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Running head: ASSESSMENT REFELCTION

Assessment Reflection Rayshawn [Elijah] Carr Seattle University Erica K. Yamamura, Ph.D. SDAD 579: Student Development Capstone Seminar Section 1-12FQ 29 October 2012

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2 Assessment Reflection

As I reflect on my educational journey in the Student Development Administration Program, I noticed personal growth both cognitively and emotionally. This development was evident with my ability to fully understanding the foundations and emerging nature of the Student Affairs profession and higher education, which has enhanced my cultural awareness for authentic learning. As stated by Baxter Magolda (1999), Active learning draws learners into the process of learning and encourages them to become authors of their own perspectives (p.21). The process of student learning was cultivated In SDAD 578 Student Development Theory, Research, and Practice; I put into practice Yossos (2005) Theory of Community Cultural Wealth in a service learning project for the Seattle Youth Initiative undergraduate volunteers. Roberts (2007) said Student affairs professionals have a responsibility to continue learning and there are multiple methods in which to gain knowledge and skills (p.575). I was able to put into to practice Roberts statement by creating an inclusive training workshop and gained first-hand knowledge of course design, which is a transferable skill that I will integrate into my craft as a future professional in higher education. At Seattle University I developed my ability to use validation and open dialogue to establish an understanding of students and student issues. As the LGBTQ Project Coordinator for the Office of Multicultural Affairs, direct communication was used as a catalyst in reducing personal assumptions that all marginalized students have identical educational needs and desires. Welkner & Bowesher (2012) note it is not uncommon as professionals to pay little attention to the personal lives of students (p.3). As a way to reducing my inability to support the holistic student needs, I referred to Kegans (1994)

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Theory of Evolution of Consciousness, which explains that students personal experience develops their state of mind and ability to handle conflict (p.177). I understand the need to embrace a students multifaceted educational need, which influences their educational success and my ability to provide correct educational guidance. As advisor of the Queer Mens Discussion Group at Seattle University, I exhibit professional integrity and ethical leadership in professional practice by supporting gay, bi, trans, and questioning students in believing that their sexual orientation does not prevent them from being influential. I came into my experience as the advisor thinking I was going to be the teacher, but learned along the process that professional integrity means I have to be willing to learn and grow from those I teach and support. As cited by Welkner & Bowesher (2012) Student define meaning and purpose based on cues from important others in their lives (p.5). As a continuing student in the SDA Program, I feel that I am in a place where I can effectively and efficiently work with students to gain their respect. I understand now as a future professional in0rder for me to be an ethical leader I must first have a clear understand of my leadership style before I can move forward in assistant students with understanding their leadership philosophy. I did not have much knowledge of understanding and fostering diversity, justice and a sustainable world formed by a global perspective and Jesuits Catholic tradition. However, within my time at Seattle University, I have been able to cultivate meaning by self-reflecting on the Jesuits mission, which has been an empowering agent. Spring 2012, I implemented Mccarn and Fassinger s(1996) Model of Gay and Lesbian Identity

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Development when I supported the first non-violent peaceful protest for queer-inclusion at Seattle University: the LGBTQ Amplify Voices Rally lived out the true meaning of the Jesuit Catholic tradition of Social Justice inclusion. According to Waters (2010) Designing programs that promote ally development as a component of social justice education will allow programs to tailor ally development exercises and programs to a range of ally subpopulations (racial justice allies, LGBTIQ allies, etc.). I supported the students in advocating for their rights to be heard and respected, and the administration at Seattle University was receptive to formulating ally hoods. Supporting the Amplify Voices Rally allowed for the queer subpopulations to create an inclusive environment by challenging the status quo queer inclusion and advocating for needed change. I have progressed in adapting student services to specific environments and cultures because I choose to engage in meaningful student interactions rooted in recognizing racial and cultural environmental dynamics. While working at Seattle University as the advisor for the Black Student Union, I encountered student stories of racial discrimination, or being distressed that their academic advisors were not affirming. Patton, McEwen, Rendn, & Howard-Hamilton (2007) supports my statement by founding that it is essential to be competent in assessing the norms of racism within the constructs of a society (p. 43). In my effort to be racial competent I supported leaning spaces in OMA Lounge 390 where students supported each with class assignments and validated each others experiences. I strongly believe that the bedrock of Student Affairs is to assist students in taking a self-empowering role in intelligent decision-making, while also being accountable for their educational paths. I integrate

