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Wrtsil Italia S.p.A.
Bagnoli della Rosandra, 334 34018 San Dorligo della Valle Trieste - ITALY Tel +39 040 319 5000 Fax (Service) +39 040 319 5674 Fax (Spare parts) +39 040 319 5237 Telex 460274/5 GMI

This manual is intended for the personal use of engine operators and should always be at their disposal. The content of this manual shall neither be copied nor communicated to a third person.

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Audacia W38B 24154 - 24159

Copyright by Wrtsil Corporation

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, graphic, photocopying, recording, taping or other information retrieval systems) without the prior written permission of the copyright owner.
THIS PUBLICATION IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ACCURATE AND AUTHORITATIVE INFORMATION WITH REGARD TO THE SUBJECT-MATTER COVERED AS WAS AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF PRINTING. HOWEVER, THE PUBLICATION DEALS WITH COMPLICATED TECHNICAL MATTERS SUITED ONLY FOR SPECIALISTS IN THE AREA, AND THE DESIGN OF THE SUBJECT-PRODUCT IS SUBJECT TO REGULAR IMPROVEMENTS, MODIFICATIONS AND CHANGES. CONSEQUENTLY, THE PUBLISHER AND COPYRIGHT OWNER OF THIS PUBLICATION CAN NOT ACCEPT ANY RESPONSIBILITY OR LIABILITY FOR ANY EVENTUAL ERRORS OR OMISSIONS IN THIS PUBLICATION OR FOR DISCREPANCIES ARISING FROM THE FEATURES OF ANY ACTUAL ITEM IN THE RESPECTIVE PRODUCT BEING DIFFERENT FROM THOSE SHOWN IN THIS PUBLICATION. THE PUBLISHER AND COPYRIGHT HOLDER SHALL UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES BE HELD LIABLE FOR ANY FINANCIAL CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR OTHER LOSS, OR ANY OTHER DAMAGE OR INJURY, SUFFERED BY ANY PARTY MAKING USE OF THIS PUBLICATION OR THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN.

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Service Department Wrtsil Italia S.p.A., Business Unit Service Bagnoli della Rosandra, 334 34018 San Dorligo della Valle Trieste ITALY

24h Phone +39 335 784 1217

Nights and weekends, please call mobile phone for service engineer or spare parts

SALES SUPPORT

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Phone: +39 040 319 5071 Americas Phone: +39 040 319 5072 Middle East and South Asia Phone: +39 040 319 5073 Southern Europe and Africa Phone: +39 040 319 5074 Italy Phone: +39 040 319 5075

Fax: +39 040 319 5216

North, Central and East Europe

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TECHNICAL SERVICE Fax: +39 040 319 5767 Wrtsil 64 engines Phone: +39 040 319 5080 Wrtsil 38B engines Phone: +39 040 319 5081 Wrtsil 26 engines Phone: +39 040 319 5082 Sulzer Z engines Phone: +39 040 319 5083 GMT engines Phone: +39 040 319 5084

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Contact Informations

WRTSIL

The list of Wrtsil Network www.wartsila.com web site.

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WRTSIL

Contact Informations

The Wrtsil Engine Documentation


General
The Engine documentation has been split up in five binders: - Instruction Manual - Spare Parts Catalogue - Service Bulletins - Record Book of engine Parameters - Sub-suppliers Manual

Contents

The content of the binders is as follows:

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Spare Parts Catalogue x Spare Parts Catalogue (of the engine)

Instruction Manual x General Description of the engine x Description of main engine parts x Main Data x Description of the various gas-, fluid- and control systems x Operation directives x Maintenance schedule, -tools and -instructions

Service Bulletins x Division with separate tabs for filing standard forms and all commercial and technical, product related after sales documents which are mailed customer specific. Record Book of Engine Parameters x Engine Test protocol x Statement of Compliance EIAPP Technical file x Record forms x General Installation documents Sub-suppliers Manual x Documentation as received from Sub-suppliers if not incorporated in another way in the engine documentation.

Bagnoli della Rosandra, 334 34018 S. Dorligo della Valle Trieste, Italy

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The users of the documentation are assumed to be trained operating and maintenance personnel, with an understanding of the construction and use of the engine.

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Telephone: +39 040 319 5000 Telefax: +39 040 319 5647 Telex: 460274/5 GMI

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Bagnoli della Rosandra, 334 34018 S. Dorligo della Valle Trieste, Italy Telephone: +39 040 319 5000 Telefax: +39 040 319 5647 Telex: 460274/5 GMI

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0.0. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 1


0.0.1. 0.0.2. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 2 0.0 3

1.0. Main Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 1


1.0.1. 1.0.2. 1.0.3. Basic information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 2 Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 3 Derating conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 5 1.0.3.1. Derating limits for ambient conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 5 1.0.3.2. Glycol derating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 5 1.0.3.3. Restrictions on the application of the derating calculation . . . 1.0 6 1.0.3.4. Adjustment of power output for ambient conditions . . . . . . . . 1.0 6 1.0.4. Correction of heat balances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 10 1.0.5. Operating Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 11

1.1. Fuel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1.1. HFO engines running on distillate fuels* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2. Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.1. Residual fuel oil quality* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.2. Crude oil quality* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.3. Distillate fuel oil quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.4. Fuel oil quality before engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.5. Fuel conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.6. Avoiding difficulties during operation on HFO* . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2.7. Comments on fuel characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3. Internal fuel system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.4. Draining of fuel system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1. 1.1 2 1.1 2 1.1 3 1.1 3 1.1 6 1.1 8 1.1 11 1.1 12 1.1 16 1.1 17 1.1 20 1.1 22

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1.2. Lubricating Oil System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 1


Lubricants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.1. Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.2. Influences on the lubricating oil condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.3. Testing of main lubricating oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.4. Condemning limits for main lubricating oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.5. Comments on lubricating oil characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1.6. Recommendations for refreshing lubricating oil . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2. Internal lubricating oil system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2.1. Oil flow lower part of the engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2.2. Upper part of the engine oil flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3. Components of internal system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.1. Lubricating oil pump unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.2. Prelubricating oil pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.3. Lubricating oil module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.4. Centrifugal filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.5. Lubricating oil sampling valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3.6. Crankcase breathing system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 2 1.2 3 1.2 5 1.2 5 1.2 7 1.2 8 1.2 9 1.2 10 1.2 12 1.2 19 1.2 22 1.2 22 1.2 26 1.2 27 1.2 44 1.2 48 1.2 49

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1.3. Starting Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3.1.1. Starting air quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 2 1.3 2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.4. Cooling Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.2.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.2.2. Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.2.3. Qualities of cooling water additives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.2.4. Cooling water control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.3. Internal cooling water system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.3.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.3.2. Cooling water flow HT section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.3.3. Cooling water flow LT section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.4. Components of internal system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.4.1. Cooling water pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.4.2. Flexible pipe connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.5. Maintenance cooling water system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.5.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.5.2. Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.5.3. Cooling water venting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4.5.4. Draining of cooling water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1.5. Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quality of suction air filtration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charge air system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.3.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.4. Internal system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.4.1. Charge air cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.5. Inlet and Exhaust gas module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.5.1. Compensator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.5.2. Insulation box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.5.3. Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.5.4. Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6. Turbocharger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.2. Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.3. Turbocharger cleaning devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.4. Compressor side cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.5. Turbine side cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.6. Compensator bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.7. Exhaust waste gate valve control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.8. Local indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.9. Remote outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.6.10. Degraded operating modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5.1. 1.5.2. 1.5.3. 1.5 2 1.5 2 1.5 3 1.5 3 1.5 4 1.5 5 1.5 13 1.5 14 1.5 15 1.5 15 1.5 15 1.5 16 1.5 16 1.5 16 1.5 16 1.5 17 1.5 19 1.5 23 1.5 25 1.5 28 1.5 28 1.5 29

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1.3.1.2. Starting air quantity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 2 1.3.2. Internal starting air system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 3 1.3.3. Components of starting air system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 5 1.3.3.1. Main starting valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 5 1.3.3.2. Starting air distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 6 1.3.3.3. Starting air valve on cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 11 1.3.3.4. Starting air pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 12 1.3.3.5. Pneumatic control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 13

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.6. Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6 1


1.6.1. 1.6.2. 1.6.3. 1.6.4. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Actuator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.3.1. Booster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel control mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.1. Load indication HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.2. HP fuel pump connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.3. Fuel rack adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.4. Stop mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.5. Checking linkage between actuator and common fuel control shaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.6. Checking actuator stop position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.4.7. Removing / Mounting the actuator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Governing system maintenance and trouble shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil mist detector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Engine instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.1. Switches, transmitters and temperature elements . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.2. Speed sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.3. Electro Static Discharge (ESD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.4. Welding precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.5. General list of abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.7.6. List of sensor tags and ISO codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WECS Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.1. System description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.2. General application info . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.3. Local user interface description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.4. Instructions for normal operating mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.5. Instructions degrading operating mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.6.8.6. Failure identification facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2.3.1. 2.3.2. 2.4.1.

2.3. Start, Operation and Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.1. Preheating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.2. Putting the engine into operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.3. Local start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.4. Remote or automatic start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.5. Start after a stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2.6. Start after overhaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3. Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.2. Loading performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.3. Wrtsil 38B operating areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.4. Engine log sheet (example) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.5. Measurement of cylinder pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.6. Runningin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.7. Operating Troubles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3.8. Emergency operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.4. Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 2 2.3 3 2.3 3 2.3 3 2.3 4 2.3 6 2.3 6 2.3 7 2.3 10 2.3 13 2.3 15 2.3 16 2.3 17 2.3 18 2.3 19 2.3 26 2.3 28

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2.4. Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 1


Maintenance Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 2

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Manual Wrtsil 38

2.4.2.

2.4.3.

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2.4.4. 2.4.5. 2.4.6. 2.5.1. 2.5.2.

2.4.1.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.1.2. Rules for inspection and maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.1.3. Maintenance schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maintenance Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.2. Tool set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.3. Miscellaneous tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.4. Lubricating oil system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.5. Cooling water system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.6. Charge air and exhaust gas system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.7. Engine block, main bearing, cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.8. Crankshaft, connecting rod, piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.9. Cylinder head with valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.10. Camshaft and valve drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.2.11. Injection system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Background information for hydraulic tools and torque spanners . . . . . 2.4.3.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.2. Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.3. Hydraulic tool set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.4. Hydraulic extractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.5. Hydraulic hoses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.6. Quickrelease coupling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.7. Hydraulic hand pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.8. Safety instructions for hydraulic tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.9. Loosening of hydraulically tightened connection . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.10. Tightening of hydraulically tightened connection . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.3.11. Torque spanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tightening torque and jack pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.1. Lubricating oil system components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.2. Cooling water system components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.3. Engine block with bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.4. Crankshaft, connecting rod, piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.5. Cylinder head with valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.6. Camshaft and Valve drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.7. Injection system components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.4.8. General table of tightening torques for not specified bolt connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adjustments and Tolerances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.5.1. Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4.5.2. Tolerances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dimensions and masses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2.5. Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 1


Engine block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 2 Main bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 3 2.5.2.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 3 2.5.2.2. Removal of a main bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 4 2.5.2.3. Inspection of main bearings and journals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 9 2.5.2.4. Main bearing assembling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 9 2.5.3. Crankshaft axial locating bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 16 2.5.3.1. Removal of the 0bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 17 2.5.3.2. Inspection of axial thrust rings and thrust collars on the crankshaft. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 18

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2.4 2 2.4 2 2.4 5 2.4 15 2.4 15 2.4 15 2.4 23 2.4 30 2.4 31 2.4 32 2.4 34 2.4 42 2.4 49 2.4 59 2.4 68 2.4 74 2.4 74 2.4 75 2.4 79 2.4 81 2.4 82 2.4 83 2.4 84 2.4 85 2.4 86 2.4 88 2.4 90 2.4 92 2.4 92 2.4 93 2.4 94 2.4 97 2.4 99 2.4 102 2.4 105

Manual Wrtsil 38

TABLE OF CONTENTS

2.5.3.3. 0bearing assembling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camshaft bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.4.1. Inspection of the camshaft bearing bush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.4.2. Removal of the camshaft bearing bush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.4.3. Mounting the camshaft bearing bush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.5. Cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.5.1. Inspection of the cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.5.2. Removal of the cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.5.3. Mounting the cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.6. Replacing cylinder head stud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.7. Crankcase safety valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5.4.

2.6. Crankshaft, intermediate (PTO) shaft, connecting rod, piston 2.6 1


2.6.1. Crankshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.1.1. Crankshaft deflections check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.1.2. Measurement axial clearance crankshaft thrust bearing . . . . Intermediate (PTO) shaft* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting rod and piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.3.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.3.2. Removal and dismantling of piston and connecting rod . . . . . 2.6.3.3. Inspection and maintenance of piston rings and gudgeon pin bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.3.4. Assembling and mounting of piston and connecting rod . . . . Big end bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.4.1. Removal of big end bearing after removal of piston and connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.4.2. Removal of the big end bearing shells without removing piston / connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.4.3. Assembling the big end bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vibration damper crankshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.5.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.5.2. Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.5.3. Liquid sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turning gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.6.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6.6.2. Maintenance turning device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 2 2.6 2 2.6 3 2.6 5 2.6 6 2.6 6 2.6 7 2.6 13 2.6 14 2.6 19 2.6 19 2.6 23 2.6 25 2.6 28 2.6 28 2.6 28 2.6 29 2.6 31 2.6 31 2.6 32

2.6.2. 2.6.3.

2.6.4.

int ern a
2.6.5. 2.6.6. 2.7.1.

2.7. Cylinder Head with Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 1


Cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.1.1. Maintenance of the cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.1.2. Removal of the cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.1.3. Mounting of the cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.1.4. Centring the cylinder head. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.2. Adjusting the valve clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.3. Exhaust and inlet valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.3.1. Removal of the valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.3.2. Check and reconditioning of valve disc and valve seat . . . . . 2.7.3.3. Valve seats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.3.4. Valve guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.3.5. Valves assembling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.4. Valve rotators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.4.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7.4.2. Maintenance of the inlet & exhaust valve rotators . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 2 2.7 3 2.7 4 2.7 10 2.7 12 2.7 14 2.7 17 2.7 18 2.7 19 2.7 20 2.7 24 2.7 25 2.7 26 2.7 26 2.7 27

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Manual Wrtsil 38

2.8. Camshaft and Valve Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 1


Camshaft driving gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1.2. Camshaft gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1.3. Intermediate gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1.4. Crankshaft gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.2. Camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.2.1. Removal camshaft section / journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.2.2. Mounting camshaft section / journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.3. Valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.3.1. Removal of valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.3.2. Inspection of valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.3.3. Mounting valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8.1. 2.8 2 2.8 2 2.8 4 2.8 9 2.8 12 2.8 13 2.8 13 2.8 17 2.8 18 2.8 19 2.8 21 2.8 22

2.9. Injection System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9 1


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.1. General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.2. HP fuel pump maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.3. Removing HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.4. HP fuel pump disassembling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.5. Assembling of the HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.6. HP fuel pump adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.2.7. HP fuel pump mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.3. Fuel pump drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.3.1. Disassembling the fuel pump drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.3.2. Mounting the fuel pump drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.4. Fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.4.1. Removing the fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.4.2. Fuel injector maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.4.3. Testing of fuel injectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.4.4. Mounting the fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.5. HP fuel line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.5.1. Connection HP fuel line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9.1. 2.9.2. 2.9 2 2.9 2 2.9 2 2.9 3 2.9 4 2.9 5 2.9 7 2.9 8 2.9 10 2.9 12 2.9 12 2.9 13 2.9 14 2.9 15 2.9 16 2.9 19 2.9 21 2.9 22 2.9 22

3.1. Instruction Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 1


3.1.1. 3.1.2. Internal Systems & Pipes Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wiring Diagrams & Configuration Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 3 3.1 5

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Indicator cock and safety valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 28 Starting air valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 29 Fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 29

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

for

Fig. 0.0 1 Fig. 0.0 2 Fig. 0.0 3 Fig. 0.0 4 Fig. 1.1 1 Fig. 1.1 2 Fig. 1.1 3 Fig. 1.1 4 Fig. 1.1 5 Fig. 1.2 1 Fig. 1.2 2 Fig. 1.2 3 Fig. 1.2 4 Fig. 1.2 5 Fig. 1.2 6 Fig. 1.2 7 Fig. 1.2 8 Fig. 1.2 9 Fig. 1.2 10 Fig. 1.2 11 Fig. 1.2 12 Fig. 1.2 13 Fig. 1.2 14 Fig. 1.2 15 Fig. 1.2 16 Fig. 1.2 17 Fig. 1.2 18 Fig. 1.2 19 Fig. 1.2 20 Fig. 1.2 21 Fig. 1.2 22 Fig. 1.2 23 Fig. 1.2 24 Fig. 1.2 25 Fig. 1.2 26 Fig. 1.2 27 Fig. 1.2 28 Fig. 1.2 29 Fig. 1.3 1 Fig. 1.3 2 Fig. 1.3 3 Fig. 1.3 4 Fig. 1.3 5 Fig. 1.3 6 Fig. 1.3 7 Fig. 1.4 1 Fig. 1.4 2 Fig. 1.4 3 Fig. 1.4 4 Fig. 1.4 5 Fig. 1.5 1 Fig. 1.5 2

Engine definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of reading the flywheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Designation of main & camshaft bearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Designation of valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viscosity conversion diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viscosity temperature diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nomogram for deriving CCAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low pressure fuel pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drain plugs engine fuel system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Runningin filter main bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow main bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pump drive oil flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow gear drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Axial camshaft bearing oil flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Runningin filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow for drive HP fuel pump/valves and camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil flow cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lubricating oil pump unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gearwheel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pressure control and safety valve unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prelubricating oil pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lubricating oil module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lubricating oil flow through the cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LT cooling water flow through the cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water flows not through the cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lubricating oil cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thermostatic valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic backflushing filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic backflushing filter (Filtration phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic backflushing filter (Back flushing phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic backflushing filter (Overflow valves) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic backflushing filter (Maintenance) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centrifugal filter on engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centrifugal filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Location of the lubricating oil sampling valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crankcase breather and vent pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting and slow turn sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting air distributor with drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting air distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting of air distributor disc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pilot air lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting air valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting air pipe arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water flow to the cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Location of cooling water thermostatic valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water pump assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draining points of the HT and LT cooling water system . . . . . . . . . . . . Charge air cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooler stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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0.0 4 0.0 5 0.0 6 0.0 7 1.1 12 1.1 13 1.1 18 1.1 21 1.1 22 1.2 12 1.2 13 1.2 14 1.2 15 1.2 16 1.2 17 1.2 18 1.2 19 1.2 20 1.2 21 1.2 22 1.2 23 1.2 25 1.2 26 1.2 27 1.2 28 1.2 29 1.2 30 1.2 31 1.2 35 1.2 36 1.2 37 1.2 38 1.2 39 1.2 40 1.2 44 1.2 46 1.2 48 1.2 50 1.3 5 1.3 6 1.3 7 1.3 8 1.3 10 1.3 11 1.3 12 1.4 7 1.4 8 1.4 11 1.4 12 1.4 18 1.5 5 1.5 6

LIST OF FIGURES

Manual Wrtsil 38

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for

Fig. 1.5 3 Fig. 1.5 4 Fig. 1.5 5 Fig. 1.5 6 Fig. 1.5 7 Fig. 1.5 8 Fig. 1.5 9 Fig. 1.5 10 Fig. 1.5 11 Fig. 1.5 12 Fig. 1.5 13 Fig. 1.5 14 Fig. 1.5 15 Fig. 1.5 16 Fig. 1.5 17 Fig. 1.6 1 Fig. 1.6 2 Fig. 1.6 3 Fig. 1.6 4 Fig. 1.6 5 Fig. 1.6 6 Fig. 1.6 7 Fig. 1.6 8 Fig. 1.6 9 Fig. 1.6 10 Fig. 1.6 11 Fig. 1.6 12 Fig. 1.6 13 Fig. 1.6 14 Fig. 1.6 15 Fig. 1.6 16 Fig. 1.6 17 Fig. 1.6 18 Fig. 1.6 19 Fig. 1.6 20 Fig. 1.6 21 Fig. 1.6 22 Fig. 2.3 1 Fig. 2.3 2 Fig. 2.3 3 Fig. 2.3 4 Fig. 2.3 5 Fig. 2.3 6 Fig. 2.3 7 Fig. 2.4 1 Fig. 2.4 2 Fig. 2.4 3 Fig. 2.4 4 Fig. 2.4 5 Fig. 2.4 6 Fig. 2.4 7 Fig. 2.4 8

Front view charge air cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loosening the cooler stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removal of cooler stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhaust gas system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fixation of exhaust section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gas flow in Compensator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Compressor cleaning device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turbine washing system layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position of valves before and after cleaning procedure on L engines . Position of valves during cleaning procedure on L engines . . . . . . . . . Gas flow in compensator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bypass pipe compensator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Diagram Exhaust WasteGate Valve Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position of wastegate valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wastegate valve assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Actuator / drive / booster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel control mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Load indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preclearance levers to HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local start and stop unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency stop device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil mist detector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed sensor at the turning gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Speed sensors at camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structure of WECS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Principle diagram speed control system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Signal block diagram of WECS 7000 in overall system . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frontend cabinet overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local display unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example view of main page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example view of history page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example view of Start Blocks & Pressures page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example view of Menu page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of control switches for local engine operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . View of panel meters for digital indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local control panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local control stand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DE (Marine), gradual load increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum sudden power increase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Runningin diagram (n = constant 600 rpm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manual stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diagram of pneumatically driven hydraulic pump unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump and jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single hydrauli jack cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Twin hydraulic jack cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hydraulic jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H.P. quickrelease coupling (example) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dust caps H.P. quickrelease coupling (example) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hydraulic hand pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1.5 8 1.5 9 1.5 9 1.5 13 1.5 13 1.5 14 1.5 18 1.5 20 1.5 21 1.5 21 1.5 23 1.5 23 1.5 25 1.5 26 1.5 27 1.6 5 1.6 6 1.6 7 1.6 7 1.6 8 1.6 9 1.6 10 1.6 15 1.6 17 1.6 18 1.6 25 1.6 33 1.6 35 1.6 37 1.6 38 1.6 40 1.6 41 1.6 41 1.6 42 1.6 42 1.6 43 1.6 63 2.3 4 2.3 6 2.3 14 2.3 14 2.3 18 2.3 28 2.3 29 2.4 76 2.4 78 2.4 80 2.4 80 2.4 81 2.4 83 2.4 83 2.4 84

Manual Wrtsil 38

LIST OF FIGURES

for

Fig. 2.4 9 Fig. 2.4 10 Fig. 2.4 11 Fig. 2.4 12 Fig. 2.4 13 Fig. 2.4 14 Fig. 2.4 15 Fig. 2.4 16 Fig. 2.4 17 Fig. 2.4 18 Fig. 2.4 19 Fig. 2.4 20 Fig. 2.4 21 Fig. 2.4 22 Fig. 2.4 23 Fig. 2.4 24 Fig. 2.4 25 Fig. 2.4 26 Fig. 2.4 27 Fig. 2.4 28 Fig. 2.4 29 Fig. 2.4 30 Fig. 2.4 31 Fig. 2.4 32 Fig. 2.4 33 Fig. 2.4 34 Fig. 2.4 35 Fig. 2.4 36 Fig. 2.4 37 Fig. 2.4 38 Fig. 2.4 39 Fig. 2.4 40 Fig. 2.4 41 Fig. 2.5 1 Fig. 2.5 2 Fig. 2.5 3 Fig. 2.5 4 Fig. 2.5 5 Fig. 2.5 6 Fig. 2.5 7 Fig. 2.5 8 Fig. 2.5 9 Fig. 2.5 10 Fig. 2.5 11 Fig. 2.5 12 Fig. 2.5 13 Fig. 2.5 14 Fig. 2.5 15 Fig. 2.5 16 Fig. 2.5 17 Fig. 2.5 18 Fig. 2.5 19

