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UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA PSYCHOLOGY 100B Section A01 Introductory Psychology: Social and Applied Emphasis

Instructor: Dr. Jody L. Bain Office: Phone / E-mail: Office Hours: Classtime: Cornett A213 472-4491 / jlbain@uvic.ca By appointment September 9 December 4, 2009 (No classes October 12 and November 9, 10, 11, 2009) Monday and Wednesday 18:30 19:50 DSB C103 Psychology: The Adaptive Mind (3rd Canadian Edition) by J.S. Nairne, D.S. Lindsay, D. Paulhus

SUGGESTED TEXT:

OPTIONAL RESOURCE MATERIAL: Note: Students will not necessarily require any of the optional resource material to pass the course, but many students will find some of the optional material useful as learning aids. Most students will find the paper Study Guide the most useful learning aid, but some may find the activities on the textbook Website useful as well.

Study Guide: Burns, S. (2004). Study Guide for use with Psychology: The Adaptive Mind (2nd Canadian Edition). The Study Guide is available for purchase in the bookstore. (Note: the Study Guide is available for purchase bundled with the textbook.) Textbook Website: At the URL http://www.adaptivemind2e.nelson.com/ . This site includes additional multiple choice study questions for each chapter, as well as other learning activities and links. If you have any comments about or problems with this WebSite, contact the Course Coordinator at p100co@uvic.ca.

Videotape series: All of the series listed below are available for loan from the Music/Audio/ Video section of the library. Discovering Psychology. This series consists of 26 30-minute video programs, which cover much of the material discussed in the course. Call number BF141 D572.

Psychology: The Study of Behavior. Another video series consisting of 26 30minute video programs, which cover much of the material discussed in the course. Call number BF121 P797. The Brain. A video series examining the brain and behaviour. Call number QP376 B7. The Mind. A video series examining various aspects of research on the human mind. Call number QP356 M54. Psychology Baron/Earhard/Ozier. Short episodes from the CBC about various aspects of psychology. Call number BF121 P76.

Welcome to Introductory Psychology! Psychology is an exciting and complex scientific discipline, as well as an essential part of the helping professions. The goals of PSYC 100A and PSYC 100B are to provide an overview of: The main areas, findings and methods of modern psychology. Different theoretical perspectives and professional orientations within psychology. Scientific methods of gathering information and forming conclusions about human behaviour and functioning. Some ways psychological principles have been used to help people lead better, healthier lives and solve real world problems. How to locate and utilize psychological research information. Psychology that will serve as a foundation for taking more advanced courses in psychology and other related disciplines. PSYC 100A covers the historical, methodological, biological, learning, and cognitive aspects of psychology. PSYC 100B deals with human intelligence, personality, child and adult development, psychological disorders and psychological treatment. You need not continue on to take PSYC 100B after you have completed PSYC 100A, but you should be aware that you must complete both PSYC 100A and PSYC 100B if you wish to take any further courses in Psychology at the University of Victoria. Psychology is a scientific discipline, and as such it requires considerable thought and time to understand psychological research and principles. Students are expected to complete the assigned reading before each lecture, to attend lectures and take detailed notes from them and to spend several hours a week in mastering the course material.

COURSE OUTLINE (subject to change):


Date Sept. 9-16 Sept. 21 - 23 Sept. 28 Sept. 30 Oct 5 OCTOBER Oct 14 - 19 Oct. 21 26 Oct. 28 Nov. 4 November Nov. 16 NOVEMBER Nov 23 30 DECEMBER Reading Course Outline/ Ch. 9 Ch. 9/10 Ch. 10 Ch. 11 Topic Intelligence Intelligence/Hum Dev Human Development Motivation/Emotion Notes

Assign 1 due SEPT. 28 beginning of class

7 Ch. 11 Ch. 12 Ch. 13 9 - 11 Ch. 13/14 18 Ch. 16/15 2

EXAMINATION #1 Personality Personality / Social Social/ Psych. Disorders NO CLASSES Psych. Disorders EXAMINATION #2 Stress-Health/ Therapy EXAMINATION #3 Assign 3 due NOV. 23 beginning of class

Assign 2 due OCT. 26 beginning of class READING BREAK

Option A
1) Examinations: There will be 3 in-class examinations: Exam 1 20% - October 7, 2009 Exam 2 20% - November 18, 2009 Exam 3 15% - December 2, 2009 TOTAL: 55% They will consist of short answer questions (1 to 5 marks). If you miss an exam due to illness: 1. Contact Dr. J.L. Bain by telephone or email as soon as possible. 2. Submit medical documentation to Dr. J.L. Bain when you return. You do not need to submit the Request for Academic Concession form if you miss an exam. (That form only applies to final exams written in the final exam period).

