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RBG Street Scholars Think Tank

February, 2010

History and Select Documents of the Provisional Government of The REPUBLIC OF NEW AFRIKA (PG-RNA)
Compiled and designed by RBGStreetScholar (Marc Imhotep Cray, M.D.)

Source: PG-RNA History


Kenneth Kwame Welsh

Enjoy the Wisdom of the Queen Mother of the PG-RNA Play/Download mp3
Audio from January 4, 2010 by freemixradio

Marilyn J. ""Mama Marilyn"" Preston Killingham August 30, 1933 - December 26, 2009 Washington, DC Marilyn J. ""Mama Marilyn"" Preston Killingham - Homepage

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In the late 1960s, at the height of the Black Power Movement, two acquaintances of Malcolm X, Gaidi Obadele and Imari Abubakari Obadele assembled a group of 500 militant black nationalists in Detroit, Michigan, to discuss the creation of a black nation within the United States. On March 31, 1968, 100 conference members signed a Declaration of Independence outlining the official doctrine of the new black nation, elected a provisional government, and named the nation the Republic of New Africa (RNA). The RNA believes that as a nation, black people are entitled to the full rights of a nation, including land and self-determination. Furthermore, Amerikkka as the land upon which Black People (New Afrikans) have lived, toiled and made rich as slaves is theirs; it is land that Blacks must gain control of because, as Malcolm X said, land is the basis of independence, freedom, justice and equality. The RNA even identified the five states of Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina as Black People's land. According to the RNA, gaining control of our land is the fundamental struggle facing Black People; without land, Black Power, rights and freedom have no substance.
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Companion Document:

RBG Tribute to Dr. Imari Abubarki Obadele OUR STORY A Black Nation - a New Afrikan nation - exists in the United States. It began forming during colonial days, after 1660, when the Black Codes were instituted. It was fully evolved by the time of the Civil War in 1861, two hundred years later. We have common culture, common perspective and values, and group identity, and common gene pool, derived from our distinct group history. We are "New Afrikans" because We, an Afrikan people, evolved from not one but several Afrikan nations and have some Indian (Native/indigenous) and European genes, melded during the course of 200 years, between 1660 and 1861. Those seeking independent statehood began once more in 1968. Three years after the assassination of Brother Omowale, Malcolm X, led by his inspiration and teachings, his followers in the Malcolm X Society lead over 500 Black activists at a national convention of our people. The Provisional Government of the Republic of New Afrika (PG-RNA) was formed and brought into exstence on March 30-31 of that year and announced a parliamentary strategy for winning independence. They issued a Declaration of Independence of the Black nation; named it RNA; formed a Provisional Government ["Provisonal" means "temporary" or, in this case, "pre-independent], with officials elected in Convention; created basic law and adopted a constitution, "Code of Umoja" (revised); identified and designated the Five States of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina as the New Afrikan nation's National Territory [subject to agreement with the Indigenous People]; under a mandate the PG-RNA set as its main purposes and goals: to free the oppressed Black nation in North America making it even

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more independent than Canada, for those of us who want this; to win Reparations from the United States. PG-RNA cadres aim is to educate people about our existence as an oppressed, colonized nation and our right to self-determination; our right to "Free The Land" (our battle cry); and to create by an independence plebiscite (a vote of the people) an independent Black nation-state, to be held first in the counties of western Mississippi and the parishes of eastern Louisiana [the Kush District], in accordance to U.N. General Assembly resolutions. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1968: 1st President: Robert F. Williams (1925-1997): He was in China 1966 to May 1968; Tanzania, May 1968 to Sept. 1969) 1st Vice President: Gaidi Obadele (Atty. Milton R. Henry) 2nd Vice President: Betty Shabazz (d. 1997) Minister of Information: Imari A. Obadele (Richard Henry) Minister of Health and Welfare: Queen Mother Moore (1899-1997) Minister of Education: Herman Ferguson * Minister of State and Foreign Affairs: William Grant Minister of Defense: H. Rap Brown (now, Jalil Al Amin): He was also Minister of Justice for BPP in May 4, 1968 issue of The Black Panther. Co-Ministers of Culture: Imamu Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), Maulana Karenga and Baba Adefunmi Minister of Justice: Joan Franklin Minister of Finance: Raymond Willis Special Ambassador: Muhammad Ahmed (Maxwell Stanford) * PG-RNA Cabinet in 1969: President: Robert F. Williams (1925-1997): He returned to U.S. (Detroit), Sept. 1969. (The Black Panther, Dec. 6, 1969; Jan. 3, 1970). 1st Vice President: Gaidi Obadele (Atty. Milton R. Henry) 2nd Vice President: Betty Shabazz (d. 1997) Minister of Education: Maulana Karenga: denounced and removed by PCC in Detroit, Apr. 5th. A May 11, 1969 letter in The Black Panther officially denounced Karenga. Wilbur Grattan Sr., the Minister of State and Foreign Affairs of the "Republic of New Africa," wrote to Bobby Seale: "Speaking in the position of Minister of State and Foreign Affairs for RNA, I have always felt that Ron Karenga represented a great deal less than the best interests of the Black Liberation struggle against domestic colonialism, white racism, and world-wide imperialism." Herman B. Ferguson was afterwards appointed Minister of Education, East Coast Vice President, and acting director of Freedom Corps. Minister of State and Foreign Affairs: Wilbur Grattan Sr. Minister of Defense: Mwuesi Chui, commander of Black Legion