Torque spanner extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lubricating oil pump assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cooling water pump gear wheel assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Main bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder liner clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Explosion cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crankshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Big end bearing and counter weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhaust connection cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder head upper side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Actuator drive shaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting air distrubutor drive on camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High pressure fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Injector, HP fuel pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gear wheel train . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Measuring the cylinder liner bore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Measuring the big end bore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valve stem and valve disc burning in wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inlet valve and valve seat in cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exhaust valve and valve seat in cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Driving gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Governor drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel pump bracket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nozzle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Engine components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turbochargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charge air cooler inserts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Engine block (view freeend side) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position bearing temperature sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Positioning jack on side stud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Positioning the main bearing jacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bearing shell driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inserting main bearing shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pushing the upper main bearing shell into position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crankshaft axial locating bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Camshaft and axial bearing assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connect the hoses to the pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0bearing bush in engine block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liner in engine block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liner lifting device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lifting the cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centre of gravity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Measuring the cylinder liner bore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marks on cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Replacing cylinder head stud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crankcase safety valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2.4 91 2.4 92 2.4 93 2.4 94 2.4 95 2.4 96 2.4 97 2.4 98 2.4 99 2.4 100 2.4 100 2.4 101 2.4 102 2.4 103 2.4 104 2.4 105 2.4 106 2.4 107 2.4 112 2.4 113 2.4 117 2.4 119 2.4 120 2.4 120 2.4 121 2.4 122 2.4 124 2.4 125 2.4 126 2.4 126 2.4 127 2.4 128 2.4 128 2.5 2 2.5 4 2.5 5 2.5 7 2.5 8 2.5 9 2.5 10 2.5 16 2.5 19 2.5 20 2.5 21 2.5 22 2.5 23 2.5 24 2.5 24 2.5 25 2.5 26 2.5 27 2.5 29

LIST OF FIGURES

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Fig. 2.6 1 Taking crankshaft deflection readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 2 PTO shaft arrangement at free end. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 3 Connecting rod and piston assembling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 4 Removal of antibore polishing ring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 5 Hydraulic tool connecting rod studs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 6 Connection of the hydraulic tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 7 Hoisting tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 8 Fitting the protecting device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 9 Hoisting the piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 10 Piston with fixating tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 11 Removal of the retainer spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 12 Removal of gudgeon pin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 13 Marks on piston and connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 14 Moving the connecting rod into the piston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 15 Piston on connecting rod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 16 Lowering the piston and connecting rod into the cylinder liner . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 17 Hydraulic tool big end bearing studs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 18 Connection HP hoses big end bearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 19 Frame and support big end bearing caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 20 Carriers of the big end bearing caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 21 Mount piston support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 22 Fit hydraulic tightening tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 23 Positioning device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 24 The big end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 25 Liquid sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.6 26 Electrically driven turning device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 1 Cross section cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 2 Tilting frame cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 3 Removal of the hotbox panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 4 Removal of cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 5 Loosening the cylinder head nuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 6 Lifting the cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 7 Cylinder head on liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 8 Protecting ring for cylinder head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 9 Centring tool usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 10 Valve clearance adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 11 Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 12 Removal of valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 13 Blueing test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 14 Removing the exhaust valve seats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 15 Removing inlet valve seats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 16 Mounting valve seats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 17 Extracting the valve guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 18 Valve guide detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 19 Valves rotators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.7 20 Indicator cock / safety valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 1 Gearwheel drive camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 2 Camshaft section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 3 Axial bearing camshaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 4 Removal of camshaft end journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 5 Position of jack bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 2.8 6 Position of pillar bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2.6 3 2.6 5 2.6 6 2.6 7 2.6 8 2.6 8 2.6 9 2.6 10 2.6 11 2.6 11 2.6 12 2.6 12 2.6 14 2.6 15 2.6 16 2.6 17 2.6 20 2.6 20 2.6 21 2.6 22 2.6 23 2.6 24 2.6 24 2.6 25 2.6 29 2.6 31 2.7 2 2.7 3 2.7 4 2.7 5 2.7 7 2.7 8 2.7 9 2.7 9 2.7 13 2.7 15 2.7 17 2.7 18 2.7 19 2.7 20 2.7 21 2.7 23 2.7 24 2.7 25 2.7 27 2.7 28 2.8 2 2.8 3 2.8 4 2.8 5 2.8 6 2.8 6

Manual Wrtsil 38

LIST OF FIGURES

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Fig. 2.8 7 Fig. 2.8 8 Fig. 2.8 9 Fig. 2.8 10 Fig. 2.8 11 Fig. 2.8 12 Fig. 2.8 13 Fig. 2.8 14 Fig. 2.8 15 Fig. 2.8 16 Fig. 2.8 17 Fig. 2.8 18 Fig. 2.8 19 Fig. 2.8 20 Fig. 2.8 21 Fig. 2.8 22 Fig. 2.9 1 Fig. 2.9 2 Fig. 2.9 3 Fig. 2.9 4 Fig. 2.9 5 Fig. 2.9 6 Fig. 2.9 7 Fig. 2.9 8 Fig. 2.9 9 Fig. 2.9 10 Fig. 2.9 11 Fig. 2.9 12 Fig. 2.9 13 Fig. 2.9 14

Removal of the camshaft gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tool for intermediate gear wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Intermediate gear wheel section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removal of intermediate gear wheel shaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mount shaft intermediate gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crankshaft gear wheel assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Securing fuel tappet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tappet securing plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position of pillar bolt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removal of camshaft section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removal of camshaft journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tightening camshaft section / journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valve drive mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valve lifting gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Push rod assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tappet guide block assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump and drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removing the HP fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tool dis/assembling HP Fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP Fuel pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Injection timing deviation graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pump drive adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel pump drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cylinder head with injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel injector assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extracting the fuel injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fuel injector cross section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Protecting the nozzle tip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing fuel injectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HP fuel pipe connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2.8 7 2.8 9 2.8 10 2.8 10 2.8 11 2.8 12 2.8 13 2.8 14 2.8 15 2.8 15 2.8 16 2.8 17 2.8 18 2.8 19 2.8 20 2.8 20 2.9 3 2.9 4 2.9 5 2.9 6 2.9 9 2.9 10 2.9 12 2.9 14 2.9 15 2.9 16 2.9 17 2.9 17 2.9 19 2.9 22

LIST OF FIGURES

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Manual Wrtsil 38

LIST OF FIGURES

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0.0. General

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General

Manual Wrtsil 38

Wrtsil Corporation reserves the right to minor alterations and improvements due to engine development without being obliged to enter the corresponding changes in this manual. The diesel engine will be supplied as agreed upon in the sales documents. No claim can be made on the basis of this instruction manual as there are some components described herein that are not included in every delivery. The operation and/or maintenance work described in this manual must only be carried out by trained technicians specialised in diesel engines.

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Be sure everyone who works with the engine has this manual available and understands the contents. Ensure all equipment and tools for maintenance purposes are in good order. Use only genuine parts to ensure the best efficiency, reliability and life time of the engine and its components. Modifications as to the settings may only be made after written approval from Wrtsil Corporation. Settings altering may effect the warranty. During the warranty period of the engine the owner is obliged to follow strictly the instructions for operation and maintenance outlined in this manual.

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The purpose of this manual is to give the user a guide for operation and maintenance on the engine. Basic general knowledge hasnt been entered. The manual is part of the documentation supplied with the engine. Before starting or while performing any job could happen you have questions which the manual gives no answers to, in this case do not take any unnecessary risks and contact the Service department of Wrtsil Corporation or your local Wrtsil Service network.

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0.0.1.

Introduction

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Manual Wrtsil 38

General

General about terminology

The most important term used in this instruction manual are defined as follows: 1 Manoeuvring (Operating) side The longitudinal side of the engine where the operating devices are located (start and stop, instrument panels, speed governor, ...). 2 3 4 Rear (Nonoperating) side Driving end Free end The longitudinal side opposite to the manouvering side. The end of the engine where the flywheel is located. The end opposite the driving end. Designation of cylinders

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1 2 3 4 5 Top dead center (TDC)

According to ISO recommendation 932 and DIN 6256 the designation of cylinders begins at the driving end. In a Vengine the cylinders in the left bank, seen from the driving end, are termed A1, A2, etc., and in the right bank B1, B2, etc. (See fig. 0.0 1 ). Designation of engine sides and ends Manoeuvring side and ends Details located on the manoeuvring side may be marked with M" and correspondly B" for the back one of the engine (Bbank on a Vengine) (see also fig. 0.0 1 ). Clockwise rotating engine An engine which has a clockwise rotating crankshaft when looking from the driving end. CounterClockwise rotating engine An engine which has a counterclockwise rotating crankshaft when looking from the driving end. Bottom dead center (BDC) It is the bottom turning point of the piston in the cylinder, where the piston speed is zero. It is the top turning point of the piston in the cylinder, where the piston speed is zero. During a complete working cycle, consisting of two crankshaft revolutions in a fourstroke engine, the piston reaches the TDC twice.

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0.0.2.

Terminology

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0.0 3

General

Manual Wrtsil 38

1. Top dead center at scavenging

For the first time, the piston reaches the TDC when the exhaust stroke of the previous working cycle ends and the suction stroke of the following one begins. Exhaust valves as well as inlet valves are somewhat open and then the scavenging phase takes place. If the crankshaft is turned back and forth from this TDC both exhaust and inlet valves will move, a fact which indicates that the cranckshaft is near the position which is called TDC at scavenging. 2. Top dead center at firing For the second time, the piston reaches the TDC when, within the same cycle, the compression stroke comes to the end and the working one is going to begin. Slightly before this TDC the fuel injection take place (on an engine in operation) and therefore this TDC can be defined as TDC at firing. In this case all the valves are closed and do not move if the crankshaft is turned back and forth from this TDC. When watching the camshaft and the injection pump it is possible to note that the tappet roller is on the lifting side of the fuel cam.

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B6 A6 B5 A5 A4 A3

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65
Free end

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B4 A2 B3 A1
Driving end

43

21

Manoeuvring side

Fig. 0.0 1 Engine definitions

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B2 B1

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Manual Wrtsil 38

General

Marks on the flywheel Markings on the circumference of the flywheel indicate the TDC for each cylinder. From 15 before till 15 after each TDC the circumference of the flywheel is divided into sections of 5. Where two TDCs are indicated at the same mark, one cylinder is in TDC at firing and the other in TDC at scavenging. The indicator (1) is provided with a scale per degree, starting at 5 before TDC till 5 after TDC. For the firing order see chapter 1.0.

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CW

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1 CCW Fig. 0.0 2 Example of reading the flywheel 0.0 5

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General

Manual Wrtsil 38

Designation of bearings

Main bearings The flywheel bearing is No. 0, the first standard main bearing is No. 1, the second No. 2 etc. Thrust bearings The thrust bearing rails are located at the flywheel side. the outer rails close to the flywheel are marked with 00 and the inner rails with 0. Camshaft bearing Camshaft bearings are designated in the same sequence as the main bearings and the thrust bearing bushings are designated, the outer one 00 and the inner one 0. Intermediate shaft (Power Take Off) bearing The PTO bearing, for the additional power take off shaft on the engine, is located on the pump cover at free end. Intermediate (camshaft) gear wheel bearings The bearings located directly behind the flywheel are designated as 00 and the inner bearings as 0.

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n+1 n n1 n = number of cylinders on each bank

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Fig. 0.0 3 Designation of main & camshaft bearings

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Manual Wrtsil 38

General

Designation of valves

AIR IN

EXHAUST OUT

A B

D C

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Fig. 0.0 4 Designation of valves

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A&B C&D

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INLET VALVES EXHAUST VALVES
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General

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Manual Wrtsil 38

General

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1.0. Main Data

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Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

In the Configuration Structure for Wrtsil 38B engines the following applications are identified: 1. Marine: 2. Marine: 3. Marine: 4. Power Plant: Engine types: 6L38B 8L38B 9L38B Cylinder bore Stroke Main engine, Fixed Pitch Propeller

Main engine, Continuous Pitch Propeller. Main engine, Diesel Electric Propulsion Power Plant Base Load

12V38B 16V38B 18V38B

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Direction of rotation Firing order 6L38B Firing order 8L38B Firing order 9L38B Clockwise 142635 Firing order 12V38B 50 consecutive Firing order 16V38B 50 consecutive Firing order 18V38B 410 alternate 1.0 2

Number of cylinders

13258674 174286395 A1B1A3B3A5B5 A6B6A4B4A2B2 A1B1A3B3A2B2 A5B5A8B8A6B6 A7B7A4B4 A1B8A7B6A4B3 A2B9A8B5A6B1 A3B7A9B4A5B2

The Wrtsil 38B diesel engine is a 4stroke, medium speed, turbocharged and intercooled engine with direct fuel injection.

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380mm 475mm 6/8/9/12/16/18 Counter Clockwise 153624 14768523 159368247 A1B2A2B4A4B6 A6B5A5B3A3B1 A1B4A4B7A7B6 A6B8A8B5A5B2 A2B3A3B1 A1B2A5B4A9B7 A3B1A6B5A8B9 A2B3A4B6A7B8

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1.0.1.

Basic information

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

Engine output according to engine rating plate Fywheel Output 100% Marine: DE, CPP. FPP Power Plant: BL Rated Engine speed Suction air temperature

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rpm
oC oC

Charge air coolant temperature

Engine output according to ISO 30461 : 1995(E) Fywheel Output 100% Rated Engine speed kW/ Cyl. rpm Same as table above [600]

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Ambient air pressure Site altitude above sea level Suction air temperature Total suction air pressure loss Ambient air pressure Suction air temperature

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ISO 3046 substitute reference conditions Marine engines kPa m


oC oC

Charge air coolant temperature Total exhaust gas back pressure

Continuous Power and Prime Power engines kPa


oC oC

Charge air coolant temperature Sum of suction air losses and exhaust gas back pressures

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kW/Cyl. 725 675 675 [600] 38 45 100 0 45 38 3 1 100 35 45 5 kPa kPa kPa 1.0 3

1.0.2.

Output

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Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

Fuel limiter settings Marine: DE CPP, FPP Power Plant: BL 100 %

110 % for governing purposes only

100 % no overload is allowed

Continuous power base load

Continuous power is defined in ISO 85281 as the power that a generating set is capable to deliver continuously for an unlimited number of hours per year, between stated maintenance intervals and under the stated ambient conditions, if the maintenance has been carried out as prescribed by the manufacturer.

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Note!
1.0 4

Torsional vibration barred operational conditions rpm rpm none none

Barred speed/load range during normal operation Speed range to be restricted during misfiring for continuous running

Barred speed and load ranges: The zone where the load caused by torsional vibrations exeed the permissible values for continuous operation. Misfiring: see section 2.3.3.8.3

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The full output of the engine is available at the ISO substitute reference conditions. No compensation (uprating) is allowed for operating conditions better than the ISO substitute reference conditions. For derating data see section 1.0.3.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

1.0.3.1.

Derating limits for ambient conditions

The derating is according to ISO 30461:1995(E) applying: hm = 0.90.

1.0.3.2.

Glycol derating

Maximum allowable glycol% in water is 50 %. In case glycol is applied in cooling system the capacity of the lubricating oil cooler on the engine and all external heat exchangers has to be designed for the specified glycol%. 1 If glycol is applied in winter season only, there is no derating for glycol; anyway the settings of the thermostatic valves have to be changed during winter time. while changing from the cold season to the warm one the clycol cooling water has to be replaced by fresh water. HT water system Control temperature for the HT water after the engine: Dt HT water with glycol: 2C/10% glycol (85C at 50% glycol instead of 93C at 0%). LT water system Control temperature for the LT water: Dt LT water with glycol: 1C/10% glycol.

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Note!

As soon as there is no risk of below 0C temperatures the glycol cooling water must be replaced by fresh water immediately.

2 If the glycol is used also during summer time, then derating will be applicable. For certain applications where glycolwater is used as cooling media in the HT &/or LT cooling system derating is 0,5%/10%.

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The rated output of the engine is available at the rated substitute reference conditions. No compensation (upgrading) is allowed for ambient conditions better than substitute.

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1.0.3.

Derating conditions

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1.0 5

Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.0.3.4.

Adjustment of power output for ambient conditions

The adjusted output for site conditions is calculated by means of the following formula:
Px + a Pra Px"

is the adjusted power output under site conditions; is the power output under substitute reference conditions;

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Pra" a" a" a + Ktot * 0, 7 Ktot + K1

is the power adjustment factor.

must be calculated by means of the following formula and parameters:


(1 * Ktot) K2 K3 10, 9 * 1 K4

Derating due to the suction air temperature tx" (C) Marine:


tx v 15

15 t tx v 45 45 t tx

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K1 + 1 ) 0, 004 K1 + 1 K1 + 1 ) 0, 004 K1 + 1

K1 + (273 ) 45)(273 ) tx)

Continuous power and Prime Power engines:


tx v 15 (tx * 15)

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15 t tx v 35

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(tx * 15)
1,2

Modifications to the engine may be required when the calculated power adjustment factor " a" trepasses the value of 0,95. In such a case the derated output of the engine is subjected to the confirmation of the Technology Department of Wrtsil Italia S.p.A. by means of the Performance Request Sheet".

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1.0.3.3.

Restrictions on the application of the derating calculation

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

Emergency Genset (LTP):


tx v 15 15 t tx v 25 25 t tx

K1 + 1 ) 0, 004 K1 + 1

K1 + (273 ) 25)(273 ) tx)

Note!

For suction air temperature below 5 C heating of suction air and/or special requirements may be required. Derating due to the charge air coolant temperature tcx" (C) Marine:
tcx v 38 38 t tcx

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tcx v 45 45 t tcx

Continuous power and Prime Power engines:


K2 + 1 K2 + (273 ) 45)(273 ) tcx)

Emergency Genset (LTP):


tcx v 35

35 t tcx

Note!

The dew point shall be calculated for the specific site conditions. The minimum charge air temperature shall be above the dew point in order to avoid condensation occurs in charge air cooler.

lu
K2 + 1 K2 + 1

se
K2 + (273 ) 38)(273 ) tcx) K2 + (273 ) 35)(273 ) tcx)

on
(tx * 15)
1,2

35 t tx

K1 + (273 ) 35)(273 ) tx)

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1,2

Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.0 7

Derating due to ambient air pressure Marine:

Under the assumption that the ambient air pressure for marine applications is equal to the barometric pressure, K3"
K3 + 1

Continuous power and Prime Power engines & Emergency Genset (LTP):
0,7

pair u 100

Derating due to the total exhaust gas back pressure (kPa)

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K3 + 1 K4 + 1 K4 + 1 K4 + 1

pair v 100

se
K3 + pair100 K4 + 103(100 ) Dpex)
1,5

int ern a
Dpex v 3 Dpex u 3

Marine:

Note!

For total exhaust gas back pressure a factor is added to ISO 30461:1995(E). The factor shall be added if the design target of 3 kPa is exceeded. Continuous power and Prime Power engines:
Dpex v 5
1,5

Dpex u 5

K4 + 105(100 ) Dpex)

Emergency Genset (LTP):


Dpex v 3 Dpex u 3

for

K4 + 103(100 ) Dpex)

1.0 8

on
pair"

(kPa)

1,5

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Dpex"

Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

Note!

Reduce engine load if operating temperatures of lubricating oil or cooling water exceed the nominal values or exhaust gas tends to exceed the maximum values, see section 1.0.5. High operating temperatures can be caused among other by: 2 reduction of charge air pressure by: too much wear of the turbine

contamination of turbocharger compressor and/or turbine contamination of air in take filter 3 4 5 6 7

deviation of setting of (individual) high pressure fuel pumps bad functioning of fuel injectors high fuel CCAI value (> 870) high ambient temperature bad functioning of HP fuel pumps

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Note!

Never change fuel rack settings to equalize the exhaust gas temperature.

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contamination of charge air cooler

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contamination of coolers

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Data mentioned in Operating Data (section 1.0.5.) must stay at the nominal values

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1.0 9

Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

The following table supplyes a complete overview for heat balance guidance values according to different ambient conditions in relation to the substitute reference conditions as stated above.

Turbocharger air inlet temperature Exhaust waste gate Air and exhaust mass flow Exhaust gas temperature Charge air heat, total HT LT Jacket water heat Lubricating oil heat Air temp. after compressor Exhaust waste gate kg/s C kW kW kW kW kW C No 2.6 % +5.1 % +8.4 % +0.1 % +2.7 % +1.3 %

+10.3 C +0.3 C

LTcoolant temperature before air cooler Air and exhaust mass flow Exhaust gas temperature Charge air heat, total HT LT kg/s C kW kW kW kW kW C

int ern a
+0.0 % 5.3 % +0.0 +6.1 C +0.0 % +2.1 % +0.7 % 13.3 % +1.0 C / / kg/s C kW kW kW kW kW C 4.1 % +16.0 C +2.2 % +4.8 % 1.7 % +3.8 % +2.1 % +9.6 C

Jacket water heat

Lubricating oil heat Altitude

Air temp. after compressor

Air and exhaust mass flow Exhaust gas temperature Charge air heat, total HT LT

for

Jacket water heat

Lubricating oil heat Air temp. after compressor

1.0 10

lu
+3.2 % +0.8 % +0.0 % +11.5 C No Yes +6.6 C 5.2 % +0.0 % 14.0 % +2.2 % +0.8 % +1.0 C

se
Yes Reference +0.0 % +10.1 % +14.1 % Reference Reference

per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp. per 10 C higer suction air temp.

+16.1 C per 10 C higer suction air temp.

per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp. per 10 C higer LTcool. temp.

per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level per 1000 Above Sea Level

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1.0.4.

Correction of heat balances

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

Operating Data Conditions Fuel condition before injection pumps: Pressure Viscosity (HFO) Viscosity (LFO) 1) Temperature (HFO) Temperature (LFO) Lube oil condition:

on
Max. 24 24 Nom. 20 63 4.5 73 93 3.8 2) 3.4 2) 50 30 bar cSt cSt
oC oC

1.0.5.

Operating Data

se
oC

140 45 4.6 38 4.6 0.8 33

Temperature before engine Pressure before engine HT cooling water condition:

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bar
oC oC

Temperature before engine Temperature after engine Pressure before engine LT cooling water condition:

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Temperature before engine Temperature after engine Pressure before engine Firing pressure
1) 2) static

bar
oC oC

bar bar
oC

HT and LT cooling water static pressure: At inlet cooling water pump Charge air temperature in air receiver Starting air pressure (min. pres. at 20 oC) 0.5 12

bar bar

210

The temperature of the fuel shall be adjusted such that the minimum viscosity before the engine is well above 2 cSt. pressure to be added.

for

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Min. 10 16 2 44 1.0 11

Main Data

Manual Wrtsil 38

ooooo

for

1.0 12

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se

on

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Main Data

for

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1.1 1

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1.1. Fuel System

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Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Selection of the most economical fuel for diesel engines depends on several variables such as engine requirements, operating conditions, fuel quality, availability, and costs. Engines vary widely in the grade of fuel required for satisfactory operations. In general high speed engines require a more refined fuel than low speed types. High cetane number light distillate fuels are more expensive than low cetane heaviertype fuels. For any class of fuel, careful control of uniformity generally carries a price premium because of the operating limitations imposed on the refiner. Engine operation on any fuel resulting in excessive maintenance is obviously uneconomical regardless of fuel cost. The engine manufacturers recommendation is the logical starting point for selecting the fuel of an engine. These recommendations may subsequently be tempered to obtain additional economies in view of experience and the local fuel situation. Such steps, however, should be taken carefully.

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1.1 2

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1.1.1.1.
Note!

HFO engines running on distillate fuels*

(*) This section must be taken into account for HFO engines only. The engine is designed for continuous operation on heavy fuel. For limited periods it is possible to operate the engine on distillate fuel without modification. Engines designed for continuous or prolonged operation on distillate fuels corresponding to ISO 8217 : 2005(E), FDMA & DMB are adapted to such fuels and consequentely require no modification. For continuous operation on distillate fuel corresponding to ISO 8217 : 2005(E), FDMC, no specific modifications are needed on the engine. See also section 1.1.2.3. Engines can be started and stopped on heavy fuel oil by providing the engine and fuel system are preheated to operating temperature. It is only recommended to change over from HFO to distillate fuel operation when it is necessary to fill or flush the fuel oil system.

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1.1.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

1.1.2.1.
Note!

Residual fuel oil quality*

(*) This section must be taken into account for HFO engines only. The fuel specification HFO 2" is based on the ISO 8217 : 2005(E) standard and covers the fuel categories ISOFRMA30 & RMK55. Additionally the engine manufacturer has specified an alternative fuel HFO 1" with a tighter specification. By using a fuel meeting this specification longer overhaul intervals of the specific engine components are reached.

Note!

