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Sarah, Plain and Tall

Reading Unit By: Chelsea Duff Standards that are a Part of Each Day of Unit:
Reading Literature Key Ideas and Details CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. Reading: Foundational Skills CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. Language CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Speaking and Listening CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1a Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1c Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.1d Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.3 Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. Daily Extensions: Fluency Whisper Reading Worksheets, Comprehension Worksheets

DAY 1: KANSAS Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). Reading Informational Text CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). Materials Needed: Books about Maine and Kansas, Kansas Worksheets Bring in books about Maine and Kansas. Introduce the setting of the stories so that students have background knowledge of both Maine and Kansas. Start by introducing Kansas as a prairie and explaining what a prairie is. Do a read-aloud/picture walk of a story of Kansas. Then, read the article about Kansas together. Pre-highlight important information from the article. As students read with you, have them highlight what you already highlighted in the article. Using the Builda-Prairie website, build a prairie together as a class. Give students three minutes to quietly think about what it would be like to live in Kansas. They can write about it in their thinking journal. Then draw a T-Chart on the notepad. Write down main ideas about Kansas: What does it look like? What does it feel like to live there? What are the seasons like? What are some jobs people have there and why? Then, have students pair together to work on the Kansas worksheet together.

DAY 2: MAINE Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.9 Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). Reading Informational Text CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). Materials Needed: Books about Maine and Kansas, Maine Worksheets Today, introduce Maine as an area by the sea. Do a read-aloud/picture walk of a story of Maine. Then, read the article about Maine together. Pre-highlight important information from the article. As students read with you, have them highlight what you already highlighted in the article. Bring up pictures of Maine and have them take three minutes to quietly think about what it would be like to live in Maine. Then, get out the T-Chart from the day before, and write down main ideas about Maine: What does it look like? What does it feel like to live there? What are the seasons like? What are some jobs people have there and why? Then, have students pair together to work on the Maine worksheet together. If they finish, show book trailer for Sarah, Plain and Tall.

DAY 3: CHAPTER 1, READERS THEATER AND HOME THEME Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. Speaking and Listening CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.3.5 Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details. Materials Needed: This is Home by Switchfoot lyrics, Vocabulary pictures and worksheets, Readers theater worksheets Write HOME on the board for students to see as they walk in from recess. Ask them to get out their thinking journals and write down any words that remind them of home for three to five minutes. Then, pass out This is Home lyrics by Switchfoot and participate in a shared reading. After reading, ask students: What does home mean? Do you have to have anything with you to make it feel like home? Get out the T-Chart from yesterday and remind students that Kansas and Maine are the homes of the characters in this story. Then, go over new vocabulary words from the text, using pictures and a worksheet when necessary. Remind students that if there are any words that dont make sense in the story, they can always raise their hand at the carpet and ask the meaning of the words. Transition to carpet and read the story out loud as a class. After the story is finished, start a class discussion. Show a picture of a real advertisement used during the time period and explain how the advertisements work. Have students retell what happened in Chapter 1. Then, ask students to get into two groups of 7. Pass out Readers Theater scripts and

assign roles. Have students practice reading fluidly. After ten minutes of practice time, have students act out their readers theater pieces.

DAY 4: CHAPTER 2, CHARACTERIZATION Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. Materials Needed: Say and Do worksheets, Vocabulary pictures and worksheets, Old letters Have students come in and sit at their desks. Begin by having pictures of old letters on the board/actual old letters to pass around and discussing how people communicated back then and how they communicate now. Explain that the majority of this chapter is written through letters, so well get to see how writing letters worked. Go over vocabulary words and use pictures when appropriate. Have students meet at the back carpet. Review what happened in Chapter 1 and finish Readers Theater if necessary. Read Chapter 2 together. Afterwards, discuss what happened in the chapter. Then, talk about the characters. Ask five people in the class to say one word that describes them. Then brainstorm words that describe Papa, Anna, Caleb, and Sarah. Ask: Why do you think these words describe Papa, Anna, Caleb, and Sarah? Introduce the idea that its because of what they say and do! Ask students to break into four groups of four and hand out characters at random for them to work on. Pass out Say-And-Do worksheets. When those are complete, the group must draw a picture of the character from the story and three character traits beneath the picture they drew. Save to share with the class the next day.

