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Curriculum Overview for Grade Seven In seventh grade, students will analyze, define, compare, and evaluate ideas

when reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students will read a variety of classic and contemporary novels, short stories, nonfiction texts, poems, and plays. A particular emphasis will be placed on developing seventh grade students abilities to cite specific evidence to support their interpretations of a text. Students will be able to effectively communicate their ideas through a variety of genres of writing and speaking and for a range of audiences. A Sample of What Students Will Be Working on in Grade Seven: Citing several sources of specific evidence from a text to support literal and inferential interpretations of a text. Analyzing literary elements in works of fiction and how each element affects the others (i.e. how setting shapes the characters, how the plot shapes the theme) Determining an authors purpose and point of view and analyzing how the author develops an argument. Writing literary, informational, and persuasive essays with a clear focus, effective organizational structure, strong evidence, and appropriate conventions. Conducting research on a specific topic by drawing on evidence from several credible literary or information sources to support an analysis or reflection Evaluating a speakers key points and reasoning, asking questions, and stating his or her own well-supported ideas in discussions. Avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citations (works cited list) Using grade-appropriate vocabulary and applying knowledge of Greek and Latin roots to define the meaning of new words. Developing an understanding of the conventions of formal written English and applying them to craft sophisticated and clear sentences and paragraphs. Applying reading skills independently to independent reading selections

7th Grade English Ms. Hawe Units of Study Unit 1: Why Read? (Freak the Mighty) Unit 2: What Can I Learn from Reading? A Study of Theme in Seedfolks Unit 3: Poetry: Studying the Choices Poets Make Unit 4: Why Are We Mean? Reading and Writing Nonfiction for Social Change Unit 5: ELA Test Preparation Unit 6: Dystopian Literature Book Clubs and Short Story Writing Grammar Curriculum Overview: This year the 7th grade students will be studying grammar using a sentencecomposing approach based on the work of Don and Jenny Killgallon. This approach teaches grammar in the context of writing as students learn to craft increasingly complex and varied sentences by emulating model sentences. Sentence Composing Toolbox Students will learn to craft sentences using the following tools o Opening adjective o Delayed adjective o Opening adverb o Delayed adverb o Absolute phrase o Appositive phrase o Prepositional phrase o Gerund phrase o Infinitive phrase o Clause types (independent, dependent) o Adjective clause o Adverb clause o Noun clause Vocabulary Overview: Vocabulary study in 7th grade will focus on academic vocabulary, vocabulary taken from shared texts, and Greek and Latin roots. Students will be encouraged to use vocabulary words in their writing and discussions. Independent Reading Expectations: Students will be expected to read a variety of genres independently throughout the year (approximately 700 pages a month). Each Friday will be reserved as an independent reading day during which students will read independently, engage in teacher and peer conferences, and demonstrate their application of reading skills in a reading

portfolio. Unit 1: Why Read? Freak the Mighty (New Unit) September Priority Common Core State Standards RL.7.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.7.3. Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). RI.7.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RI.7.2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RI.7.3. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events). Supporting Common Core State Standards RI.7.6. Determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others. W.7.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. W.7.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. RI.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. Texts Freak the Mighty by Rodman Philbrick Superman and Me by Sherman Alexie (Non-fiction)

Essential Questions Thematic Questions: Why read? What impact do books have on our lives? Skill Based Questions: How do readers support their interpretations of what they read? How do authors create engaging and realistic characters? How can we learn more about characters by studying how they behave? What do readers pay attention to when they read nonfiction?

Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings Thematic Understandings: Reading entertains, informs, educates, and opens doors. Skill Based Understandings: Readers support their claims and inferences about their reading by providing strong textual evidence. Characterization describes the ways the author reveals a character through physical description, speech/thoughts/actions, other characters reactions, and the narrators direct comments. Readers can make inferences about characters by studying how characters behave in certain situations and asking, What does this show about the character? When readers read nonfiction, we consider the authors purpose, the main idea of the text, and how the author supports his claim with evidence. SKILLS Students will be able to do Select strong pieces of textual evidence and explain how they support their claim or inference. Describe how an author uses characterization in a particular text. Make inferences about characters based on descriptions of setting and how they react to conflict. Identify the main idea and authors purpose in a nonfiction article. Make text-to-text connections between a novel and a nonfiction article. Explain the benefits of reading and how it is important to their lives.

CONCEPTS Students will know Vocabulary/Concepts Textual evidence o Direct quotations o Summary o Paraphrase Characterization Conflict Setting Inference Main idea Purpose Compare and contrast Additional vocabulary words will be selected from Freak the Mighty and Superman and Me and studied using a word of the day format.