The residual fuels are further in this manual indicated as Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO). Bunker quality The residual fuel oil quality as bunkered must be within the following specification:

Property Viscosity at: Viscosity at: Viscosity at: Density at: CCAI 2) 4) 100C 50C 100F 15C 1)

lu
Unit max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max.

se
Limit HFO 1 55 700 7200 991.0 1010.0 850 0.5 0.3 2.0 0.05 100 50 30 30 15 8

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Water Water before engine 4) Sulphur Ash Vanadium % volume % volume % mass % mass mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg
3)

cSt cSt Redwood No.1 sec kg/m3 kg/m3

Sodium 3) 4) Sodium before engine 4) Aluminium + Silicon

for

Conradson Carbon residue % mass Asphaltenes 4) % mass

on
Limit HFO 2 55 700 7200 991.0 1010.0 870 0.5 0.3 5.0 0.20 600 50 30 80 22 14

1.1.2.

Fuel

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Test method reference ISO 3104 ISO 3104 ISO 3104 ISO 3675 or ISO 12185 ISO 8217, Annex B ISO 3733 ISO 3733 ISO 8754 or ISO 14596 ISO 6245 ISO 14597 or IP 501 or 470 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 or IP 501 or 470 ISO 10730 ASTM D 3279 1.1 3

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Property Flash point (PMCC) Pour point Total sediment, potential C C % mass

Unit

for

1.1 4

int ern a

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Limit HFO 1 min. 60 max. 30 max. 0.10

Limit HFO 2 60 30 0.10

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Test method reference ISO 2719 ISO 3016 ISO 103072

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

1)

2) Straight run residues show CCAI values in the 770 to 840 range and are

very good ignitors. Cracked residues delivered as bunkers may vary from 840 to in exceptional cases above 900 CCAI. At the moment most bunkers remain in the range between 850 and 870. 3) Sodium contributes to hot corrosion on exhaust valves when combined with high sulphur and vanadium contents. Sodium also strongly contributes to foul the exhaust gas turbine blades at high loads. The aggressiveness of the fuel depends on its proportions of sodium and vanadium, but also on the total amount of ash. Hot corrosion and deposit formation are, however, also influencedby other ash constituents. It is therefore difficoult to set strict limits only based on the sodium and vanadium content of the fuel. Also a fuel with lower sodium and vanadium contents than that specified above can cause hot corrosion on engine components. 4) Additional properties specified by the engine manufacturer which are not included in the ISO specification or differ from the ISO specification.
5)A

sulphur limit of 1.5% mass will apply in SOx emission controlled area designated by International Maritime Organization. There may be also other local variations.

int ern a

Lubricating oil, foreign substances or chemical waste, hazardous to, the safety of the installation or detrimental to the performance of engines, should not be contained in the fuel. The limits above concerning the demands of: CIMAC 2003, Class Grade K700 HFO 2" also correspond to the

BS MA 100: 1996, RMH55 & RMK 55

ISO 8217:2005(E), ISOF RMK 700

Note!

For fuel oil quality before engine see section 1.0.5. and 1.1.2.4.

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Maximum of 1010 kg/m3 at 15C, by providing the fuel treatment system can remove water and solids.

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1.1 5

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

(*) This section must be taken into account for HFO engines only.

Bunker quality The crude oil quality as bunkered must be within the following specification:

Viscosity at: Viscosity at: Viscosity at: Density at: CCAI Sulphur Ash Vanadium Sodium

100C 50C 100F 15C 1)

cSt cSt Redwood No. 1 sec. kg/m3

lu
max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max. max.

% mass % mass mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg

int ern a
% mass C C % mass mg/kg

Sodium before engine Aluminium + Silicon

Calcium + Potassium mg/kg +Magnesium before engine

Conradson Carbon residue % mass Asphaltenes Pour point Reid vapour pres. at 37.8C kPa Cloud point or Cold filter plugging point 2) Total sediment, potential Hydrogen sulphide

for

1.1 6

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max. max. max. 55 700 7200 991 1010.0 4.5 0.15 30 30 50 22 14 65 30 60 0.10 5

Property

Unit

Limit

on
ISO 3104 ISO 3104 870 ISO 8217 ISO 8754 ISO 6245 600 ISO 14597 or IP 501 or 470 50 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 or IP 501 or 470 ISO 10370 ASTM D 3279 ASTM D 323 ISO 3016 ISO 3015 IP 309 ISO 103072 IP 399

1.1.2.2.

Crude oil quality*

Test method reference

ISO 3104 or 12185 ISO 3675 or 12185

IP 501 or 500 for Ca and ISO 10478 for K and Mg

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

2)Fuel

Lubricating oil, foreign substances or chemical waste, hazardous to the safety of the installation or detrimental to the performance of engines, should not be contained in the fuel.

Note!

For fuel oil quality before engine, in detail, see section 1.0.5. and 1.1.2.4.

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int ern a
1.1 7

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se

temperature in the whole fuel system including storage tanks must be kept during standby, startup and operation 10 15 0C above the cloud point in order to avoid crystallization and formation of solid waxy compounds (typically paraffins) causing blocking of fuel filters and small size orifices. Additionally, fuel viscosity sets a limit to cloud point so that fuel must not be heated above the temperature resulting in a lower viscosity before the injection pumps than specified above.

on

1010 kg/m3 at 15 C, provided the fuel treatment system can remove water and solids.

1)Max.

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Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Distillate fuels The fuel specification is based on the ISO 8217:2005 (E) standard and covers the fuel categories ISOFDMX, DMA. DMB and DMC. The distillate grades mentioned above can be described as follows:

DMA is a high quality distillate, generally designed as MGO (Marine gas Oil) in the marine field.

DMC is a fuel which can contain a significant proportion of residual fuel. Consequently it is unsuitable for installations where engine or fuel treatment plants is not designed for the use of residual fuels.

for

1.1 8

int ern a
Note!

The distillate fuels are further in this manual indicated as Light Fuel Oil (LFO).

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DMB is a general purpose fuel which may contain trace amounts of residual fuel and is intended for engines not specifically designed to burn residual fuels. It is generally designed as MDO (Marine Diesel Oil) in the marine field.

se

DMX is a fuel which is suitable for use at ambient temperatures down to 15C without heating the fuel. In merchant marine applications, its use is restricted to lifeboat engines and certain emergency equipment due to reduced flash point. This type of fuel is not further specified in this chapter.

on

1.1.2.3.

Distillate fuel oil quality

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

Property Viscosity pumps 2) Viscosity pumps 2) before injection cSt cSt injection cSt

Unit min. max. max. max. min. % vol.

DMA 2.0 6.0 24.0

DMB DMC1) Test meth. ref. 2.0 2.0 ISO 3104 ISO 3104 ISO 3104 ISO 3675 or 12185 ISO 5165 or 4264 ISO 3733 ISO 8574 ISO 6245 ISO 14597 or IP 501 or 470 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 ISO 10478 ISO 10370 ISO 10370 ISO 2719 ISO 3016

Viscosity at 40C before

11.0 24.0

Density at 15C Cetane number Water Sulphur Ash Vanadium Sodium before engine 2) Aluminium + Silicon

kg/m3

lu
1.5 0.01 max. max. max. max. 0.3 60 6 0 min. max.

max.

% mass max. % mass max. mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg

int ern a
Aluminium + Silicon before mg/kg engine Carbon residue (10% vol % mass max. dist. bottoms, micro method) Carbon method) residue (micro % mass max. C C Flash point (PMCC) 2) Pour point : winter quality summer quality Total sediment potential % mass max.
1)

se
24.0 890 900 920 40 35 0.3 0.3 2.03) 0.01 0.3 60 0 6 0.10 2.03) 0.05 100 30 25 15 2.5 60 0 6 0.10

The use of ISOFDMC category fuel is allowed by providing the fuel treatment system is equipped with a fuel centrifuge. 2) Additional properties specified by the engine manufacturer which are not included in the ISO specification or differ from the ISO specification.
3)A

for

sulphur limit of 1.5% mass will apply in SOx emission controlled area designated by International Maritime Organization. There may be also other local variations.

on
14.0

Bunker quality The distillate fuel oil quality as bunkered must be in the following specification based on ISO 8217: 1996(E) ISOFDMA, DMB and DMC:

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ISO 103071 1.1 9

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Some distillate fuel oils may contain wax particles which solidify at temperatures below 50 oC and may clog the fuel filter. It is advised to install a heater in the supply line to the fuel filter. In case of a clogged filter the heater can be switched on to overcome the problem.

Note! Note!

For fuel oil quality before engine, in detail, see section 1.0.5. and 1.1.2.4. For fuel oils out of the specifications as stated in this paragraph, contact Wrtsil Corporation.

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1.1 10

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Lubricating oil, foreign substances or chemical waste, hazardous to the installation or detrimental to the performance of the engines, should not be contained in the fuel.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

Requirement before engine All fuel oil supplied to the engine must be properly conditioned and fulfil the following requirements:

The HFO must be purified in an efficient centrifuge system. Furthermore, the fuel should pass through an automatic filter before entering the engine.

lu

Filter absolute mesh size, max (HFO, automatic fine filter)

se

Property Unit Value Fuel condition before injection pumps: For pressure, temperature (LFO / HFO) and viscosity (LFO / HFO) see section 1.0.5.

Filter absolute mesh size, max (LFO, automatic or duplex filter) Safety filter; absolute mesh size, max (HFO) Water / volume 1) Sodium 1)

int ern a
Aluminium + Silicon 1)
1) Additional
2)

Quantity of clean leak HFO (at 100% load) Quantity of clean leak LFO (at 100% load) Fuel flow / fuel consumption ratio (at 100% load)

properties specified by the engine manufacturer which are not included in the ISO specification or differ fromthe ISO specification. % of Specific Fuel Oil Consumption

for

on
[mm] [mm] [mm] % mg/kg mg/kg % 2) % 2) 10 10 25 ca. 2

1.1.2.4.

Fuel oil quality before engine

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max. 0.3 max. 30 max. 15 ca. 0.2 min. 4 : 1 1.1 11

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

World wide different viscosity units are used. Fig. 1.1 1 , shows a diagram to convert the viscosity from one unit to another. The unit [mm2/s] is equal to [cSt].

[mm2/s]

for

1.1 12

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Fig. 1.1 1 Viscosity conversion diagram

Conversion from various viscosity units to [mm2/s] can be made in the diagram, fig. 1.1 1 . The diagram should be used only for conversion of viscosities at the same temperature. The same temperature should then be used when entering the viscosity / temperature point into the diagram of fig. 1.1 2 .

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1.1.2.5.

Fuel conditioning

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

[mm2/s] 5000 Residual fuel 2000 1000 600 400 300 200 Distillate fuel H

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G A C 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

se
Approx. pumping limit 90

Fuel oil viscosity and temperature Proper atomisation of fuel in the combustion chamber of the engine requires for each fuel oil a specific fuel viscosity. Controlled heating to obtain the corresponding temperatures is required. These temperatures can be determined from the diagram in fig. 1.1 2 . The diagram shows: The viscositytemperature lines for a number of viscosity grades. For residual fuels (ISO RM..) the viscosity is specified at 100C . For distillate fuels (ISO DM..) the viscosity is specified at 40C . The line for 35 mm2/s at 100C, fuel for instance is the one running through points H and E. Other viscosities fuels lines run parallel.

int ern a
60 50 40 30 25 20 16 14 12 10 9 8 7 6 DMC (Max. 14 mm2/s at 40C) DMB (Max. 11 mm2/s at 40C) DMA (Max. 6,0 mm2/s at 40C) 5 DMX (Max. 5,5 mm2/s at 40C) 4 3 10 0 10

100 80

Minimum storage temperature

for

Fig. 1.1 2 Viscosity temperature diagram

on
Centrifuging temperature F B D E 100 110 120

RM55 (Max. 55mm2/s at 100C)

RM45 (Max. 45mm2/s at 100C) RM35 (Max. 35mm2/s at 100C) RM25 (Max. 25mm2/s at 100C) RM15 (Max. 15mm2/s at 100C) RM10 (Max. 10mm2/s at 100C)

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Viscosity range residual fuels before HP fuel pumps Max. temperature before HP fuel pumps 130 [C]

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.1 13

The line with sharp bends through point G, which shows the minimum storage temperature for all viscosity classes. For higher viscosity class fuels a higher storage viscosity is accepted to limit the heating demand. The line with sharp bends through point F, shows the required centrifuging temperature. For viscosity classes higher than 40 mm2/s at 50C a higher centrifuging viscosity than 14 mm2/s is accepted to save heating power. Finally the line turns vertical at 97C because boiling of the sealing and operating water in the centrifuge must be avoided. With further increase of viscosity the throughput through the centrifuge must be reduced for maintaining the required degree of purification. The maximum temperature before the HP fuel pumps is 130 C for fuels of the highest viscosity.

Example: RM35 a fuel with a viscosity of 380 mm2/s at 50C (point A) or 35 mm2/s at 100C (point B):

for

1.1 14

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At 80C (point C) the estimate viscosity is 77 mm 2/s.

Is pumpable above 37C (point H). Minimum storage temperature is 41C (point G). It is advised to keep the fuel about 10C above this temperature.

Centrifuging temperature is 97C (point F). Heating temperature before entering the engine for proper atomisation with a viscosity between the 24 and 16 mm 2/s, is maximum 127C and minimum 112C (point D and E).

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The (horizontal) line at 1000 mm2/s above which pumping is difficult.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

Recommended temperatures, depending on the fuel viscosity, are stated in the diagram, see fig. 1.1 2 . Sufficient heating capacity is needed to make centrifuging at recommended levels possible. The temperature must be controlled on 2C before centrifuge when centrifuging high viscosity fuels with densities approaching or exceeding 0.991 g/ml at 15C. Be sure the correct gravity disc is used. Never exceed the flow rates recommended for the centrifuge for the grade of fuel in use. The lower the flow rate the better the purification efficiency.

Viscosity at 100C Viscosity at 50C

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mm2/s mm2/s 12 100

Recommended centrifuge flow rate 10 40 60 15 25 35 45 55 80 180 380 500 730 40 30 25 20 15

Centrifuge flow % of rated capacity

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Sufficient separating capacity is required. The best and most disturbancefree results are obtained with purifier and clarifier in series. Alternatively the main and standby separators may run in parallel, but this makes heavier demands on correct gravity disc choice and constant flow and temperature control to achieve optimum results. Flow rate through the centrifuges should not exceed the maximum fuel consumption of the engine by more than 10 %. In case pure distillate fuel is used, centrifuging is still recommended as fuel may be contaminated during transport and in storage tanks. The full rated capacity of the centrifuge may be used provided the viscosity is less than 12 mm2/s at centrifuging temperature.

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on

Purification Heavy fuel (residuals, and mixtures of residuals, distillate and DMC) must be purified in an efficient working centrifuge before entering the day tank. The fuel should be heated before centrifuging.

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1.1 15

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

(*) This section must be taken into account for HFO engines only.

The engine is designed for burning HFO. In order to avoid difficulties mind the following points: 1 At all loads the charge air temperature should be kept at design temperature by controlling the LT cooling water temperature. 2 Fuel injection temperature with regard to HFO. For requirements see "Fuel viscosity / temperature in the engine". Poor fuel quality will adversely influence wear, engine component life time and maintenance intervals.

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1.1 16

int ern a

4 Limit low load operation as much as operating conditions permit if fuel is known or suspected to have higher sulphur content above 2 %, carbon content " carbon residue" above 15 % and/or asphaltene content above 8 %. 5 Avoid unstable and incompatible fuels (precipitation of heavy components in the fuel) by avoiding blending of fuels unless the fuels are known to be compatible. Store fuels from different deliveries in separate tanks. If stability and compatibility problems occur never add distillate fuel as this will probably increase precipitation. A fuel additive with highly powerful dispersing characteristics can be of help until a new fuel delivery takes place. 6 Some of the difficulties may occur on heavy fuels blended from cracked residuals, see section 1.1.2.7.

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3 Clean the turbocharger turbine side frequently straight from the beginning. Fuels with high vanadium and sodium contents in unfavourable ratios may lead to rapid contamination of the turbine and higher gas temperatures. In such cases more frequently cleaning is necessary.

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1.1.2.6.

Avoiding difficulties during operation on HFO*

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

1 Viscosity determines the complexity of the fuel heating and handling system, which should be considered when estimating installation economy. The standard engine fuel system is designed for fuels up to the viscosity class 55. 2 When the density exceeds 0.991 g/ml at 15C water, and to some extent solid matter, can no longer be removed with certainty by a centrifuge. Centrifuging systems claiming to clean fuel oils with densities up to 1.010 g/ml at 15C are on the market. If such systems of the so called controlled discharge design are installed, fuels with densities up to 1.010 g/ml at 15C may be used.

Note!

High density fuels with low viscosity may have low ignition quality. 3 Higher sulphur content increases the risk for corrosion and wear, particularly at low loads, and may contribute to hightemperature deposit formation. The lubricating oil specification must be matched to such qualities.

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4 High ash content causes abrasive wear, and may cause high temperature corrosion and contributes to formation of deposits. The most harmful ash constituents are the vanadiumsodium combinations. 5 High vanadium content causes high temperature corrosion on hot parts like exhaust valves, particularly in combination with high sodium content. The corrosion accelerates with increased temperatures (increased engine output). 6 Sodium (Na) contributes to hot corrosion on hot parts like exhaust valves in combination with high vanadium (V) content. Sodium also contributes strongly to fouling of the turbine blading of the turbocharger at high exhaust gas temperature. The permissable content of Na of the cleaned fuel should be below 30 ppm. 7 High "carbon residue" may cause deposit formation in combustion chamber and exhaust system, particularly at low engine output. 8 High content of asphaltenes may contribute to deposit formation in the combustion chamber and exhaust systems (at low loads). Asphaltenes may under certain circumstances precipitate from the fuel and will block filters and/or cause deposits in the fuel system. Precipitating asphaltenes may also cause excessive centrifuge sludge.

9 Heavy fuels may contain up to 1 % water at delivery. Water can originate from the installation bunker tanks. To avoid difficulties in the engine fuel injection system water must be removed.

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1.1.2.7.

Comments on fuel characteristics

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1.1 17

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Ignition quality is not defined nor limited in marine residual fuel standards. The same applies to ISOFDMC marine distillate fuel. The ignition quality of these fuels cannot for a variety of reasons be determined by methods used for pure distillates, i.e. Diesel Index, Cetane Index and Cetane Number. Low ignition quality may cause trouble during starting and at low load operation, especially at too low charge air temperature. This may result in long ignition delay and as a consequence, in high firing pressure rise ratio. The combustion will be more noisy in this case, known as "Diesel knock", i.e. hard, high pitch combustion noise. Diesel knock increases mechanical load on components surrounding the combustion space, increases thermal load, increases lube oil consumption and increases lube oil contamination. Basically a low viscosity, in combination with a high density, will result in a low ignition quality and is expressed in a CCAI value.

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1.1 18

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Fig. 1.1 3 Nomogram for deriving CCAI

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mm2/s at 50 oC kg/m3 at 15 oC

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10 Reduced ignition and combustion quality can be caused by using HFO from modern refinery processes compared with "traditional" heavy fuels. HFO from modern refinery processes may approach at least some of the limits of fuel characteristics.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

CCAI values above 870 are not advised.

Note!

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11 Aluminum + Silicon. Fuels may contain highly abrasive particles composed of aluminium and silicon oxides known as "catalytic fines" from certain refining processes. If not removed by efficient fuel treatment, wear of high pressure fuel pumps, nozzles and cylinder liners can be expected in a few hours.

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Although low ignition quality produces long ignition delay, advancing the ignition timing makes things only worse; fuel is injected at a lower compression temperature and this will produce even longer ignition delay.

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Normal diesel engines should accept CCAI values up to 850 with no difficulties. CCAI values between 850 and 870 may cause difficulties under unfavourable conditions such as low charge air temperatures, insufficient preheating of the engine at the start, malfunctioning of fuel injection system (in particular, badly maintained nozzles).

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What do the CCAI values mean? Straight run residues show CCAI values (Calculated Carbon Aromaticy Index) in the 770 to 840 range and are very good igniters. Cracked residues delivered as bunkers may range from 840 to, in exceptional cases, above 900.

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1.1 19

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

For proper acknoledgement of the specific fuel system please refer to the related diagram which is enclosed in section 3.1.1.

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1.1 20

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General The fuel system on the engine consists of a Low Pressure a High Pressure system and a leakoff fuel system. The systems are basically situated inside the Hot Box. System components are: HP fuel injection pumps Spring loaded fuel injections valves Fuel pipes

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1.1.3.

Internal fuel system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

The High Pressure injection system consists of the High Pressure (HP) fuel pumps, fuel injectors and High Pressure fuel lines. These components are described in chapter 2.9. "Injection system". The clean leakoff fuel from injectors, HP fuel pumps and possible leak from damaged or broken HP fuel lines is drained via connection (103). The clean leak fuel can be pumped to the day tank without treatment. An other possible leakage, the dirty" fuel, has to be drained separately via connections (104) and has to be led to the sludge tank.

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Note!
Fig. 1.1 4 Low pressure fuel pipes

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20

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, tools, intervals, tolerances, inspection, tightening torque and procedures see chapter 2.4.

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21

The Low Pressure systems consists of supply and return connections (101) and (102). Supply and return lines on the HP fuel pumps are (20) and (21), see fig. 1.1 4 .

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1.1 21

Fuel System

Manual Wrtsil 38

As the fuel quantity in the supply and discharge line is relatively large, it is preferred to purge the fuel lines into a waste tank before commencing any maintenance to this system and components. Engines, operating on HFO, should be drained when engine and fuel are still warm. Prior to perform any engine overhaul the fuel system is recommended to be flushed with Light Fuel Oil. 1 Close the supply and return lines to the engine fuel system.

2 Drain the engine fuel system by removing plug (22) from the supply and plug (23) from the return line of the HP fuel pumps.

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22 Fig. 1.1 5 Drain plugs engine fuel system
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23 1.1 22

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1.1.4.

Draining of fuel system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fuel System

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1.2 1

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1.2. Lubricating Oil System

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Under normal operation the engine lubricating oil is exposed to high pressures and temperatures. The oil is often finely divided as a spray or mist, intimately mixed with air and subjected to catalytic effects of various contaminators. The contact with air results in oxidation and the production of gums, resins and acids. Other major contaminators are products of combustion, such as soot, ash and (partially) unburnt fuel mixed with the lubricating oil on the cylinder wall. High sulphur content of the fuel may also accelerate the rate of oil degrading. Some of the poisoning agents can be removed by means of normal filtering; the maintenance of lubricating oil filter devices is therefore an essential activity to prevent oil deterioration. Regular sampling and testing is necessary to determine the oil condition; the samples should be sent to a qualified laboratory for a detailed analysis. The oil manufacturer remains responsible for the quality of the oil under operating conditions. Detecting needs for oil refreshment is under the responsibility of the operator together with the advise of the oil supplier and nogo criteria given by Wrtsil Corporation.

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1.2 2

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Lubricating oil must have a number of physical and chemical qualities which are required for reliable diesel engine operation. Lubricating oil fulfills various functions in an internal combustion engine, in addition to wear prevention it performs a cooling function, it acts as a sealant agent and must also be able to neutralize combustion products on engine parts as well as to remove dirt and general residuals.

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1.2.1.

Lubricants

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

1.2.1.1.1. Main lubricating oil

Main lubricating oil for the engine must be of an approved brand accordingly to the following specifications: Viscosity class : SAE 40 Viscosity index (VI) : Min.95 Alkalinity (BN) : The required lubricating oil alkalinity is linked to the enginerelated fuel specification as mentioned in the table below. Category A B C Fuel standard ISO 8217: 1996(E)

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Remarks Category A and B: If the recommended lube oil BN is not available an approved lube oil with a BN of 2430 can also be used. Category C: If the recommended lube oil BN causes short oil change intervals (fuel with high sulphur content), it is recommended to use lubricating oil with BN 50 55. If experience shows that the lube oil BN equilibrium remains at an acceptable level (fuel with very low sulphur content) lube oil with a BN 30 can also be used. Additives The oil should contain additives that ensures good oxidation stability, corrosion protection, load carrying capacity, neutralisation of acid combustion and oxidation residues and should prevent deposit formation on internal engine parts (piston cooling gallery, piston ring zone and bearing surfaces in particular). Foaming characteristics Fresh lubricating oil should meet the following limits for foaming tendency and stability, according to the ASTM D 89292 test method: Sequence I, II and III : 100/0 ml Base oils Only the use of virgin base oils is allowed, i.e. recycled or rerefined base oils are not allowed. Approved lubricating oils For a list with approved lubricating oils, please contact Wrtsil Corporation. Lubricating oils that are not approved have to be tested according to the engine manufacturers procedures.

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DMX, DMA DMB DMC, RMA10 RMK55

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1.2.1.1.

