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Anna Brandon Explicit Instruction Lesson Plan (Handwriting Without Tears) Date: December 1, 2011 Subject: Writing Grade:

First Lesson Topic: Capital letter writing: H & K Group size: One Learning objective (Performance, conditions, criterion): Student will independently write capital letters H and K five times each using appropriate letter formation and with careful handwriting. I. Core and Supplemental Materials I need: Handwriting Without Tears Slate Chalkboard, letter cards for letters H and K, chalk. Student needs: Wet sponge, chalk, small piece of paper towel, (H & K) letter worksheets. State curriculum standards: K.6.1 Write capital and lowercase letters of the alphabet, correctly shaping and spacing the letters. II. Context for Learning This lesson is a one-on-one exercise that should take place in a quiet section of the classroom or a different room of the school. Jake writes below grade level and that of his classmates. His writing is difficult to read due to frequent handwriting errors. Handwriting errors include writing letters backwards, problems with size discrimination, spacing of lines letters, and line quality. Individualized education plan (IEP) link: Jakes annual IEP goal states that he is to write the entire alphabet in capital letters with correct letter formation. If Jake is to learn the correct formation of the capital letters H and K, as well as be able to independently write them neatly and accurately, he will be working towards his goal of being able to do so with the entire alphabet. III. Preinstructional Set Gain attention: We are getting ready to begin our lesson! Jake, can you show me that you are ready to begin? Remember how we show we are ready to work? We use SLANT! (Wait for Jake to sit up and lean forward) Great! You look ready to work! I will begin the explicit instruction by informing Jake that we will be working on handwriting specific letters. Today we will be working on writing capital letters! We will be using different materials to practice two different letters. First lets work on holding our pencil correctly. Make the A-OK sign with your hand, drop your fingers, open the A-OK and pinch your pencil! Great! I will tell him that we will be working on three specific capital letters for todays lesson. Okay Jake, we will be working on two capital letters H and K today. By working on

writing these letters neatly and the right way you will improve your handwriting. It will be easier to write these letters with practice and will also be easier to read your handwriting! Eventually we will work on writing the whole alphabet neatly and correctly. Handwriting is very important because we use it everyday in the classroom in almost every subject. It is also important to have good handwriting so that others can read what you have written. IV. Prepare Students for Instructional Content Review prerequisite skills and activate prior knowledge: The teacher will make sure the student understands what capital letters are. The teacher should review with students the correct way to hold a pencil to practice with the fine motor skills that they will be using to create the letters during the lesson. The teacher should demonstrate the a-ok method in which to hold a pencil. For this method students create the a-ok sign with the hand that they write with, drop the rest of their fingers, open up their hand so that there is a small space between the index finger and thumb and then pinch their pencil in between those two fingers. The students will, furthermore, be applying their imitating skills while watching the teacher demonstrate how to write the letters, so the teacher should make sure that they student understands that the teacher will model the letter first and then the student will get a chance to write the same letter independently. Preteach key vocabulary (If applicable): The teacher will make sure that the student reviews and understands the concepts of the directional vocabulary down, up and across as these are the directions that the students will be placing the wooden blocks as well as drawing lines to make the letters. The student should also be able to differentiate between a big line and little line when writing the letters. V. Instruction Capital Letter H Cognitive modeling: I will show the student a letter card with the letter H on it. I will first show him what the letter H is on the worksheet, then, using the Slate Chalkboard I will demonstrate how to make the letter H. This is the letter H. Using the chalkboard: Start in the starting corner at the -big line down- jump up to the other top corner- big line downjump to the middle of the first big line- little line across. Guided practice: I will hand the student the Slate Chalkboard as well as a wet sponge so that he can trace what I have written using the correct letter formation. Now I want you to trace the H using the wet sponge, the same way that I wrote the H. Ready? Okay, so start in the starting corner at the- big line down- jump up to the other top corner- big line downjump to the middle of the first big line- little line across. Now, can you wet your pointer finger with the sponge and trace it again? Great! (Teacher watches and checks for

student understanding). Now that you have done that, I want you to use a paper towel and trace it again. Good job! Finally, I want you to take a piece of chalk and try to write the letter L yourself on the chalkboard. Capital Letter K Cognitive modeling: I will show the student a letter card with the letter K on it. I will first show him what the letter K is on the worksheet, then, using the Slate Chalkboard I will demonstrate how to make the letter K. This time we are going to use a story to remember how to write the letter K. This Karate K. Using the chalkboard: Start in the starting corner at the . This is Mr. Kaye a karate teacher (put chalk in starting corner and make a big line down). This is Mrs. Kelly. She is a karate teacher too (put chalk in other top corner). Mrs. Kelly kicks Mr. Kaye right in the middle. HiYaaa! (Make a karate kick with the pencil). Okay so lets try that one more time! Teacher erases chalkboard. So, starting in the corner at the- big line down- jump to the other corner-kick to middle! Slide away. Guided practice: I will hand the student the Slate Chalkboard as well as a wet sponge so that he can trace what I have written using the correct letter formation. Now I want you to trace the H using the wet sponge, the same way that I wrote the K. Ready? Okay, so, starting at the- big line down- jump to the other corner- kick to middle! Slide away. Now, can you wet your pointer finger with the sponge and trace it again? Great! (Teacher watches and checks for student understanding). Now that you have done that, I want you to use a paper towel and trace it again. Good job! Finally, I want you to take a piece of chalk and try to write the letter K yourself on the chalkboard. Independent practice: I will provide the student with a worksheet for the letter H. Okay so here is the letter H that we just worked on, see, H for horse. Now, trace the letter H with your finger following the arrows. Good job! Do you see what lines you need to make the H? Great! Now, find the H gray block. Put your pencil on the dot and copy H. Do the first row and save the second row for tomorrow. I will provide the student with a worksheet for the letter K. Here is the letter K that we just worked on, see, K for koala. Now, trace the letter K with your finger following the arrows. Good job! Do you see what lines you need to make the K? Great! Now, find the K gray block. Put your pencil on the dot and copy K. Do the first row and save the second row for tomorrow. Reteaching: I will address reteaching if the student has difficulty by providing the student with the large letter cards as well as a variety of different wood pieces. I will ask the student to find which wood pieces he thinks make the letter H. This is H. H starts at the . This word is HORSE. HORSE begins with H. What do you need to make H? First you needa

big line. How many? Two! Get two big lines. Then you needa little line. How many? One! Get one little line. Youre ready. For the letter K: This is K. starts at the . This word is KOALA. KOALA begins with K. What do you need to make K? First you needa big line. How many? One! Get two big lines. Then you needa little line. How many? Two! Get two little lines. Youre ready. Afterwards I would continue with more practice using the slat chalkboard that is modeled above. VI. Assessment Jake will have met his learning objective when he successfully and independently writes the five Hs and five Ks on his worksheet using the correct letter formation. The teacher can also assess if he has met his learning objective when, on the following day, he completes his worksheets by writing the second row of five Hs and Ks independently. VII. Closure Active review and follow up: The next day Jake will be asked to complete the second row letters on his worksheets as a review and practice for that days lesson. The teacher will teach the letters L and U following H and K because they are all Starting Corner Capitals and are the easiest for students to learn. The following letters to be taught are more difficult Starting Corner Capitals, letters V, W, X, Y and Z. The students will then move on to Center Starters capital letters such as C, O, Q, G, S, A, I, T and J. To review the letters H and K, the teacher will provide the student with a variety of handwriting worksheets to be completed as well as writing assignments. A majority of these worksheets should take place before a new letter is learned as active review or previously learned letters.