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U C B E R K E L E Y E X T E N S I O N
Laudscapc /|c||ccu|c C E R T I F I C AT E P R OGR AM GU I DE
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Ear t h, sky, wat er, pl ant s. Ti me. Peopl e. Desi gn.
Earth, sky, water, pl ant s.
We gain inspiration from the light and splash
of water against granite in the streams of the
Sierra; find solace in the sensuous golden
folds of the coastal foothills; feel the bound-
less energy in the wind and waves along our
coast; thrill in the diversity of our California
flora and fauna.
Ti me.
We note the changes of the natural
world throughout the day, throughout
the seasons, throughout the centuries.
We are informed by the passage of
cultures; aware of the evolution of
philosophies and the imprints they
have passed on to us. We are engaged
not just with the past or the present,
but most profoundly with the future.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
| 3
Eart h, sky, wat er, pl ant s. Ti me. Peopl e. Desi gn.
Design.
Observation. Analysis. Synthesis. The design process
is the means by which we make environmentally
responsible, thoughtful, and innovative decisions.
This process is driven by the complexities and inter-
relationships of the living, growing, changing elements
of the natural world; by the social, political, and economic
forces of communities around the world; and by the
ephemeral, the beautiful, the visionary.
People.
We listen. The needs and desires,
the dreams and values of the
people with whom we work also
inspire us. We strive to create
places for people that provide
opportunities for memorable,
meaningful activities.
| Amir Kunin | STudenT prOjeCT fOr STudiO L2: prOjeCT pLAnning And deSign |
| nAOKO TSunOdA | STudenT prOjeCT fOr STudiO L1: envirOnmenTAL deSign |
THE PROFESSION
Ours is an expanding and ever-challenging profession.
Landscape architects are involved in a diverse array of
projects, ranging in scale and focus from community
gardens, urban parks, residential developments, resort
complexes, campuses, and commercial plazas to stream
corridor restoration, urban transit corridors, and national
park master planning, to name but a few. Employment
opportunities range from architectural and planning firms
to local, regional, and federal agencies to academic insti-
tutions; many landscape architects are self-employed.
Increasingly, landscape architects are asked to solve
some of the most crucial environmental and social chal-
lenges of our time. We are often called upon to facilitate
decision making within communities and to make critical
land-use decisions. We understand, manage, and analyze
increasingly complex volumes of information. We are
advocates of the preservation and conservation of
cultural and natural resources.
Our professional mandate requires acute observational,
analytical, and problem-solving skills. It also calls for a
far-reaching knowledge of design history and theory and
construction materials and techniques; highly developed
technical skills; and an unfailing commitment to the
stewardship and conservation of natural and cultural
resources. The practice of landscape architecture requires
a comprehensive and high-quality education.
THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE CERTIFICATE
PROGRAM AT UC BERKELEY EXTENSION
Since the founding of UC Berkeley Extensions Landscape
Architecture Certificate Program just over 25 years ago,
one of its primary goals has been to offer students with
no prior background an educational experience that
prepares them for entry-level positions in the profession,
as well as for continued professional achievement and
advancement.
Introductory courses in the certificate program are open
to all. Successful completion of the program provides
students with the essential knowledge and skills to pur-
sue a career in landscape architecture, and provides the
educational foundation needed to prepare for the state
licensing exam.
The Landscape Architecture Certificate Program is a
comprehensive course of study that teaches students
the design methodology required to solve complex spa-
tial problems and helps them develop a diverse array of
skills. The program aims not only to reflect the landscape
architecture profession as it is currently practiced, but to
anticipate changes so that students are well equipped
to make relevant contributions throughout their careers.
The curriculum encourages individual creativity and
expression while emphasizing the practical applications
of design solutions. In short, the program offers realistic
exposure to the theory and practice of the profession.
Specifically, our certificate program curriculum is
designed to develop
aesthetic sensitivity and environmental awareness
a thorough knowledge of historical precedent
a definable and defensible design methodology
the technical knowledge and skills necessary to
compete effectively for entry-level jobs in both the
public and private sectors
The Landscape Architecture Certificate Program is cer-
tified in a formal process by the State of Californias
Landscape Architects Technical Committee (LATC), which
ensures its rigor, professionalism, and adherence to state
requirements. Courses and instructors are reviewed regu-
larly by UC Berkeley Extension to ensure that they meet
UC Berkeley's high academic standards.