ASSESSMENT Formative Assessment: Evidence About Me Activity: Students will create bags of items that connect to their identity. Their classmates will then make use the items to help them make inferences about their classmates. (Connect to Lorettas purse in Freak the Mighty) Short Answer Questions: Students will respond to a variety of questions about the texts using strong pieces of textual evidence to support their claim. Performance Assessment #1: Groups of students will be assigned to analyze a character from Freak the Mighty. They will then create a PowerPoint presentation describing how the author characterized their assigned character using strong textual evidence. Performance Assessment #2: Students will use the characterization techniques they studied to write a character portrait based on a photograph. Vocabulary Quizzes: Students will demonstrate their ability to understand and use academic vocabulary and vocabulary from Freak the Mighty in a vocabulary quiz. Summative Assessment: Imagine that books are about to be banned (read excerpt from The Last Book In The Universe). Write a persuasive essay explaining why books are important. Use evidence from Freak the Mighty and Superman and Me. Conclude your essay with an explanation of how reading is important in your own life. Instructional Sequence Week 1: Skill Focus-Characterization (What is it? How do authors create compelling characters? How do readers learn about characters?) Week 2: Skill Focus- Citing Textual Evidence to Support What Text Says Directly and Indirectly (Inferences) (quote, paraphrase, summarize) Week 3: Skill Focus-Reading nonfiction (authors purpose, main idea, supporting claims with evidence, close reading) Week 4: Assessment (comparison between novel and nonfiction article)

Unit 2: What Can I Learn from Reading? A Study of Theme in Seedfolks October-November Priority Common Core State Standards 7.RL.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 7.RL.1: Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. W.7.2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. Establish and maintain a formal style. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.

SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. Supporting Common Core State Standards L.7.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. L.7.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

W.7.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. W.7.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. Texts Thank You Maam by Langston Hughes Seedfolks by Rodman Philbrick Excerpts from Kids With Courage: True Stories About Young People Making a Difference by Barbara Lewis (nonfiction)

Essential Questions Thematic Questions How can individuals make a difference in their communities? What does it take to be a good leader? Skill Based Questions How do authors communicate themes through their writing? What makes textual evidence strong? How can I communicate my ideas about a text to others through writing and discussion?

Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings Thematic Understandings Anyone is capable of making a difference if they identify a problem and work together to fix it. A good leader is dedicated, hardworking, and able to motivate a group of people to make a difference. Skill Based Understandings Authors write to communicate a message(s), or theme, to their readers. They do this by developing themes throughout a story. Readers need to support our claims about a text with textual evidence that directly supports our ideas. Readers modify their claims if they cannot find supporting textual evidence. Readers can deepen their thinking about a text and share it with others by writing a literary essay or engaging in discussions. Literary essays follow specific conventions and need to be organized and written in a way that clearly communicates the writers ideas to a specific audience.

CONCEPTS Students will know Themes are the authors message about a topic (theme vs. topic) Themes develop over the course of a text Texts often have more than one theme Summaries are objective Textual evidence is used to support analysis o quote o paraphrase The structure and purpose of a literary essay o introduction o thesis statement o body paragraphs o topic sentences o conclusion MLA in-text citations

SKILLS Students will be able to do Determine a theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text. Provide an objective summary of the text.

Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content o Select the most effective textual evidence to support the thesis statement. o Plan the essay using boxes and bullets to organize ideas in a way that is clear to the reader. o Write a clear introduction that includes TAG (title, author, genre), a brief summary, and a thesis statement. o Develop the topic with relevant details from the text and quotations and explain how the textual evidence supports the thesis. o Write clear topic sentences and use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. o Establish and maintain a formal style by not using I or personal opinions.

o Provide a concluding paragraph that restates the thesis in a new way and provides new insight on the topic. ASSESSMENT Pre-assessment: Students will identify the theme in a story they previously read and provide one piece of textual evidence to support it. Formative Assessment: Performance Task #1: Write an objective summary of the first three vignettes in Seedfolks Performance Task #2: Nominate the character that is most deserving of an award for being the most responsible for the gardens success (group 1) or an award for being the character who changed the most as a result of the garden. Prepare evidence to support your nomination and defend your choice during a Socratic Circle discussion. Performance Task #3: Collect textual evidence relating to an assigned topic through double entry notes. Develop the topic into a theme. Select the pieces of textual evidence that best support the theme. Performance Task #4: Compare and contrast the leadership skills of a character in Seedfolks to a teen who made a difference in Kids With Courage: True Stories About Young People Making a Difference by Barbara Lewis (nonfiction) Ongoing Assessments: Exit tickets, graphic organizers, comprehension checks, class discussions Summative Assessment: Write a literary essay exploring how Paul Fleischman develops a theme through the course of the novel.