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The "New Bethel Incident" took place in Detroit, Michigan, in March 31, 1969 during the First New Afrikan Nation Day Celebration at the New Bethel Baptist Church, on the West Side. One policeman killed and another wounded. Four Blacks wounded. Between 135 and 240 persons were arrested. Police later freed 125 persons. Criminal Court Judge G. Crockett [1909-1997], frees 8 other Blacks. Chaka Fuller, Rafael Viera, and Alfred 2X Hibbets were charged with killing. All 3 were subsequent tried and acquitted. Chaka Fuller was mysterious assassinated a few months afterwards. * April 2, 1969 - The New York BPP "21" arrested on conspiracy charges. In 1969, a Newsweek magazine poll of Afrikans in the Northern U.S. showed that 27 percent of Afrikans under age thirty (and 18 percent of those over the age of thirty), wanted an independent Afrikan state. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1970: President: Robert F. Williams (1925-1997) Minister of Defense: Alajo Adegbalola (?) PG-RNA Cabinet in 1971: President: Imari Obadele 1st Vice President: Alajo Adegbalola (?) 2nd Vice President: Chokwe Lumumba (?) Workers of the PG-RNA also announced that they would not permit those who opposed the peaceful plebiscite to shoot at them with impunity. The RNA cadres in Mississippi and elsewhere, in 1970 and 1971 were armed for self-defense. * March 5th, BPP sponsors Day of Solidarity dedicated to "Freedom of Political Prisoners." On March 28th, the RNA Capitol consecrated, Hinds County, Mississippi. Over 200 persons attended the dedication. They used, and use, political means rather than military means. The United States Justice Department, instead of helping to organize the plebiscite; on 18 August 1971 a force of FBI agents and local Jackson police staged an armed attack on the official Government Residence (the main residence-office of the PG) in Jackson, Mississippi, supposedly to serve fugitive warrants on three RNA members (one being a FBI informant/agent provocateur). The five people in the house were not wounded by the 20-minute barrage of bullets--a skirmish, but one police lieutenant died and another policeman and an FBI agent were wounded. Five young men and two young women at this house were captured, along with PG-RNA President, Imari Obadele, and three others in a nearby office, and sent to jail. In the face of this unprovoked attack, three PG-RNA workers: Antar Ra, Maceo Sundiata (fsn Michael Finney) and Fela Sekou Olatunji (fsn Charles Hill) from the Bay

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Area, left in response to the call for Mississippi to provide support and defense for our assaulted movement. Clearly the U.S. had declared war on us! While driving east, the three were intercepted by a policeman whose aggressiveness caused his death. They then commandeered an airline and arrived in Cuba. They were granted asylum. (On August 19th, FBI and police tried to assassinate President Imari Obadele.) They are convicted two years later. Most served long years in jail. Their sovereign immunity demand was flatly rejected by the United States' courts and executive branch, and no one was accorded treatment as a prisoner-of-war. The Republic of New Afrika-Eleven (RNA-11): Citizens of the RNA: Imari Obadele; Hekima Ana and his wife, Tamu Sana, and Chumaimari Askadi (fsn Charles Stallings), all of Milwaukee; Karim Njabafudi (fsn Larry Jackson) of New Orleans; Tarik Nkrumah (fsn George Matthews) of Boston; Addis Abba (fsn Dennis Shillingford) of Detroit; Offogga Qudduss (fsn Wayne M. James) and Njeri Qudduss, both of Camden, New Jersey; Spade de Mau Mau (fsn S. Walker) of Jackson, Mississippi; and Aisha Salim (fsn Brenda Blount) of Philadelphia. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1972: President: Gaidi Obadele Vice Presidents: Alajo Adegbalola, Chokwe Lumumba, Herman B. Ferguson (?) Army: Black Legion commander: Gen. Mwuesi Chui In 1972, Ahmed Obafemi had been sentenced on a gun charge clearly engineered by the F.B.I.'s Cointelpro. The F.B.I. succeeded in framing this key leader and officer of the RNA-PG. He was doing political work at the Democratic National Convention in Miami, Florida. Sentenced with him was Tarik Sonnebeyatta, of Camden, New Jersey. Brother Ahmed was jailed. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1973: * Jan. 7, 1973 - Mark Essex, 23; is killed atop New Orleans hotel after killing 6 and wounding 15. * Jan. 19th - One policeman killed and 2 wounded as Black freedom fighters seize a Brooklyn sporting goods store. * May 2nd - Zayd Malik Shakur (fsn James Coston) killed by New Jersey state police on New Jersey Turnpike; Assata Shakur (fsn Joanne Chesimard) wounded and Sundiata Acoli (fsn Clark Squire) arrested. * Nov. 14th - Twyman Fred Myers, 23, BLA member, ambushed by FBI and New York police; was 6th BLA member killed in this fashion. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1980:

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President: Imari Obadele * A study conducted among Afrikan college students by Professor Luke Tripp which showed that 34 percent of the students favored an independent Afrikan state in North Amerika.

