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Digital Unit Plan Template Unit Title: Literary Analysis Content Area: English Language and Arts

CA Content Standard(s)/Common Core Standard(s):

Name: Eric Godoy Grade Level: 10-11

Reading Standards (Grade 10) 1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. 7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Audens Muse des Beaux Arts and Breughels Landscape with the Fall of Icarus). Writing Standards (Grade 10) 1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audiences knowledge level and concerns. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking adva ntage of technologys capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically. Speaking and Listening Standards 1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 910 topics,

texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented
Big Ideas:

Literature is vast and no two books are the same. Yet, many books are able to speak to us. Why is this? Works of literature reflect the idea that human themes stretch timelessly and have no bias. How do the themes of older works of literature relate to our present day? How do they differ? How can analyzing two completely different texts help us understand both works better? Can characters from different works of literature switch into each other's worlds? Why or why not? Can background information about the author and the time he or she wrote in give us insight to help our literary analysis?

Unit Goals and Objectives:

Students will effectively discuss themes and important plot devices with their peers and teacher in a respectful and productive manner. Students will improve their writing skills as they work on various activities to improve their comprehension of literary analysis. Students will use technology to develop their group assignments and complete their various writing activities. Students will know how to create useful commentary in their writings by mixing comparisons and contrasts with important content discussed throughout this unit. Literature is one of the many tools we use to define and share our humanity. In this unit students will focus on reading various texts in order to compare and contrast the content present within. We will have whole class discussions as well as Socratic Seminar discussions wherein students share their ideas with one another. These discussions will help students improve their commentary building for the literary analysis paper that is to be completed at the end of the unit. And of course, along this journey we shall complete fun and highly helpful group activities and projects to help us in our practices of literary analysis.

Unit Summary:

Assessment Plan:

Entry-Level:

Formative:

Summative:

Brainstorming Activity. What narrative elements make a good story? Compare and Contrast any stories you like. Specifically what they do well and what they dont do well. Use bubbling.

Quiz- Important themes and quotes from The Fault in Our Stars. Socratic Seminar- Discussing characterization and how it relates to the thematic content in TFIOS. Quickwrite- How did you feel about the realism presented in TFIOS. Visual Ranking- Rank the elements of a story in the order that you find most important. Explain why in complete sentences.

Literary Analysis Paper- Compare and contrast TFIOS with any novel we have read in class or any novel you have checked with me. You should be looking to compare and contrast story elements and thematic content. Group Presentation/Video Project-A 2 minute recreation of your choice of scene from TFIOS. All group members must provide a paragraph relating to why they chose the scene and what themes are present.

Lesson 1 Student Learning Objective:

Students will effectively discuss themes and important plot devices with their peers and teacher in a respectful and productive manner.

Acceptable Evidence: Progress monitoring through checking of guided notes and making sure everyone is involved in the presentation.

Instructional Strategies: Communication Collection Collaboration Presentation Organization Interaction

Lesson Activities: Guided notes to go along with presentation as well as: Student partner activity (responses on individual guided notes) Music and analyzing lyrics activity. Whole group discussion. Video from the author. Student group video project.

Lesson 2 Student Learning Objective:

Students will use technology to develop their group assignments and complete their various writing activities.

Acceptable Evidence: Student progress will be monitored through the checking of answers on their webercise assignment.

Instructional Strategies: Collection Collaboration Organization Interaction

Lesson Activities: As well as completing the webercise, students will be quizzed on the webercise answers as well as asked to complete simple writing assignments such as: Comparing and contrasting characters with evidence from the text. Expanding themes presented in the novel and with quotes from the pages they appear on. Students will each be given a random slip of paper where they will be asked to either: analyze, summarize, evaluate or summarize an article that will be provided to everyone. If needed, the instructor will present webercise answers on screen by going step by step through the Purdue Owl website.

Lesson 3 Student Learning Objective:

Students will improve their writing skills as they work on various activities to improve their comprehension of literary analysis.

Acceptable Evidence: Answers to the Anticipation/Reaction guide will be discussed in class before students start a Socratic Seminar. If students follow the ideas of the Anticipation/Reaction guide their discussion will be vivid and fluid.

Instructional Strategies: Communication Collection Collaboration Presentation Organization Interaction

Lesson Activities: Group discussion about the differences of anticipation and reaction. Anticipation/Reaction guide to John Greens Paper Towns. Socratic Seminar run by students and monitored by the instructor where students should be able to discuss: -The differences of their anticipations and reactions to the reading. -How certain themes from the novel relate to their lives. -How certain themes relate to one another in the novel.

Unit Resources:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ -MLA Formatting Guide http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/697/01/ -Writing a Literary Analysis Presentation http://www.ipl.org/div/litcrit/ - Collection of Literary Criticisms http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/elementslit.html -Using Elements of Litearature http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/comparison-contrast-guide-30033.html -Comparison & Contrast Guide

Useful Websites:
http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/compare-contrast-30066.html - Compare & Contrast Map http://www.gutenberg.org/ Gutenberg Project (Free Books) http://www.workshopexercises.com/DiscussionTips.htm -Discussion Tips