Unit 3: Poetry: Studying the Choices Poets Make November-December Priority Common Core State Standards RL.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama. RL.7.5: Analyze how a dramas or poems form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning. L.7.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 1. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context. 2. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). Supporting Common Core State Standards 7.RL.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. 7.RL.1: Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. Texts Metaphors by Sylvia Plath Hope by Emily Dickinson The Sea by James Reeves Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening and The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence Thayer Oranges by Gary Soto Abuelito Who by Sandra Cisneros Sleeping in the Forest by Mary Oliver Identity by Julio Polanco Echoes by Pat Mora

Essential Questions How do poets communicate their message to their readers? How does the form of a poem connect to its meaning? Why do poets use figurative language? What strategies can I use to analyze a poem?

Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings Poets make deliberate choices about the form of their poems to communicate their message. Poets use figurative language to create a mood and communicate their message. A careful, close reading of a poem will uncover its meaning and the ways the author communicated it. SKILLS Students will be able to do Identify the rhyme scheme of a poem and analyze how it impacts the mood and meaning of the poem. Analyze how the choices the poet made about the form of a poem (stanzas, lines, capitalization and punctuation) communicate the poets message. Identify different types of poetry. Analyze how poets use figurative language and poetic devices to communicate the poems meaning. Write original poems using different forms, figurative language, and poetic devices. Conduct close readings of poems to analyze the mood and message of the poem.

CONCEPTS Students will know Vocabulary/Concepts Form: o rhyme scheme o stanzas o line length o capitalization and punctuation Types of poetry o traditional vs. unconventional o sonnet o limerick o haiku o free verse o concrete Figurative Language and Poetic Devices o metaphor o simile o personification o alliteration o onomatopoeia Formative Assessment:

ASSESSMENT Quiz on Poetry Forms: Identify different types of poetry. Identify the rhyme scheme of a poem. Analyze how the form of a poem contributes to its meaning. Quiz on Figurative Language: Identify the different types of figurative language in short poems. Analyze how the figurative language in one poem contributes to its meaning. Performance Task #1: Write an original poem using at least three types of figurative language or poetic devices. Think carefully about the form of the poemuse stanzas, line length, rhyme, capitalization and punctuation to help communicate your message. Explain the choices you made in a reflection. Performance Task #2: With your group, conduct a close reading of the poem your

group selected. Analyze the figurative language the poet used and the choices he or she made about the poems form. Present your findings in a Glogster (online poster maker/blogging platform). Ongoing Assessments: Exit tickets, graphic organizers, class discussions, and poetry writing exercises. Summative Assessment: In class essay analyzing how the form and figurative language in a poem(s) contribute to its meaning.

Unit 4: Why Are We Mean? Reading and Writing Nonfiction for Social Change January-February (May be moved to align with Challenge Day) Priority Common Core State Standards RL.7.6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. RI.7.2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. RI.7.5. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6. Determine an authors point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others. RI.7.8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. RI.7.9. Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts. W.7.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. W.7.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. Supporting Common Core State Standards RI.7.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RI.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Essential Questions Thematic Questions: Why are we mean? How does bullying affect people? What can I do to end bullying? Skill Based Questions: What do good readers pay attention to when they read nonfiction? How do nonfiction writers organize their ideas and present them to specific audiences? How do readers research a topic using multiple texts?

Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings Thematic Understandings: People mistreat others for a variety of reasons. Sometimes they dont even know they are being mean. When we are intentionally or unintentionally unkind to people, our actions might have unintended consequences. Everyone has a responsibility to take a stand against bullying. Skill Based Understandings: Readers pay attention to text features, main ideas, and authors purpose when reading nonfiction. Nonfiction writers use text features such as headings to organize their ideas. Writers write with a specific audience in mind. Readers take notes on their topic as they read multiple sources of information and try to synthesize what they have learned. SKILLS Students will be able to do Determine the type of narrator used in a short story and analyze why the author made that choice Compare and contrast the points of view of different characters in a short story Identify text features in a nonfiction article and analyze their purpose. Use text features in their own writing to better communicate with their intended audience. Determine two or more main ideas in a text analyze their development over the course of the text. Paraphrase a text accurately without plagiarizing Determine the authors purpose and intended audience. Take notes on a specific topic using multiple sources Synthesize their research and present their findings in an informational brochure

CONCEPTS Students will know Vocabulary/Concepts Point of view o first person, third person limited, third person omniscient Text features o titles and subtitles o headings and subheadings o photographs and captions o graphic aids (charts, time lines, maps, diagrams) o sidebar o bulleted list o bold or italicized words Main idea paraphrase authors purpose synthesis

ASSESSMENT Formative Assessment: Point of View Analysis: Students will analyze the point of view in a short story through a Socratic Circle discussion and written assignment Point of View Writing: Students will rewrite a scene from their literature circle short story in the point of view of a different character. Understanding Checks: Students will complete graphic organizers or other written work to demonstrate their understanding of each of the following skills: Analyze Text Features Determine the Main Ideas Determine the Authors Purpose Paraphrasing Taking Notes Research Notes: Students will complete a note taking sheet for each article they read for their research (at least four articles) Pamphlet Planning Sheet: Students will complete a planning sheet in which they articulate their plans for their pamphlet (content, audience, purpose, organization, text features).