3. Upon receipt of acceptable documentation, you will be informed when the make-up exam will be held. You must write the make-up exam at the designated time. Make-up examinations are usually on Friday afternoons at 2:30. Students who miss an exam and do not contact Dr. J.L. Bain within 7 days of the exam date or who do not submit medical documentation within 10 days will be deemed to have not completed a course requirement, and will receive an N grade (failure due to not completing a course requirement) for the course. Students with disabilities who require special arrangements for exams should discuss such arrangements with Dr. J.L. Bain. A referral from the Student Services office may be required in order to receive exam accommodations.
Grade A+ A AB+ B BC+ C D F Percentage 95 100 90 - 94 85 - 89 80 - 84 75 - 79 70 - 74 65 - 69 60 - 64 50 - 59 0 - 49

2. Assignments: There will be three short assignments. Each assignment is worth 10%.They are due September 28, October 26, November 23, 2009. Each assignment will be submitted at the beginning of class. There will be no exceptions. You may submit the assignments early. These assignments are to be no longer than THREE pages in length, doublespaced, type-written. No hand-written assignments will be accepted. The assignments focus on current or past events in psychology that may have impacted how we perceive human behaviour. The topics for these assignments will be distributed during the first week of classes. TOTAL VALUE: 30%

3. Class Presentations: Working in small groups students will create a poster presentation, which will be summarized in an oral discussion in class, along with submission of a 5-page essay to Dr. Bain. These presentations will occur throughout the term; the schedule will be created during the second week of classes. TOTAL VALUE: 15%

Option B
1. Examinations: There will be 3 in-class examinations: Exam 1 32.5% - October 7, 2009 Exam 2 32.5% - November 18, 2009 Exam 3 20% - December 2, 2009 TOTAL: 85% They will consist of short answer questions (1 to 5 marks). 2. Class Presentations: Working in small groups students will create a poster presentation, which will be summarized in an oral discussion in class, along with submission of a 5-page essay to Dr. Bain. These presentations will occur throughout the term; the schedule will be created during the second week of classes. TOTAL VALUE: 15%

If you miss an exam due to illness: 1. Contact Dr. J.L. Bain by telephone or email as soon as possible. 2. Submit medical documentation to Dr. J.L. Bain when you return. You do not need to submit the Request for Academic Concession form if you miss an exam. (That form only applies to final exams written in the final exam period). 3. Upon receipt of acceptable documentation, you will be informed when the make-up exam will be held. You must write the make-up exam at the designated time. Make-up examinations are usually on Friday afternoons at 2:30. Students who miss an exam and do not contact Dr. J.L. Bain within 7 days of the exam date or who do not submit medical documentation within 10 days will be deemed to have not completed a course requirement, and will receive an N grade (failure due to not completing a course requirement) for the course.

Students with disabilities who require special arrangements for exams should discuss such arrangements with Dr. J.L. Bain. A referral from the Student Services office may be required in order to receive exam accommodations.
Grade A+ A AB+ B BC+ C D F Percentage 95 100 90 - 94 85 - 89 80 - 84 75 - 79 70 - 74 65 - 69 60 - 64 50 - 59 0 - 49

Psychology 100A/BBonus Points/Extra Credit for Research Participation


I. Introduction An important part of this course is learning about research in psychology. Faculty and advanced students in the Department of Psychology will be conducting research throughout the year, performing studies exploring processes such as social interaction, perception, memory, problem solving, and communication. You are encouraged to participate in this research; as part of that encouragement, you can earn extra credit toward your course grade by participating in approved research. By participating in such research projects you will learn first-hand how psychological research is done. You will be given a full description of the purpose of the research once your participation in a study is complete. In most projects, participating involves having your responses measured as you perform a task or complete a questionnaire. All of the extra credit projects have been reviewed and approved by a Departmental committee. The aim of these projects is not to evaluate your personal abilities, but to explore human behaviour and how it changes under different conditions. Researchers will protect your confidentiality. Your performance (i.e., the responses you make) will have no effect on your marks. One point will be awarded for each half hour (or part thereof) of participation, up to a maximum of 10 points. You can take part in as many projects as you wish, but you will receive no more than 10 points per term and points cannot be carried over from one term to another. Note that 10 points is a maximum, and that the opportunity to earn all 10 points may not be available, as this depends on the number of research projects requiring participants. You can participate in any