Extensions certificate program is increasingly respected
in the Bay Area design community. Students enrolled in
the program gain valuable exposure to individuals already
working in the industry and build professional portfolios
that demonstrate the broad knowledge and skills that
employers and clients expect.
OUR STUDENTS
Our students are dedicated, hard-working adults with a
serious interest in making positive, responsible changes
in the environment. Our program is structured to accom-
modate people with varying backgrounds in design, and
students can enter the program with little or no design
experience. The majority of our students already have
an undergraduate degree and are returning to school to
make a career change. Most are working adults who
enjoy the program's flexibilitythe majority of our classes
meet in the evenings or on weekends, so students can
continue to work while earning their certificate.
UC Berkeley Extension is a great place for international
students who want to study landscape architecture in
the San Francisco Bay Area, one of the worlds centers
for innovative design. For more information about enroll-
ing as an international student, visit the UC Berkeley
Extension website at www.unex.berkeley.edu/intl.
4 |
The professi on. The program. Our students. Our i nstructors.
| Yarnie Chen | Student projeCt for LandSCape graphiCS i |
| 5
SUZANNE ARCA, B.A., is a certified horticulturist, landscape designer, and contractor with
27 years of experience in the field. She is owner of Suzanne Arca Design, a Bay Area
design/build company. She also teaches for the horticulture department at Merritt College.
MARNI BARNES, ASLA, LCSW, is principal of the landscape architecture and consulting firm
Deva Designs. She is the co-author of Healing Gardens: Therapeutic Benefits and Design
Recommendations, and recently designed the central courtyard for the Kaiser Medical Group.
TONI BAVA, M.L.A., is a landscape architect with 21 years of experience in design and is
managing principal with Antonia Bava Landscape Architects, San Francisco.
CARLISLE BECKER, M.L.A, has been self-employed for 40 years, including 18 years as an
educator. His experience includes regional planning, commercial/industrial facilities,
woodland revegetation, aquatic habitat restoration, erosion control, and landscape
management.
RON BENOIT, ASLA, is principal with Ron Benoit Associates, Palo Alto, with services
including site planning, urban design, environmental analysis, revegetation programs,
irrigation and planting design, and greenroof design.
ELIZABETH BOULTS, M.L.A., is a landscape architect specializing in the creation of
small-scale artful environments. She has an extensive background in teaching, research,
and theory.
CATHERINE CHANG, B.A., is a landscape, architectural, and urban designer with extensive
professional and academic experience in the Bay Area. She has worked with Calthorpe
Associates, Catalyst, and Thomas Dolan Architecture, and taught at UC Berkeley and
California College of the Arts. The recipient of several awards for design excellence, she is
currently principal at Catherine Chang Design Studio in Oakland.
(continued)
The professi on. The program. Our students. Our i nstructors.
| naoko tSunoda | Student projeCt for LandSCape graphiCS i |
| Yarnie Chen | Student projeCt for LandSCape graphiCS i |
OUR INSTRUCTORS
Our instructors are working professionals representing some of the most innovative landscape architecture firms and well-respected
public agencies in the region. They are dedicated to inspiring students with their enthusiasm and creativity and are able to bring their
daily professional experiences directly into the classroom, resulting in a dynamic and relevant learning experience.
JIM CHAPPELL, B.Arch., M.C.P., is president of San Francisco Planning and Urban Research
Association (SPUR), the nationally known urban affairs think tank. He has lectured on
and taught landscape architecture, architecture, and urban design for 35 years.
CONwAy CHENG CHANG, M.A., works at the office of Peter Walker and Partners.
EDMUND CHAU, M.L.A., is a landscape architect with more than 10 years of professional
experience. He has taught drawing and drafting for several years.
TIMOTHy COPPOLA, M.L.A., has more than 30 years of experience worldwide in the plan-
ning and design of mixed-use and urban design projects. He is a registered landscape
architect in three states and past president of both the ASLA-NCC and the BSLA. He also
taught at Harvard University Graduate School of Design and Radcliffe College.
GARy QUIN ELLIS, A.S., horticulturist and author, is a managing partner of a small design/
build company.
VERA GATES, B.S., is a landscape architect in private practice, specializing in the custom
design of private gardens.
TIM GILBERT, M.L.A., ASLA, is project manager for Moore Iacofano Goltsman, Berkeley.
He has taught a variety of courses at UC Berkeley Extension for over 10 years.
DOUGLAS GODFREy, M.L.A., is a landscape architect working with Royston Hanamoto
Alley & Abey.
