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Works Cited Primary Sources "Basic Education." Gov.cn: The Chinese Central Government's Official Web Portal. www.gov.

cn, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2012. <http://english.gov.cn/images/images/00123f37b8d505552fdd34.jpg>. This is a picture of Chinese kids at school. Their appearances and clothing represent life in a communist country. Fall of the Berlin Wall. Photo Essay: The Conflict in Chechnya Fall of the Soviet Union. PBS, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2012. <http://wwwtc.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/files//home/wnetwp/webroot/wnet/wpcontent/blogs.dir/2/files/2008/06/photo14.jpg>. This is a picture of a person destroying the Berlin Wall. This represents the re-unification of the two Germanys and the fall of the Soviet Union. Freidrich Engels and Karl Marx. BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 26 Dec. 2012. <http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/42353000/jpg/_42353926_split_image_203.jp> . This is a photograph of Freidrich Engels and Karl Marx. They are the authors of the book The Communist Manifesto, and therefore, they are the fathers of communism. "Gorbachev and Reagan." History. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2012. <http://www.history.com/images/media/slideshow/russian-leaders-and-politicians/ronaldreagan-and-mikhail-gorbachev.jpg>. This is a picture of Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev and US president Ronald Reagan. The fact that they are smiling represents the peace between their two nations and the end of the Cold War. Hanes, Sharon M., and Richard C. Hanes. "George Bush." Cold War Primary Sources. By Hanes and Hanes. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 319-25. Print. This source is the State of the Union Address in which President George Bush declared victory in the Cold War. This source provides the information that the US greatly reduced its stock of nuclear weaponns. - - -. "George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev." Cold War Primary Sources. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 307-18. Print. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source talks about George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev meeting at the 1989 Malta Summit to talk about problems in the Soviet Union. Bush offers financial help, and Gorbachev tries to end the arms race between the two superpowers. - - -. "Mikhail Gorbachev." Cold War Primary Sources. By Hanes and Hanes. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 298-306. Print. This source is the speech that Gorbachev gave at the UN headquarters in New York City in 1988. He talked about "democratizing the entire world order", which eventually backfired. Hungarians crowd onto a Soviet tank. The Guardian. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Dec. 2012. <http://static.guim.co.uk/sysimages/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2006/10/18/Hungary372.jpg>. This photograph shows the Hungarian revolution. It represents the confrontation between the Hungarian people and the Soviet army.

A modern Chinese city (Shanghai). Encyclopedia Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2012. <http://www.britannica.com/blogs/wpcontent/uploads/2008/04/shanghai.jpg>. This is a picture of modern Shanghai, China. It shows that China has started to develop a modern, urban society rather than the mostly agriculture-based Mao Zedong-era communist China. "Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: Geography." Map. Britannica Online for Kids. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. 12 Dec. 2012. <http://kids.britannica.com/elementary/art-90656>. This source provides a visual representation of the Soviet Union and each individual republic. It also shows how large the Soviet Union was. US/USSR flags. The Peoples Voice. Peoples Voice, n.d. Web. 27 Dec. 2012. <http://www.thepeoplesvoice.org/cgi-bin/blogs/media/cold_war.jpg>. This is a picture of the flags of the US and USSR. The fact that there is a line seperating them represents the tension between the two countries, which is the Cold War. Vladimir Lenin. Time. Time, n.d. Web. 26 Dec. 2012. <http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2011/1106/360_lenin_0614.jpg>. This photograph shows Soviet communist revolutionary Vladimir Lenin. Lenin led the Bolshevik Revolution, the revolution that led to the creation of the Soviet Union. Secondary Sources Brager, Bruce L. "1989- The End of an Era." The Iron Curtain: The Cold War in Europe. Philadelphia: Chelsea, 2004. 109-19. Print. Arbitrary Borders: Political Boundaries in World History. This source provides information about the fall of the Soviet Union, the Iron Curtain, and the Berlin Wall. It also talks about the overthrowing of communist governments in Eastern Europe. "A Country Study: Soviet Union (Former)." Soviet Union (Former) : Country Studies - Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. LC, n.d. Web. 2 Dec. 2012. <http://memory.loc.gov/frd/cs/sutoc.html>. This source talks about the fifteen different countries that made up the Soviet Union. It also provides information about how the Soviet Union was formed. "Fall of the Soviet Union." The Cold War Museum. Cold War Museum, n.d. Web. 15 Nov. 2012. <http://www.coldwar.org/articles/90s/fall_of_the_soviet_union.asp>. This source provides information about the fall of the Soviet Union. It talks about the revolts that occured in Eastern Europe, and the coup d'etat attempted on Mikhail Gorbachev. Fandel, Jennifer. Communism. Mankato: Creative Education, 2008. Print. Forms of Government. This source talks about the system of communism, communism in different countries, and communist leaders. It also talks about how communist ideals were born. Hanes, Sharon M., and Richard C. Hanes. "End of the Cold War." Cold War Almanac. Vol. 2. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 347-76. Print. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source provides information about the fall of the Soviet Union. It also talks about the change in Eastern Europe.

- - -. "George Bush." Volume 1: A-J. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 53-61. Print. Vol. 1 of Cold War Biographies. 2 vols. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source provides information about the protests in the Eastern European countries in 1989. It talks about the fact that the Soviet military did not intervene during the protests. - - -. "Germany and Berlin." Cold War Almanac. Vol. 1. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 55-77. Print. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source talks about the Berlin Wall. It provides information on what the wall was constructed for. - - -. "Improving Relations with Communist China." Cold War Almanac. Vol. 2. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 327-28. Print. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source provides information about the People's Republic of China, or PRC. It talks about how the communist government and the PRC was founded. - - -. "Japan and Indochina." Cold War Almanac. By Hanes and Hanes. Vol. 1. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 42. Print. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source talks about Vietnam and its colonization. It also provides information about the establishment of a communist government in Vietnam. - - -. "Mikhail Gorbachev." Volume 1: A-J. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004. 146-57. Print. Vol. 1 of Cold War Biographies. 2 vols. UXL Cold War Reference Library. This source provides information about Gorbachev and the fall of the Soviet Union. It talks about the attempted coup and Gorbachev's resignation from the Communist party and the presidency. Sherrow, Victoria. Cuba. Brookfield: Twenty-First Century, 2001. Print. This source talks about the Cuban Revolution. It provides information on Fidel Castro's rise to power as well. Taylor, David. The Cold War. Chicago: Heinemann Library, 2001. Print. 20th Century Perspectives. This source provides information on how the Soviet Union was created. It also talks about how the US, Britain, Japan, and France tried to overthrow the new government. Warren, James A. Cold War: The American Crusade against World Communism 1945-1991. New York: Lothrop, Lee, & Shepard, 1996. Print. This source talks about the the reasons for the fall of the Soviet Union. It also provides information about glasnost and perestroika, the policies of Mikhail Gorbachev that are linked to the fall of the Soviet Union.