given project only once. The last day for participation in experiments for extra credit is December 4, 2009. Note: At the time of this publication the credit was one point for each half hour. This may change at the beginning of 2009 (i.e., perhaps .5 credits per 15 minutes). You will be advised of any changes. II. How to Create an Account If you created an account for the Psychology Research Participation System at the Sona web site in September 2003 or at any time since then, do not create another account. Use your existing account. As a reminder, your User ID is the first part of your UVic e-mail address and you can go to the Sona site (see web address below) to request that your password be sent to you if you have forgotten it. If you do not yet have an account, then follow these steps. 1. To use the system, you must have a UVic email address (i.e., one ending in @uvic.ca). For help on this, go to the Computer Help Desk in Clearihue A004 (in the section of the building nearest the Library). 2. Test your UVic email address (by emailing yourself) to make sure it works. If not, go to Clearihue A004. 3. Go to the Sign-Up Home page (http://uvic.sona-systems.com/) and look for New User? in the lower left-hand corner of the screen. Click on Request an account here. Complete the form, then click Register Account. It is essential that you enter a valid UVic e-mail address (ending in @uvic.ca). Do not use other e-mail accounts provided by other sources (e.g., hotmail). 4. You will receive an e-mail at your UVic e-mail address with your User ID & password for the web-based experiment sign-up system. (Now you have an account and can use the system.) Your User ID will be the first part of your UVic e-mail address (the part before @uvic.ca) and your password will be a long string of digits and will not be easy to remember. So write it down and see option 3 (My Profile) in the next section for information on how to change your password to something that is easier to remember.

III. How to Use the System


Go to the Sign-Up Home page (http://uvic.sona-systems.com). Enter your User ID and password and click Log In. Be sure to use your web-based experiment sign-up system User ID and password (not the password for your UVic e-mail account). The first time you use the system, you will be required to complete a brief questionnaire (pre-test) that all students must complete before participating in any experiments. You will complete this questionnaire only once. If you completed the questionnaire last term, you will not be asked to complete it again.

You will be asked to provide basic demographic data (e.g., age, gender) that are used to examine individual differences in some studies. After completing the questionnaire, you can proceed as follows. You now have 3 options: 1. Experiment Sign Up Use this option to view available experiments and to sign up for participation. Details are provided in section IV. 2. My Schedule and Credits Use this option to view information about appointments you have made to participate in experiments (or to cancel appointments), and to review your credit points. 3. My Profile Use this option to change your password, your contact information, or to add a secondary e-mail address to which reminders etc. will be sent. It is advisable to include your telephone number as part of your profile in case an experimenter must cancel a session for which you have signed up. The experimenter can then attempt to contact you by telephone as well as email to inform you of the cancellation. IV. How to Sign Up to Participate in Research Studies Click Experiment Sign-Up. A list of available experiments will appear. To find out more about any experiment click on the title of the experiment. Most experiments involve one session at a specific time and place. To sign up for an experiment of this kind, click on Time Slots Available and choose a time. Other experiments require two or more sessions (appointments) at specific times, perhaps separated by specific time intervals (e.g., two days or one week). An experiment of this kind will appear in the system with a different, but related experiment name for each session (e.g., Banjo1, Banjo2). Full credit for these multiplesession experiments is earned by completing all sessions. Participation in the first session is a prerequisite to signing up for subsequent sessions of that experiment. Finally, some experiments may be web-based and are to be completed by visiting a specified web site at your convenience. In such cases, the web address for the experiment and the date by which you must participate to receive credit will be listed. Notes:

Some studies have more than one page of sign-up times. Some studies have restrictions on who can participate. You will not get points if you sign up for a study for which you do not meet the requirements. Some studies have more than one session [even though for such studies you may be able to register only for the first session]. When you make an appointment to participate, make a note of the time, place, project name, and project telephone number as a reminder. The

course TAs and instructors do not have information as to where and when research studies are being held, so you must keep track of your own appointments. Please do not sign up unless you are confident that you can and will keep the appointment. You cannot sign up for a project that you have already done (even in a previous term).