LEwIS KNIGHT, B.L.A., M.L.A.U.D., is a senior urban designer with EDAW, a landscape
architecture and urban design firm in San Francisco. His expertise includes urban design,
master planning, and transport infrastructure design. He has taught at Texas A&M
University, and is the recipient of several design awards.
MICHAEL LAMB, M.L.A., is a registered landscape architect with more than 24 years of
experience in both the private and public sectors of the profession. He is currently the
historic landscape architect with the Presidio Trust.
DAVID MANDEL, M.L.A., ASLA, CLIA, has more than 30 years of landscape architecture,
city planning, and landscape and irrigation construction experience. He is currently a
planning and design consultant for Bay Area jurisdictions, conservation nonprofits, and
private clients, with a focus on environmental planning and mitigation. He has also
taught at the University of Washington and Oklahoma State University, is a licensed C-27
contractor, and writes and does research on equitable public resource allocations, sustain-
able parks design, and irrigation technology.
o |
| Steven goetz | Student projeCt for Studio L4: environmentaL anaLYSiS and deSign |
0
| 7
JANE E. MILLER, B.A., is partner and horticulturist, 2M Associates, Berkeley. She also
teaches at UC Davis and Merritt College.
PATRICK MILLER, M.L.A., is a landscape architect and partner with the design firm 2M
Associates, Berkeley. His expertise includes the development of master plans and revegeta-
tion plans for trail systems and parkways throughout California.
MARy SwANSON, B.A., is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Extension Certificate Program in
Landscape Architecture. She has extensive design experience in landscape architecture,
architecture, construction materials, and graphic production.
JOHN F. THOMAS, M.L.A., has been a landscape architect with the City and County of
San Francisco since 1986, where he has designed numerous urban parks and other
urban public open spaces throughout the city. He has taught at UC Berkeley Extension
since 1986.
CLARK wILLIAMS, B.S., is a senior designer at EDAW with more than 10 years of
professional experience.
ADvISORY BOARD MEMBERS
JIM CHAPPELL, president of San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR)
TIMOTHy COPPOLA, principal, Tabor Coppola and past president of ASLA-NCC and the BSLA
wINSTON J. DONG JR., AASLA, community designer/planner, Urban Ecology
DAVID EVANS, founding partner, SFE Urban Design and Landscape Architecture
SUSAN GOLTSMAN, FASLA, founding principal, Moore Iacofano Goltsman (MIG), Inc.
KATHy HOwARD, project manager, Merrill-Morris Partners, Inc.
MICHAEL LAMB, historic landscape architect for Presidio Trust
JC MILLER, ASLA, principal, Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey
TITO PATRI, owner, Tito Patri & Associates
CHIP SULLIVAN, professor of landscape architecture, College of Environmental Design,
University of California, Berkeley
| jonnY mcphee | Student projeCt for Studio L1: environmentaL deSign |
8 |
FREE OPEN HOUSES AND EXHIBITS
Prospective students are invited to attend one of our information sessions, held twice
a year. At these free presentations, instructors and staff are on hand to discuss course
content, job prospects, and any questions relating to the program.
STARTING THE PROGRAM
In order to begin the certificate program, simply enroll in one or more of the required
foundation courses or electives that dont have any prerequisites. You may begin the cer-
tificate program during any of Extensions three terms. Required courses must be taken
for a letter grade; if a course is taken on a not-for-credit basis, it cannot be applied toward
completion of the certificate. We recommend that you register for the program before
completing Studio L1: Environmental Design by completing the Certificate Registration
Form (available in the Extension catalog and online at www.unex.berkeley.edu/cert/cert.pdf)
and submitting it with the $100 registration fee.
The certificate is awarded after the Landscape Architecture Certificate Program office,
upon request, reviews your records to determine that you have satisfactorily completed
all the requirements.
TIME REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THE CURRICULUM
This is a professionally oriented program; consequently, standards and expectations of
our students are extremely high. All courses in the program are demanding and require
an extraordinary commitment of time and energy. Spending 10 hours per week to com-
plete homework in the foundation courses and more than 20 hours per week in the
advanced courses is not uncommon. The majority of our students complete the required
courses in four to five years of part-time study, taking one to three courses per term. A
full-time, three-year course schedule is also available.
SUBSTITUTIONS AND WAIvERS
Candidates may substitute an equivalent course or courses from another institution
for one in this certificate program. The course must have been taken within the past
10 years with a B grade or better, cover substantially the same material as the required
course, carry equivalent or more credit, and be from an accredited academic institution.