Requirements

Lube oil BN [mg KOH/g] Required Recommended 10 30 10 22 15 30 15 22 30 55 40

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1.2 3

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating oil, supplied to the engine, must be conditioned: centrifugal separated on water and dirt filtered controlled to the correct temperature. Water content Fineness automatic backflush filter: fine filter safety filter max. % vol

The suction height of the main lubricating oil pump (including pressure losses in the pipes and suction filter): Before any operation the lubricating oil should be at least at preheated condition:

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max. m min. C

1.2.1.1.2. Lubricants additional equipment


Lubricating oil for turning gear For the turning gear lubrication an EPgear oil is recommended, viscosity 400500 cST/40C = ISO VG 460. The lubricating oil is added before the startup procedure. For a list with approved lubricating oils, please contact Wrtsil Corporation. Actuator / Governor Generally a 20W40 multigrade oil can be used; for a proper specification see the related section of the subsupplier manual which deals with recommended oils for hydraulic controls. Oil for hydraulic tools These tools require an oxidation resistant oil with a viscosity of about 45 mm2/s at 40 C. The following oil specifications meets the requirements: ISO hydraulic oil type HM DIN 51525 hydraulic oil type HLP DIN 51585 corrosion test with steel, corrosion degree 0 DIN 51759 corrosion test with copper, corrosion degree 1 ASTM D 665 corrosion test approved.

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Engine lubricating oil system requirements

30 m Absolute mesh size 100 m Absolute mesh size

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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1.2.1.3.

When the engine is in operation under "extreme" conditions the operator should check the oil condition more frequently. The following engine conditions are "extreme" : During the engine runningin period when a relative large quantity of metal wear products are generated and carried by the lubricating oil. After replacement of liners and piston rings, the engine runningin process will produce larger quantities of blowby gas, which consist of contaminating combustion products (sulphur dioxide, water and CO2), and liner and piston ring wear products. Wide fluctuations in engine load create more blowby. A bad fuel combustion process caused by bad condition of injectors and/or fuel pumps and insufficient scavenging air pressure. A fuel oil quality with a CCAI > 850. A frequent engine overhaul introduces a relative high percentage of dirt into the crankcase. A delayed engine maintenance determines the risk of water and fuel oil entering the lubricating oil. Eccessive clearance between piston and liner, due to wear, increases the quantity of blowby gas. Frequently cold starts. An high sulphur content in fuel (> 3% ) which causes fast BN depletion.

It is the duty of the operator to monitor the behaviour of the lubricating oil carefully and at regular intervals in order to ensure the oil remains in a good condition; that is especially necessary when a new engine is put into operation, when a change is made in the brand of selected oil or when the oil is taken from a batch with different composition. However it is not advised to mix different types of lubricating oil and, eventually, in such a case always consult the lubricating oil supplier. Always follow the instructions of the supplier while testing the quality of lubricating oils. On a new engine or after a major overhaul it is advised to sample the lubricating oil at intervals of 250 operating hours and send it to a qualified laboratory. On the basis of the results it is possible to determine suitable intervals.

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Testing of main lubricating oil

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1.2.1.2.

Influences on the lubricating oil condition

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1.2 5

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Information required for oil analysis 1 Name of vessel or plant 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Owners Date of sampling Date and place

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1.2 6

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Running hours of the engine.

Oil brand, product name, nominal viscosity Hours lubricating oil in service Engine model, manufacturer and serial number Position of sample drawing in lubrication oil system

10 Type of fuel oil used including sulphur content 11 Date of previous sample drawn from the same source 12 Quantity of lubricating oil in system and top up

13 Any special reasons for the analysis sampling being if required out of routine schedule Unacceptable sampling An unsatisfactory sample will be the result if oil is drawn from areas of stagnation or where little flow is occurring. These places are: Sumps Auxiliary / smaller pipelines Purifier suction lines or discharge lines Drain plugs of filters, coolers etc. Samples drawn from those points will not be representative for the bulk of the oil in the active circulation.

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Recommendations for sampling Samples should be drawn from the sampling valve which is specifically fitted for this purpose. Ensure the total quantity of oil in circulation is approximately the same before drawing each sample. Draw samples only when the engine is running and the oil is at normal operating temperature. Before filling the sampling container open the sampling cock and drain some oil to make sure that it is flushed and hot oil is flowing slowly from the outlet point. Draw oil samples directly into clean, dry onelitre capacity containers. Draw a sample during a period of about ten minutes. Shake the sample thoroughly before pouring into the sample bottle which is provided for this purpose; the bottle should not be filled over 90% of its content.

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Lubricating Oil System

On basis of test results it can be determined whether lubricating oil is suitable for further use.

Condemning limits for used lubricating oil Property Viscosity Viscosity Water Unit Limit Test method cSt at 40 C cSt at 100 C vol% max. 25% decrease ASTM D 445 max. 45% increase max. 20% decrease ASTM D 445 max. 25% increase max. 0.30 ASTM D 96 or ASTM D 1744

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Base Number mg KOH/g Insolubles Flash Point, PMCC Flash Point, COC C C

w% in nPentane

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max.

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2.0 min. 170 min. 190

Condemning limits for main lubrication oil While estimating the inuse lubricating oil condition the following properties must be noted with reference to the corresponding limit values. If the mesured values are exceeding the limits, notes will be taken. Compare the condition also with reference to guidance values for fresh lubricating oil of the same brand and type which is currently used.

min. 20 for HFO ASTM D 2896 operation max. 50% depletion for LFO operation ASTM D 893b ASTM D 93 ASTM D 92

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1.2.1.4.

Condemning limits for main lubricating oil

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1.2 7

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

Selfcleaning defective separators can, under certain circumstances, quickly increase the water content of the oil. 2 Flash point At 150 C a serious risk of a crankcase explosion exists.

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1.2 8

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3 Water content Lubricating oil with a high water content must be purified or discarded.

4 Choose BN according to our recommendations. A too low BN value increases the risk of corrosion and contamination of the engine components. 5 Insolubles The quantity of allowed insolubles depends on various factors, the oil supplier s recommendations should be closely followed. 1.5% Insolubles in nPentane require actions, however, it can be said that changes in the analyses usually give a better basis for estimation than the absolute values. Rapid and big changes of insolubles may indicate abnormal operation of the engine or system. 6 Wear metal sudden increase is going to indicate an abnormal wear. Immediate actions should be taken to find the cause. If necessary contact the oil supplier and/or the engine manufacturer

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1 Centrifuging of the system oil is required in order to separate water and insolubles from the oil. Do not supply water during purifying. The oil should be preheated till 8090C. Many oil manufacturers recommend a separation temperature of 8595C for an effective separation. Please check with the supplier of your lubricating oil for the optimal temperature. Select the highest recommended temperature. For efficient centrifuging, use not more than 20% of the rated flow capacity of the separator. For optimum conditions, the centrifuge should be capable of treating the entire oil quantity in circulation 45 times every 24 hour at 20% of rated flow. The gravity disc should be selected according to the oil density at separation temperature.

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1.2.1.5.

Comments on lubricating oil characteristics

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

9 Daily top up of the circulating tank/wet sump will extend the life time of the lubricating oil.

Note!

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2 4

Utmost cleaning should be observed during lubricating oil treatment. Dirt, metal particles, rags etc. may cause serious bearing damages. After disconnecting pipes or components from the system, cover openings with gaskets and/or tape them all. Avoid dirt and water enter the lubricating oil during transport and storage. 1 Drain the oil system when the oil is hot. Be sure oil filters, coolers and external pipes have also been got empty. Use service air to empty coolers and pipes. Clean oil spaces including filters and camshaft compartment.

3 Check if filter elements from external system are clean and undamaged. Supply the required quantity of oil into the system. 5 The oil refreshment interval can efficiently be predicted by plotting the analyses taken at regular intervals. Copies of the lubrication oil analysis should be archived for at least 12,000 running hours of the engine.

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1.2.1.6.

Recommendations for refreshing lubricating oil

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8 Intervals between changes are influenced by system capacity (oil volume), operating conditions, fuel oil quality, centrifuging efficiency and total oil consumption. Efficient centrifuging in combination with large systems (dry sump operation) generally allow longer intervals between changes.

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7 Measure and record the quantity which is added to compensate the oil consumption. Wise attention to lubricating oil consumption may give valuable information about the engine condition. A continuous increase may indicate wear of piston rings, pistons and cylinder liners. A sudden increase demands inspection of pistons, at least, if no reason else is found.

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1.2 9

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

For proper acknoledgement of the specific lubricating oil system please refer to the related diagram which is enclosed in section 3.1.1. The lubricating oil system is build on the engine. The main oil supply manifold is integrated in the engine block and takes care for the lubricating oil supply at the lower part of the engine. For the lubrication of the upper part, the system is provided with external pipes. During runningin the engine is protected against dirt by means of the runningin filters. Main lubricating oil system components builton the engine are: Lubricating oil module with automatic backflush filter, lubricating oil cooler and thermostatic valves. Centrifugal filter. Dry sump. Engine driven main lubricating oil pump with combined pressure control valve and safety valve. Prelubricating oil pump. Sampling valve. Crankcase air breather. Oil mist detector. Explosion valves.

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1.2 10

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Note!

For maintenance background information , safety aspects, tools, intervals, tolerances, inspection, tightening torque and procedures see chapter 2.4

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1.2.2.

Internal lubricating oil system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

the manifold supplies the oil to the lower part of the engine, See section 1.2.2.1. for detailed description of oil flow for: crankshaft main and axial bearings connecting rods and pistons gear wheel of pump drives at the free end camshaft axial bearing actuator drive

intermediate gearwheel for camshaft drive

From manifold the flow is branched towards the upper part of the engine for the lubricating oil supply to: turbocharger bearings camshaft bearings fuel pump drive valve drive

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cylinder heads with valve lifting gear

See section 1.2.2.2. for detailed description. After lubricating and cooling of the engine parts the oil is collected in the dry sump and reaches an external wet sump through the connection (202) . Only components builton the engine are described in this chapter, external components are not dealt in this manual.

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1.2 11

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Lubricating oil is taken from an external sump via connection (203) and is forced to the lubricate oil module. In the module the lubricating oil is cooled to the correct temperature and filtered. For function description of the oil module, see section 1.2.3.3. From the module the lubricating oil is directed to the main oil supply manifold which is integrated in the engine block.

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

25

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20 6

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20 Fig. 1.2 1 Runningin filter main bearing

Note!

It is recommended to install runningin filters after a major overhaul and damages which can lead to the possibility of dirt in the internal lubricating oil system. Remove them after nearly 100 running hours.

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1.2 12

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Oil supply via runningin filter The lube oil flowing from manifold to each main bearing, passes a runningin filter (see fig. 1.2 1 ). They have to be used after a major overhaul and removed after nearly 100 running hours. To remove the runningin filter, turn it out of the supply line and mount cover (25) with Oring and retaining ring . If a filter get clogged within the first 100 running hours, the lube oil supply will be guaranteed by a spring loaded by-pass valve in the filter.

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1.2.2.1.

Oil flow lower part of the engine

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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Fig. 1.2 2 Oil flow main bearing

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Oil flow main bearing Lubricating oil in the manifold (20) flows via a horizontal and vertical bore into groove (27) of the engine block, see fig. 1.2 2 . A portion of the upper main bearing shell is provided with large size holes where the oil flows towards the main bearing and the crankshaft.

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20 27 28 1.2 13

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Via large size holes in the lower big end bearing shell the oil flows into a circumferential groove (29), see fig. 1.2 3 , which is situated in the bearing cap and partly in the upper part of the connecting rod big end. From that place the oil is provided up to the gudgeon pin bearing (30) through an horizontal groove and a vertical hole in the connecting rod.

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Fig. 1.2 3 Oil flow connecting rod 1.2 14

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30 29

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Connecting rod oil flow Via a "cross-over" channel (28) in the crankshaft (see fig.1.2 2 ) the oil flows from the main bearing journal to the crankpin journal and big end bearings.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

The oil is discharged into 4 vertical holes (32) in the piston skirt. At the end of the vertical drillings the lubricating oil flow is restricted by orifices (34) in order to control the oil quantity for piston crown cooling. The oil spray from four horizontal holes (33) takes care of the lubrication for the liner, the piston skirt and the piston rings. The excess of lubricating oil on the liner is scraped off by the scraper ring and drained via a groove, below the scraper ring, through holes in piston skirt down to the crank case. After passing the restrictions (34) in top of the piston skirt the lubricating oil enters the outer space (35) of the piston crown. The outer space is separated from the center space by a rim in which there are two rows of holes. Due to these holes the outer crown space is always partly filled with oil. Due to the piston movement the lubricating oil is shaken resulting in intensively cooling the piston crown. The displaced oil flows to the center section (36) of the piston crown. A second shaker action takes place for cooling the center of the crown. From that place the oil runs down into the engine sump.

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Fig. 1.2 4 Oil flow piston

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35 36 34 33 32 31

Piston oil flow By means of holes in the middle of the gudgeon pin the oil enters a distribution space (31) and leaves via holes at both outer ends. (See fig.1.2 4 )

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1.2 15

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The gearwheel is provided with 4 radial holes (39) for the lubrication of the gearwheel teeths. The outer end of the radial holes are provided with calibrated holes for a proper oil spray.

43

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42 40 39

37

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1.2 16

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Fig. 1.2 5 Pump drive oil flow Intermediate (PTO) shaft bearing oil flow When the intermediate shaft is installed on the engine at the free end for an additional power take off device, the lubricating oil flow for the related bearings is taken via an horizontal drilling on the crankshaft (37). One more horizontal drilling (40) in the intermediate shaft (41) supplies the oil to the bearings through 4 radial holes (42). The assembly described in the fig. 1.2 5 is also built with a filling plate instead of the vibration damper (43) depending on the engine operation frequencies.

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Pump drive oil flow Via an horizontal drilling (37) in the crankshaft, see fig. 1.2 5 , the oil flows from the last main bearing journal to the driving gearwheel (38) of the pump.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

Intermediate gear wheel oil flow

Part of the lubricating oil flow is branched at (40) for the lubrication of the intermediate gearwheels (41), see fig. 1.2 6 . Both gearwheels are provided with 4 radial holes for the lubrication of the gearwheel teeths. The outer end of the radial holes are provided with calibrated holes for a proper oil spary.

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41 40 Fig. 1.2 6 Oil flow gear drive 1.2 17

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Axial camshaft bearing and actuator drive oil flow

A part of the lubricating oil flow which is branched at (40), see fig. 1.2 6 , enters at (45), see fig. 1.2 7 , for the lubrication of the camshaft zero bearing (42), the axial bearing rings (43), the actuator drive (44) and is finally drained via (46) down to the engine sump.

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1.2 18

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45 46 Fig. 1.2 7 Axial camshaft bearing oil flow

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42 43 44

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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20 14

Fig. 1.2 8 Runningin filter

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22 1.2 19

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Engine upper part oil flow via runningin filter The lube oil, which is flowing from manifold (20) (see fig. 1.2 8 ), is supplied to an aluminium manifold (22) through a runningin filter (14) for lubrication of the upper part of the engine. The runningin filter must be removed after the first 100 running hours or after every major overhaul of the engine. If the filter is going to get clogged within the first 100 running hours, the lube oil supply will be guaranteed by a spring loaded by-pass valve in the filter. After the runningin filter removal, replaced it with the proper oil supply pipe sealed with Orings.

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1.2.2.2.

Upper part of the engine oil flow

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Drive HP fuel pump/valves/camshaft oil flow

From the aluminium manifold the lubricating oil is branched at (47) (see fig. 1.2 9 ) for the lubrication of the camshaft bearing (48), the HP fuel pump tappet (49) and push rod (50) of the fuel pump drive. The lubricating oil in manifold (22) is also branched at (51) for lubrication of the the valve drive tappets (52). A pipe connection at (53) provides the cylinder head components with oil. (See fig. 1.2 9 ). 50 47 52 53 51 47

49

48

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Fig. 1.2 9 Oil flow for drive HP fuel pump/valves and camshaft

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48

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

Cylinder head (with valve lifting gear) oil flow

The lubricating oil while leaving the engine block at (53) (See fig1.2 9 ), enters the cylinder head at (54) (See fig. 1.2 10 ). The lubricated components are the rocker arms and shaft (55), the pivots for push rod (56), the bridge pieces (57), the valve rotators (58), the valves and related guides (59). 54 55 57 58 59

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Fig. 1.2 10 Oil flow cylinder head

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56 1.2 21

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.2.3.1.

Lubricating oil pump unit

The lubricating oil pump unit seen from engine side is shown in fig. 1.2 11 .

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64 60 65 63 Fig. 1.2 11 Lubricating oil pump unit 1.2 22

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The combined pressure control and safety valve (16/15) with overflow connection (63) are built-on the junction box (61), for description and maintenance see section 1.2.3.1.1.

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The lubricating oil pump (1) is driven through gearwheel (60). To avoid reversed flow during engine prelubricating by a stand by pump or by a prelubrication pump via connection (62), a non return valve (10) is mounted.

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16/15 62 61

1.2.3.

Components of internal system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

2 By means of a crane and a sling, the lubricating oil pump unit can be supported. 3 Remove all bolts (64) and (65), see fig. 1.2 11 . 4 Take the lubricating oil pump unit from the engine by a crane and a sling. Dismantling pump 5 Remove the junction box (61) including the built-on pressure control unit (16/15) and the overflow connection (63), see fig. 1.2 11 . 6 Remove the non return valve (10). 7 Remove the gear wheel (60) by removing the bolts (66) and the gland (67) by knocking on the gear wheel shaft hub 68). 8 Remove the pump driveend cover (69) and both shafts (68) (70) out from the pump housing (71), see fig. 1.2 12 . 9 Remove the pump front cover (72).

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60 67 66 76 68 69

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75 73 70

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71

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74

Removing pump unit from engine 1 Remove the pipe sections which are connected to the lubricating oil pump unit.

Fig. 1.2 12 Gearwheel pump

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72 1.2 23

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

2 Check the bearings and the shafts for wear and other possible damages. 3 Inspect the housing and the cover faces for scoring and damages. 4 If necessary replace the bearings accordingly the planned maintenance. 5 Replace the O-rings (73) (74). 6 Install both shafts in the pump housing and mount both covers. A wrong assembling of the pump driving cover is avoided by dowels (75). 7 First place the gear wheel (60) over pump shaft (68) and then the clamping rings (76), the inner ring first; finally place the gland (67) accordingly to fig. 1.2 12 .

Note!

Mind the correct position of the clamping rings. 8 Fit the bolts (66) and tighten them evenly in steps of 10 Nm. For final torque, see chapter 2.4.

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1.2 24

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3 4 5 7 9

Check if the shafts are free turning.

Mounting the pump unit on engine 1 Install the non return valve (10), mind the flow direction, renew all the O-rings, between the lubricating oil pump (1) and the junction box (61), see fig. 1.2 11 . 2 Clean the flange connections of the pump (1), the overflow connection (63) and the engine connections. Renew the O-ring in the overflow connection (63) to the engine sump. Lift the lubricating oil pump unit by the crane and the sling. Place the pump unit close in touch to the engine.

6 Fasten the flange bolts (64) evenly in steps till the final torque mentioned in chapter 2.4. Fasten the flange bolts (65) of the overflow connection (63). 8 After the pump unit mounting onto the engine, check the backlash of the pump drive. Fit all the pipe connections to the lubricating oil pump unit. 10 Prelubricate and check the pump components for leaks.

11 Run the engine on nominal rpm without load and check the lubricating oil pressure.

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Pump inspection and assembling 1 Clean all the components.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

1.2.3.1.1. Pressure control unit

The pressure control unit, see fig.1.2 11 and fig. 1.2 13 , avoids oil pressure pulses due to variations of the pump screw revolution speed and/or the lubricating oil viscosity. The unit consists of a housing, a pressure control valve (16) and a spring (77) which is factory adjusted by bolt (78). The reference pressure (79) for the control valve is the pressure at the end of the engine lubricating oil manifold. A safety valve (14) is integrated and factory adjusted.

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16

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release to engine sump 77

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79

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oil pressure from pump

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Warning!
2 4

Fig. 1.2 13 Pressure control and safety valve unit Maintenance 1 Measure and note the X value, see fig. 1.2 13 .

Take good care for the strong spring tension of spring (77) when removing cover (80).

Remove the pressure control valve (16) and the safety valve (15).

3 Clean all the parts and check for wear. Replace the worn or damaged parts. Check if the pressure control valve moves freely in the unit.

5 Renew the Oring and the sealing rings. Fit all the parts back in the unit. 6 Make sure the X value is the same as that measured before maintenance actions, see fig. 1.2 13 .

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x

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Manual Wrtsil 38

80 78

1.2 25

Between the discharge of the prelubricating oil pump and the junction box (61) (see fig. 1.2 11 ) a non return valve (05.1) is mounted in order to avoid a reversed flow. The prelubricating oil pump runs if the engine is in the start mode with the standby function switched on, furthermore, before and during the engine starting procedure or when the engine has been out of operation for a long time. The suction height of the builton prelubricating pump (including pressure losses in the pipes) should not exceed 3.5 m.

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05.1 Fig. 1.2 14 Prelubricating oil pump 1.2 26

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81 82

The prelubricating oil pump (09), (see fig. 1.2 14 ) is an electric motor driven gearwheel pump, its equipped with a safety overflow valve. Lubricating oil is taken from an external sump via the connection (207) and is forced to the lubricate oil module. The pump and the electric motor (81) are both mounted on the pump drive house (82) and connected to each other by a flexible coupling. Check, through the inspection slot in the pump drive house, if the clearance on both sides of the coupling is 3 mm.

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09

1.2.3.2.

Prelubricating oil pump

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

The lubricating oil module is mounted on the rear of the engine and comprises a lubricating oil cooler (04), the thermostatic valves (02) and an automatic backflushing filter (03). See fig. 1.2 15 .

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87

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93 91 96 92 83

1.2.3.3.

Lubricating oil module

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03 90 02

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04 Fig. 1.2 15 Lubricating oil module

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88 94 95 1.2 27

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.2.3.3.1. Flows through the lubricating oil module

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85 83

88

87

86

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02 84

89 90

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Lubricating oil flow through the cooler The lubricating oil enters the module at (83) and is directed into the bypass branch (84) where it is split into two flows, the former which is remaining in the bypass branch and the latter which is directed over the outside of the cooler tubes (85) to branch (86). See fig. 1.2 16 and fig. 1.2 15 . The lubricating oil from branch (84) and the cooled lubricating oil from branch (86) are mixed by the thermostats (02) and, at the required temperature, discharged at (87). From the outlet (87) the oil is directed to the build on automatic backflushing filter (03).See fig. 1.2 15 . After passing the filter, the clean lubricating oil returns at (88), flows through a passage behind the thermostatic unit (89) and leaves the module at (90) towards the engine. 86

Fig. 1.2 16 Lubricating oil flow through the cooler

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1.2 28

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84 85

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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89 Fig. 1.2 17 LT cooling water flow through the cooler

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LT cooling water flow through the cooler The LT cooling water, returning from the charge air cooler, enters the module at (91), flows through a passage behind the thermostatic unit (89) to the cooler (04) where it is forced through the cooling water tubes and leaves the module at (92). See fig.1.2 15 and fig. 1.2 17 .

91

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04 1.2 29

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92

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The LT cooling water, on its way from the LT cooling water pump to the charge air cooler, flows through a passage incorporated in the module. It enters the module at (95) and leaves the module behind the thermostatic unit at (96). See fig. 1.2 18 and fig. 1.2 15 .

94

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Fig. 1.2 18 Cooling water flows not through the cooler

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93

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95

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1.2 30

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96 94 95

The module used as connection piece for cooling water flows The HT cooling water, on its way from the charge air cooler to the external cooling water cooler, flows through a passage incorporated in the module. It enters the module behind the thermostatic unit (89) at (93) and leaves the module at (94). See fig. 1.2 18 and fig. 1.2 15 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

1.2.3.3.2. Lubricating oil cooler

103

102

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110 105 17 104 110 108 107 109 107 101 03 98 97 100 99 103 111 106 112 108 107 Fig. 1.2 19 Lubricating oil cooler

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102

Removing the cooler stack 1 Drain the LT cooling water system at (97) and the HT cooling water system at (98) and collect the water. See fig. 1.2 19 . Drain also the piping from and to the lubricating oil unit. 2 Drain the lubricating oil by removing the drain plug (99) and by opening the sampling valve (17), drain also the manifold (20) (See fig. 1.2 19 ) by removing the plug at the end of the manifold at driving end. 3 Remove the HT and LT cooling water pipes and the lubricating oil pipes from the cooler.

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103 102 1.2 31

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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1.2 32

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Note!

