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“Me…as Liberty!”

A Reflective Self-Portrait Lesson

“Me…as Liberty!” A Reflective Self-Portrait Lesson Created By Arianne O’Connor Mixed Media – Grade Four October

Created By Arianne O’Connor Mixed Media – Grade Four October 08, 2012

“Me…as Liberty!”

A Reflective Self-Portrait Lesson

INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION LESSON TITLE: “Me as Liberty”: An Abstract Self Portrait Lesson GRADE LEVEL: Fourth CLASS SIZE: 20-25 LENGTH OF PERIOD: 45 minutes, 3 classes

LESSON TOPIC & DESCRIPTION

In this lesson, students will explore a new way of representing themselves by creating a reflective self-portrait. Using the Statue of Liberty and what she symbolizes to the United States of America as the basis for this lesson, the students will be introduced to the idea of what liberties we have, or hope to have, and what liberties we should be thankful for (for example: the freedom to obtain an education, freedom to express ourselves through what clothing we wear, the freedom of speech, the freedom to vote, the freedom to allow equal rights for men and women, etc.). Through the introductory discussion, students will be encouraged to discuss or inquire about the liberties that other countries do or do not yet possess. The students will also be introduced to a few variations of self-portraiture to encourage them to explore different venues for self-expression and to look intrinsically at themselves. Students will be instructed to depict themselves in their self-portrait as a Statue of Liberty. By using imagery within the background of their self-portrait, the students will be asked to display at least three examples of liberties (freedoms) that they are thankful or hopeful for. The students will use a variety of media to create their overall composition.

STAGE ONE: DESIRED RESULTS

A. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS:

Artists create a self-portrait depicting themselves in an alternate or representational form

Artists can represent an emotion or an idea through the use of images and without the use of words

Artists reflect on their personal experiences and interests through creating art

B. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

What am I thankful for?

What liberties or freedoms do I wish I could possess?

How can I show what freedoms interest or apply to me?

How can I express a sense of thanks for the freedoms I have?

C.

GOALS AND STANDARDS (Massachusetts State Frameworks):

Learning Standard 1: Method, Materials and Techniques. Students will demonstrate knowledge of methods, materials and techniques unique to the visual arts.

Learning Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention and Expression. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention and expression in a variety of media, materials and techniques.

Learning Standard 10: Interdisciplinary Connections. Students will apply their knowledge of the arts to the study of English language arts, foreign language, health, history and social science, mathematics, and sciences and technology/engineering.

D. LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

The students will gain a better understanding of what liberties mean to them personally and globally

The students will experiment with a variety of media.

The students will aim to represent themselves as a Statue of Liberty

The students will display at least three images representing liberties they are thankful or hopeful for

The students will explore a wide range of mixed media

• The students will explore a wide range of mixed media STAGE TWO: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE A.
• The students will explore a wide range of mixed media STAGE TWO: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE A.
• The students will explore a wide range of mixed media STAGE TWO: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE A.

STAGE TWO: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE

A. PERFORMANCE TASKS AS EVIDENCE (ART PRODUCT):

A successful example of the final product will be a well thought out and designed composition of a self-portrait as a Statue of Liberty. The student’s final composition should depict representational images within the background that display at least three liberties the student is thankful or hopeful for. Over a three-week session, the students will have completed this assignment using a variety of media for their final image.

B. OTHER EVIDENCE/CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:

The students will be attentive during initial introduction of the lesson. The students will actively engage in a collaborative discussion in relation to the topic and content as well as contributing their personal opinions and ideas on what the Statue of Liberty symbolizes and what liberty means to them. Before moving onto the mixed media aspect of the lesson, all students will participate in an initial “gallery walk” where they will share what liberties they

are thankful or hopeful for with their peers and instructor. Once their self-portrait is complete, all students will participate in a final “gallery walk” and re-introduce their piece providing a brief Artist’s Statement of their work expressing to the class what liberties they are most thankful for. Students will show respect for their peer’s opinions and express interest in each other’s work during our initial and final product “gallery walk” critique.

C. CRITERIA:

Did the student render a self-portrait as a Statue of Liberty?

Does the student understand what “liberties” are?

Did the student actively engage in class discussions?

Did the student learn something new about a classmate through their self-portrait representation?

Did the student respectfully engage in class “gallery talks”?

Did the student display at least three liberties in their composition that they are thankful or hopeful for?

Did the student make use of a variety of media in their composition?