By the middle of 1980, because of public support and intense legal work, almost all of the RNA-11 (except for one) were set free and out of jail. In the fall, some members of BLA, and some accused of being BLA personnel, had come under intense oncentration by FBI and, principally, New York, New Jersey, and California police. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1981: President: Imari Obadele PCC Chairperson: Fulani Sunni-Ali July 1983 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, RNA National Territory. Oct./Nov. 1984 - Third National New Afrikan Elections Nov. 1985 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in Chicago, Illinois. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1986: President: Imari Obadele Minister of Justice: Nkechi Taifa Minister of Defense: Gen. Chui July 1986 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, RNA National Territory. July 1986 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in Detroit, Michigan. Sept. 1986 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in Brooklyn, New York. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1987: President: Imari Obadele Minister of Justice: Nkechi Taifa July 1987 - People's Center Council (PCC) Meeting in Washington, DC (Banneker City). Oct./Nov. 1987 - Fourth National New Afrikan Elections

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Oct./Nov. 1990 - Fifth National New Afrikan Elections: Kwame Afoh elected president. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1991: President: Kwame Afoh PCC Chairperson: Imari Obadele PG-RNA Cabinet in 1992: President: Kwame Afoh PCC Chairperson: Imari Obadele PG-RNA Cabinet in 1993: President: Kwame Afoh PCC Chairperson: Imari Obadele Nov. 1993 - National New Afrikan Elections: President Kwame Afoh re-elected. * In April 1994, several mainstream newspapers (New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Sun-Times, and the Wall Street Journal) ran articles dealing with University of Chicago Professor Michael Dawson and Professor Ronald Brown of Wayne State University. The report concerned the findings of a random national survey of 1,206 Afrikans in the U.S., which in Dawson's words showed " a more radical Black America than existed even five years ago." (Wall Street Journal). It found that fifty percent of Afrikans in the U.S. believe that our people are "a nation within a nation." Oct. 1996 - National New Afrikan Elections: President Kwame Afoh re-elected. PG-RNA Cabinet in 1997: President: Kwame Afoh PCC Chairperson: Marilyn Preston Killingham PG-RNA Cabinet in 1998: President: Kwame Afoh PCC Chairperson: Marilyn Preston Killingham Oct./Nov. 1999 - National New Afrikan Elections ================================== See also these Articles and Books: A Brief History of Black Struggle in America, by Kwame Afoh, Chokwe Lumumba, Imari A. Obadele, and Ahmed Obafemi, 1997. A Short History of the Republic of New Afrika, 1970. Crossroad, Vol. 8, No. 1, June 1997, p. 10.

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Ebony, Feb. 1995, pp. 76-82 Forty Acres and A Mule....In Search of Sherman's Reservation, by Roger Clendening. Nation Time, Vol. 1, Fall 1996 Nation Time, Vol. 2, Spring 1997 New Afrikan Prison Organization Calendar, 1978. New Afrikan Prison Organization Calendar, 1979. New York Times, March-August, 1969 New York Times, March-November, 1971 Provisional Government Legal Chronology, by Kwame Welsh. PDCLA, Sept. 1997. ========================================= PG-RNA CADRE IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY: PDCLA ========================================= INSTRUCTIONS FOR RUNNING A LOCAL PEOPLE'S DISTRICT COUNCIL (PDC). ITS ACTIVITIES AND DUTIES OF MEMBERS--FOR VARIOUS PROGRAMS. 1. Make sure you have the name, phone number and address of all PDC/PG Officers, Staff persons, and/or workers. 2. Establish a record file for this program. 3. Assist RNA/PDC in developing different programs within your church, mosque, or organization. 4. Recruit other coordinators within your city or neighborhood to assist you in promoting these programs. 5. Organize "RNA/New Afrikan Nation Day (NAND)" events. Check with RNA/PDC for details. 6. Be prepared to speak before other groups in order to promote these programs. 7. Organize annual events around the theme "Free The Land" and invite speakers from PDC/RNA-PG to appear. 8. Establish a central mailing address to be used by PDC, if needed (See RNA/PDC Instructions).

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9. Provide PDC/RNA's Main Office with a contact person for times when you may not be available. 10. Make sure all checks, or money orders are made payable to PDCLA, or RNA or RNA Land Fund. 11. Make weekly or monthly reports to RNA, accounting for all weekly or monthly activities. 12. Write welcome letters to all new members and citizens. 13. Invite local grassroots organizations to become supportive of these programs, by speaking on programs you organize promoting the PDC (and therefore PGRNA). 14. Organize prison visits for anyone desiring to visit an inmate. Check with PDC/RNA for details. 15. Each person is encouraged to offer any constructive suggestions on ways to improve these programs for maximum effectiveness. ============================================================== THIS CADRE ALSO INCLUDES THREE DETACHMENTS OF THE BLACK LEGION ============================================================== The California Unit of the Black Legion is recruiting at this time! We are looking for a few good New Afrikans, 16 years old and over, male or female! Please contact us SOON! Before its too late!