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Hollands (1997) Person- Environment Theory regularly to serve as an affirming agent where students could vent about their experience, while forging need partnerships to navigate their negative higher education experiences. Undoubtedly, I have grown the most this last year in skills in leadership and collaboration. I learned from team projects that being a leader means that I have to create spaces for partnerships, which allows for authentic professional and personal collaboration. I now know the importance of connecting leadership and teamwork which prevented disconnects I previously experienced with peers. Ellis (2009) states, Partners share a joint interest and work together to accomplish a common goal with shared sense of purpose and sharing responsibility for the outcome (p.450). I became an effective student affairs professional during my summer Best Practice Independent Study with to peers in Southern California. We were able to work with each other efficiently because we shared a common objective to learning Best Practices to become successful Student Affairs Professionals. Yossos (2005) Theory of Community Cultural Wealth was apparent as we worked together to cultivate new personal and professional relationships. Overall, I strongly believe our group success in collaborating was due to our abilities to pull from personal and professional attributes. In Spring 2012, I enrolled in Adult Education and Training Course 563, where I learned to utilize assessment, evaluation, technology, and research to improve practice. Using Kolbs (1981) Experimental Learning process, I created and taught two peer teaching sessions where learners were able to recognize and explicate key concepts, theories, and terminology on Summative Assessment. As stated by Dungy (2012) Clearly, higher education in changing (p.2). I saw her words as a clear indication of

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having an awareness of the Summative Assessment process. In the process it allowed for me to support students to take a functioning role in their learning: how to identify their learning styles and how assessment influences their capacity to learn. Lastly, I am better equipped to help students foster a deeper meaning to why they are often tested on course comprehension. Entering graduate school has helped me understand my personal limitations in communicating effectively, orally and in writing. During my first quarter in the SDA program, I received a 23/33 on an assignment and questioned my capabilities as a student. Kruger (2000) suggests The very practice and philosophy of student affairs implies on-going, lifelong professional development (As cited in Roberts, 2007, p 561). As a student and future professional I made it a point to re-evaluate why I was seeking a M.Ed. and created realistic expectations for my success. By setting incremental goals for myself, I did not allow my one low-grade to prevent me from preserving. As Kuh (1999) claims, setting the bar high motivates people to achieve their potential and surpass their self-perceived limits (p.67). In response to my struggle, I hired a writing tutor and I was able to gain constructive support, which has improved my writing skills. In the summer of 2012, I was selected to be the NODA Intern at the University of California Riverside where I put into practice Dungys (2012) concept of experiential learning (p1). Within my internship experience, I gained a deeper understanding of issues surrounding law, policy, finance and governance, which has shaped my worldview regarding inclusion for marginalized and undocumented students. After meeting with my supervisor, I learned that the Summer Bridge Program I was working for could not accept undocumented students because they did not qualify for federal

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student aid. I was very troubled that there was nothing set in place for this population at UCR because California has a large population of undocumented students. As a result, I now seek to learn more about funding opportunities for undocumented students. I have set as my personal and professional goal to only work in institutions that support this marginalized group of students. As a new professional I will educate myself of laws and bills such as the DREAM Act, which create equitable experiences for undocumented students in higher education institutions. I am still working to establish and enhance my professional identity. Being a Black man with intersecting identities and working with students who share complex identities, I have learned how to use my knowledge from SDAD 575 - Best Practices Student Services as an example when encountering adversity as a future professional. Furthermore, with the assistance of Waters (2012) concept of recognizing diverse identities, I am able to build coalitions with paraprofessionals and professional with different salient cultural and racial perspectives (p.2). During Best Practices I was able to interview Dominic Alletto who supported me in my identity development. He shared that it is important when facing identity conflicts with others to not always push back and to keep your eye on the bigger goal. Alletto shared that it can be very difficult to hold back when encountering conflicts, but we must keep in mind that as professionals, we have to be positive role models for students at all times. Now, I understand the need to not push back when encountering disagreements, rather to dialogue and own my feelings of being triggered, or unheard as professional. This will allow me to focus my energy on being an effective and efficient Student Affairs professional with moral integrity.