DAY 5: CHAPTER 3, POINT OF VIEW Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. Materials Needed: Reminders from Home Bulletin Board Pattern, Vocabulary pictures and worksheets, Something that means home to you Have groups present their characters from yesterday. Then, get out new vocabulary words and worksheets. When those are completed, have students meet you at the back carpet. Read Chapter 3 aloud. Ask students to retell what happened in the chapter. Then, introduce the item that means home to you. Tell students why it is so important to you and what it reminds them of. Ask students: Like Sarah, if you moved very far away you would probably want something to

remind you of home. However, you have a different point of view. Since you are not from Maine, you probably wouldnt bring sea shells. What are some things you would bring? Brainstorm together. Then, have students return to their seats. Pass out bulletin board pattern. Explain that students need to list three things they would bring from home found in nature using CUPS. Tell them to do their best work because they will be displayed around the room.

Day 6: CHAPTER 4, CHARACTERIZATION AND POINT OF VIEW Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. Materials Needed: Vocabulary words and pictures, Dear William letter heads, Sumer is Icumen In lyrics Have a short sound clip of a seal barking ready on the screen for when students come in from recess (http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/sound-library/quiz/audio/soundsix.aiff). Play it 2-3 times. Ask students: What do you think it sounds like? Explain that it is a seal and show a picture of a seal. It is a sound that one of the characters makes later in the story, so they have to listen for it. Introduce new vocabulary words, using pictures when useful. Transition to the carpet. Read Chapter 4 together as a class. Then, pass out the Sumer is Icumen and sing them together as a class. Ask students: What happened in Chapter 4? How are the characters feeling? What did you think about the Sumer is Icumen song? Is it different from some popular songs we have in Michigan? What is different about it? Then, have students go back to their seats and write a letter from Sarahs point of view to her brother William. How is she feeling? What exciting things have happened to her? When students are finished with their letter, they may find someone else who is also finished and whisper read to make sure it makes sense and follows CUPS.

Day 6: CHAPTER 5, SUMMARIZATION AND KEY POINTS Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text.

Materials Needed: Wool or things made from wool, Vocabulary words or worksheets Have some wool or things made from wool ready at the front of the class. Pass it around to everyone as they come in from recess. Ask students: What does it feel like? What can it be used for? What is it? Explain that it is wool from sheep, and at one point most clothing was made from wool and that sheep lived on the farm in Kansas. Introduce new vocabulary words, using pictures when useful. Transition to the carpet. Read Chapter 5 aloud. Ask students: What happened in the chapter? Why is it important? Retell the story. Then instruct students to grab a sheet of white paper and a pencil to sketch a drawing of something that happened in the chapter. They should pretend that they are Sarah and are sending it home to William. When the picture is complete, they should write one sentence explaining what the picture shows and why it is important.

Day 7: CHAPTER 6, METAPHORS AND SIMILES Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. Vocabulary Acquisition and Use CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings. Materials Needed: Vocabulary words or worksheets, Ch. 6 Journal Activity Before the lesson, write down metaphors and similes from the chapter on the notepad paper in the back. As students come in, draw sticks to have one or two students share their pictures from the day before. Then, introduce new vocabulary words, using pictures when necessary. Transition to the carpet area. Read Chapter 6 aloud. Ask students to retell what happened in the chapter. Get out the notepad with metaphors and similes from chapter written on it. Ask students what they notice about the statements. Point out that they are very descriptive, and explain that when you use other words to describe one word, it is a metaphor. Underline the metaphorical part of the sentences. Then read this poem to the class, and ask them to close their eyes, sit quietly, and listen:
Anger is a neglected pot on the stove. It seethes

boiling over frothing the lid can not contain it. Turn down the heat, let it simmer and not burn. Let is not smoke and crackle, making itself known to the world.

Ask: What did you imagine when you heard the poem? What is the metaphor? Read these statements and allow students to fill them in: 1) School is _________________. 2) Snow is ______________. Then, have students choose a partner and return to their seats. Pass out Ch. 6 journal page and have them write down three metaphors of their own. Have them highlight their favorite one.