12 Remove the visible Orings (108) on both sides of the cooler stack housing . 13 To allow the removal of the remaining Orings (109) from the cooler stack, the cooler must be partly pushed out of the cooler housing side by side in both directions. 14 To prevent damages, support the cooler stack end plate (110) while pushing the cooler stack out of the cooler housing. 15 For cleaning of the water side, the charge air cooler cleaning instructions can be used, see section 1.5. For repair instructions, see chapter 1.5. Cooler stack tubes can not be exchanged

Mounting the lubricating oil cooler stack 1 Clean the cooler housing carefully and check if the locations of the Orings are clean and without damages, see fig. 1.2 19 . 2 Support both cooler stack end plates with a crane and a sling while lifting the cooler stack carefully into the cooler housing. Mind the position of the locating pin (111) counter hole in the cooler stack end plate corresponds with the position of cover side (106) ,see fig. 1.2 19 . 3 Fit one Oring (109), see fig. 1.2 19 with silicon grease on the end plate of the cooler stack. Check if the Oring is without damages. 4 Push the cooler stack with the Oring side into the cooler housing till both Oring grooves at the other side are visible.

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4 Remove the lubricating oil pipe (100) from the automatic backflush filter (03) and disconnect the electric wiring from the pressure difference indicator (101). See fig. 1.2 19 . 5 Fit two eye bolts (M30) on the top side of the cooler housing and support the module by using a crane and a sling before the removal of the entire lubrication oil module from the engine block. 6 The module is mounted on the engine block with eight M16 bolts. First remove the six bolts (102) at the side of the engine block before removing the two bolts (103) at the top of the engine block. 7 Take good care the weight of the module is taken by the crane and afterwards remove the two bolts (103). 8 Lift the module from the engine block. 9 First remove the two bolts (104) at the bottom side of the cooler before placing the module with the cooler section onto two wooden beams. 10 Remove the thermostat cover" (105) with built on automatic backflush filter (03) and remove cover (106). 11 Remove the filling plates gaskets (107) at both sides.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

6 Pull the cooler stack into position and check the pin counter hole (111) is matching on cover (27). 7 Fit at both sides Orings (108) with silicon grease. Check if the Orings are without damages. 8 Place the three gasketlocating plates (107) at nonthermostat" side.

Note!

The free spaces between the gasketlocating plates form telltale channels for leaking fluid in case one of the Orings is leaking. 9 Place the Oring (112) in the "nonthermostat cover". Check if the Oring is without damages. 10 Place and tighten the "nonthermostat cover" (106). 11 Place the Oring in the "thermostat cover". Check if the Oring is without damages.

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12 Place the three gasketfilling plates (107) at thermostat" side.

13 Place and tighten the "thermostat cover" with built on automatic backflush filter(4). 14 Lift the entire lubrication oil module by using a crane and a hoisting sling and mount the two bolts (104) at the bottom side of the cooler before placing the module onto the engine block. 15 First tighten the two bolts (103) at the top of the engine block by hand. 16 Tighten the 6 bolts (102) at the module side. 17 Tighten the two bolts (103) at the top of the engine block.

18 Connect the HT and LT cooling water pipes and the lubricating oil pipes to the cooler. Connect the lubricating oil pipe (100) to the automatic backflush filter (03) and connect the electric wiring.

19 Replace the water and oil drain plugs and close the sampling valve (17). 20 Start the prelubrication oil pump and check for leaks and verify the oil level. 21 Fill the cooling water system and check for leaks and verify the water level.

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The gasketlocating plates (107) at nonthermostat" side should fit into a groove between the two Orings (108) and (109) to locate the position of the cooler stack in the cooler housing.

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5 Fit the other Oring (108) at this side and use silicon grease. Check if the Oring is without damages.

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1.2 33

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.2.3.3.3. Thermostatic valve

The lubricating oil temperature is controlled by thermostatic valves (7) to keep it at the proper value at engine inlet, See fig. 1.2 20 . Thermostatic valves in closed position: The top side figure at the left side shows the thermostatic valve position with cold lubricating oil. The thermostatic valves are closed for oil from the cooler at (86). Oil from the cooler by-pass (84) flows via the thermostatic valves (7) and the channel (87) to the automatic backflush filter. Thermostatic valves in open position: The top side figure at the right side shows the thermostatic valves position with hot lubricating oil. The thermostatic valves are open for oil from the cooler at (86). Oil from the cooler enters at (86) and flows via the thermostatic valves (7) and the channel (87) to the automatic backflush filter. Operation The cooling systems will usually operate in a small range around nominal temperature. Any system, which is operating at temperatures with a deviation of 6C or more from the nominal one, is probably malfunctioning. The cause should be identified and fixed immediately. Maintenance It is advised to check periodically the correct working range of the elements. That can be done by slowly heating the elements in a bucket with water while measuring the water temperature. Replace elements out of range. The nominal temperature range is mentioned on the elements themselves.

Warning!

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1.2 34

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The elements exposed to temperatures 10C above the maximum working range, which are harmful for the wax elements, should be renewed.

Trouble shooting If the cooling system does not operate near to the operating temperature see section 2.3.3.7. Operating troubles.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

115 116

88

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86 88 84 90 02

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87 114

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113 90 02

Fig. 1.2 20 Thermostatic valve

1.2.3.3.4. The thermostatic valves removal / mounting


1 Drain the lubricating oil by removing the plug (113) and remove the cover (114). See fig. 1.2 20 . 2 Remove the two bolts M6 of the sleeve (115) and place two M8 bolts instead to loosen the sleeve. Remove the thermostatic valve(s) 3 Check the valve and the sleeve. Renew the Oring (116) and fit valve, sleeve, cover and plug. Run the prelubricating oil pump and check for leaks .

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87 86 84 1.2 35

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Manual Wrtsil 38

1.2.3.3.5. Automatic backflushing filter

03

105

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1.2 36

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06 Fig. 1.2 21 Automatic backflushing filter

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General The automatic backflushing filter (3), see fig. 1.2 21 is mounted on the "thermostat cover"(105) of the lubrication oil cooler. The filter works with permanent backflushing using its own process fluid. No external power is required to operate the automatic filter. The solids caught during continuous backflushing are filtered out by the centrifugal filter (6). The filtered backflushed oil is fed back via the centrifugal filter (34) into the engine sump.

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Lubricating Oil System

120

118

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88

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119 117 87

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Fig. 1.2 22 Automatic backflushing filter (Filtration phase) Filtration phase The oil to be filtered enters through inlet (87) and passes the turbine (117). After the turbine the oil enters the filter candles (118) at both ends. Direct at the right side and via the central connection tube (119) at the left side. The oil flows from the inside to the outside while leaving most of the dirt particles at the inside of the filter candles (118). The fluid filtered in this way now passes through the protective filter (120) to the filter outlet (88).

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1.2 37

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

132

126

118 132

124 132 131

129

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130

Fig. 1.2 23 Automatic backflushing filter (Back flushing phase)

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1.2 38

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Back flushing phase The oil flow energy drives the turbine (117) installed in the inlet flange (87). The high speed of the turbine (117) is reduced by the worm gear unit (122) and the gear (123) to the lower speed required for turning the flushing arm (124). The individual filter candles (118) are now connected successively via the continuously rotating flushing arm (124), the flushing bush (125) and the centrifugal filter (5), see fig. 1.2 21 to the engine sump. The lower pressure in the interior of the filter candles (118) during the backflushing operation and the higher pressure outside the filter candles (118) produce a counterflow through the mesh from the clean filter side via the dirty filter side to the centrifugal filter (5), see fig. 1.2 21 . The counterflow together with the crossflow (unfiltered oil entering the top side of the filter candles (118)) result in an efficient cleaning action. The rotary motion of the flushing facility can be seen at the visible shaft end (132) in the left filter cover (126).

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122 125

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

121

120

118

Fig. 1.2 24 Automatic backflushing filter (Overflow valves)

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Note!

Functioning of the overflow valves If the filter candles (118) (first filter stage) shouldnt be adequately cleaned any longer for whatever reason, the overflow valves (121) are opened at a differential pressure of 2 bar upwards and all the fluid is filtered through the protective filter (120) (second filter stage).

However, before this situation arises, the installed differential pressure indicator (101), see fig. 1.2 19 emits a differential pressure warning. The cause must now be identified and fixed.

The filter may only be operated in this emergency condition for a short time (opened overflow valves and differential pressure warning). Prolonged operation in this mode can result in damages to engine components. The overflow valves are closed under normal operating conditions, even during startup at lower fluid temperatures.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

120

123

122 127

127

118 124

Fig. 1.2 25 Automatic backflushing filter (Maintenance)

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1.2 40

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1 2 3

Maintenance Even with automatic filters, inspections and maintenances must be performed at regular intervals. It is important to remember that, in spite of constant backflushing, the mesh may become clogged depending on the quality of the fluid. In order to maintain a troublefree operation, the following aspects must be observed during maintenance: The filter must be switched off for all maintenance works. Check the filter and connections for leaks. Have a visual inspection of all the filter candles (118) once a year.

Note!

If a higher differential pressure occurs beforehand, all the filter candles (118) and the protective filter (120) must be checked and, if necessary, cleaned. See also the section: filter candle inspection and cleaning.

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117

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

Warning!

A highly contaminated protective filter (120) is a sign of prolonged operation with defective or clogged filter candles (118) and thus opened overflow valves (121), see fig.1.2 24 . It is necessary to check these components.

Note!

It is recommended to replace the filter candles (118) after 2 years.

Note!

A longer use is also possible if the filter candles (118) are checked carefully. 6 Replace the dynamic loaded seals (129), see fig.1.2 23 when required. It is advisable to replace all static seals during an overhaul.

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To have that check the cover (127) must be removed. Now check the free movement with a suitable spanner on the hexagon of the worm gear unit (128), see fig. 1.2 25 . If the movement is sluggish, refer to section: Sources of faults and their remedy.

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4 Check the turbine (117) for a free movement as well as the worm gear unit (122) and the included gear (123) with flushing arm (124).

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1.2 41

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Filter candle inspection and cleaning 1 2 Drain the filter by means of the drain screw.

Remove the left cover (126). see fig.1.2 23 .

3 Pull the entire filter element including the flushing arm (124) and the gear (123) out of the housing.

Note!

Make sure that the exposed gear (123) is not damaged. 4 Remove the upper cover plate (130).

5 The filter candles (118) can now be pushed out from below or pulled out from above. 6 Place the filter candles (118) in a cold solventfree cleaner, max. soaking time 24 hours.

Note!

the filter candles must be ensured to be cleaned at a pressure of max. 60 bar and at a minimum distance of 20 cm from the cleaning nozzle. Otherwise, damages could occur to the mesh. 8 Before the filter candles (118) are installed, they must be visually inspected and the damaged candles replaced by new ones. Defective filter candles (118) must not be used anylonger.

Warning!

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1.2 42

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Note! Note!

During maintenance take good care that the outside of the protective filter (120) is the clean side, see fig.1.2 24 .

Before the installation of the entire filter element, the free motion of the flushing facility must be checked. The flushing arm (124) must not grind against the bottom filter plate (131) 9 Now push the entire filter element into the housing. The gear (123) is forced into the drive pinion of the gear unit (122) by slightly turning the flushing shaft (132). 10 The filter reassembling must be performed following a reverse actions sequence.

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7 After immersing the filter candles (118), clean them from the outside inwards using high pressure.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

1.2.3.3.6.

Sources of faults and their remedy Fault Cause Viscosity too high High volume of dirt

Reasons and remedy

Filter candles clogged Flushing volume too low

Shaft end does not turn

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Wait for normal operating conditions Check bypass treatment unit (centrifugal filter) Clean candles Check flow control device in outlet and sludge discharge line for clogging Turbine jammed Remove parts jammed between turbine and wall Gear unit defective Check for free movement (see section Maintenance) Replace gear unit if necessary Flushing arm (41) jammed, Remove any foreign matter

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quantity

Operating pressure < 2 bar Run for prolonged period at higher pressure 56 bar and thus eliminate the blockage Oil quantity too low / Increase oil

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Trouble shooting automatic backflushing filter

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1.2 43

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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12 1.2 44

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135 Fig. 1.2 26 Centrifugal filter on engine

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134

The centrifugal filter is mounted on the engine as a part of the engine filter system. The centrifugal filter starts working when the engine runs and lubricating oil feed valve (12) is open for supply from the back flush filter at (134) and for supply to the centrifugal drive at (135), see fig. 1.2 26 . The valve is open with the lever in the horizontal position ("ON"). For maintenance of the filter, switch over valve (12) to the vertical position ("SERVICE") to close the oil supply to the filter and to open the drain hole (146) see fig. 1.2 27 , to the engine sump.

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1.2.3.4.

Centrifugal filter

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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1.2 45

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Operation The filter comprises a housing (136) in which a dynamically balanced rotor unit (137), with a hardened steel spindle, (138) rotates. The rotor comprises a cleaning chamber(139) and an outlet chamber (140). The oil flow at connection (141)) from the back flush filter enters at the inner side of the spindle (138) and flows to the cleaning chamber (139). Then the oil passes from the cleaning chamber to the outlet chamber (140), with outlet holes (142), at the lower part of the rotor. The oil flow, directed at connection (143) from the lubricating oil pump, drives a pelton turbine wheel (144) which is connected to the spindle. Due to the high speed of the rotor, the oil is subjected to a high centrifugal force inside the cleaning chamber (139). The dirt particles will form a deposit of heavy sludge on the wall (137) of the rotor. The clean oil, from the outlet holes (145) and the oil from the turbine wheel drive, returns to the engine oil sump via drain hole (146) of the filter housing back.

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

149 150 148 137 139

140 142 144

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141

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145 147

136

146

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1.2 46

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143

Fig. 1.2 27 Centrifugal filter

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

Filter cleaning

Note!

Clean more frequently if the filter has collected the maximum quantity of dirt (the dirt deposit layer is 25mm thick) within the recommended cleaning interval (weekly).

2 Open and slacken the cover clamp (147). Remove the cover (148), see fig. 1.2 27 3 Lift off the rotor unit (137) together with the spindle (138). Hold the rotor body and remove the rotor cover nut (149). Remove the rotor cover (150) and the rotor wall (137) from the rotor bottom. 4 Remove sludge from the rotor cover and the inside of the rotor body by means of a wooden spatula or suitably shaped piece of wood and wipe clean. Ensure all rotor components are thoroughly cleaned and free from dirt deposits.

Note!

Use a paper insert for easy dirt removal on the rotor unit. See the parts catalogue for the part number of the insert. 5 Clean out the oil pipes of the rotor drive connection (143) with compressed air. 6 Examine the top and bottom bearings to ensure they are free from damage or excessive wear. Examine the all the O-ring for damage. Renew the Orings and the paper insert if necessary. 7 Reassemble the rotor in opposite order. Use silicone grease for the Orings. 8 Examine the spindle journals to ensure they are free from damage or excessive wear. 9 Replace the rotor unit (137) together with the spindle (138). Refit the filter cover (148). Tighten the cover with the filter cover clamp (147).

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10 Open the oil supply to the filter by means of valve (133), see fig. 1.2 26 .

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1 Close the oil supply to the filter by means of valve (133), see fig. 1.2 26 .

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1.2 47

Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Take the lubricating oil samples according the instructions in section 1.2.1.3. Fig. 1.2 28 shows the position of the lubricating oil sampling valve (17) on the engine.

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Fig. 1.2 28 The Location of the lubricating oil sampling valve

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Lubricating oil sampling valve

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

The crankcase breather avoids any overpressure in the crankcase due to blowby gasses from piston rings and turbocharger. The crankcase breather consists of a pipe (153), which connects the space inside the cranck case to the discharge line (see fig. 1.2 29 ). Inspect periodically proper functioning of the system during engine operation. The free end of the vent pipe should be covered by an anti flame gauze. Clean this gauze periodically to avoid crankcase over pressure. At the bottom, the vent device is provided with perfored metal sheets (154) in order to have a filter element which prevents any inclusion of dangerous dirt for the safe life of the engine. A part of the crankcase gasses consist of oil particles and water vapour.

Note!

Excessive smoke from crankcase breather might indicate that a hot spot is vaporizing lubricating oil and may lead to a crankcase explosion.

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1.2 49

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Crankcase breathing system

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Lubricating Oil System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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1.2 50

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Fig. 1.2 29 Crankcase breather and vent pipe

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154

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153

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Lubricating Oil System

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1.3 1

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1.3. Starting Air System

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Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The engine is started by means of compressed air with a maximum pressure of 30 bar. and a minimum pressure of 12 bar. The required temperature of the engine room at minimum pressure is 20C or higher. The starting air should be clean and free from water and oil to make a normal start possible.

A nonreturn valve, a safety valve and a flame arrester are mounted in the main supply air pipe. As a precaution the engine can not be started when the turning gear is engaged.

1.3.1.1.

Starting air quality

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1.3 2

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1.3.1.2.
Note!

Starting air supplied to the engine should be cleaned by means of an oil and water separator. For safety reasons the control air supply pipe to the air container is provided with an oil mist detector and a pressure control valve (see relevant system diagram in section 3.1.1). Requirements Maximum size of particles 40 micron Maximum oil contents 5 mg/m3n ( Reference: Pneurop recommendations 6611 )

Starting air quantity

The starting air consumption is about 1.8 Nm3 (at 20C) per start.

At remote and automatic starting, the consumption is 2 ... 3 times higher.

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The start is performed by direct injection of air into the cylinders through the starting air valves on the cylinder heads.

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1.3.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

Engine start process

The main starting is operated pneumatically via the starting valve. Before activating the starting valve, the pilot air has to pass through the blocking valve in order to avoid an accidental engine start with the engaged turning gear. After the engine is ready for start which means: Lubricating oil pressure is minimal 0.8 bar. Control air pressure is minimal 10 bar. Cooling temperature is minimal 60 C. Low lubricating oil level switch of the turbocharger is released. Stop lever is in operation position Turning gear is not engaged External start blockings are released The engine is normally started from the control room. In case of an emergency the engine can be started by pushing the emergency start button (2). See section 2.3.2. fig. 2.3 2 and section 1.6.8.5. When the starting valve (20) is operated electrically (remote control) or manually (on the engine) pilot air to activate the main starting valve (01) has to pass the blocking valve (19). With the turning gear engaged main starting valve (01) will not be activated to avoid an engine start. When the turning gear is disengaged the main starting valve (01) can be activated. Starting air goes to the starting air distributor (04) and through the flame arrester (02) to the starting air valves (03) in the cylinder heads. The starting air distributor controls opening and closing of the starting air valves in the cylinder heads according to the firing order. The engine starts.

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Note!

For proper acknoledgement of the specific starting air system and main components please refer to the related diagram which is enclosed in section 3.1.1.

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1.3.2.

Internal starting air system

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1.3 3

Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The stop system is provided with an air container with a sufficient capacity for, at least, one emergency stop in case of an air supply lack via the connection (302).

Note! Note!

Leave the main ball valve (15) and the air supply to (302) always open during engine operation. For maintenance background information, safety aspects, tools, intervals, tolerances, inspection, tightening torque and procedures see chapter 2.4.

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In case of a failure of the normal and emergency stop functions, the engine can be locally stopped by pulling the lever (1) on the common fuel control shaft, see also section 2.3.4. fig. and fig. 2.3 7 .

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When the control valve is activated a pilot air signal is directed to the stopping valve for the HP fuel pumps, thus it lets the control air (30 bar) flow to the pneumatic stop cylinders on the fuel pumps which will push the fuel pump rack to zero" load position.

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Engine stop process Normally the engine is stopped remotely from the control room or locally by means of the stop button on the WECS cabinet. See section 2.3.4. In case of a failure of the normal stop functions the engine can be stopped manually by pushing the emergency stop button (3) on the local start / stop unit, see fig. 2.3 7 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

1.3.3.1.

Main starting valve

The main start valve is controlled by the WECS system and is pneumatically operated. The start sequence is described as follows. Start sequence (fig. 1.3 1 ). pilot air enters at port (26) and operates valve (27). starting air flows via non return valve (13) to port (28). air passes valve (29) and flows direct to the engine at (25) and the engine starts to rotate. pilot air to port (26) stops when the engine starts.

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01 28 13 Fig. 1.3 1 Starting and slow turn sequence 1.3 5

26

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27 25

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1.3.3.

Components of starting air system

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Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

General The free end of the camshaft is provided with an extension shaft (30) to drive the starting air distributor (2), see fig. 1.3 2 . The air distributor makes the starting valves on the cylinder heads operate according to the firing order.

30

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1.3 6

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Fig. 1.3 2 Starting air distributor with drive

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Starting air distributor

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

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34 30

Working principle of starting air distributor When the main starting valve is activated the compressed air enters at (31) and flows to the starting air valve in the cylinder head accordingly to the position of the slot (32) in disc (33) via the channel (34). Fig. 1.3 3 , and fig. 1.3 4 . show an example of cylinder number 1. When the air enters at (31) the disc (33) is pushed against the housing (35) and only admits air to the cylinder which is in starting position. Via the slot (32) the air passes through the drilling in the housing and goes via (34) and a pilot air line, see fig. 1.3 5 , to the piston of the air starting valve in the cylinder head, see fig. 1.3 6 . The starting valve opens and allows the starting air enter the engine cylinder. The engine starts to rotate and the air distributor disc as well. The starting valve in the cylinder head is opened untill the slot (32) closes the air supply. The pressure of the starting air valve on the cylinder head is released via the groove (36) in the back side of disc (33). The right side of fig. 1.3 3 . shows the pressure is released via the opening (37). That procedure takes place as long as the main starting valve is open.

31

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36

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40 39 41 38

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32 33

35

32

33

cylinder 1

CW turning engine 36

CCW turning engine

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Fig. 1.3 3 Starting air distributor

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37

Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.3 7

Remove cover (38) and the gasket, see fig. 1.3 3 .

4 Check if timing is correct. If not continue with setting the timing. If the timing is correct continue with the next point. 5 Fit the cover, using a new gasket 6 Connect the air supply line to the cover of the starting air distributor.

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32 Cyl. 1
4 6

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3 Turn the flywheel to 5 after TDC of cylinder 1. The beginning of the slot opening (32) in the distributor disc should just open the air duct to cylinder 1 in the distributor housing, see fig. 1.3 4 . Mind the direction of rotation! The direction of rotation, seen towards the distribution disc, is indicated with an arrow on the distributor housing, it is counter clockwise for a clockwise turning engine and it is counter clockwise for a clockwise turning engine.

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1 3 5

CCW turning engine

CW turning engine

Fig. 1.3 4 Setting of air distributor disc In the fig. 1.3 4 there is a complete overview of the distributor discs for 6L engines, the working principles description and the maintenance operations mentioned can be easily extended to 8L and 9L engine configurations just by taking into account a different number of cylinders connected to the starting air supply system.

Note!

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1.3 8

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36

Checking the timing 1 Disconnect the air supply line to (31) at the cover of the starting air distributor. See fig. 1.3 3 and fig. 1.3 5 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

2 Pull the distributor shaft (39) complete with nut (40), distributor disc and driver (41) out of the distributor housing. 3 Loosen nut (40) a few turns, see fig. 1.3 3 . Pay attention to the type of thread, in connection with the direction of rotation. Look at the final digit on the rating plate of the starting air distributor. 1 = lefthand thread 2 = righthand thread 4 Tap on the end of the distributor shaft with a plastic hammer to separate the distributor disc from the conical part of the shaft. 5 Tighten the nut manually, but not too tight, so that the distributor disc can still turn on the shaft. 6 Place the distributor shaft, complete with nut, distributor disc and driver, into the distributor housing.

Note!

Make sure that the driver (41) fits properly in the shaft. The driver recesses X and Y have different lengths. See fig. 1.3 3 . Check if distance Z is 1.75 mm at the X and Y side with the engine at ambient temperature. There should be no clearance between the distributor disc and the distributor housing. 7 Set the distributor disc so that the first part of the slot (32) in the distributor disc intersect with the air passage to cylinder 1 in the distributor housing. See fig. 1.3 4 . Pay attention to the direction of rotation! 8 9 Tighten the nut without turning the distributor disc. Check if measurement Z" is still 1.75 mm.

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Note!

10 Fit the cover with a new gasket. 11 Fit the air supply line on the cover of the starting air distributor.

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Setting the timing 1 Check if the position of the flywheel is 5 after TDC of cylinder 1.

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Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fig. 1.3 5 Pilot air lines

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1.3 10

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2 4 5

Replacing the driver 1 Disconnect the air supply line (31) from the cover of the starting air distributor, see fig. 1.3 5 . Remove cover (38) and the gasket, see fig. 1.3 3 . 3 Pull the distributor shaft (39), complete with nut (40), distributor disc and driver (41) out of the distributor housing. Remove the dowel pin from the driver and distributor shaft. Fit the new driver with a new dowel pin.