V. Rules for Using the System and Participating in Experiments


Do not, under any circumstances, sign up someone else to participate in a study. Be Patient! Please do not click twice when you are signing up. Students sometimes click, sign up, get impatient waiting for the system to confirm the appointment, sign-up again, and get a message saying they can't sign up (because the system registered that they signed up moments earlier). However, they have actually already been signed up, but they think they have not, and therefore miss their appointment. Before Going to Your Session: Check your e-mail before going to the session (i.e., up to 24 hours in advance) to find out if there have been any changes (e.g., change of place or, in rare cases, cancellation of the study by the researcher). Just as students can cancel 24 hours in advance, so too can researchers (although they rarely do). You are allowed to sign up for a session as little as 4 hours in advance of the session's start time, but keep in mind that you will not be able to cancel any session within 24 hours of its scheduled start. Show Up On Time. Be sure to show up on time for your appointment. If you fail to show up, your extra-credit points will be reduced by the number of points for the session for which you had signed up. If you are late (even by just a few minutes), the researcher may not have sufficient time for you to participate (e.g., if doing so would conflict with other sessions); in such a case you will not receive credit but rather lose points as per the no-show policy. Also note that if you are penalized three times for failure to show up on time, your participation privileges will be terminated for the remainder of the term. Out of respect for researchers who are expecting you and for other students who are seeking participation opportunities, it is VERY important to be responsible about showing up on time. Deducted points can be made up by participating in future studies; a negative balance of bonus points will not affect your mark. (i.e., will not be deducted from your exam marks). If you must cancel your appointment, return to the sign-in web site, find the session for which you scheduled yourself, and select "Cancel." Note that this must be done at least 24 hours before your appointment; otherwise you will be

treated as a "no-show" and points will be deducted, except in cases of documented emergency (in which case you should contact the research contact person listed on the web site for the study for which you had signed up. If that is not possible, contact Research Participation Coordinator (p100res@uvic.ca). Specify the project name, your name, and the date and time of the appointment. If you change your mind about participating during an experiment. If you begin a project and decide part way through that you do not wish to complete it (e.g., you feel ill or find the study disagreeable in some way), you are free to leave. If this occurs, simply tell the researcher that you do not wish to continue participating (you do not need to specify why you want to stop). In this case, you will receive credit for the amount of time you participated. If you show up for your appointment and no one is there, contact the telephone number associated with the experiment in question (the telephone number is on the web site page for that experiment) and report what happened. If you cannot contact anyone at the telephone number, send an e-mail message to the Research Participation Coordinator (p100res@uvic.ca) explaining what happened. Be sure to include the name of the experiment in this message. If the researcher was at fault, you will receive credit for the session and you will still be able to sign up for that experiment at a later time. Save Your Receipt. When the experiment is complete, the researcher will enter your credit points electronically. The researcher will also complete and sign a receipt specifying how much extra credit you have earned. Save this receipt in case questions arise as to the amount of credit you have earned. Post-Experiment Questionnaire. Attached to your receipt will be an optional questionnaire that invites you to evaluate your experience in the project. Do not put your name on the questionnaire. If you wish to turn it in, detach it from your receipt and turn it in anonymously to the mail box beside the Psychology 100 office. We very much appreciate receiving questionnaires. Debriefing. At the end of each experiment, the experimenter will provide you with an explanation of the purpose of the research in which you have taken part (a debriefing). This is an opportunity for you to learn more about the discipline of psychology. Take advantage of it: ask questions, satisfy your curiosity, and try to come away with a better understanding of human behavior. Check your bonus points credit balance at any time by visiting the sign-in web site (http://uvic.sona-systems.com). Type in your User ID and password, click on My Schedule & Credits and your balance will be displayed. For some experiments, it may take a day or two for the credit points to be entered into the system. If you have any questions about your credit balance, you must bring these to the attention of the Research Participation Coordinator (p100res@uvic.ca) BEFORE Exam 3 (because the final grades are submitted soon after the last exam and we require time to process your research bonus points prior to calculating your final grade).

Availability of experiments in which you may participate will vary over the course of the term. Typically, more experiments become available as the term progresses and researchers complete preparations for their studies. If you are unable to find an available time slot, be patient and check the system each day for new opportunities. If you have concerns about the P100 Research Participation System, contact the Research Participation Coordinator, Dr. Masson (p100res@uvic.ca). More information about the Experiment Sign-up system is available on the web site (http://uvic.sona-systems.com) in the FAQ section