To request a substitution, candidates should write to the Landscape Architecture office
indicating which Extension course the substitution is being requested for and enclosing
a course description, course outline, and official transcript indicating successful
completion. In many cases a portfolio review will be required.
The combined total of course substitutions and waivers should add up to no more than
five courses.
| Yarnie Chen | Student projeCt for LandSCape graphiCS ii |
| 9
PREPARATION FOR THE LICENSING EXAM
The State of California requires a license in order to practice
and be recognized as a landscape architect. The regulating
body of the profession is the Landscape Architects Technical
Committee (LATC), which operates under the aegis of
the California Department of Consumer Affairs Board of
Architectural Examiners. The LATC administers the licens-
ing exams, monitors professional practice in the state, and
responds to public concerns.
In order to ensure that UC Berkeley Extensions Landscape
Architecture Certificate Program provides the necessary
educational requirements for professional licensure, the
LATC reviews the program every five years. This program
has been continuously certified since its founding and is one
of only two certified programs in landscape architecture in
the nation (the other is at UCLA Extension).
Upon completion of the program, a student will have
successfully earned a portion of the qualification credit
needed to take the landscape architecture licensing exam.
Specifically, if you have an undergraduate degree from an
accredited university or college, four of the required six
qualification credits are issued upon receipt of the certificate.
The remainder of the qualification credits are completed by
employment with a California licensed landscape architect,
architect, or civil engineer.
Note that the four qualification credits earned by receiving
a certificate in landscape architecture from UC Berkeley
Extension are the same as would be granted upon comple-
tion of an accredited academic degree program in landscape
architecture.
| marCia paCkLiCk | Student projeCt for Studio L4: environmentaL anaLYSiS and deSign |
10 |
| amir kunin | Student projeCt for pLanting deSign |
The curriculum. The courses.
CONTACT US
UC Berkeley Extension Landscape Architecture Program: (415) 284-1070;
extension.berkeley.edu/cert/land.html; landarch@unex.berkeley.edu
For a free UC Berkeley Extension catalog, visit our online catalog at extension.berkeley.edu.
CURRICULUM
For complete descriptions of our courses and their prerequisites, visit the
program Web site at extension.berkeley.edu/cert/land.html.

Prerequisites
Students should be aware that if they do not have the proper prerequisites for any
required course, they will not be allowed to take that course. In particular, studio
courses (Studios L1 through L5) need to be taken in the proper sequence with the
required prerequisites.
Required Foundation Courses
Introduction to Landscape Architecture (fall, spring, summer)
Principles and Elements of Design (fall, spring, summer)
Gardens, Parks, and Urban Open Spaces I (fall)
Gardens, Parks, and Urban Open Spaces II (spring)
Landscape Graphics I (fall, spring)
Landscape Graphics II (spring, summer)
Spring Plants and Applications (or Summer Plants and Applications) (spring, summer)
Autumn Plants and Applications (fall)
Studio L1: Environmental Design (fall)
AutoCAD for Landscape Architecture: Level I (summer, fall)
Advanced Courses
Studio L2: Project Planning and Design (fall)
Construction Technology I (spring)
Construction Technology II (summer)
Planting Design (fall, spring)
Advanced AutoCAD for Landscape Architecture: Level II (spring)
Social Factors in Environmental Design (fall)
Professional Practice in Landscape Architecture (fall)
Studio L3: Advanced Landscape Architectural Design (spring)
Studio L4: Environmental Analysis and Design (fall)
Studio L5: Site Planning Practicum (spring)
Electives: 2 semester units
| 11
Copyright 2007 by the Regents of University of California A&D 107BR443 LandArch brochure 8/07 3M
FOUNDATION COURSES
Introduction to Landscape
Architecture X25 (2 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Provides an orientation to landscape archi-
tecture as one of the environmental design
professions and an exploration of the his-
tory of the field and the central ideas of the
profession.
Principles and Elements of Design
X412.1 (4 semester units in Architecture)
Teaches principles that are the founda-
tion of good design: balance, harmony,
rhythm, emphasis, contrast, and proportion.
Students also learn how these principles
interact with scale, form, color, and texture.
Gardens, Parks, and Urban Open
Spaces I X416 (3 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Examines the development of the built envi-
ronment and focuses on the interrelation-
ship of landscape architecture, architecture,
and urban design from primitive societies to
the present.
Gardens, Parks, and Urban Open
Spaces II X418 (3 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Continues to explore the interrelationship
between landscape architecture, architecture,
and urban design and examines the history
of landscape architecture as a profession.