Summative Assessment: Create a pamphlet about bullying for a specific audience. Your pamphlet should have a specific and clear focus (i.e. cyberbullying) and audience (i.e. parents, children, teens, teachers, etc.). Include text features to organize the content of your pamphlet and at least two direct quotes. Include a works cited list. Instructional Sequence Bend 1: Short Stories about Bullying: Studying Point of View Bend 2: What do readers pay attention to when they read nonfiction? Bend 3: Researching a topic Bend 4: Creating pamphlets Texts Born of Man and Woman Literature Circle Stories (various levels): Oliver Button is a Sissy, All Summer in a Day, The Stolen Party, On the Bridge, Epiphany, Hum Articles about bullying from Scope, Time, New York Times, Junior Scholastic, and other sources Extension Activities Depending on timing Students will work in groups to create anti-bullying initiatives for Oyster Bay High School. They will write persuasive essays to the school administration in support of their proposed program.

Students will present their ideas to their classmates at a Kindness Fair.

Unit 5: ELA Test Preparation March-April This unit will be revised once information about the 2013 test is released. The unit will provide students with opportunities to practice: Multiple choice reading comprehension questions Short answer questions (using RAFT) Listening passages Extended response

Students will also be expected to continue their independent reading during this unit. Reading stamina will be emphasized.

Unit 6: Dystopian Literature Book Clubs and Short Story Writing May-June Priority Common Core State Standards RL.7.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.7.3. Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). RL.7.6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. RL.7.9. Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. W.7.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

Supporting Common Core State Standards RL.7.7. Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

RI.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. W.7.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed Essential Questions Thematic Questions: o How do dystopian novels comment on the problems in our own society? o How does change happen in a society? o Is a perfect society possible? o How much control should the government have? Skill Based Questions: o How can we use book club discussions to deepen our understanding of our books? o What makes a book club successful? o How can we use critical lenses to interpret our books? o How do writers hook their audience and keep them engaged? o How do writers create compelling characters and plots? o How do writers of science fiction create vivid worlds? o How do writers critique problems they see in the world around them in their writing? Big Ideas/Enduring Understandings Thematic Understandings: Dystopian books comment on problems in our society. In order for change to happen in a society, several ingredients must come together. There are different types of governments and revolutions happen when people are not satisfied with the amount of control the government has over them. Skill Based Understandings: Book club discussions deepen our understanding of our books by allowing us to ask questions and hear other perspectives and ideas we might not have considered on our own. A successful book club requires its members to come prepared with the reading completed, thorough post-it notes, and effective speaking and listening skills. Literary critics use critical lenses to deepen their understanding of their books. Stories follow a story arc (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution). Stories use techniques such as foreshadowing, figurative language, rich imagery, and dialogue to engage their readers. We can communicate our beliefs about the world around us through our fiction writing.

CONCEPTS Students will know Vocabulary/Concepts Dystopia/Utopia society types of governments social change and revolution conflict authors purpose point of view critical lenses story arc/story mountain dialogue

SKILLS Students will be able to do Analyze text details and use them to support their ideas about the novels themes. Analyze the text using critical lenses (gender, historical, economic, etc.). Create and use higher level questions to think more deeply about a text and prepare for discussion. Apply strategies to sustain a conversation that is on topic, uses text details, and involves all members of the group. Make text-to-text and text-to-world connections Collect multiple ideas for stories Identify problems they see in society and create stories that address them Effectively use the writing process Plan their stories using the story arc (mountain) Select and effectively use literary techniques to engage their audience Create compelling characters, settings, and plots. Texts

Read Alouds The Lottery Harrison Bergeron The Last Dog Book Club Books Among the Hidden Uglies Hunger Games Unwind The Giver Nonfiction Texts: Students will read articles that connect to the issues being explored in their dystopian novel. Students will also read articles on recent uprisings in Egypt and other countries.

ASSESSMENT Formative: Readers NB pages on read alouds and book club discussions; discussion sticky notes and reflections; compare/contrast of film of Harrison Bergeron (or The Lottery) to story; Story mountain graphic organizer (apply to published story and use for planning); story drafts; Final group discussion using critical lenses (with written component); Ingredients for social change project (synthesize ideas from books and nonfiction articles. Summative: Directors Promptbook for a film adaptation of book club novel (group project) Original dystopian short story. Instructional Sequence Bend 1: What is dystopian literature? Launching book clubs and genre study Bend 2: Reading analytically using critical lenses Bend 3: Synthesizing ideas about social change using text-to-text and text-to-world connections Bend 4: Directors Promptbook project Bend 5: Writing dystopian short stories