Lets Create An Independent Black State and Win Reparations! Revised: March 12, 2007

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The New Afrikan Creed


1969 WITH CHANGES APPROVED 5 MAY 1993

1. I believe in the spirituality, humanity and genius of Black People, and in our new pursuit of these values. 2. I believe in the family and the community and the community as a family, and i will work to make this concept live. 3. I believe in the community as more important than the individual. 4. I believe in constant struggle for freedom, to end oppression and build a better world. I believe in collective struggle, in fashioning victory in concert with my brothers and sisters. 5. I believe that the fundamental reason our oppression continues is that We, as a people, lack the power to control our lives. 6. I believe that the fundamental way to gain that power, and end oppression, is to build a sovereign Black nation. 7. I believe that all the land in America, upon which We have lived for a long time, which We have worked and built upon, and which We have fought to stay on, is land for Us to use as a people. 8. I believe in the Malcolm X Doctrine: that We must organize upon this land and hold a plebiscite, to tell the world by a vote that We are free and the land independent, and that, after the vote, We must stand ready to defend ourselves, establishing the nation beyond contradiction. 9. Therefore, i pledge to struggle without cease, until We have won sovereignty. I pledge to struggle without fail until We have built a Better condition than the world has yet known. 10. I will give my life if that is necessary. I will give my time, my mind, my strength and my wealth because this IS necessary. 11. I will follow my chosen leaders and help them.

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12. I will love my brothers and sisters as myself. 13. I will steal nothing from a brother or sister, cheat no brother or sister, misuse no brother or sister, inform on no brother or sister, and spread no gossip. 14. I will keep myself clean in body, dress and speech, knowing that i am a light set on a hill, a true representative of what We are building. 15. I will be patient and uplifting with the deaf, dumb and blind, and i will seek by word and deed to heal the Black family, to bring into the Movement and into the Community mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, left by the wayside. Now, freely and of my own will, i pledge this Creed, for the sake of freedom for my people and a better world, on the pain of disgrace and banishment if i prove false. For, i am no longer deaf, dumb or blind. I am, by the inspiration of our Ancestors and the grace of our Creator a New Afrikan!

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The New Afrikan Declaration of Independence


This is one of the main political and philosophical documents of the New Afrikan Independence Movement, which guide the Work of the Provisional Government of the Republic of New Afrika.

The Declaration of Independence 31 March 1968 - Detroit, Michigan [EXCERPTS] We, the Black People in America, in consequence of arriving at a knowledge of ourselves as a people with dignity, long deprived of that knowledge.... We claim no rights from the United States of America other than those rights belonging to human beings anywhere in the world, and these include the right to damages, reparations, due us for the grievous injuries sustained by our ancestors and by ourselves by reason of United States lawlessness.... - To free Black people in America from oppression;.... - To build a new Society that is better than What We now know and as perfect as man can make; - To assure all people in the New Society maximum opportunity and equal access to that maximum; - To promote industriousness, responsibility, scholarship and service; - To create conditions in which freedom of religion abounds and man's pursuit of God and the destiny, place, and purpose of man in the Universe will be without hindrance; - To build a Black independent nation where no sect or religious creed subverts or impedes the building of a New Society, the new State government, or the achievement of the Aims of the Revolution as set forth in this Declaration;....

Provisional Government of the Republic of New Afrika: President Kwame Afoh Chairperson Marilyn Preston Killingham, People's Center Council

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National New Afrikan Elections (NNAE)


***Next National Election -- OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1999***

**At voting sites locally and nationwide!!!**

*Come vote for PG-RNA President, Vice Presidents, District Representatives and District Court Judges!!!*

8:00 AM - 8:00 PM October 1999 or November 1999 ========================================================== Provisional Government of the Republic of New Afrika National New Afrikan Elections (NNAE) October xx-xx, 1999 SAMPLE NATIONAL BALLOT PRESIDENT (vote for only 1) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) VICE-PRESIDENT (vote for no more than 3) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) PCC DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE: National Legislature (vote for no more than 5) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state) DISTRICT COURT JUDGE(vote for no more than 2) _________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state)

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_________________(write-in)_____________(city)_________(state)

REFERENDUM ISSUES 1. I believe that the Provisional Government should continue to help create a powerful movement to win Reparations for Afrikan people in the United States of America for slavery and racial discrimination! Yes_____ No_____ 2. I believe that the Provisional Government should continue developing and implementing an independent Foreign Policy and gain recognition by the United Nations! Yes_____ No_____ 3. I believe that the Provisional Government should continue to work to Free All New Afrikan Political Prisoners and Prisoners of War! Yes_____ No_____

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PG-RNA
By Rev. Khandi Paasewe Registered Washitaw/PG-RNA
Administrator: RBG Worldwide 1 Nation
(Edited / re-formatted and embeded with hot-links for the purposes of deep layered study by RBGStreetScholar)
Outline Thesis: Discussion of New Afrikan Independence Movement Survival to spite united states governmental policy & CONstitutional Impacts I.Key terms A. New Afrikan B. grants C. rescind D. informed choice E. viable options F. plebiscite II.Authors note III.Content A. Definition of New Afrikan B. declaration of war against Afrikans C. brief analysis of colonial europeans founding fathers D. Three Viable options plus one E. Afrikan nation builders IV.Conculsion Authors Note All spellings of amerikkka, overstand vs. understand, i lower case, We in capital, u.s.a., european, w hite, in lowercase, Black in upper case and the like are purely intentional, as symbolic of the efforts of this author to purge from the psychopathology which is in opposition to the Afrikan centered ethos of which this author subscribes. Survival of the New Afrikan Independence Movement Thesis: Discussion of New Afrikan Independence Movement Survival to Spite united states governmental policy & CONstitutional Impacts. New Afrikans are defined as a people linked by common experience, being captured by invaders of the new world, sold into slavery, suffering dehumanizing treatment and were denied basic human rights. Being denied our history, cultures, tradition and languages, the common thread that binds community and family were broken. So We could not build alliances on the basis of being identified as Ashanti or Hausa, Zulu, Yoruba or Mandinka. Thus, We find a New Afrikan, with new common bonds: Independence. New Afrikans set into full motion the revolutionary actions necessary to fight amerikkkans for our own independence. The New Afrikan Independence Movement grew out of a desperate need to respond to governmental policy and CONstitutional laws of the united states. The written declaration of war against the New Afrikan Independence Movement in the form of Article one, paragraph one, section 9 (titled the legislative articles/powers denied to congress), states, ...the migration of importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight... (Burns; 1989:22C) What this means in plain english is, the united states declares war on Afrikans in Afrika as well as New Afrikans. It also meant the slave trade would continue another 20 years and ...the full powers of