Day 8: CHAPTER 7, PREDICTION Materials Needed: Pictures of horse and plow in the prairie, Picture of tractor/model tractor, Pictures of flowers, Vocabulary words and pictures, Prediction worksheet, (If possible) homemade biscuits As students come in, put the picture of the horse and plow in the prairie on the document camera. Ask students to get out their thinking journal and write down what they notice and think about the picture. Let them write for five minutes. Then ask students what they think is happening in the picture. Explain that they had to furrow the ground to put seeds inside the ground, and at one time all they had were horses and plows! Now, there are tractors. Show model tractor of picture of tractor. Introduce vocabulary words and pictures. Transition to the carpet area. Read Ch. 7 aloud. After the chapter has been read, ask students to share what happened in the chapter. Show students pictures of the different flowers in the story. Have you seen any of these flowers? Where? If not, why not? Then ask: How are the characters in the story feeling? What do you think is going to happen nextwill Sarah stay or go? Have students return to their seats and write three sentences about what they think is going to happen next and why. Check for CUPS and neatness!

Day 9: CHAPTER 8, CHARACTERIZATION Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. Materials Needed: Vocabulary words and pictures, Say-And-Do Worksheet

As students come in to the classroom, have them put their heads down on their desk and turn out the lights. Then play a squall sound clip (http://www.sounddogs.com/soundeffects/2107/mp3/323299_SOUNDDOGS__wi.mp3). Ask students: What did you just hear? How did it make you feel? What do you think it was? Explain that it was a squall and that squalls are bursts of wind that often come with rain, sleet, or snow in the prairie. Introduce new vocabulary words, using pictures when necessary. Transition to the carpet area. Read Ch. 8 aloud. After the reading is over, ask students to retell what happened in the chapter. Ask: Do you think you would be scared of the squall? What would you do to stay safe? What would you bring with you to keep safe? How did the characters feel? What are some words that describe the characters? Ask students to break into four groups of four and hand out characters at random for them to work on. Pass out Say-And-Do worksheets. When they finish the Say-And-Do worksheet, have them write an answer to the question: How has this character changed from the beginning of the story to the end of the story. Ask children to check for CUPS and write neatly!

Day 10: CHAPTER 9, SUMMARIZATION Reading Literature CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. Materials Needed: Vocabulary words and pictures, Vocabulary review, Blue, gray, and green colored pencils On the board, draw a bar graph of the predictions that students made showing how many students predicted Sarah would stay and how many predicted Sarah would leave. Excitedly say that well have to see which one comes true! Show students blue, gray, and green colored pencils. Explain that they have something to do with the story. Ask students to take guesses as to what they mean (excluding students who have already read ahead). Introduce vocabulary words, using pictures when necessary. Transition to the carpet area. Read Ch. 9 aloud. Then, ask: Whose predictions were right? What happened in the chapter? Why did Sarah stay? What did the blue, gray, and green colored pencils mean? Ask students to return to their seats and write a short paragraph (3 sentences) about their favorite part of the story. What is their favorite part of the story and why? If they finish early, they can draw a picture showing their favorite part. Send home vocabulary review sheet as homework.

DAY 11: SARAH, PLAIN AND TALL TEST Students can read quietly when finished.

DAY 12: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT Create Character Trading Cards. Each student must create one, but the student can choose the character they like the most. If possible, reserve the lab and use the trading card making website (http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/trading_cards_2/), which will walk students through the process of filling out the card. If not, make a format for students to use that allows them to fill in these items: 1) Description: Where do you read about or see Sarah [or character of choice]? What does Sarah look like? What is her personality like? 2) Development: What is Sarahs most important challenge at the beginning of the story? What does Sarah want to happen? Does she succeed? 3) Memorable Interactions: What is one memorable thing Sarah said? What is one thing she did that caught your attention? How did she interact with other characters? 4) Personal connection: Do you like Sarah? Why or why not? If you have the computer lab, bring flash drive to save students work. If not, give them class time to finish it.

DAY 12: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT WORK DAY

DAY 13: PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT SHARE DAY

DAY 14 & 15: MOVIE, COMPARE AND CONTRAST?

END OF UNIT