Landscape Graphics I X15 (1 semester
unit in Landscape Architecture)
Introduces graphic communication methods
unique to landscape architectural analysis,
design, and client presentation.
Landscape Graphics II X17 (1 semester
unit in Landscape Architecture)
Continuation of Landscape Graphics I
emphasizes sharpening visual thinking skills
for applications where drawing is used to
communicate ideas and images. Participants
explore illustration techniques for plans and
elevations.
Spring Plants and Applications
X444 (3 semester units in Landscape
Architecture)
Presents a study of the design applications
of trees, shrubs, and ground covers used in
landscaping in Northern California, with an
emphasis on plants valued for their spring
foliage, color, blooms, or fruit.
Summer Plants and Applications
X445 (3 semester units in Landscape
Architecture)
Presents a study of the design applications
of trees, shrubs, and ground covers used in
landscaping in Northern California, with an
emphasis on plants valued for their summer
foliage, color, blooms, or fruit.
Autumn Plants and Applications
X446 (3 semester units in Landscape
Architecture)
Presents a study of the design applications
of trees, shrubs, and ground covers used in
landscaping in Northern California, with an
emphasis on plants valued for their autumn
foliage, color, blooms, or fruit.
Studio L1: Environmental Design
X116 (2 semester units in Landscape
Architecture)
Provides an introduction to site-specific
design projects, both large- and small-scale.
Participants are introduced to basic design
vocabulary and approaches and to concepts
of spatial order, scale, complexity, percep-
tion, and visual thinking.
AutoCAD for Landscape
Architecture: Level I X428 (2 semester
units in Landscape Architecture)
Introduces participants to CAD techniques
to create landscape architectural drawings
using a computer. Software specific to the
needs of landscape architects, such as
Architectural Desktop and Land Desktop, is
explored on a limited basis.
ADvANCED COURSES
Studio L2: Project Planning and
Design X406 (4 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Builds on knowledge acquired in Studio L1
and applies it to find solutions at the prelimi-
nary design phase for projects at a variety
of scales.
Construction Technology I X404 (4
semester units in Landscape Architecture)
Covers grading, drainage, and erosion
control. Participants learn about structures
appropriate to grading solutions (retaining
walls, curbs, etc.) and develop grading skills
for both earth forms and hard surfaces.
Construction Technology II X405 (4
semester units in Landscape Architecture)
Covers drainage conveyances, irrigation
systems design, and technical design and
specification of structures, with an emphasis
on design criteria, materials and methods of
construction, and designer-contractor docu-
mentation requirements.
Planting Design X401 (3 semester units
in Landscape Architecture)
Provides an overview of the history of plant-
ing in environmental design and explores
concepts of site analysis, client/user analy-
sis, and schematic design through discus-
sions of such concepts as plant massing,
proportion, texture, scent, illusion, and sea-
sonal changes.
Advanced AutoCAD for Landscape
Architecture: Level II X433 (2 semester
units in Landscape Architecture)
Lectures, demonstrations, and one-on-one
assistance reinforce students ability to cre-
ate landscape architectural designs using
AutoCAD 2006 for Windows. This course
expands on topics covered in AutoCAD for
Landscape Architecture: Level I.
Social Factors in Environmental
Design X402 (2 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Participants explore social factors in land-
scape design, such as the interaction of
people and place, the relationship between
designers and users, and methods of incor-
porating social research and data into the
design process.
Professional Practice in Landscape
Architecture X427 (2 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Explores the role of the landscape architect
in contemporary society by examining cur-
rent forms of practice and emerging trends
in the profession. Key topics include con-
tractual relationships, ethical responsibilities,
office management, and promotion.
Studio L3: Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design X408 (6 semester
units in Landscape Architecture)
Provides instruction in advanced landform
and planting design, design detailing, prepa-
ration of working drawings, and presentation
graphics. Builds on knowledge acquired in
Studio L1 and Studio L2.
Studio L4: Environmental Analysis
and Design X407 (4 semester units in
Landscape Architecture)
Emphasizes a multidisciplinary design
approach by integrating data from the natural
sciences, economics, sociology, and other
fields that influence the design and develop-
ment of the landscape.
Studio L5: Site Planning Practicum
X409 (6 semester units in Landscape
Architecture)
Provides detailed guidance on the prepara-
tion of a comprehensive set of contract
documents for a site planning project.
Participants focus on such issues as market-
ing, project management controls, licensing,
and construction administration.
L ANDS C AP E AR C H I T E C T U R E