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the united states government would be used to protect all amerikkkans engaging in the trade. (Obadele; 1989:17) The united states, by law, supported war in Afrika against Afrikans. In brief analysis of some of the europea n colonial founding fathers writings, We find some very interesting text, relating to New Afrikans. In the CONstitution for example, article 4, section 2, paragraph 3, interstate relations (in the portion some textbooks refer to as privileges & immunities ), it states, ...no person held to service or labour in one state, under the laws thereof, escaping into another shall in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labour, but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or labour may be due. (Burns; 1989: 22d). This article was certainly never for the benefit of New Afrikans. For amerikkkans, article 4, section 2, paragraph 3 calls for no celebration of New Afrikans who dared to seize independence by fighting for our freedom. For New Afrikans, article 4, section 2, paragraph 3 represents a clear, unquestionable declaration of war which still stands today. The authors of various text books would have us think that the th 13 amendment repeals this article. Such is not the case. Article 4, section 2, paragraph 3 is clearly defined in Imari Obadeles book titled, The New International Law Regime and united states Foreign Policy, where he states, ...article 4, section 2, paragraph 3 ... pledged the full force of the united states state structurepresident, governors, courts, militia, army, navy, sheriffs to prevent the quest of freedom of the brave New Afrikans and to return those to slavery who succeeded in winning their strikes for freedom. (Obadele; 1991:323) Clearly, the white founding fathers (policy makers) and their documents, they co-authored, were designed to have damaging affects on the New Afrikan Independence Movement. Further, more obstacles to the New Afrikan Independence Movement include th th th the 13 , 14 , & 15 amendments. Amendment 13 made a change in the law. New Afrikans held as th slaves were no longer slave or property. Slavery was dead but the 13 amendment was merely declamatory of the fact that New Afrikans died with honors in the civil war for the rights of freedom. As for th the 14 amendment, where it grants citizenship, it must be noted that, that which is granted can be rescinded. In fact, it is, at best an offer, not a grant. It is an option which We have and have never given up our rights to. The CONstitution assumes a conquerors superiority when addressing New Afrikans in legislation under the facade of offers and grants. Such is the case with the united states and Turtle Islander (native amer. indian) nations like the Cherokee, Creek, and Tuscarora in which the supreme kkkourt stated these nations and others were not completely independent but domestic and dependent nations. (Obadele; 1991:323) Thus, these amendments (even if well intended, which is qu estionable) are th th th in violation of New Afrikans rights. Freedom, citizenship, the vote, which the 13 , 14 , and 15 amendments attempt to address, are rights, not grants or offers or acts of legislation; rights of choice of New Afrikans; rights demonstrated by plebiscite which has yet to occur. New Afrikans have the right to informed choice to follow the Strategies of Struggle. Until We vote to either: 1. build an Independent Nation State, 2. Choose united states citizenship, 3. go back to Afrika, 4. go to some other country of our choosing (not Afrika or u.s.a.); live with independent Turtle Islander nations, any legislation constitutes an imposition of our right to self determination. New Afrikans must consciously and freely choose. The key element here is the right of free informed choice. It can not be emphasized enough that New Afrikans had and still have four logical choices of political futures. Choices other than united states citizenship find New Afrikans far less informed, since the other options still remain less palatable to white amerikkkans. Another example of the CONstitution assuming a conquerors superiority stance is eloquently stated in Dr. Imari Obadeles book, Foundations of a Black Nation, When the u.s. bought the Virgin Islands from Denmark... the u.s. never asked the Black Virgin Islanders... to express their views on future status. u.s. congress simply passed a law and made all Virgin Islanders u.s. citizens. (1975:22) This is yet another clear example of the denial of our rights to self determination. For those who celebrate Kwanzaa, the New Afrikan holiday created by Dr. Ron Karenga, you will relate to the principle of Kujichagulia (Self Determination). Defined, self determination means, man know thyself, determine for yourself who you are, and accept no one elses definition of you. Kujichagulia is one of the laws of the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles) which govern conscious New Afrikans lives and the holiday of Kwanzaa. The New Afrikan Independence Movement is not a new concept. Available to New Afrikans were what i refer to as the Three Viable Options, plus One.