Psychology 100B - JLBain Mini Assignments These assignments are to be THREE pages in length, double-spaced, type-written. No hand-written assignments will be accepted. The assignments focus on current or past events in psychology that may have impacted how we perceive human behaviour. They are not research-based but, instead, require you to search out articles in mainstream media as well as integrate your own opinions. #1. Due September 28, 2009: Sternberg, in his triarchic theory of intelligence, suggests that there are three types of intelligence. Analytical intelligence involves your ability to reason logically and mathematically. Creative intelligence is your ability to cope with new and novel tasks and situations. Practical intelligence involves your ability to solve problems that are uniquely posed by your surroundings. Howard Gardner suggests that we all have multiple intelligences. Do you believe our intelligence changes as we age? Discuss differences one may expect to see in intelligence across the lifespan by focusing on three different stages of development such as infancy, childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, young adulthood, middle adulthood, late adulthood. #2. Due October 26, 2009: Review Eriksons stages of psychosocial development. a) Mainstream media, creative arts, and literature are filled with people in different stages of life. Pick out four characters or real people from television shows, books, or your family who differ substantially in age. What are the everyday trials and tribulations experienced by these individuals? What are their main concerns or worries? Do these worries/conflicts fit in with Eriksons theory (are they predicted concerns)?

#3. Due November 23, 2009: Examine your own health behaviours. How important is the factor/process of stress in your health behaviours (e.g., I smoke because it reduces stress. I smoke because it curbs my hunger.)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA Department of Psychology Important Course Policy Information


Winter 2009

Prerequisites
Students who remain in courses for which they do not have the prerequisites do so at their own risk. Students who complete courses without prerequisites ARE NOT exempt from having to complete the prerequisite course(s) if such courses are required for the degree program.

Program Requirements
For more information see pages 215-217 of the UVic Calendar 2009-10.

Registration Status
Students are responsible for verifying their registration status. Registration status may be verified using WebReg or by invoking the list (L) function on the TelReg system. Course adds and drops will not be processed after the deadlines set out in the current UVic Calendar.

Commitment to Inclusivity and Diversity


The University of Victoria is committed to promoting, providing and protecting a positive and supportive and safe learning and working environment for all its members.

In the Event of Illness, Accident or Family Affliction (See UVic Calendar, 2009-10, p. 3435)
Refer to the course outline The Department of Psychology fully endorses and intends to enforce rigorously the Senate Policy on Academic integrity (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2009/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html , p. 32-33, UVic Calendar 2009-10). It is of utmost importance that students who do their work honestly be protected from those who do not. Because this policy is in place to ensure that students carry out and benefit from the learning activities assigned in each course, it is expected that students will cooperate in its implementation. The offences defined by the policy can be summarized briefly as follows: 1. Plagiarism. You must make sure that the work you submit is your work and not someone elses. There are proper procedures for citing the works of others. The student is responsible for being aware of and using these procedures. 2. Multiple Submission. Only under exceptional circumstances may a work submitted to fulfill an academic requirement be used to satisfy another similar requirement. The student is responsible for clarifying this with the instructor(s) involved. 3. Falsifying Materials Subject to Academic Evaluation. This includes falsification of data, use of commercially prepared essays, using information from the Internet without proper citation, citing sources from which material is not actually obtained, etc.

Policy on Academic Integrity including Plagiarism and Cheating

4. Cheating on Assignments, Tests, and Examinations. You may not copy the work of others in or out of class; you may not give your work to others for the purpose of copying; you may not use unauthorized material or equipment during examinations or tests; and you may not impersonate or allow yourself to be impersonated by another at an examination. The Department of Psychology has a policy of not making old examinations available for study purposes. Therefore, use of old exams without the express written permission of the instructor constitutes cheating by the user, and abetting of cheating by the person who provided the exam. 5. Being an Accessory to Offences. This means that helping another student to cheat (for instance, by showing or communicating to them answers to an assignment, or by allowing them to view answers on an exam) is an academic offence. Instructors are expected to make every effort to prevent cheating and plagiarism. This may include the assignment of seating for examinations, asking students to move during examinations, requests to see student identification cards, and other measures as appropriate. Instructors also have available to them a variety of tools and procedures to check for Internet and electronic media-based cheating. In instances of suspected or actual plagiarism or cheating, instructors, following prescribed procedures, are authorized to take steps consistent with the degree of the offence. These measures will range from a zero on the test or assignment or a failing grade for the course, probation within a program to temporary or even permanent suspension from the University. Rights of Appeal are described in the Policy on Academic Integrity in the University calendar (on p. 3233 in 2009-10). The definitive source for information on Academic Integrity is the University Calendar (p. 32-33 in 2009-10) (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2009/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html) Other useful resources on Plagiarism and Cheating include: 1. The Learning Skills program: http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/index.html 2. The Ombudspersons office: http://www.uvss.uvic.ca/ombudsperson/pubsguides/plagiarism.pdf 3. The English Department: http://web.uvic.ca/wguide/Pages/CitPlagiarism.html

Dept Syllabus 100A-100B info Winter 09.rtf