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William Kempe: One of the principal actors of Shakespeare's earlier plays, and one of the original shareholders in the

Globe theatre. He left the company in 1599, possibly because of a dispute with Shakespeare. He was named as one of the 26 actors who performed in the plays which were listed in William Shakespeare's First Folio William Kempe played in the early plays of William Shakespeare playing the roles and characters of Dogberry in Much Ado About Nothing, Peter in Romeo and Juliet, Falstaff in Henry IV and Costard in Loves Labours Lost The First Folio was published in 1623 and contained approximately 900 pages containing 36 of the plays by William Shakespeare. It was entitled "Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories & Tragedies" Robert Armin (c.1568-1615) Listed as one of the "Principall Actors" in the Folio edition of Shakespeare's plays, Robert Armin was the comic actor who succeeded Will Kempe in 1599.

Richard Cowly: Acting Troupes: Member of the Admiral's Men, Lord Strange's Men in 1593 and a founder member of the Lord Chamberlain's Men and the Kings Men Career - Elizabethan Actor. Famous for being a founder member of the Lord Chamberlain's Men and friend of William Shakespeare. Richard Cowley died in 1618. He is buried at St Leonard's, Shoreditch. St Leonards Church was often frequented by Elizabethan actors as it was located near to the first purpose built theatre called 'The Theatre' and also in close proximity to the 'Curtain Theatre'. He was named as one of the 26 actors who performed in the plays which were listed in William Shakespeare's First Folio. Augustyne Phillips. Acting Troupes: Member of the Chamberlain's Men and the King's Men Career - Actor, Musician and Dancer. Died 1605 Famous for : Augustine Phillips was one of the six men who became the joint owners of the Globe Theatre with the following stakes: Cuthbert Burbage (25%), Richard Burbage (25%), William Shakespeare (12.5%), John Heminges (12.5%), Augustine Phillips (12.5%), Thomas Pope (12.5%) He was named as one of the 26 actors who performed in the plays which were listed in William Shakespeare's First Folio The First Folio was published in 1623 and contained approximately 900 pages containing 36 of the plays by William Shakespeare. It was entitled "Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories & Tragedies" The Life of a Globe Theatre Actors The reputation of the early Elizabethan Actors was not good and any were viewed as no better than rogues and vagabonds - actors were not trusted. The standing of Elizabethan Actors improved when the purpose-built theatres

were introduced and some of the Globe Thatre actors became the equivalent of today's superstars. The Skills of Globe Theatre Actors William Shakespearean and the other Globe Theatre actors were expected to perform their own stunts. Their skills would include sword fighting skills and they had to be able to fall convincingly. The voices of the actors had to carry well. To ensure that the plot was being communicated to the audience the actors had to 'over-act', making exaggerated gestures with their arms and hands. Their skills also had to include a good memory - there was a fast turnover of plays and this skill was a great asset for an actor although not an essential one... Rehearsals at the Globe Theatre Actors - 'cue acting' and 'cue scripting' The Globe Theatre was known to produce eleven performances of ten different plays in just two weeks. It was essential to beat the competition for attracting vast audiences and this was achieved by an extremely rapid turnover of plays. Rehearsal time was therefore limited. On many occasions the Globe Theatre Actors only got their lines as the play was actually in progress. Parts were often only allocated on the day of the performance. Sometimes the actors didn't even get any lines. Working with a method called "cue acting " which meant that there was a person backstage who whispered the lines to the actor just before he was going to say them. This rapid turnover led to another technique called cue scripting , where where each actor was given only his own lines. The complete scene and content of the play was not explained to the actors until it was actually being performed. These techniques allowed for zero rehearsal time, thus enabling a fast turnover in terms of new productions at the Globe Theatre and a huge portfolio of different roles. The Income of a Globe Theatre Actor The salaries of actors varied according to their position in the theatre. The boy actors who took the female roles were paid the least of all actors. The Admirals Men paid boy players three shillings a week. The boys were apprenticed to adult actors and their wages were paid to their masters who gave them board and lodging and a small allowance in return. Part players were paid a daily wage of approximately one shilling per day. The main players were paid at least two shillings per day. However, many of the major Elizabethan Actors such as William Shakespeare became stake holders in the theatres, such as the Globe Theatre, and the profits made them very wealthy men.

List of Names of the leading Globe Theatre Actors The leading actors who performed in the plays were listed in William Shakespeare's First Folio included the following: Globe Theatre Actors William Shakespeare Samuel Gilburne Richard Burbadge (Burbage) Robert Armin John Hemings (Heminges) William Ostler Augustine Phillips Nathan Field William Kempt (Will Kempe) John Underwood Thomas Poope (Pope) Nicholas Tooley George Bryan William Ecclestone Henry Condell Joseph Taylor William Slye Robert Benfield Richard Cowly Robert Gouge John Lowine Richard Robinson Samuell Crosse John Schanke Alexander Cooke John Rice

Names to Research Richard Burbage Edward Alleyn Henry Condell Ben Jonson Philip Henslowe