydrants
Fixtures Floors

Fire protection smoke detectors Fire protection wet risers

8
8

FLORLEVL FOUN---FUEL---FUELEQPT

7 7 7 7

7
6

7 7
8

1 Floorl~latform level 1 Foundation

1 Finishes

8 8

7 7 7 8
1

Fuel system piping Fuel equipment Fuel piping Furniture

8 7 8 7 7 7

I Gas s u ~ ~ l v 1 Handrails
Lightning protection system Lifts Lighting Lighting circuits

Liahtina switches Landscape and tree planting - Not for submission requirements P~ODOS~~ landsca~e, trees. shrubs. ~lantina Existing landscape, trees, shrubs, planting to be removed Existing landscape, trees, shrubs, planting to be retained

11 1

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Layer name LNSP-----E--R LNSP-----E--E LNSPARTN LNSPBUFF LNSPVERG MEDG---MEVS---MEVSSMOK MEVSSPUR


-

I CIS I MIE I Description of elements I remarks

1141141
214 94 94 94 214
8 8 8 8

I
8
7 7

Existing landscape, trees, shrubs, planting removed without approval Existing landscape, trees, shrubs, planting to be retained at time of approval Landscape aeration area , aeration trough Green buffer line Planting verge Medical gas system Mechanical exhaust/ventilation system

8 8
8 8

8
8

1
1

8
8 8

1
1

8
8 8

1 1

7
7 7 7

1 Smoke purging system

1 Smokecontrol system

MEVSSTRC MHAN---MTAL---OTHR---PAGN PATH---PCAP---PGRD---POOL---PRCS---PUBA---PUBASPKR RAIL---RAILZONE RALG---REFR---REIN---RETW---ROAD---ROAD---ROAD---ROADBPST ROADBSHL ROADCLVL ROADLEVL-E--N ROADLEVL-E--E ROADTLGT-E,N

1 Staircase pressurisation system


Material handling system Miscellaneous metal parts Other installations Paging system Footpaths, walkways Pile caps

8 8
8 8

8 8
8 8

8
8

---1 1

7
8

8
94 174
8

1 1

8 8 8 8 8

1 Playground, park facilities 1 Swimming pool


Industrial process Public address system Public address system speakers Railways Railway protection corridor Railings

8
7 7 7 7 7

7 7

8
8 8

8
8

14

8
1 14 7 7 7 7

7
8

1 1 7

1 Refrigerationsystem

1 Reinforcement
Roadways

7
8 8 8 8 8

Retaining walls Kerb, inner, outer and centre carriageway (long sect), bus bay Road hump, service road and car park hump Bus stop post Bus shelter Road hump crest level

6
7
8 6

1 1

8 6
4

1 1
1

8 6
4

1
1

8 8
8 6

1 Proposed road spot level

1 Proposed trafficlight

1 Existing road spot level

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Layer name ROADTLGT-E--E ROADMARK-E--N ROADMARK-E--E ROADWIDL

A 4

I CIS I MIE I Description of elements I remarks


4
6

6
8 8
8

Existing traffic light Proposed traffic markings on road Existing traffic markings on road Road widening lines

6
4 14

4 14

1 ROOF---I SANI---SANIDRAN

1 1

5 5 5

1 1

8 5 5

1 1

8
5

1 Roofs 1 Sanitarysystem
Sanitary drainage

I I

5 7 5 7 3 5

I SANlFlXR
SANlPlPE SANlPlTS SANIVENT SDRN----

171
5 7 3 5

1 Plumbing fixtures
Sanitary pipes Sumps/pits/hatch-boxes Sanitary vent pipes

--

5
7 3 5

Proposed surface water drainage

1 SDRNGTTR
SDRNLEVL SDRNPIPE SDRNRESV SECU---SEWRDEEP SEWRLEVL

5 5 5 5 7 7 7

5 5 5 5 7 7 7

1 Surface water drainaae autters


Proposed surface drainage invert level Surface water drainage pipeslculverts Drainage reserve Security system Deep tunnel sewers and drop shafts

5
5 5

8
7 7

Sewerage invert level Majorlmain sewers and manholes for diameter 300mm - 900 mm Minor sewers and manholes for diameter < 300mm Proposed sewer distribution system and overflow pipes Existing sewer distribution system and overflow pipes Trade effluent Trunk sewers and manholes for diameter > 900 mm Signage Site, external works

l7l7I7l l7I7l71
SEWRPRSS-E--N SEWRPRSS-E--E SEWRTREF SEWRTRNK SIGN---SITE---7 7 7 7 7 7 3C 3 7 7 8 1 7 7 7 7 8 8

I I

I SITEBNRY
SITECADA SITEKPLN SITENRTH SITESTBK SITEWALL

1P 7 7 7 ID 174

1P 7 7 7 8 174

8P 7 7 7 8 8

1 Site boundary
Cadastral information Key plan North point Building setback Boundary wall, site fencing

I SLAB---SLABOPEN

1 1

7 8

1 1

7 7

1 1

8 8 8

1 Floorslabs
Slab openings

I SLABPLNH

1 Concrete plinth for equipment

II

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001
-

Layer name SLABSTEP SPAC---SPRK---STEL---STEM---STRC---STRCHANR STRCLNDG STRCSTEP STRCWLIN TCOM---TCOMCABL TIMB---TOPOBORE