STAGE THREE: LEARNING PLAN

A. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:

Watercolor Paper (dimensions: 9” by 18”)

Charcoal Pencil

Black Sharpie Marker – fine and wide point

Markers

Crayons

Watercolor Paints

Gold and Silver Accent Marker or Gold/Silver Paint

Glitter Glaze Paint or Glitter

Tissue Paper

White All-Purpose Glue

B. VOCABULARY WITH DEFINITIONS:

(1) LIBERTY noun \ˈ li-bər-tē\ (Plural: liberties)

The quality or state of being free:

The power to do as one pleases

The freedom from physical restraint

The positive enjoyment of various social, political, or economic rights and privileges

The power of choice

(2) IMAGERY noun \ ˈ i-mij-r ē , -mi-j ə -\

(Plural: imageries)

Figurative language

The art of making images

Mental Images; Especially the products of imagination

Pictures produced by an imaging

(3) SYMBOLIZE verb \ˈ sim-bə-ˌ līz\

To serve as a symbol of; to represent, express, or identify by a symbol

C. VISUAL IMAGE RESOURCES:

Maestro, B. (1989) The Story of the Statue of Liberty. HarperCollins; 1st Mulberry Edition.

Burke, M. (2010). The Story of the Statue of Liberty [Board Book]. Candy Cane Press, Ideals Publications.

Eldridge, A. & Eldridge, S. (2012). The Statue of Liberty: An American Symbol. Enslow Elementary.

D. TEXT, MEDIA, AND WEB RESOURCES:

PowerPoint Presentation (created by teacher)

- Students will be provided with various images of the Statue of Liberty as well as a

variety of Self Portraiture examples from historical and contemporary artists such as (but not limited to):

Renditions of the Statue of Liberty by: Peter Max, Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and

Daniel O’Connor Self Portraits By: Vincent Van Gogh, Frida Kahlo, Paul Gauguin, and Pablo Picasso.

Statue of Liberty Images:

- Keith Haring. Statue of Liberty. (1986) Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website:

http://www.haring.com/cgi-bin/essays.cgi?essay_id=06

- Peter Max. Statue of Liberty. (2000) Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website:

http://www.petermax.com/

- Daniel O’Connor. Statue of Liberty. (2002) Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website: http://www.dannyoart.com/about_o.php

Self Portrait Images:

- Frida Kahlo “Self Portrait with Bonito” Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website:

http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/frida-kahlo/self-portrait-with-bonito-1941

- Pablo Picasso. Self Portrait (1907) Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website:

http://www.pablopicasso.org/self-portrait.jsp

- Paul Gauguin, Self-Portrait with Manao tupapau. (1893-94) Retrieved October 3,

2012 from website: http://calitreview.com/14503 Vincent Van Gogh. Self Portrait. (1889) Retrieved October 3, 2012 from website:. www.google.com

E. INSTRUCTION:

The teacher will begin the lesson an introduction to who the Statue of Liberty is and what she represents.

The teacher will use visual images to assist in the introduction of the Statue of Liberty using different resources

The teacher will give facts on what the Statue of Liberty means to the United States of America and why she is a symbol of liberty

The teacher will define liberty

The teacher will offer examples of what liberties we have or can be hopeful for

The teacher will host a discussion on the topic and its symbolism to create a concrete idea and working knowledge of the term liberty

The teacher will show and offer examples of a variety of ways in which the Statue of Liberty has been represented by various artists

The teacher will display examples of various forms of portraiture

The teacher will provide students with simple instruction and a teacher example (benchmark) of a variety of Statue of Liberty self-portraits

The teacher will instruct that each student must represent at least three different liberties within the background of their composition

The teacher will suggest students draw ideas upon their personal experiences, preferences, imagination and creativity

The teacher will express that this lesson is to be representational of personal liberties the students are thankful or hopeful for, therefore their artwork should be as expressive of their personal taste

The teacher will instruct that all imagery within the composition is to be respectful and appropriate (per their schools guidelines, rules and regulations)

The teacher will discuss how art can be representational with the use of imagery

F. QUESTIONS TO GENERATE DISCUSSION:

What does the Statue of Liberty symbolize?

What does Liberty mean?

What Liberties do we have?

What Liberties can we be hopeful for?

Do we all have the same liberties?

Are we all thankful for the same liberties?

What is imagery?

What curiosities do you have about the Statue of Liberty?

What is mixed media?

How does it feel to express yourself this way?

G. LEARNING ACTIVITES:

Students will learn the definition of liberty, imagery, and representational art through their exploration and completion of this lesson

Students will respectfully examine works of their peers during gallery walks of class artwork

Students will brainstorm ideas of liberties that they are thankful and/or hopeful for with their instructor and classmates

Students will experiment with a variety of mixed media in the process of completing their abstract self portraits

Students will learn about representational art without the use of words within their composition

Students will explore abstract art in representing themselves as a Statue of Liberty

“Me… as Liberty” The following Artist Educators artistically created the abstract portraits shown above on

“Me… as Liberty”

The following Artist Educators artistically created the abstract portraits shown above on October 8, 2012 in order of their appearance from top left to bottom right:

Jennifer Baldvins Maura Tully Holly Kelfer Brenna Crothers Azita Moradkhani Haruka Sauda Heather Gates Pamela Bower-Basso

Colored Benchmark Portrait (to the right) completed by Arianne Q. O’Connor