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These options were/are: 1. return to Afrika, 2. integrate into united states society, 3. build an independent Nation State or plus one: escaped to Turtle Islander Nations. History records a few instances where enslaved/captured Afrikans chose the option of returning to Afrika. Such instances of resistance to enslavement include the overtaking of the slave ship Little George in 1730, the overtaking of the slave ship the William in 1732 and the slave ship Creole in 1841. The Creole did not return to Afrikan but rather to the Bahamas to establish themselves as free, independent and sovereign Afrikans. In 1820, 88 New Afrikans arrived on the west coast in the state of Liberia. Their return to Afrika, contributed to the building of Sierra Leone and Liberia. Hundreds of thousands of New Afrikans believed this to be the only way to uplift a degraded people. Among those who returned was David Coker, religious leader and schoolmaster of Baltimore. Others who returned to Afrika include John Russwurm, college grad, co-founder of the first New Afrikan newspaper; Alexander Crummell, minister and scholar; Lott Carey, clergy, doctor, agriculturist; Ed W. Blyden, scholar; Henry Garnet; and Dr. Martin Delaney who was a physician. The next option of integration was chosen by such Afrikans as Osborne Perry Anderson, who was a comrade of John Brown who led a force of white amerikkkans and New Afrikans on a successful attack on Harpers Ferry (the united states arsenal) in Virginia in 1859. Andersons hope was that their collective would become a state of the united states. Instead, John Brown and others were hung, Perry Anderson escaped and became a fugitive thereafter. Other integrationists include Richard Allen, Frederick Douglas (who knew of John Browns plan to attack Harpers Ferry and wa s forced to flee to europe for fear of united states prosecution of co-conspiracy), Harriet Tubman, David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, Ida B. Wells and Sojourner Truth. The united states declared its independence in 1776. Its CONstitution went th into effect in 1789. In 1800, on October 7 , a mere dozen years after the CONstitution was approved, General Gabriel Prosser and his secret army of over 1000 freedom fighters, armed with weapons and a careful, meticulous plan marched towards Richmond, Virginia. Fierce thunderstorms washed out roads and bridges, causing the revolt to be aborted. General Prosser and 22 others were hung when their plans were discovered. General Prossers objective was not merely to abolish slavery but also to establish an independent nation state. His intentions are stated in his choice of target, the state capital. This objective makes clear that his was a movement and not an individual or small group attack, nor a blow in anger to kill evil slavemasters. Herein, Prophet Nat Turner deserves honorable mention for his revolt which killed 60 whites. Abolishment of slavery was his mission and less focused was he on New Afrikan Nation building. As it relates to the Three Viable Options (or the Strategies of Struggle), General Prosser was in the good company of fellow nation builders like General Gracia. General Gracia established Gracia Real De Santa Teresa De Mose in 1739 to 1763. Then united states general andrew jackson uprooted and forced General Gracia southward; exercising the plus one option, General Gracia established the New Afrikan-Turtle Islander Seminole state in 1836-1842 in Spanish Florida. General Gracia was later captured and murdered. Also, following in the footsteps of General Gabriel Prosser was General Denmark Vesey, in 1822, whose army numbered over 9,000. His elaborate plan centered on total secrecy and taking Charleston. Due to special preparations by amerikkkans, the attack was postponed. Rumors of revolt led to the arrests of Denmark, Peter Poyas and 4 others. They died silently. The army of over 9,000 was never discovered by the white amerikkkans. New Afrikan freedom fighters all over the new world fought and built independent nation states from Zumbi of Palmares Republic in Brazil; to General Kojo, Accompong, Kofi, Johnny and Nana Acheampong (a female) in Jamaica; to Toussaint LOverture in Hait i. Other nation builders include Martin Delaney who published various Black Nationalist newsletters; Rev. Tunis Campell, who built a New Afrikan government on several islands including St. Catherine and Sapelo off the coast of Georgia with a 275 man defense force (u.s. army forced him to give up the islands); Henry Adams who appealed fruitlessly for land for his nation state in Louisiana; and finally, Edward McCabe who sought to make Oklahoma his national territory. Generals Prosser, Gracia, Vesey, Kojo and Rev. Campbell with all the above mentioned nation builders along with those whose names escape the history books, are prime examples of the support for and the practice of the viable option (strategic goal) of independent nation-statehood. The Plus One option, was not considered viable. Escape of New Afrikans to Turtle Islander states was considered temporary. Though, temporary, many New Afrikans resorted to finding safehaven in these communities.