A
8

I CIS I MIE I Description of elements I remarks


--

8
8

Slab risesldrops Space usage Fire sprinkler system Steel structures Steam system Staircases

7 7 7 7 7

8 8
7

1 7 7

8
7

1 1

7 7

1 1

8 8
8

8
7 7 7 7
8

1 1

Handrailofstaircases

8 8
8

Istaircaselandings

1 Staircasesteps
Staircase walk-lines Telecommunication installations Telecommunication cables Miscellaneous timber parts Bore-holes - Layout Outline of bore - Detail Clay, gravel, silt, sand

8
1
8 8

7 7

8 8

3
TOPOCONT TOPOCROS TOPOGRAD TOPOLONG TOPOPLVL TOPOPONT-E--N TOPOPONT-E--E TOPOSLOP-E--N TOPOSLOP-E--E WAN---VC UM---WALL---WALLFIRE WALLOPEN WALLPARP WALLPRTN
-

7D

7D

Site contour lines and elevations

1 1

1 1

7
3

3
7 7

1 1

7
8

1 Crosssections
(Sitegradients

8 8
7

1 Longitudinalsections
Platform level Proposed spot level point for earthworks computation Proposed spot level point for earthworks computation
-

7
6

11 7 1 1 4 1 1 7 1 1
7
6

8 8

Proposed embankment, slope Existing embankment, slope


TV antenna system, cable n/ system

7 7 7 1 1 7

5
8

7 7
8

8
1

Vacuum system Walls Fire rated walls Wall openings

1
7

1
8

7 14

1
1
(

7
14
3

1
1

8 8

1 Parapetwalls
1 Partitionwalls
-

WALLSTRU WATR---WATRFPRT WIND---WINDSKYL

3 5
7 7 7

1 7

1 Structuralwalls
Water supply installations Water supply installations for fire protection system Windows Skylight

5
8 8 8

5
7

8
8

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Annex B Colour numbers for CAD file formats


In order to cater to users of different CAD software, a list of colour numbers for the various CAD format is provided below:

1 Colour I Red
Yellow Green Cyan Blue Magenta White Grey Medium Red Medium Yellow Medium Green Medium Cyan Medium Blue Medium Magenta

I 1
I

DWG 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 14 54 94 134 174 214

DGN 3 4 2 7 1 5 0 9 131 132 130 135 129 133

FCW 2 4 1 5 3 6 15 14 165 131 99 30 49 180

MCD 7 5 6 2 4 3 255 8 173 252 174 249 175 250

DWG: AutoCAD, IntelliCAD or other software using DWG file format DGN:

Microstation and lntegraph

FCW: FastCAD 32 MCD: Vectorworks PCIMAC

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

Annex C Recommendations for additional layer names


This annex lists the additional layer names:

Layer name ACONFRES ACONRETN ACONSUPP ACONTHEM FlREGPlP GASPEQPT MEVSEXHA MEVSSUPP MEVSEXDF MEVSSUDF SPRKEXPO SPRKMPIP

CIS

MIE 3 214 5 94 5

Description of elements Iremarks Air-conditioning fresh air duct


Air-conditioning return air duct Air-conditioning supply air duct Air-conditioning thermostat Inert gas pipe

I
I

1
I

1
1

14 54

1 Gas supply equipment


1 Mechanicalexhaustduct

3
54 174
1

1 Mechanical supply duct


Exposed sprinkler Sprinkler main pipe

Mechanical exhaust diffuser Mechanical supply diffuser

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

ABOUT THE STANDARDS, PRODUCTIVITY AND INNOVATION BOARD (SPRING SINGAPORE)


The mission of the Standards, Productivity and lnnovation Board, or SPRING Singapore in short, is to raise productivity so as to enhance Singapore's competitiveness and economic growth for a better quality of life for our people. In carrying out its mission, SPRING Singapore focuses on three areas: productivity and innovation, standards and conformance, and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the domestic sector.