6 Place the distributor shaft, complete with nut, distributor disc and driver, into the distributor housing. Make sure that the driver (41) fits properly in the shaft. The driver recesses X and Y have different lengths. See fig. 1.3 3 . Check if distance Z is 1.75 mm at the X and Y side with the engine at ambient temperature. There should be no clearance between the distributor disc and the distributor housing. 7 Check if the timing is correct. If not correct continue with setting the timing. If correct continue with next point. 8 Fit the cover, using a new gasket 9 Connect the air supply line to the cover of the starting air distributor.

Note!

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31

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

General When the main starting valve is activated starting air flows to all starting valves in the cylinder heads and enters at (42), see fig . 1.3 6 . The starting air valve is operated by air pressure controlled by the starting air distributor and enters at (43). Piston (44) together with valve (45) is pushed against the spring tension. The valve opens and starting air flows from (42) via (46) into the cylinder.

53 47 43 48

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44 50 49

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46 51 45 42 52 1.3 11

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6 7

Fig. 1.3 6 Starting air valve

Maintenance Carry out maintenance during the normal maintenance intervals of the cylinder head. 1 Remove the plate (47) and pull the complete starting air valve out of the cylinder head. 2 Remove the self locking nut (48), piston (44) and spring (49). 3 Clean all components and check the seat condition of valve and valve housing. If necessary, lap the seats by hand. Keep the piston on the valve spindle mounted for support during grinding. 4 Check if the vent holes (50) in the valve housing are open. 5 Lubricate piston and housing with lubricating oil and reassemble the valve, spring and piston. Check if the valve moves smoothly and closes completely. Renew the Oring (51) and lubricate with silicone grease.

8 Renew the copper ring (52) between starting air valve housing and cylinder head. 9 Place plate (47) and tighten the bolts (53) to the torque setting as mentioned in section 2.4.4.5.

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1.3.3.3.

Starting air valve on cylinder head

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Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting air distribution pipes supply the cylinder units of starting air of max. 30 bar. After the main starting valve is opened, starting air flows to each of the starting air valves. Before the starting air enters the main distribution pipe (54) the air passes a flame arrester (02). Via connecting pipe (56) the air is supplied to the starting valve in the cylinder head. See fig. 1.3 7 . Control air to the starting valve is supplied through pipe connection (57). Pipe connection (58) is connected to the stop cylinders on the fuel pump. Connection pipe (56) is fitted with two Orings. Always use silicon grease when mounting new Orings.

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02 58

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54

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Fig. 1.3 7 Starting air pipe arrangement

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56 57

1.3.3.4.

Starting air pipes

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

General The following devices are involved in the start and stop process; consult also the system diagram at chapter 3.1.: The blocking valve (19) on turning gear is a start interlock to avoid the start of the engine when the turning gear device is engaged.

The emergency push button on the control valve gives the possibility to stop the engine locally in case of an emergency. The air container (07) is a pressurised air tank for back up in order to stop the engine in case of too low control air pressure. A pressure transmitter connected to this air vessel will warn in case of too low internal air pressure. The drain valve (10) which automatically drains the air filter each time the engine is started.

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Warning!

The starting control valve (20) CV321 activates the main starting valve.

Maintenance The system consists of high class components and it requires no other maintenance than a function check and cleaning of the air filter (06). Check during a start the automatic working of the water drain valve. Filter The bottom section of the air filter is connected by an internal spindle to the top section. To open the filter, close the air supply ball valve (15). Release the air pressure and loosen the central spindle to remove the bottom section of the filter. Clean the insert and the inside of the filter every 8000 h. After the filter is replaced and safe loked, open the valve (15) to supply pressurised air to the system. Start and stopping solenoid valves In case of a malfunction in the electric system of the valve, test the valve by pushing the button on the solenoid. In case of a mechanical malfunction, a special tool is required to open the valve. If the problem still exists replace the valve.

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The pneumatic stop cylinders (08) are connected to the fuel rack of each HP fuel pump. In case of an emergency engine stop, the stop/shutdown control valves (17) CV153, in combination with stopping valve will pressurize all stop cylinders and push all the HP fuel pump racks to zero" position.

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1.3.3.5.

Pneumatic control system

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1.3 13

Starting Air System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Water drain valve Clean the valve in case of malfunctioning.

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1.3 14

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Starting Air System

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1.4 1

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1.4. Cooling Water System

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Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.4.2.

Cooling water
1.4.2.1. General

Cooling water = Makeup water + additives. Makeup water has to meet certain requirements. Water that normally fulfils these requirements, in order of preference :

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1.4 2

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Demineralized water. Reverse osmosis water. Softened water.

Distillate, (provided the quality is good, little corrosion products, salts etc.). Softened and decarbonated water.

Cooling water must be treated with an additive in order to prevent corrosion, scale or other deposits in closed circulating water systems. Example of water that normally NOT fulfils these requirements: Rainwater has a high oxygen and carbon dioxide content; great risk of corrosion.

Drinking water in many places is practically too hard and may contain considerable quantities of chlorides. Sea water will cause severe corrosion and deposit formation, even if supplied to the system in small amounts.

Note!

The better the water quality the less additive has to be supplied. Makeup water must be checked before adding the additive. For requirements see below.

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To prevent formation of scale and to maintain the highly efficient and uniform heat transfer rate through the engine liners and cylinder heads, only soft, treated water (cooling water), should be used. Furthermore, water should be free of corrosive properties. A competent water chemist specialised in closed cooling water circuits or manufacturer of water treatment chemicals should be consulted for recommendations.

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1.4.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

Makeup water must be checked before adding the additive. For makeup water quality see table.

Makeup water quality

Property Chloride (Cl) Sulphate content (S) pH Hardness

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Unit [mg/l] max. [mg/l] max. min. [ dH] max. Unit [bar]

Free of any foreign particles, air, gases and within the following specification: 80 150 6.5 10

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Property Temperatures and pressure Static pressure inlet HT and LT cooling water pump

Cooling cooling water loss through evaporation should be water supply compensated by makeup water. cooling water loss through leakages or otherwise should be compensated by adding fully treated water. Cooling Cooling water to be drained may be reused provided water reuse that it is collected in a clean tank. See operating data 0.5 0.8

Preheating: Temperature of HT cooling water system before starting. [C] min.

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Engine cooling water system

Note!

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Reuse of cooling water provided that the quality is beyond any doubt is highly recommended instead of new. Used cooling water contains very little oxygen, is environmentally more friendly and needs less correction. Not reusable cooling water should be drained and disposed of in an ecologically safe way.

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60 1.4 3

1.4.2.2.

Requirements

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Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

General Use of approved cooling water additives during the warranty period is mandatory and is also strongly recommended after the warranty period. Start always with the maximum concentration of additives due to the fact that the concentration of active corrosion inhibitors drops in time. Approved cooling water additives For approved cooling water additives and systems please contact Wrtsil Corporation. Recommended Coolant based on Nitrite borate

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1.4 4

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Silicate Molybdate Organic

Not to be used with soldered surfaces, aluminium and zinc. Toxic. Limited suitable (see restrictions when mentioned): Coolant based on Nitrite (sole) In combination with borate (pH control) nitrite performs better. Not to be used with soldered surfaces, aluminium and zinc. Toxic. Harmless to handle. Can protect steel as well as copper and aluminium. Not so efficient.

Not advised Chromate, Phosphate, Borate (sole) and Zinc. The use of glycol is not recommended. If however glycol is used an additional derating has to be applied. See section derating, 1.0.3.

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Harmless to handle. Can form undesirable deposits. May contain phosphonates, polymers (like polycarboxylic acid) and azoles (for instance tolytriazole).

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1.4.2.3.

Qualities of cooling water additives

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

Check the cooling water quality according the maintenance schedule. Most suppliers of cooling water additives can provide a test kit for measuring the active corrosion inhibitors.

Note!

With most additives correct dosing is very important. Under dosing of additives causes spot corrosion while overdoses may cause deposits. Request the supplier of the treatment product for instructions, procedures, dosage and concentration based on the applicable make up water. 1 2 Follow thoroughly the instructions of the supplier. Record results of tests in the engine log book.

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1.4 5

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1.4.2.4.

Cooling water control

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Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.4.3.1.

General

The cooling water system on the engine is arranged by two separate cooling water circuits. The High Temperature (HT) and the Low Temperature (LT) circuit.

The LT cooling water circuit cools the LT section (second stage) of the charge air cooler.

Note!

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, tools, intervals, tolerances, inspections, tightening torques and procedures see chapter 2.4

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Note!

For proper acknoledgement of the specific cooling water system and main components please refer to the related diagram which is enclosed in section 3.1.1.

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The HT cooling water circuit cools the cylinders, cylinder heads and the HT section (first stage) of the charge air cooler.

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1.4.3.

Internal cooling water system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

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21

Fig. 1.4 1 Cooling water flow to the cylinder head Cooling water flow to cylinder liner and cylinder head Via a recess around each cylinder liner the cooling water flows upwards through bores in the cylinder liner collar resulting in an effective cooling of the liner top side. After cooling the liner top side, the cooling water enters the cylinder head through bores in the rim at the cylinder head bottom side, see fig. 1.4 1 . The cooling water is forced over the cylinder head bottom and along the injector sleeve. A part of the cooling water is forced around both the exhaust valve seats. The cooling water leaves at the top of the cylinder head at exhaust gas side and enters the cooling water outlet manifold (22). see fig. 1.4 1 .

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1.4 7

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22

Relative cold water, returning at (401) from the external system, is mixed before the suction side of the HT cooling water pump with water returning from the HT cooling water outlet manifold via the thermostatic valve of the HT system. The cooling water regulated at the correct temperature is forced to the cooling water inlet channel. The inlet channel is integrated in the engine block, where the flow is split over all cylinders. Two adjustable orifices, one in the the cooling water outlet manifold and one in the bypass before entering the HT cooling water pump, are adjusted to the nominal flow during the engine commissioning.

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1.4.3.2.

Cooling water flow HT section

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Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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To cooler Bypass From engine 2 3 HT Bypass To cooler LT 1.4 8

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5 4 From engine

Cooling water flow to HT section charge air cooler The water from the the cylinder outlet manifold enters the HT section of the charge air cooler (first stage). Then the water leaves the charge air cooler and is forced to an adjustable orifice which adapts the water flow to the nominal rate. Through the thermostatic valve the water returns to the suction side of the cooling water pump via the bypass or leaves the engine via connection (402) to the external system. The HT cooling water, returning via the bypass, passes a second adjustable orifice before entering the cooling water pump. Thermostatic valves There are two thermostatic blocks, one for the HT and one for the LT cooling water circuit. Each block accommodates a thermostatic valve which regulates the engine cooling water temperature. The temperature ranges for HT and LT cooling water are different. Make sure that the elements of the HT and LT cooling water systems are not mixed up; for instance during testing. In case of a failure of the thermostatic valve it is possible to force the water flow completely or partly over the cooler by means of the manually override (4); see fig. 1.4 2 .

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Fig. 1.4 2 Location of cooling water thermostatic valves

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

Operation Cooling systems will usually operate in a range slightly below or above the nominal operating temperature. Any system operating with a deviation of 6C or more from the nominal operating temperature is to be checked on cause. The cause should be located and corrected immediately. Trouble shooting In the event the cooling system does not operate near to the operating temperature see section 2.3.3.7. Operating problems.

1.4.3.2.1. Maintenance of the thermostatic valves

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Note!
4 5 Renew the sealing rings.

Removal / mounting of the thermostatic valves 1 Drain the cooling water system, see section 1.4.5.4., and, if necessary, at the lowest point of the external system; collect the treated cooling water for reuse. 2 Remove bolts (1) sleeve (2) and thermostatic valve (3), see fig. 1.4 2 . 3 Check the element status by warming it up slowly while its submerged in water; measure continuously the water temperature. Read the temperature which the valve starts opening at. The nominal temperature range is mentioned on the elements. Be careful not to mix the thermostatic valves of different cooling water systems since each system has its own working range.

Renew the element if damaged or out of range.

Note!

If manual override (4) is separated from thermostatic valve (3) make sure plate (5) is fitted correctly which means the slot at the manual override side, see fig. 1.4 2 . 6 Fill the cooling water system and check for leaks .

Warning!

Elements exposed to a 10C above the maximum working range do harm the wax elements and should be renewed.

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Check periodically the correct working range of the elements accordingly to the maintenance intervals.

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1.4 9

Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Relative cold water, returning at (451) from the external cooler, is mixed before the suction side of the LT cooling water pump with water returning from the lubricating oil cooler via the LT thermostatic valve. The LT cooling water regulated at the correct temperature is forced to the Low Temperature section (second stage) of the charge air cooler and then to the lubricating oil cooler. The water leaves the lubricating oil cooler and flows to an adjustable orifice which adapts the water flow to the nominal flow. The water returns through the thermostatic valve to the suction side of the cooling water pump via the bypass or leaves the engine to the external system via connection (452). The cooling water, returning via the bypass, passes a second adjustable orifice before entering the cooling water pump. The adjustable orifices, one at the outlet of the lubricating oil cooler and one at the bypass before entering the cooling water pump, are adjusted to the nominal flow during engine commissioning. The LT section of the charge air cooler is deaerated via an orifice and connected to (454).

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1.4.3.3.

Cooling water flow LT section

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

1.4.4.1.

Cooling water pump

Each cooling water pump is engine driven via a gearwheel (23). At the suction side a mix of cooling water returning from the external system at (24) and from the bypass connection at (7) is forced by the pump to the pressure side (25). See fig. 1.4 4 .

Maintenance of the pump mainly consists in replacing the water and/or oil seals in case of leakage. A leaking seal is indicated by liquid which appears from the tell tale hole (28). See fig. 1.4 4 . The bearings are lubricated by splash oil.

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06 07 23

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26 25

In order to avoid any reversed flow of cooling water in case of an engine stop, a cooling water stand by or preheating pump is used at connection (20) and a non return valve is mounted in casing (26) , see fig.1.4 4 .

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7

Cooling water pumps for the HT cooling water system (07) and for the LT cooling water system (06) are commonly assembled with exactly the same parts. Although the pump parts are identical they are assembled differently to fit in their specific positions. See fig. 1.4 3 .

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1.4.4.

Components of internal system

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Fig. 1.4 3 Cooling water pump

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20 24 1.4 11

Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.4.4.1.1. Maintenance of the cooling water pump

For inspection and renewal of the rotating part of the mechanical water seal (49) it is not necessary to remove the cooling water pump from the engine. See fig. 1.4 4 . 26 59

36 35 20

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x 60 42 28 44 48 49 55 28 56

33

31

30 39

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52

60

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34 29 32 30 38 45 46 47 1.4 12

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Fig. 1.4 4 Cooling water pump assembly

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05 25 41 37 58 57 54 23 53 43 51 50

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

2 Remove the bolts (33) and remove the suction line (24) at connection (34). 3 Remove the bolts (35) and remove the supply line (20) of the preheating pump at connection (36). 4 The orifice bypass (29) is adjusted during commissioning and locked with two bolts (30). Dont remove these two bolts.

6 Slide the compete pump carefully out of the pump casing cover. Be careful not to damage the pump gear wheel (23). Disassembling the cooling water pump, see fig. 1.4 4 . 1 Remove nuts (38) , washers and bypass suction connection (39).

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2 9

Remove bolts (43) , washers and non return valve casing (26).

3 Remove nuts (42) , washers and pressure chamber (41) from bearing housing (37). 4 To remove the impeller (44) loosen all locking bolts (45) a few turns. Remove the bolts adjacent to each threaded hole in conical outer part (46) and screw them as jack bolts into these holes pressing it of the conical inner part (47). Remove the impeller and the locking assembly from the pump shaft (53).

5 Remove ring (48) and the rotating parts of the mechanical water seal set (49). 6 To remove the gear wheel (23) loosen all locking bolts (50) a few turns. Remove the bolts adjacent to each threaded hole in conical outer part (51) and screw them as jack bolts into these holes pressing it of the conical inner part (52). Remove the gear wheel and the locking assembly from the pump shaft (53). 7 Remove circlip (54). Apply slight force on the pump shaft (53) at the impeller side to push the shaft out of bearing housing. 8 Remove nonrotating ring (55) of the mechanical seal set together with the Oring and remove the oil seal (56). Remove ball bearings (57) from the pump shaft.

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5 Place cooling water pump hoisting tool 9651DT907 and loosen the connection of the cooling water pump bearing housing (37) at the engine.

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Note!

If it is necessary to renew the Orings (31) mark the position of the orifice bypass flange (29) on the pump suction flange (32) before removing the two bolts (30).

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Removal of the cooling water pump, see fig. 1.4 4 . 1 Drain the cooling water and collect it for reuse. See section 1.4.5.4.

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1.4 13

Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Inspect parts for cavitation, scoring and other possible damage.

3 Replace all wearing parts (bearings, oil seal, mechanical seal and Orings). 4 Clean recesses of the cooling water pump and check if sealing water circulation holes (40) and drain hole (28) are open and clean.

6 Press the nonrotating ring (55) of the mechanical seal set with Oring in the bearing housing (37). Use a plastic pressure piece. 7 Heat ball bearings (57) electrically up to 80C and shrink it on the pump shaft (53). 9 Push the pump shaft in the bearing housing and fit the circlip (54).

10 Check if the shaft is free spinning.

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1.4 14

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11 Prior to installation of the gear wheel locking assembly, clean and slightly oil the contact surfaces of all parts (Do not use Molybdenum Disulphide). Note that by reassembling, the threaded holes in conical outer part (51) have to be positioned opposite undrilled spaces of the conical inner part (52) and have to be kept free for disassembling. 12 Place the locking assembly together with the gear wheel (23) over the pump shaft (53).

13 Tighten the locking bolts (50) lightly and slide gear wheel (23) to its position on the pump shaft. Hold the gear wheel in position while tightening the bolts evenly and crosswise in two ore three steps to the final torque. See section 2.4.4. 14 Recheck tightening torque by applying it to all bolts all the way around. 15 Check if measurement X" is 1221 mm. 16 Put some liquid soap on the bellows of the rotating part of the mechanical seal set (49) and slide it on to the pump shaft until the seal faces touch each other. 17 Place ring (48) over the pump shaft. 18 Prior to installation of the impeller locking assembly clean and slightly oil the contact surfaces of all parts (Do not use Molybdenum Disulphide). Note that by reassembling, the threaded holes in the conical outer part (46) have to be positioned opposite undrilled spaces of the conical inner (47) and have to be kept free for disassembling. 19 Place the locking assembly in the impeller and place impeller together with locking assembly over the pump shaft (53).

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Wait till the bearings and shaft are cooled down.

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5 Fit Oring (60) with silicon grease and fit a new oil seal (56) with lubricating oil and with the lip pointing to the bearing side.

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Pump inspection and assembling 1 Clean all parts carefully and check for wear and damage; replace if necessary.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

21 Recheck tightening torque by applying it to all bolts all the way around. 22 Place pressure chamber (41), washers and nuts (42). Tighten the nuts evenly in three steps to 43 Nm. 23 Place non return valve casing (26), washers and tighten with bolts (43). 24 Fit new Oring (60) with silicon grease on suction/bypass connection (39). 25 Place the suction/bypass connection, washers and nuts (38). Tighten the nuts evenly in thee steps to 43 Nm. 26 Fit new Orings (58), and (59) and one on the bypass connection (not visible) with silicon grease on the pump. Mounting the cooling water pump to the engine, see fig. 1.4 4 . 1 Place hoisting tool 9651DT907 for cooling water pump . 2 Lift the pump in position and push the pump carefully in the pump casing cover. Be careful not to damage the pump gear wheel (23) and Orings. 3 Tighten the the pump on the engine cover. 4 Fit the supply line of the preheating pump at connection (36) and tighten bolts (35). 5 Fit the suction line at connection (34) and tighten with bolts (33). 6 Pipe connections to pump casings must be stress free. Tighten flange bolts evenly and cross wise. 7 Check the presence of backlash by opening the cover next to the pump. 8 Refill the cooling water systems and check the levels.

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1.4.4.2.

Some pipe connections are made flexible by the application of a "metalgripcoupling". To apply the "metalgripcoupling" the pipe ends should be well in line and lateral within 1% of the pipe diameter. Fitting instructions 9 Remove sharp edges and burrs. 10 Clean pipe where coupling mounts. Eliminate such as scratches, cracks, remove rust, paint and other coatings,

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Flexible pipe connections

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20 Keep on pressing on the conical outer part (46), against the spring pressure of the mechanical seal, as far as possible on to the pump shaft while tightening the bolts evenly and crosswise in two or three steps to 15 Nm.

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1.4 15

Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

11 Mark half width of coupling symmetrically on both pipe ends.

12 Slide coupling over pipe end. Do not rotate coupling if teeth are in contact with the pipe. 13 Push pipes together and make sure they are in line. 15 Tighten bolt with a torque wrench. 14 Position coupling such that marks are visible on both sides.

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1.4 16

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Disassembling of coupling Loosen screw. Casing must eventually be spread and grip ring with screw driver released from anchoring on pipe. Do not rotate coupling as long as teeth are in contact with the pipe. Grease bolt before new assembly.

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Note!

Torque indicated on coupling is valid for radially rigid pipes. Couplings can be used several times! No dirt under sealing lips!

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

1.4.5.1.

General

If the risk of freezing occurs, drain all the water. Collect drained water for reuse.

1.4.5.2.

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1.4.5.3.

In completely closed systems the fouling will be minimal if the cooling water is treated accordingly to the instructions in section 1.4.2. Depending on the cooling water quality and the efficiency of the treatment, cooling water spaces may or may not foul over the period beetween inspections. Deposits on cylinder liners, cylinder heads and cooler stacks should be removed to avoid any disturbance in the heat transfer to the cooling water with a thermal overload as a consequence. Any need of cleaning should be investigated, especially during the first year of operation. This may be executed during a cylinder liner inspection for fouling and deposits on the liner itself and the block. Deposits can quite vary in structure and consistency and, in principle, can mechanically and/or chemically be removed.

To keep at low level the quantity of air in the cooling water, the water surface in the makeup tank and expansion tank must be free of turbulence. Permanent venting pipes for HT (404) and LT (454) water must terminate below the water level. Check periodically the tank level. Air also tends to enter the cooling water through a defective shaft seal of the cooling water pump when the suction pressure is below zero.

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Cleaning

If an emulsion oil has been used the entire system must be cleaned from oil deposits. Changing brand and type of additives requires the cleaning of the entire system by flushing. Compensate leakage or spillage by treated water.

Cooling water venting

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Normally, no reason for maintenance of the cooling water systems exists unless the temperatures tend to rise without a clear reason. A deviation in cooling water temperature can be caused by any malfunctioning in one of the cooling water thermostats. All the inspections and cleaning of the cooling water system components should be carried out at planned intervals.

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1.4.5.

Maintenance cooling water system

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1.4 17

Cooling Water System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The cooling water quantity in the system, supply and return pipes of the LT and HT sections is relatively large. Before starting any maintenance to this system and relevant components, drain and collect the cooling water for reuse. Drain points are, for the HT system the plug (60) and for the LT system the plugs (61) and (62). See fig. 1.4 5 . If necessary drain also the external systems at the lowest points.

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61 62
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Fig. 1.4 5 Draining points of the HT and LT cooling water system

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1.4.5.4.

Draining of cooling water

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cooling Water System

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1.5 1

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1.5. Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The term charge air" or supercharging" refers to the practice of filling the cylinder, with air at a pressure substantially higher than atmospheric pressure to support the combustion of the fuel, plus a sufficient excess to control internal combustion and exhaust gas temperatures.

Turbochargers utilise energy in the exhaust gasses and improve the engine efficiency. The speed of turbochargers has no fixed ratio to the engine speed but will vary with the load.

1.5.2.

Quality of suction air filtration

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Property Dust concentration (particles > 5 micron) Chlorides (Cl) Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) Sulphur dioxide (SO2) Ammonia (NH3) 3.0 1.5 375 1.25 94 1.5 2

The highest allowable concentration of dust and harmful components at the turbocharger inlet, after filtration, is given in the table below. Unit [mg/Nm3] [mg/Nm3] [micro g/ Nm3] [mg/Nm3] [micro g/ Nm3] Unit [mg/Nm3] [massppm] [volppm] [volppm] [volppm]

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Note! Nm3 is given at 0C and 1013 mbar. Measurements are to be performed during a 24hour period and the highest 1hour average is to be compared with the above mentioned boundary values. Weather conditions such as wind speed, wind direction, ambient temperature and air humidity may vary considerable during one year. Therefore a oneday measurement may not reflect the most critical situation. A detailed investigation concerning filtration has to be done in installations where the air includes components that are known to be caustic, corrosive or toxic.