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The strategic goal of escaping to the Indians and joining them was pursued by New Afrikans individually and in groups, but arguably, this goal never became a national strategic goal. It tended to be an expedient. (Obadele; 1991:329) Textbooks in amerikkka would have us think that New Afrikans escaping to Turtle Islander nations was not necessary and that freedom fighters like Gabriel, Denmark, Tunis and others, mentioned and not mentioned, were not worthy of note. When these New Afrikan heroes and sheroes are briefly commented upon, it is mostly in a unsuccessful or criminal context. But who are the real criminals? Are We to believe that washington, adams, hamilton, madison and jefferson along with such notables as roger sherman, robert livingston and ben franklin were lovers of freedom? Was their love of freedom merely a part of a feel good curriculum? Who were they really? Lets look at a few of these men from our Afrikan centered perspective. The first draft of the declaration of independence of 1775 reveals a compromise on the part of jefferson resulting in the omission of the indictment against slavery. thomas jefferson never had a white woman by his side after his white wife died in 1782 and for the next twenty years as he was ambassador to france, secretary of state, and president of the united states, jefferson only had a Black woman by his side named Sally Hemmings, as stated in the most capable words of Dr. Leonard Jefferies, (speech published in the Saturday, August 31, 27ADM [91] issue of the New York Amsterdam News Paper:32). None of the slaves of jefferson were ever freed by him nor were the children of Sally Hemmings nor Sally herself. It needs to be overstood that any New Afrikan who opposed the lovers of freedom were taking a very principled stand. Benjamin Banneker for example, challenged thomas jeffersons beliefs of Afrikan inferiority. Banneker accomplished what franklin could only take credit for. Banneker and franklin lived during the same time period and were acquaintances. Both were scientists and creators of almanacs. However, Bannekers almanac was so accurate that it is still the basis of almanacs of today, where franklins is not. Banneker was an inventor and engineer. When Banneker City (washington dc) was in jeopardy of not being built because the frenchman who had the plans left taking them with him, Banneker, from memory, drafted the plans. Therefore, Benjamin Banneker represents more than ben franklin (at least in the hears and minds of conscious New Afrikans). The real criminals? Throughout history franklin has taken credit for the works of Banneker. But isnt that typical behavior of white amerikkka? Lewis Latimers work was taken credit for, by thomas edison. Granville Woods work was taken credit for by alexander graham bell. Woods was a New Afrikan who is quoted in Dr. Jeffriess speech, taking the principled stand of im not going to be bought off by a white man. (Jeffries; 1991:32) Woods and his brother established the Woods Electric Co. in Ohio. It also should be noted in the face of text book omissions, that Woods took edison to kkkourt twice for stealing his patents and Woods won the case. So, We have franklin and jefferson, for example, with other white criminals who were claiming freedom for themselves, while simultaneously trying to protect and preserve the system of slavery, cultural imperialism and oppression of Afrikans globally. The New Afrikan Independence Movement today is still being met with violent opposition just as in the days of Tunis, Gabriel, Denmark and others. Those seeking the option of building our own New Afrikan independent nation state, like our New Afrikan ancestors, still sit, today, in u.s. jails, dead, discredited, in exile or in the underground network. The fact is, neither the state of Mississippi CONstitution, for example, nor the u.s. federal government CONstitution provides any methods whereby New Afrikans may exercise our right to build an independent nation, separating ourselves peacefully from the u.s. Congressman Fauntleroy and Conyers have forwarded legal documents on behalf of those seeking the option of an independent nation, placing proposals in the hands of richard nixon. With the exception of violent attacks against New Afrikans doing nation building work around the country, the u.s. chooses to ignore any such proposals. So, in conclusion, the governmental policies and CONstitutional laws and legislation are merely tools to th pacify New Afrikans and lull us into a state of illusionary contentment. The 15 amendment grants the th vote via the imposed citizenship of the 14 amendment. Yet, all attempts to organize a plebiscite by New Afrikans to participate in an informed vote of self-determination, has been met with conspiracy, armed resistance and violence on behalf of the u.s. government and its various factions of its infrastructure. These amendments are mere pacifiers and like all pacifiers, they build gas and no nourishment will ever come from them. Therefore, the cons are amerikkkas persistence to cremate the New Afrikan place of genius, persistence and resistance in history. The pros are the afterlife of New Afrikans who continue to rise like the phoenix from the ashes, unwilling to die the death of historical cremation which amerikkka