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Reflecting on my time in the SDA Program, I do not feel that there was any single moment that I was at my best; I have steadily been at my best since my educational journey began Fall of 2011. In my time at Seattle University, I have been able to fully comprehend my personal mission of being an affirming agent, creative visionary, and leader. Being aware of these roles has allowed me to cultivate meaning that the work I am doing with students campus wide matters. Being able to believe in myself as an authentic being, with an emphasis in student success in higher education keeps me motivated and dependably for students. Roberts (2007) said The ultimate responsibility lies in the hands of the practitioners, who must find the time to assess their areas for growth and devote the appropriate time and resources to be competent in their current and future positions (p.574). Now in my second year in the SDA program, I feel that I have assessed my areas of limitations and I can reflect back and see that I have: successfully navigated an educational system not created with me in mind; embraced the ongoing journey of self-enlightenment, which will allow me to be a lifelong leaner; and lastly, serve as a mentor for students who hope to create an inclusive educational experience for future marginalized communities. I confess whole-heartily that my success and limitations in the SDA program did not give me wisdom for personal and student advocacy; rather, through my experiences at Seattle University, I learned how to unpack the knowledge that was always rooted internally.

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9 References

Association of College Personal Administrators (ACPA). (2010). Professional competency ares for student affairs professionals. Alletto, D. personal communication, July 10, 2012. Baxter-Magolda, M. (2001). Development of self-authorship. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010). The student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition. (pp. 176-193) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Baxter Magolda, M., B. (1999). Engaging student in active learning. In Blimling, G.S., & Whitt, E.J. (Eds.) 1999). Good practice in student affairs: Principles to foster student learning. (pp.21-43) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Chickering, A. (1969). Chickerings theory of identity development. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010). The student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition. (pp. 64-81) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Dalton, J., C., Crosby, P., C., Valente, A., & Eberhardt, D. (2009). Maintaining and modeling everyday ethics in students affairs. In McClellan, G.S., & Stringer, J. (2010). The handbook of student affairs administration 3nd edition. (pp.166-186) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Dungy, G. (2012). Connecting and collaborating to further the intellectual, civic, and moral purposes of higher education. Journal of College and Character 13 (3), 1-8. Dunkely, J., H, Presley C., A. (2009). The helping students with health and wellness

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issues. In McClellan, G.S., & Stringer, J. (2010). The handbook of student affairs administration 3nd edition 3nd edition. (pp.265-287) San Francisco, CA: JosseyBass. Ellis, S. (2009). Developing effective relationships on campus and in the community. In McClellan, G.S., & Stringer, J. (Eds.), The handbook of student affairs administration, 3rd Edition (pp.447-462). Jossey-Bass: San Francisco. McCarn, S., & R. Fassinger, R., E (2010). Sexual identity development. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010).Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition. (pp.305326). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Holland, J., L. (1997). Using student development theory. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010).In Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition. (pp.22-40). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Kegan, R. (1994). Development of self-authorship. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010).The student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition. (pp.177-193) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Kolb, D. (1981). Kolbs theory of experiential learning. In Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F., M., Patton, L., D, Renn, K., A. (2010).Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice 2nd edition (pp.136-152) San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Kuh G., D(1999). Setting the bar high to promote student learning. In Blimling, G.S., &

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Yosso, T.J. (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race discussion of community cultural wealth. Race Ethnicity and Education, 8(1), 69-82.