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3.0

Supercharging is realised by a turbo charging system consisting of centrifugal compressor(s) each driven by an exhaust gas turbine.

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1.16 0.25 0.43 0.125

1.5.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

1.5.3.1.

General

Engine room ventilation should be such that water, foam, sand, dust exhaust smoke etc. cant enter the engine room. Avoid heating of fresh combustion air by striking hot engine room machinery. In case the engine room temperature raises over 45C the engine room ventilation ducting should be directed even nearer to the turbocharger inlet filter to avoid further heating of the fresh air. If such situation cannot be arranged, derating of the engine load should be considered to avoid thermal overloading the engine. Avoid discharge of generator cooling air to the turbocharger intake.

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Note!

For restrictions on suction air temperatures, see also chapter 1.0.

It is recommended to have separate ventilators for combustion air and for the ventilating system provided. Air supply fans must be dimensioned to obtain a slight overpressure in the engine room, but must not exceed 1 mbar.

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, inspections, tools and torque spanner instructions, see chapter 2.4.

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If the engine takes combustion air from the engine room, all combustion air should than first be supplied into the engine room. The design of engine room ventilation, special in the vicinity of the charge air intake filters, can highly influence the good performance of the engine combustion process. Full air supply to the air intake filter under arctic conditions may create too low combustion gas temperature, and ambient air further heated in the engine room under tropical conditions will raise the exhaust gas temperatures in the engine far too much. For good engine operation the following should be taken into consideration:

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1.5.3.

Charge air system

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1.5 3

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

For proper acknoledgement of the specific exhaust, charge air system and main components please refer to the related diagram which is enclosed in section 3.1.1.

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1.5 4

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The exhaust gas flow to the turbine side of the turbocharger from the cylinder heads via the exhaust gas manifold. The turbine uses the residual energy in the exhaust gas to drive the compressor weel of the turbocharger. The exhaust gas leaves the turbine at connection (501). The compressor takes air via suction branch (601), the compressed air is cooled to the required temperature in a two stage charge air cooler and flows to the cylinders via the charge air receiver.

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The charge air and exhaust gas system is build on the engine.

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1.5.4.

Internal system

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

1.5.4.1.1. General

To maintain the required charged air temperature at higher engine load the charge air has to be cooled.

The first stage is cooled by HT cooling water system and cools the charge air till approximately 90100C. The second stage is cooled with water from the LT cooling water system and cools the charge air till the required temperature of approximately 50C.

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02

Fig. 1.5 1 Charge air cooler

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The temperature at the compressor discharge side at full load is approximately 200C. To cool the charged air after the compressor the air passes a two stage air cooler (02) in which the compressed air is cooled. See fig. 1.5 1

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1.5.4.1.

Charge air cooler

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1.5 5

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.5.4.1.2. Cooler stack

The charge air cooler consists of a cooler stack (20) together with the cooling water header (21) and cooling water return header (22) are one unit. See fig. 1.5 2 . The cooling water header (21) contains the HT and LT supply and return connections and the drain plugs (23) for both systems.

24

25

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27 26 21 23 23 23 23 Fig. 1.5 2 Cooler stack 1.5 6

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20 22

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HT water enters the cooler at (24) and is discharged at (25). LT water enters the cooler at (26) and is discharged at (27).

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

1.5.4.1.3. Operation

To prevent the cooling water from freezing when the engine is not in operation the temperature in the engine room should be kept at a minimum temperature of + 5 C . When the temperature is below 5 C provisions have to be taken by means of anti freeze additives. In this case it must be realized that this affects the heat balance. A rising air temperature accompanied by a fall in air pressure indicates the fin plates around the tubes are becoming contaminated. A rising air temperature with water pressure difference over the cooler indicates contamination inside the tubes by scale or dirt. In either case cleaning of the cooler stack is required.

1.5.4.1.4. Condensate draining holes

Check daily, during operation of the engine, if the condensate draining holes (607), located on the housing of the charge air cooler and charge air receiver are open. Under normal operating conditions only compressed air should escape from these holes and possible some condensate.

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Note!

If excessive water escapes from the condensate draining holes this can be caused by: Condensate due to high air humidity. Condensate can be formed at the outside of the tubes of the LT part of the air cooler and is carried together with the air into the combustion chambers of the cylinders. The quantity of condensate depends on the suction air temperature, humidity, charge air pressure and charge air temperature. There will always be some condensate on the pipes of the LT section of the charge air cooler. By increasing the temperature of the the LT cooling water before the charge air cooler the quantity of condensate is reduced. Do not reduce the cooling water flow. Excessive water (condensate) in the combustion chambers can cause corrosion on liners, piston rings and pistons and cold corrosion on fuel injector nozzles. Charge air cooler stack has one or more leaking tubes. This should be confirmed by a lowering of the level of the HT and / or LT expansion tank. Check the kind of water (treated water or not) Continuously water leaking when the engine is out of operation may indicate a leaking cooler stack. Inspection of the cooler stack on short notice is required. Condensate draining holes have the function to inform the operator on the presence of water in the charge air receiver. Condensate draining holes are not designed to drain large quantities of water and should always be open.

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.5.4.1.5. Maintenance

Clean the cooler at intervals according to chapter 2.4.1. or, if at full load the charge air temperature can not be maintained. Removal of the cooler stack 1 Drain the HT and LT cooling water by removing plug (23), see fig. 1.5 3 , and collect water for reuse.

3 Remove all bolts (29) from the flange of the cooler stack and use M12 jack bolts to loosen the cooler stack from the housing. 4 5 Check if the cooler stack is free. Slide the cooler stack for 1/3 out of the cooler housing.

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1.5 8

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21 Fig. 1.5 3 Front view charge air cooler

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29

2 Loosen all connections from supply and return pipes to the water header (21). See fig. 1.5 3 .

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Fit strip (31) with rollers against the housing, according fig. 1.5 4 .

21

39

Fig. 1.5 4

Loosening the cooler stack

7 A dis/assembly tool for the charge air cooler is needed accordingly to the engine configuration: the tool 9651DT908 is suitable for 6L38B engines while the tool 9651DT909 is for 8L and 9L38B engines. 8 Fit hinged part (32) of tool with bolts (33) against the cooler stack housing according fig. 1.5 5 .

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Dis/assembly tool 38 37 21 Fig. 1.5 5

9 Use a crane and connect it to eye bolt (34). Hoist the hinged part (32) to horizontal position and keep it horizontal.

10 Fit rolling part (35) of tool with bolts (36) on the flange of the cooler stack and tighten it according fig. 1.5 5 .

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36 35 34

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30 31 32 33 31 1.5 9

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Removal of cooler stack

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

12 Remove bolts (33) and carefully lift the cooler stack together with tool.

Note!

Do not exert forces onto the cooler stack to avoid distortion.

2 Check if the cooler stack, housing and flange are clean and not damaged, particularly the joint faces. Apply sealing compound on the contact faces for the cooler stack at the inside part of cover (28). For sealing compound see part catalogue.

4 Fit strip (31) with rollers against the housing and fit the two guide pins (39), according fig. 1.5 4 .

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1.5 10

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5 Lift the cooler stack with tool on eye bolt (34). Place the cooler stack as far as possible against the housing on rollers (31) and fit bolts (33). according fig. 1.5 5 . 6 Keep hinged part (32) horizontal by crane, remove the four bolts (37), according fig. 1.5 5 .

7 Apply sealing compound on the joint faces on the charge air cooler where the cooler stack will be in contact with the inside part of cover (28). 8 Slide cooler stack 2/3 into the housing and apply sealing compound on the cooler stack flange. For sealing compound see part catalogue.

9 Push the cooler stack further into the housing just over the guide pins (39). Remove strip with rollers (31) and and slide the cooler stack further in the housing. See fig. 1.5 4 . 10 Remove the complete tool. Fit all bolts (29) hand tight, see fig. 1.5 3 . 11 Check if the flange of the cooler stack is in full contact with the housing and tighten all bolts (29) 12 Connect the cooling water supply and return pipes to the water header. 13 Refill cooling water system and check charge air cooler and piping on water leaks.

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3 Fit the tool including hinged part (32) and roller part (35) to the cooler stack and tighten it with four bolts (37) to the vertical part (38) and with bolts (36) to the rolling part, according fig. 1.5 5 .

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Mounting the cooler stack 1 Remove the sealing compound around the cooler stack, housing and cooler stack flange.

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11 Slide the cooler stack completely out of the housing while keeping part (32) horizontal. Fit the header (21) with bolts (37) to the vertical part (38) of tool 9651DT908, according fig. 1.5 5 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

1.5.4.1.6. Cleaning

General Cleaning of the water and air side of the charge air cooler is required to restore thermal cooler performance. Fouling of the cooler depends on the local situation. For this reason it is not possible to give a general advise for cooler cleaning. Chemical cleaning of fins and tubes is possible.

During cleaning the cooler should internally be inspected on scaling and corrosion. Scale increases the risk of pitting corrosion and possible obstacles which can block the tubes leading to erosion.

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Note! Note!

Cleaning water side Remove the water covers from the stack and inspect the tubes internally. When deposits are soft, which will occur in most of the installations, use special nylon brushes connected to a rod. the type of rod must be selected in accordance with the finned tube. Replace gaskets and, if applicable, Orings. Cleaning air side Remove the cooler stack. To clean the fins of the tubes, immerse the stack in a chemical bath containing a degreasing solvent. Raising and lowering the stack in the solvent or bringing the solvent into movement by means of a steam jet or air, will accelerate the cleaning process. Direct after the cleaning is completed, the cooler is to be flushed by applying a powerful water jet. When using chemicals take the necessary precaution and follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the chemicals. Hydraulic cleaning Hydraulic cleaning has to be carried out with the cooler stack removed using a high pressure spray gun with a special nozzle to remove dirt deposits inside the tubes. For the outside of the tubes a nozzle with a diameter of 3 mm is recommended. If the water jet attacks the tubes vertical, parallel to the fins, a pressure of 120 bar is suitable to be applied at a distance of 2 m from the fin surface. When using a high pressure water cleaning device, be careful not to damage the fins. Damaged fins will result in a decreased capacity of the cooler stack.

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Always check for corrosion after cleaning.

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Several international companies supply equipment and chemicals for cleaning heat exchangers.

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.5.4.1.7. Repairs

Leaking tubes Tube leaks can be caused by corrosion, erosion or improper operation of the cooler a leaking tube cannot be removed, they are roller expanded into tube plates. Leaking tubes can be sealed by turned hardwood plugs or rubber plugs on both sides. Up to 10 tubes per system may be sealed. Fit a new cooler stack or send the cooler stack for repair if more than 10 tubes are leaking. Hydro test cooler with specified test pressure which is stated on the name plate fitted on the cooler side wall or casing. Leaking seal All seals are either Orings, soft metal rings, gaskets or liquid gasket If necessary disassemble the cooler as far as needed. Remove dirt and corrosion residues and restore the surfaces in good shape again. Mount new seals.

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1.5 12

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

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33

All exhaust gas connections are face to face mounted (no gaskets). In case one or more cylinder heads should be removed, dont disconnect the clamps (35) of the exhaust at cylinder head side before it is secured. Use two bolts through holes (36), see fig. 1.5 7 , and fixated section (33) to the support beam (37) of the cooling water manifold. 32 34 33

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Fig. 1.5 6 Exhaust gas system

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Charge air ducting after the charge air cooler In case the cylinder heads have to be lifted only the 4 bolts of inlet bend (32) at the cylinder head side have to be removed. See fig. 1.5 6 . The tapered position of the flanges makes lifting and lowering of the cylinder heads easy. Exhaust gas ducting The exhaust gas system is a Single Pipe Exhaust System (SPEX). The system is assembled of similar sections (33) and interconnected by compensators (34). Branches of the ducting are rigid mounted against the cylinder heads. See fig. 1.5 6 .

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Fig. 1.5 7 Fixation of exhaust section

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37 36 35

1.5.5.

Inlet and Exhaust gas module

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1.5 13

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Compensators in the exhaust gas manifold make thermal expansion of the manifold possible. Make sure that, whenever the bellows have to be replaced, the arrow on the compensator corresponds to the gas flow direction, see fig. 1.5 8 . There is no gasket between bellows and exhaust manifold, it is a face to face connection. The compensator is provided with a male/female connection (38) at the closed side of the inner sleeve (39). The opposite side is provided with a flat side (40). Centre line deflection of the compensator must be limited till 1mm. 40

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39

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1.5 14

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Fig. 1.5 8 Gas flow in Compensator Mounting instructions compensator 1 Ensure flanges and sealing surfaces are clean. 2 Place the compensator in position and ensure that the flanges assemble freely. Make sure the compensator is in line. (maximum off set 1mm) 3 First fit the V clamp at the male / female (38) side over the flange profiles. See fig. 1.5 8 . 4 Engage the Tbolts through the trunnions and turn the nuts on the Tbolts. 5 Overtighten the nuts evenly to 20Nm, keeping the distance between the gaps equal on each side of the clamp, then slacken them off a turn and tighten the nuts again to 12Nm. 6 Next fit the V clamp at the flat side (40) over the flange profiles and follow the same tightening procedure.

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1.5.5.1.

Compensator

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

The insulation box, enclosing the exhaust gas ducting, is rigid mounted via the inlet bends to the engine block.

Warning!

1.5.5.3.

Operation

1 Check the working of water separating pockets and drainage system of the external exhaust system. 2 Measure periodically the exhaust gas back pressure. The back pressure should not exceed the value as mentioned in chapter 1.0. 3 Check periodically the proper working of the silencer by measuring and comparing the noise attenuation.

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1.5.5.4.
1 5

4 Check proper working of the sliding supports of the ducting after the turbocharger. 5 Check during operation of the engine the entire exhaust gas system on gas leakages.

Well designed and installed exhaust gas systems require little maintenance and can be limited to long term visual periodical inspections consisting of: Inspection to bolt connections of all flange joints in the manifold. 2 Inspection to all rigid and flexible mountings between manifold and the engine room structure. Special attention should be paid to the support in the ducting after the turbocharger. This support should be rigidly mounted against the engine room structure.

3 Inspection to the exhaust ducting insulation and cladding between turbocharger and external exhaust system. 4 Check if the external exhaust system after the turbocharger is not supported by the engine. Inspection to the good working of soot arresters.

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Maintenance

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The heat insulating material, as part of the panels, is at the inside cladded with stainless steel sheeting. This sheeting should not be painted as part of the heat insulation exist in the reflection of heat radiation.

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1.5.5.2.

Insulation box

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1.5 15

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.5.6.1.

General

The rotor shaft rpm. is measured by a speed transmitter system installed at the compressor side and described in the subsuppliers manual of the turbo charger.

1.5.6.2.

Maintenance

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1.5 16

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1.5.6.3.

For maintenance, inspection and replacement intervals of turbocharger components, see the rating plate on the turbocharger foot. Maintain the turbocharger accordingly to the Operation Manual of the manufacturer which is delivered as part of the engine documentation. It is recommended to make use of the Wrtsil Corporation service network. To overhaul the turbocharger, remove protecting covers, and disconnect oil supply and discharge pipes. Disconnect exhaust and inlet ducts. During the assembly renew all the seals. Use high temperature resistant grease on the exhaust bolt connections.

Turbocharger cleaning devices

The diesel engine efficiency is highly related to the efficiency of the turbocharger. The turbocharger efficiency is directly influenced by the degree of fouling on the compressor wheel, the exhaust gas nozzle ring and the turbine wheel. The fouling consists mainly of deposits on the nozzle vanes and the rotor blades due to dust and greasy substances which are present in the charge air. Regular cleaning is necessary during engine operation. The cleaning is not effective on very dirty components. The following factors may influence the degree of fouling e.g.: Bad combustion performance. Lubricating oil flow trough the piston rings as for instance during prolonged idle running.

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The turbocharger consists of two main components, a turbine and a compressor which are mounted on a common shaft. The bearings on this shaft are cooled and lubricated by the engine lubricating oil system. The turbocharger is equipped with cleaning devices for compressor side and for turbine side.

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1.5.6.

Turbocharger

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

1.5.6.4.

Compressor side cleaning

Daily cleaning of the compressor prevents excessive dirt. In case of an engine stop during cleaning, the cleaning process should be interrupted by operating.

Note!

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For the compressor side cleaning its strictly recommended to respect the procedure and the proper cleaning sequence which has been defined for the specific turbocharger.

The cleaning system consists in a water container (01) with valves (05 and 06) and pipe (02) connected to the pressure side and with pipe (03) connected to the suction side of the compressor. See fig. 1.5 9 . Cleaning procedure Water injection is to be executed when the engine is running at normal operating conditions at high load (about 80% of max load) and the compressor running at high speed. Record the charge air pressure, exhaust gas temperatures and the turbocharger speed to ascertain the cleaning efficiency.

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The compressor should be daily washed by water injection during engine operation. The cleaning process have good results as long as the deposit amount is limited. In case of a very thick hardened dirt crust, the compressor must be dismantled for cleaning. In this cleaning method the water is not acting as a solvent but removes mechanically the deposits by means of the water droplets impact. Use clean water without additives.

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The cleaning device The engine is equipped with permanent pipings for compressor and turbine cleaning. The valve unit, which is a part of the cleaning device, contains the water supply inlet and the air supply inlet.

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1.5 17

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

02

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05

Fig. 1.5 9 Compressor cleaning device

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1.5 18

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1 2 3 Retighten grip screw (04).

Loosen grip screw (04) on container (01), see fig. 1.5 9 . Fill container with clean water till approximate 1 cm below the edge.

4 By opening both valves (05) and (06) charged air enters the container via pipe (02). The water content is forced to the compressor inlet via pipe (03). 5 The complete water volume should be injected in 4 10 sec. After the water is injected close valves (05) and (06). The success of cleaning can be evaluated by comparing engine exhaust gas temperatures before and after cleaning. If unsuccessfully, the cleaning process should be repeated earliest after an interval of 10 minutes. 6 On completion of the cleaning process the engine should at least run another 5 minutes at high load.

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04 03 06

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

The engine should run a further 15 min after a wet cleaning process, to prevent corrosion on the internal casing surface. In case of an engine stop during cleaning, the cleaning process should be interrupted.

Note!

For the turbine side cleaning its strictly recommended to respect the procedure and the proper cleaning sequence which has been defined for the specific turbocharger. Cleaning procedure.

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To correctly perform the washing procedure, the injected water pressure has to be adjusted in the external system to 2 0,2 bar and maintained at this level for all the washing sequence. See fig. 1.5 10 for system layout.

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The turbine should be daily washed by water injection during engine operation. The cleaning process have good results as long as the deposit amount is limited. In this cleaning method the water is not acting as a solvent but removes mechanically the deposits by means of the water droplets impact. Use clean water without additives.

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1.5.6.5.

Turbine side cleaning

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1.5 19

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Scavenging air supply

Regulating knob for water flow

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1.5 20

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IN

L ball valves

Fig. 1.5 10 Turbine washing system layout 1 Connect the portable flowmeter/regulator to the turbocharger piping, see fig. 1.5 10 . The flow meter allows water flow regulation to the required water amount. 2 Before washing, make sure that the exhaust gas temperature before the turbine is not higher than 430C. In case it is not, reduce the engine load till turbine inlet temperature is 430C.

3 Allow a sufficient time for the cooling down of all the components before cleaning (15 minutes at least). Gas temperature is indeed different from components temperatures. 4 Make sure that before starting the washing sequence, water supply is in close position and the L " ball valve is on scavenging air supply position, as per normal running conditions. See fig. 1.5 11 .

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Water supply through the flowmeter

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Fig. 1.5 11 Position of valves before and after cleaning procedure on L engines

Fig. 1.5 12 Position of valves during cleaning procedure on L engines

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1.5 21

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Manual Wrtsil 38

6 Open water supply and adjust the water flow pressure by external system to have 2 0,2 bar. See fig. 1.5 12 . 7 Check for water flow indication on the flowmeter to be as indications in the following table. If water flow indicator is not showing the required value, adjust it by the regulating knob. In order to avoid any flooding of the turbocharger casing, water flow and pressure parameters should be strictly adhered to. TPL size TPL69 TPL73 Water flow rate per TC 0.28 ... 0.34 dm3/s 0.39 ... 0.45 dm3/s

9 Close water supply to stop the water flow and turn L " valve to scavenging air supply position, as shown in fig. 1.5 11 .

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1.5 22

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Note!

10 After both TC have been washed, allow sufficient time for drying all parts to prevent corrosion on internal casing surface. 11 Engine should be run at low load for further 15 minutes to allow proper thermal distribution, before loading it again. 12 Repeat complete washing sequence for the turbocharger every 150 operating hours. This washing frequency has to be considered as a starting indication. The Frequency of Turbine Side Washing procedures should be indeed modified according to engine performance feed back together with first scheduled turbocharger inspection results.

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8 Water injection time is 10 minutes per each turbine. (During washing sequence, exhaust gas temperature after the turbocharger may significantly fall down, between 50 to 150C; exhaust gas temperature before the turbocharger may rise up to 500C.)

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5 Turn Lvalve" to switch it from scavenging air supply to water supply.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

The compensator (Bellow) enables thermal expansion. Make sure that, whenever the compensator has to be replaced, the arrow has to point according to exhaust gas flow direction, see fig. 1.5 13 . There is no gasket between compensator and exhaust manifold, it is a face to face connection tightened with "V" clamps, see fig 1.5 14 . Centre line deflection of the compensator must be limited till 1mm. The ducting can be inspected after removal of one or more panels.

Fig. 1.5 13 Gas flow in compensator

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Fig. 1.5 14 Bypass pipe compensator V Clamp thigtening instructions 1 Ensure flanges and sealing surfaces are clean. 2 Place the compensator (1) in position and ensure that the flanges assemble freely. Make sure the compensator is in line. (maximum off set 1mm)

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Compensator bypass

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1.5 23

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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1.5 24

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3 Fit the clamp V sections over the flange profiles. See fig. 1.5 13 . 4 Engage the Tbolts through the trunnions and locate the nuts on the Tbolts. 5 Overtighten the nuts evenly to 20Nm, keeping the distance between the gaps equal on each side of the clamp, then slacken them off a turn. Next tighten them to 12Nm.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

All signals and system parts described in this section are shown in the block diagram, figure 1.5 15 .

MCM700 Engine speed (flywheel side) SE167

TC Acquisition Module

Charge air pressure PT601.1

Fig. 1.5 15 Block Diagram Exhaust WasteGate Valve Control

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1.5.6.7.1. General

Exhaust wastegate valve control is used for limiting the charge air pressure at high loads. The charge air pressure is limited to a constant level, typically to the level at 85% load by opening the wastegate valve (1) gradually at loads over 85%, see fig. 1.5 16 . The wastegate valve allows the exhaust gasses to bypass the turbocharger, from turbine inlet (3) directly to turbine outlet (2), in this way the the turbocharger speed decreases which results in a lower charge air pressure. The WECS controls the wastegate valve based on engine speed and charge air pressure measurements. In addition, the WECS performs control loop failure detection to result in restricted valve control and generating a wastegate failure alarm. Basically, the failure detection is based on actual charge air pressure and the validity of the charge air pressure measurement. Furthermore, load reduction requests are activated in case control loop failures are detected. The position of the wastegate valve is controlled by the Wrtsil Engine Control System (WECS). In the WECS a signal from the charge air pressure and engine speed is converted in a 4 to 20 mA signal which operates a pneumatic actuator (4) with a service air pressure between 0 and 8 bar. To visualise the valve position an indicator is provided. The control of the wastegate is indicated at the WECS on the Local Display Unit ( LDU ) at the bypass and wastegate page .

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J1939 CV519 Modbus

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ST174 IS743 Valve related info

Load reduction request Waste gate valve command

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Engine speed (camshaft side) RM

1.5.6.7.

Exhaust waste gate valve control

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Fig. 1.5 16 Position of wastegate valve

1.5.6.7.2. Wastegate pneumatic control valve assembly


The pneumatic control valve assembly for wastegate consists basically of a control valve (1) an actuator (2) a drive shaft (3) and a valve (4). See fig. 1.5 17 . The valve (4) has a metallic seat which, is within a certain range self adjusting. This means the more the valve is closed the tighter it becomes. The flow direction is indicated by the arrows in the figure. See fig. 1.5 17 . The flow direction for the wastegate valve (4) is in opposite direction of the arrow on the valvehousing.

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01

For settings of the wastegate valve, see setpoints on the Instrument Data List in the Catalogue.