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has prepared for us. From the rebellion on the first slave ships, to the present day efforts of New Afrikans to BE a force in the struggle for independence; We will not merely shut up and disappear; We can not be bought off; We will not fear. If the price of freedom is death, in the words of Malcolm X, then We will pay it with commitment and devotion through New Afrikan Nation building: a viable alternative to racism, cultural imperialism and white supremacy in amerikkka. The New Afrikan Independence movement in its present day form: Provisional Government Republic of New Afrika. PGRNA Country Report Supplement 3/10/28 ADM Country: Republic of New Afrika (RNA) Population: (based on the population of the five states in the Black Belt South, outlined as the national territory of RNA): 6,194,077.45 total Black population 21,391,663 total population Louisiana - 4,287,195 total population 1,320,456.06 (30.8%) Black population Mississippi - 2,614,294 total population 930,688.664 (35.6%) Black population Alabama - 4,135,543 total population 1,046,292.379 (25.3%) Black population Georgia - 6,751,404 total population 1,822,879.08 (27%) Black population S. Carolina - 3,603,277 total population 1,073,761.646 Black population Land Size (based on the land size of the five states in the Black Belt South, outlined as the national territory of the RNA): 229,260 total square miles Louisiana - 43,566 sq. mi. Alabama - 50,750 sq. mi. Mississippi - 46,914 sq. mi. Georgia - 57,919 sq. mi. S. Carolina - 30,111 sq. mi. Significant Natural Resources: Alabama - chief port in Mobile agriculture: peanuts, cotton, soybeans, cottonseed, catfish, hay, corn, wheat, potatoes, sweet potatoes, pecans, peaches live stock: cattle, hogs, pigs, poultry, catfish timber/lumber: pine, hard woods non-fuel minerals: stone, cement, clay, lime, sand and gravel commercial fishing principle industries: pulp, paper, electronics, chemicals, apparels, textiles, primary metals, lumber, wood products, food processing, fabricated metals, automotive tires, oil & gas exploration Georgia - chief ports: Savanna, Brunswick chief crops: peanuts, cotton, corn, tobacco, hay, soybeans timber/lumber: pine, hardwood livestock: poultry, cattle, hogs, pigs commercial fishing principle industries: services, manufacturing, government, retail trade, textiles, foods, kindred products Louisiana - chief ports: Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Lake Charles, S. Louisiana Port Commission at LaPlate, Shreasport principle industries/goods: wholesale/retail trade, transportation, mining, chemical products, foods, transportation equipment, electronic equipment, petroleum, lumber, wood, paper agriculture: soy beans, sugar cane, rice, corn, cotton, sweet potatoes, pecans surahgum livestock: cattle, hogs, pigs, sheep, poultry timber/lumber: pine, hardwood, oak natural minerals: salt, sand, gravel, sulfur commercial fishing oil (off shore & under the ground) Mississippi - Pascagoula, Vicksburg, Gulf Port, Natchez, Greenville principle industries/goods: manufacturing, government, wholesale/retail trade, apparels, food, kindred products, furniture, lumber, wood products, electrical machinery, transportation products/chief crops: cotton, catfish, rice, soybeans livestock: cattle, hogs, pigs, broilers timber/lumber: pine, oak, hardwoods non-fuel minerals: construction sand, gravel, commercial fishing oil. South Carolina - Charleston, Georgetown, Port Royal principle industries/goods: tourism, agriculture, manufacturing, textiles, chemicals, allied products, machinery, fabricated products, metals, apparels chief crops: tobacco, soy beans, corn, cotton, peaches, hay livestock: cattle, hogs, pigs, chickens, (excluding broilers)] timber/lumber: pine, oak non-fuel minerals: crushed stone, cement, clay commercial fishing Economics/GNP/P.C.I. - diversified; no immediate use for thesse in the present provisional state National/Ethnic/Tribal Groups (%s): Afrikan descendants, Turtle Islanders (native amer. indians) Religious Groups (%s): Afrikan traditionalists and other beliefs Marriage system: both polygamous and monogamous Languages: KiSwahili (national language), english, and others History: 1. Ancient Civilizations: Songhai, Timbuktu, Khemet, Ethiopia, Inca Aztec th 2. Major conflicts/wars (in 20 century): Cointel-Pro (fbi /cias counter intelligence programs waged against Afrikan and New Afrikan nationalist/PanAfrikanist/integrationist structures

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3. Independence: initial declaration October 7, 1800 by General Gabriel Prosser and New Afrikan army of more than 1,000 in Richmond, Va. Contemporary declaration: 1968, Detroit, Michigan, New Afrikans meet to establish a written document of their Declaration of Independence, establishing the Provisional Government of the Republic of New Afrika Human Rights Assessments: Rating/Source: non-applicable Political Rights: All Afrikans born in amerikkka have the right as stated in the Code of Umoja (RNA Constitution) Voting Rights: All Afrikans born in amerikkka have the right to vote as stated in the Code of Umoja (also the National Black Elections texts) Criminal (Right of Accused): All New Afrikan citizens presently held in amerikkkan kkkoncentration kkkamps prisons) should be given POW/political prisoner status and then set free (refer to POW mailing list) Economic/Property Rights: All New Afrikan citizens have the rights as sighted in the Code of Umoja International/Regional Security/Trade Groups: Libya: assist in RNA sovereignty and statehood Cuba: same as Libya (give asylum to our military in exile) Turtle Islanders: exchange assistance of our independence with theirs Sources: The Libya Papers Turtle Islander Treaty Papers Cuban Alliance Papers Type of Government (Formal Structure): Constitutional - Code of Umoja Parliamentary - PCC (Peoples Senate Council representatives elected by the ci tizens), have a vote in the PCC Ministries - not elected by popular vote, appointed by the head representative (President), approved by the PCC, have no vote in the PCC non-party system No cracies, isms, or other terms apply Current issue (political controversy or event) that is (or was recently) associated with the RNA: Afrikan Independence in the Diaspora (especially in the united states) What the political issue/controversy is about: Fundamental reason oppression of Afrikans born in amerikkka continues, is because We lack the power to control our lives; the way to gain that power and end oppression is to build a sovereign New Afrikan nation (wage parliamentary war) Source: New Afrikan Creed Primary goals in the issue: is to gain power, end our oppression, build state (military power, government, inter into relations with other states) Opposition to the objectives of the RNA: amerikkka wishes to continue to control, retain power, oppress and continue relations which affect Afrikan lives Initiatives for implementation of the Prime Minister/Chief Executive of the RNA: use the resources of Afrikans - brains, labor, natural resources, limited objective, domestic support, foreign support, inherent military viability, with second strike capability (ref. Eight Strategic Elements) What policy should u.s.a. president clinton and/or secretary of state initiate: support all reparations bills submitted to congress on behalf of the RNA (ref. Conyers HR40 Bill) and open negotiations with elected representatives of RNA to begin peaceful relations; encourage and support RNA plebiscite.

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RBG PG-RNA ASSORTED COLLECTED PHOTOS

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