Productivity and lnnovation


The Productivity and lnnovation focus has four key thrusts: promotion, business excellence, people excellence and service excellence. Under its promotion thrust, SPRING Singapore spearheads the national Productivity and lnnovation Movement. The movement aims to cultivate strong commitment to productivity and innovation in all sectors of the economy and to develop a creative workforce and innovative enterprises. SPRING Singapore serves as Secretariat to the National lnnovation Council. Using its internationally recognised Business Excellence programme, SPRING Singapore assists organisations to systematically achieve world-class standards of business excellence. At the apex of the programme is the Singapore Quality Award (SQA). Under its People Excellence thrust, SPRING Singapore initiates leading-edge programmes to enhance the capabilities of the workforce. This enables them to scale new heights and achieve higher levels of productivity. SPRING Singapore administers the Skills Development Fund (SDF), which provides incentives to help companies defray the cost of training their employees. The incentives are financed through collections from the Skills Development Levy imposed on employers. In view of the importance of service quality to competitiveness, SPRING Singapore spearheads Service Excellence in Singapore. The goal is to raise service quality levels in Singapore to world-class standards.

Standards and Quality


The focus area of Standards and Quality has two major thrusts: standardisation and conformity assessment, and measurement infrastructure development. These are aimed at enhancing productivity, facilitating market access, ensuring safety and health, and protecting the environment. As the national standards body, SPRING Singapore administers the Singapore standardisation programme, which involves the development and implementation of standards in industry. Please visit www.standards.ora.sq for more information. As standards and conformance issues can be potential barriers to trade, SPRING Singapore actively supports the government's Free Trade Agreement (FTA) strategy to ensure market access. As the national authority for the accreditation of conformity assessment bodies, SPRING Singapore audits and accredits quality systems and the competence of quality system certifiers, inspection bodies, and testing and calibration laboratories. SPRING Singapore enforces the Weights & Measures Act and Regulations to protect consumers by ensuring that market transactions based on weights and measures are accurate, fair and comply with the relevant standards. As the Safety Authority, SPRING Singapore administers the Singapore Consumer Protection (Safety Requirements) Registration Scheme to ensure that the controlled goods used by consumers in Singapore are safe. As Singapore's national metrology institute, SPRING Singapore ensures that the measurement infrastructure adequately supports the growing needs of industry. It maintains Singapore's national measurement standards for use by the industry, and provides the vital link between measurements carried out in Singapore and those in the international system.

CP 83 : Part 5 : 2001

SMEs & Domestic Sector


The SMEs and Domestic Sector area of focus has two thrusts: broad-based enterprise upgrading and industry transformation. SPRING Singapore serves as the first point of contact for SMEs that need information and assistance for upgrading. As the lead agency spearheading the upgrading of SMEs, it adopts a total approach to developing SMEs into vibrant and resilient enterprises. SPRING Singapore spearheads the transformation of the domestic sector. The goal is to create a vibrant, dynamic and resilient domestic sector that is able to contribute significantly to the overall economy. SPRING Singapore administers two key financial incentive schemes for SMEs. The first is the Local Enterprise Finance Scheme (LEFS), which is a fixed interest rate loan for SMEs to expand and develop new capabilities. The second is the Local Enterprise Technical Assistance Scheme (LETAS), which is a consultancy grant scheme to help SMEs acquire new competencies in operational management. SPRING Singapore 2 Bukit Merah Central Singapore 159835 Tel: (65) 6278 6666 Fax: (65) 6278 6667 E-mail: queries@spring.gov.sg Website: http://www.spring.gov.sg

ABOUT THE NATIONAL STANDARDISATION PROGRAMME


Under the national standardisation programme, SPRING Singapore helps companies and industry to meet international standards and conformity requirements by creating awareness of the importance of standardisation to enhance competitiveness and improve productivity, co-ordinating the development and use of Singapore Standards and setting up an information infrastructure to educate companies and industry on the latest developments. SPRING Singapore is vested with the authority to appoint a Standards Council to advise on the preparation, publication and promulgation of Singapore Standards and Technical References and their implementation. Singapore Standards are in the form of specifications for materials and products, codes of practice, methods of test, nomenclature, services, etc. The respective standards committee will draw up the standards before seeking final approval from the Standards Council. To ensure adequate representation of all viewpoints in the preparation of Singapore Standards, all committees appointed consist of representatives from various interest groups which include government agencies, professional bodies, tertiary institutions and consumer, trade and manufacturing organisations. Technical References are transition documents developed to help meet urgent industry demand for specifications or requirements on a particular product, process or service in an area where there is an absence of reference standards. Unlike Singapore Standards, they are issued for comments over a period of two years before assessment on their suitability for approval as Singapore Standards. All comments are considered when a technical reference is reviewed at the end of two years to determine the feasibility of its transition to a Singapore Standard. Technical References can therefore become Singapore Standards after two years, continue as Technical References for further comments or be withdrawn. In the international arena, SPRING Singapore represents Singapore in the lnternational Organisation of Standardisation (ISO), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Sub-committee for Standards and Conformance (SCSC) and in the ASEAN Consultative Committee for Standards and Quality (ACCSQ).