02 To turbine outlet

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

04

03

Fig. 1.5 17 Wastegate valve assembly

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1.5.6.7.3. Normal operation

The MCM700 utilises a PID type of closed loop control with engine speed (SE167, ST174) or engine load (UT793, GT165) and charge air pressure (PT601) as input signals. The control output (CV519) is connected to the control valve positioner. Either the engine speed or the engine load is utilised to calculate the charge air pressure set point for the PID control. The engine load signal will be utilised for pump drive applications. Otherwise, the engine speed signal will be utilised.

1.5.6.7.4. Control loop failure monitoring


The charge air pressure signal (PT601) is essential for the wastegate control. If the signal falls, the MCM700 is not able to control the wastegate and initiates the following actions: Sensor failure (PT601) becomes active Command wastegate valve (CV519) to closed position Generate load reduction request due to failed strategic sensor (PT601) If the difference between actual charge air pressure and desired charge air pressure atcertain engine speed or load is too high, then the MCM700 initiates the following actions: wastegate valve alarm (CV519) becomes active Command wastegate valve (CV519) to open position Generate load reduction request due to failed control loop (CV519)

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Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.5 27

A mechanical valve failure or an electrical failure in the control loop can cause this type of failure. Both load reduction requests imply to reduce the engine load to 85% (max.).

1.5.6.8.

Local indications

1.5.6.9.

Remote outputs

Detailed alarm and load reduction request related information is available for the external system through Modbus communication.

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1.5 28

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Detailed control related information is available on the Local Display Unit (LDU) through Modbus communication.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

The effects due to single system failures for each subfunction are described in the Cause & Effect Matrixes given below.

1.5.6.10.1.

Exhaust Wastegate Valve Control Troubleshooting


Failure Indication
Modbus Hardwired Engine Response

No.

Failure description

MCM700 failure

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N Y Y N Y Y N Y Y

TC Acquisition Module failure 1)

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3 PT601.1 failure 4 CV519 failure

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Availability of wastegate valve control

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Effect description

1.5.6.10. Degraded operating modes

Control: Exhaust waste gate valve control is not operational; control valve in closed position Modbus: communication is not operational;alarm activated by external alarm system Hardwired:WECS fail alarm (NS871) activated Control: Exhaust waste valve control is not operational; the control is acting on frozen value of signal PT601 Safety: load reduction request is activated at faulty Acquisition moduleTC; waste gate control valve CV519 must be closed manually Modbus: TC Acquisition Module failure alarm (TE832) active; Sensor failure (PT601.1) is activated; TC Acquisition Module load reduction request is activated Hardwired: WECS fail alarm (NS871) is activated; Load reduction request (IS743) is activated Control: Exhaust waste valve control is not operational; waste gate control valve CV519 is forced to closed position Safety: load reduction request is activated at faulty PT601.1 Modbus: PT601.1 failure indication is activated Hardwired: load reduction request (IS743) is activated Control: Exhaust waste valve can not be controlled by WECS; waste gate control valve CV519 is forced to open position Safety: Load reduction request is activated when the valve failure (CV519) is detected Modbus: WECS activates waste gate valve (CV519) failure alarm and load reduction request when the valve failure is detected Hardwired: Load reduction request (IS743) is activated

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Manual Wrtsil 38

SE167 failure Y Y N

ST174 failure Y Y N

Additional notes:

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1) Automatic control of exhaust wastegate valve to closed position at faulty TC Acquisition Module requires major software update.

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Modbus: Sensor failure (SE167) is activated when engine running Control: Engine speed related exhaust waste gate valve control is fully operational Modbus: Sensor failure (ST174) is activated when engine running

Control: Engine speed related exhaust waste gate valve control is fully operational

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Charge Air and Exhaust Gas System

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1.6 1

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1.6. Control System

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The engine is equipped with a Wrtsil Engine Control System, the WECS 7000. The WECS comprises: Measuring of the engine and turbocharger speed Controlling the engine speed / load. Engine safety system starting of the engine stopping of the engine start blocking automatic shut down of the engine load reduction request The signal processing of all monitoring and alarm sensors The read out of important engine parameters on a graphical display The data communication with external systems (e.g. alarm and monitoring systems). For functional description of the WECS 7000 see section 1.6.8. Control of the rotating speed of an engine is accomplished by varying the rate of fuel admission in the engine cylinders. The duty to which the engine is applied usually determines the degree of accuracy required in engine speed control. An actuator is used to control the engine speed and thus enables the engine to respond to changing load requirements. For maintenance background information, safety aspects, tools, intervals, tolerances, inspection, tightening torques and instructions, see chapter 2.4

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Note!

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1.6.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

For specific information about speed control unit, actuator and booster, consult the subsuppliers manual.

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1.6 3

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The speed control system consists of: A digital speed control unit. An electro hydraulically controlled actuator (1) with ball head back up and mechanically driven by actuator drive (2), see fig. 1.6 1 . The actuator provides the mechanical power for displacement of the HP fuel pump racks by transmission via power output shaft (3). A booster servo unit (4), see fig. 1.6 1 . A linkage system from the actuators to the HP fuel pumps (fuel control mechanism), see section 1.6.4.

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1.6.2.

Speed control system

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Many governing problems are the result of improper selection or improper treatment of the oil used in the actuator. The actuator should be serviced on a routine schedule. Develop the schedule with consideration to the operating temperature and the conditions in which the governing system operates.

Consult the suppliers manual for oil quality and viscosity selection as well as for acceptable operating temperatures. Maintain the oil level in the actuator between the limits on the sight glass and do not overfill. During a refill keep the oil level low and add more oil during running of the engine if needed. The oil in bad condition causes approximately 50% of all governing troubles. It is strictly recommended all the booster oil connections to the actuator have to follow an upwards or at least horizontal direction in order to avoid air bubbles could lead to any misfunctioning. During engine operation, when one of the following circumstances are observed the engine should be stopped, the oil changed and the reason for the oil deterioration be examined: The oil is contaminated or suspected to contribute for speed instability. The oil is supposed to be dirty and fumes bad. There is water in the oil. The viscosity of the oil has changed; increased or decreased. The actuator has run at a temperature higher than recommended due to the used oil.

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The actuator parts are damaged or in bad conditions.

Governing operating temperatures have changed.

The oil in operation has a wrong viscosity range.

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While changing the oil type flush the hydraulic system before the oil change. Do not mix different oil types. The most of the actuators with sumps do not have filters, therefore, add only clean oil. If water happens to enter the actuator then change the oil immediately. Clean oil is of most importance in hydraulic governing system.

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1.6.3.

Actuator

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

The booster is positioned lower than the actuator to prevent trapped air in booster and oil lines.

Note!

Consult the related section on the Suppliers Manual for detailed information about the specific mounted booster and maintenance.

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3 2 4 Fig. 1.6 1 Actuator / drive / booster

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8 7 6 5 1.6 5

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The booster (4) is activated by compressed air (starting air) and when the engine is going to be started the air is supplied at (5). The booster supplies the actuator with pressurized oil via lines (7) in order to have enough oil pressure for the HP fuel pumps linkage manoeuvring, that oil pressure eliminates the pressure rising lag due to the gear pump in the actuator; finally a faster engine start and a reduced starting air consumption are achieved. See fig. 1.6 1 .

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1.6.3.1.

Booster

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

General The actuator output shaft movement is transferred to the common control shaft (9) via lever (10), link (11) and lever (12). The common control shaft is supported by bearings (13). See fig. 1.6 2 .

Warning!

On the control shaft mechanical limiters are mounted in order to limit the rotation of the common fuel control shaft and thus the stroke of the fuel racks; the limiters are factory adjusted at minimum and maximum position. Lever (14) is connected to the HP fuel pump fuel rack. A sensor (17) at the end of the common fuel control shaft indicates the fuel rack position on the WECS display.

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20 10 Fig. 1.6 2 Fuel control mechanism 1.6 6

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Special attention must be paid to the fuel linkage mechanism in order to have easy movement and proper connections since a defect may result in a disastrous engine over speed, an unstable engine operation or a limited engine load range.

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12 11 17 9 13 16 14 13

1.6.4.

Fuel control mechanism

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

The fuel racks (22) are provided with a scale in mm divisions as indicator.

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1.6.4.2.
23 Fig. 1.6 3 Load indication Fig. 1.6 4 HP fuel pump connection

From the control shaft the rotation is transferred to the HP fuel pump racks through the lever (23). If one of the racks is going to jam the torsion springs enable the complete movement of the control shaft and thus the movement of the remaining fuel pump racks.

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HP fuel pump connection
1.6 7

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22

1.6.4.1.

Load indication HP fuel pump

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Adjust spring loaded levers with set screws (25) at a preclearance of 5 mm.

25

Fig. 1.6 5 Preclearance levers to HP fuel pump

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Place actuator lever in mid position.

3 Record all pump rack positions and calculate the average position. With the set screws (25) all pump racks readings should be adjusted at the average value calculated.

4 Check the position of the actuator in relation with the HP fuel pump rack position according table 1.6.1 and procedure of section 1.6.4.5.

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1.6.4.3.

Fuel rack adjustment

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Control System

1.6.4.4.1. Local stop

Normally the engine is stopped remotely in the control room or locally by means of the stop button on the Local Control Panel. In case of a failure of the normal stop functions the engine can be stopped by pushing the emergency stop button (4) on the local start / stop unit, fig. 1.6 6 .

In case of a failure of the normal and emergency stop functions, the engine can be stopped by means of stop lever (1), see fig. 1.6 6 . When the lever is moved to the stop position the common fuel control shaft pulls the fuel rack on the HP fuel pumps to the zero" position.

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1.6.4.4.2. Manual stop

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01 05

1.6.4.4.

Stop mechanism

Fig. 1.6 6 Local start and stop unit

Note!

Valve (2) should always be open during engine operation to ensure sufficient control air to the start / stop unit. See also the start air system diagram which is enclosed in chapter 3.1.

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1.6 9

1.6.4.4.3. Stop device

Check of stop cylinder adjustment (limit position) 1 Set the stop lever (1) to the normal operation" position. See fig. 1.6 6 .

2 Place the actuator at 100 % fuel position. The reference scale (20) is at position 8. See fig. 1.6 2 .

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26 5

Fig. 1.6 7 Emergency stop device Stop cylinders maintenance 4 Check the control air pressure at the stop cylinders. Check for air leaks in the piping. 6 Check the mechanical parts, the piston, the sealing ring (26) and the cylinder (27) for wear and replace them if necessary. See fig. 1.6 7 .

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3 Push the button (3) on the stop solenoid valve, see fig. 1.6 6 . and check if the HP fuel pump racks (22) are moving to zero" position. See fig. 1.6 7

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1 Place the HP fuel pump racks (16) on position 48 mm by moving lever (10), see fig. 1.6 2 . 2 Check if the load indicator scale on the actuator of power output shafts indicates 8. 3 Check the free movement of the linkage system. 4 Place the HP fuel pump rack on position 0 mm by moving lever (10). Check if load indicator scale of power output shaft of the actuator indicates about 0 . Table: 1.6.1 Check point 100 % load Manual stop actuator lever 0 8 0 Fuel pump rack position 0 48 0

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1.6.4.6.

1 Place the actuator output shaft in 100% position and observe that all fuel pump racks are also at 100% load position. 2 Move the stop lever (1) in stop position and check if all fuel racks are back in zero fuel position. 3 Place the actuator output shaft again in the 100% position and observe that all fuel pump racks are back at 100% load position.

4 Activate the stop cylinders (by pressing button (3)) and observe the stop lever has moved in stop position. 5 After the fuel racks are in the " zero fuel position" the locking pawl (05) should fit in the slot (06), see fig. 1.6 6 .

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Checking actuator stop position

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1.6.4.5.

Checking linkage between actuator and common fuel control shaft

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1.6 11

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

Be sure the connection to the actuator is free.

Removing 1 Make a clear reference match mark on the levers and the power output shafts.

Remove the bolts and lift the actuator from the engine.

2 Fit the actuator and fasten the bolts and the electrical connections to the actuator. 3 Mount the levers according to the match marks on the power shaft. In case of a new actuator copy the old mark.

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1.6 12

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4 Check the position of the actuator in relation with the HP fuel pump rack position according to the table 1.6.1 and procedure of section 1.6.4.5.

5 Check the actuator stop position according the procedure highlighted in section 1.6.4.6.

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Mounting 1 Clean the joint faces of the actuator and check the condition of the serrated output shafts of the actuator.

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2 Remove the levers and disconnect the electrical connections of the actuator.

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1.6.4.7.

Removing / Mounting the actuator

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Control System

Trouble shooting Any fluctuation in engine speed or load is usually due to an improper actuator working however, before exchanging or doing any inspection on the actuator check the following items: 1 Check engine load is not beyond maximum load. 2 Check if the fuel supply to the fuel pumps is at operating pressure and no vapour lock exists. 3 Check the cylinder firing pressures and the proper injectors working. 4 Check the adjustment of the external setting devices for the actuator. 5 Check the adjustment and the linkage between the actuator and the HP fuel pumps. 6 Check the actuator drive for any misalignment or eventual excessive backlash. 7 Check the level and the quality of the actuator lube oil. Replace the lube oil and flush the lube oil system if it is supposed to be critical. 8 Check the actuator oil pressure at the test port of the actuator.

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Booster maintenance 1 Check if the sump of the actuator is filled with oil up to the correct level. 2 Check the starting air supply is connected to the appropriate booster air inlet. Use the alternative inlet with the builtin orifice if a slower fuel rack movement is required. 3 When all the air and the oil connections are secured, purge the air from the booster and the oil lines by providing the booster with air from an independent supply without cranking the engine. Add oil to the actuator as much as needed. A certain failure into the purge air process may result in residual trapped air and thus in a sluggish response of the governing system.

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The maintenance of the actuator is limited and should mainly consists of: inspection for the proper working of the actuator inspection for the proper connections of the linkage mechanism lubricating oil refreshment

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1.6.5.

Governing system maintenance and trouble shooting

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1.6 13

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

3 The clearances of all the connections should be at minimum values. The total backlash should not exceed 0.5 mm at the HP fuel pump rack position. 4 Check the adjustment of the mechanism and the stop position actuators at regular intervals.

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2 Keep all the parts of the fuel control system clean and well preserved against any rust.

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Fuel control mechanism maintenance 1 The fuel control mechanism should be operated with a minimal friction resistance. In the linkages and in the common fuel control shaft the bearings require no lubrication and should not be in contact with degreasing agents. The pivot points should be periodically lubricated with engine oil/grease.

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Control System

The oil mist detector (OMD) protects the engine against serious damages which might be originated from a crank drive bearing or piston component overheating. The atmosphere of the crankcase compartments is continuously drawn out by means of headers and directed through an optical measuring track; in that measuring track the opacity (turbidity) of the drawn crankcase atmosphere is determined by means of infrared light. Air from the air supply control unit is being transferred through the pipe (2) into the OMD. By means of the under pressure due to the air flow the oil mist is sucked through the pipe (3), which is connected with the oil mist suction line in every crankcase compartment. The air flow coming from the OMD should leave free without any obstruction and without pipe connections. In the OMD the oil mist opacity is being measured and its status can be read on the display.

Note!

In case of an oil mist alarm, the oil mist detector must be in condition to react within the next few seconds and shut down the engine, in order to minimise immediate or consequential damages!

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Fig. 1.6 8 Oil mist detector For more information about the performance, the maintenance, etc, see the supplier manual delivered as a part of the engine documentation.

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1.6.6.

Oil mist detector

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1.6 15

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Documentation

The following set of instrumentation related documents are delivered with the engine documentation: Setting list: To state setpoint values for alarms, load reductions, shut downs and start blocking which are related to the sensors list of the specific project. Wiring diagrams: Connection diagram of the specific engine instrumentation signals and Junction Box. Subsupplier manuals: Manuals related sub supplier equipment, e.g. speed control, OMD.

Note!

Do not modify any parameter setting of the listed documents without written permission of the engine manufacturer.

Instrumentation

The engine is equipped with the following type of sensors:

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Pressure analogue sensor (0.54.5V ratiometric): For all pressure measurements handled by the WECS Pressure analogue sensor (420mA): For all pressure measurements handled by systems other than WECS, e.g. speed control, external systems Pressure switch (on/off type): For the WECS backup safety system and external systems Thermocouple (type K): For all temperature measurements related to the exhaust gas, main bearings and cylinder liners Thermistor (NTC type resistor): For all temperature measurements related to fluids and air Magnetic pickup: For speed measuring of turbine speed and engine speed handled by the WECS (main safety) and the speed control Inductive pickup (proximity type): For engine speed measurement handled by the WECS (main safety and backup safety) Level switch (NPN type): For lubricating oil level measurement handled by the WECS Position switch (on/off type): For detecting the position of e.g. turning gear handle, bypass valve position, etc.

Details of the sensor can be found in the Instrument List.

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1.6.7.

Engine instrumentation

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Control System

Switches

With reference to the specific engine wiring diagrams, all the on/off switches are drawn in the specified position of operation. This information is relevant with respect to the failsafe concepts of the alarm and the safety system while changing switches or wiring.

Note!

Some switches are normally opened e.g. will be engaged in normal engine operating conditions. Check / calibrate the switches, transmitters and temperature elements accordingly to the maintenance schedule, section 2.4.1.

Note!

1.6.7.2.

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X

General about speed sensors connections. The engine is equipped with speed sensors (2) and (3) at several locations. See fig. 1.6 9 and 1.6 10 . Turning gear wheel There are two magnetic pickups for the WECS and two pickups for the speed control system to detect the engine speed at the turning gear wheel (1) at the drivingend. The speed controller converts the pulses from the magnetic pickup to engine rpm.

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Speed sensors

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Fig. 1.6 9 Speed sensor at the turning gear wheel

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1.6.7.1.

Switches, transmitters and temperature elements

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fig. 1.6 10 Speed sensors at camshaft

Warning!

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1 5

Turbocharger One magnetic pickup for turbine to detect the turbine speed. See subsuppliers manual for details. The speed monitoring system converts the pulses from the magnetic pickups to the turbine rpm value. Engine speed sensor adjustment check Check the speed sensor adjustment only with a stopped engine. Improper sensor adjustments can result in failure of overspeed detection and loss of speed/control functions. Therefore it is necessary to check the sensor adjustment prior to a first start of the engine. The following checks should be carried out: Remove the connector of the sensor. 2 Check the distance X between the sensor tip and tooth of gear wheel. "X" must be 1.5 mm 0.5 mm. See fig. 1.6 9 and 1.6 10 . 3 Adjust the gap if necessary and secure the locking nut (use Loctite to avoid loosening). 4 Check if tooth of gear wheel will not touch the sensor tip while turning. Install the connector of the sensor.

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Camshaft gearwheel One inductive proximity switches (3) to detect engine speed at the camshaft gearwheel cover (4). The speed monitoring system converts the pulses from the proximity switches to engine rpm.

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Control System

Note!

ESD, the invisible threat!

The components of modern printed circuit boards are sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD). Any damage due to electrostatic discharge can cause immediate failures of a printed circuit board or problems as the components start to deteriorate. Pay always attention to ESD protection, just because the ESD damage is usually invisible. Always handle carefully printed circuit boards, EPROMs and SRAM. Static electricity is generally induced when two materials are rubbed against each other. This causes unbalanced electricity in the objects (or persons) and they become charged with static electricity. On the other hand, conducting materials in the environment usually have a balanced electrical situation. A discharge current is induced when a charged person touches a conducting object. Even when people is moving around charging and discharging processes continuously takes place but normally causing no damage. Those discharge currents, however, easily could damage the thin layers in the integrated circuits. The following precautions significantly reduce the risk of failures and malfunctions due to ESD: Always keep the board in its protection bag/box during transportation and storage. Remove it from the bag only shortly before the installation. Make sure your body always has the same potential as the table frame, board, rail, or junction box in which you install a printed circuit board. This can be done with help of a special groundterminal with wristband, but also by simply touching the object with one hand and inserting the printed circuit board with the other hand. Avoid touching the connector pins! Use the protective bag under and between the boards when placing them on a table. Do not pass the board straight into the hands of another person exceptif it is in a protective bag. It is also possible to place the board on a nonconducting table and let the other person pick it up from there. Clear the installation site from all construction or package materials before the installation. Keep the environment tidy. Before inserting the board into its frame or enclosure, check that the frame or the enclosure are clean. Check that the connector pins are clean and straight so that the board can be easily and properly inserted into its frame. Do not place the board on a conducting surface such as a metallic table. If the board has been placed on a conducting table, place one hand on the table and lift the board with the other one. Handle damaged boards as functional ones, because the damage grade is usually unknown.

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1.6.7.3. Electro Static Discharge (ESD)

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Introduction The aim of this section is to give an instruction concerning treatment and protection of engine mounted electrical equipment when arc welding is performed in the vicinity. Precautions Main principles: Preventing uncontrolled current loops while welding. Welding current path must always be checked, there should be a straight route from the welding point back to the return connection of the welding apparatus. The highest current is always following the path where it meets the lowest resistance. In certain cases the return current can therefore proceed via grounding wires and electronic components in the control system. To avoid that, the distance between the welding point and the return connection clamp of the welding apparatus should always be as short as possible and without electronic components in the returning loop path. Attention must be paid to the connectivity of the return connection clamp, a bad contact might also cause sparkles and radiation.

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Preventing radiation. The welding current and the arc is emitting a wide spectrum of electromagnetic radiation. That might cause damages on sensitive electronic equipment. To avoid those damages all cabinets and terminal boxes must be kept closed while welding. Sensitive equipment can also be protected by means of shieldings with a conductive metal plate. Also avoid having the cables of the welding apparatus laying in parallel with wires and cables in the control system. The high welding current is easily inducing secondary currents in other conductive materials.

Preventing damages due to sparks. Sparks are commonly flying all around from the welding arc. Few materials withstand the heat from those sparkles. Therefore all cabinets and terminal boxes should be kept closed while welding; sensors, actuators, cables and other equipment on the engine must be protected by means of proper protection. Sparks can also be a problem after they have cooled down, i.e. causing short circuits, sealing problems etc.

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1.6.7.4. Welding precautions

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Control System

1.6.7.5. General list of abbreviations


A/D BDC Bit Analogue to Digital Converter Bottom Dead Center Binary Digit, 0 or 1; used in computers to store information Brake Mean Effective Pressure Before Top Dead Center Group of 8 bits Crank Angle degrees / Charge Air Charge Air Cooler Controller Area Network Capacitive Coil Driver Cylinder Control Module Direct Current Engine Position Signal Engine Speed Signal Flow Control Valve Functional Block Diagram GasDiesel Gas Regulating Unit High Temperature

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BMEP BTDC Byte CA CAC CAN CCD DC CCM EPS ESS FCV GD GRU HT FBD

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Close the covers of the cabinet and all the distributed units Deactivate the system by disconnecting all external connectors (X1 ... X6). If the welding point is close to (approximately within a radius of 2 m) an electronic module (CCM, MCM, etc.) disconnect all connectors of the unit Do not connect the welding apparatus return line to the aluminium profile containing electronic modules. The profile is used as a common ground for these modules. If convenient, protect harnesses, cables, sensors and other equipment from sparks with a proper metal sheet.

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Precaution checklist The following precautions must be paid attention to before welding in the vicinity of the WECS control system:

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

I/O I/P ID J 1939

Input/Output Identification number

Current to Pressure converter

A high level protocol databus, running on CAN, standardized by SAE (Also referred to as slowCAN) kbit/s (times) thousand bits per second Light Emitting Diode Low Temperature Mega bit (one million bits)

LED LT Mb MB MCC MCM MFI Modbus RS 485 MPI N.C. NC NO PCB PID

Mega Byte (one million bytes) Main Combustion Chamber Main Control Module Main Fuel Injection

databus, speed 9.6/19.2 bits/second Arrangement with masterslave tbd Interfaces MPI or Profibus Not Connected Normally Open Normally Closed

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PCC PLC Profibus PT Pt100 RPM SCI SG RS485 SSM TBD TC TDC TJ Sub System Module Top Dead Center

Printed Circuit Board Pre Combustion Chamber Control function with ProportionalIntegrationDerivation Programmable Logic Controller High level protocol specified in European Fieldbus Standard EN50170 Profibus is an RS 485 databus, speed 187.5 bits/second Pressure Transmitter Platinum temperature sensor (rpm) Revolutions per Minute Standard serial databus Serial Communication Interface Sparkignited Gasengine (or tbd) To Be Determined TurboCharger or ThermoCouple Thermocouple type J

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HW

Hardwired

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

TS TT UPS WE CAN WECS Wepmit WOIS

Thermocouple type S Thermocouple type T

Uninterruptible Power Supply

Wrtsil Engine Controller Area Network Wrtsil Engine Control System

Wrtsil Engine Parameter Monitoring Interface Tool

1.6.7.6. List of sensor tags and ISO codes


Normally a tag will identify sensors. For example: You find sensor tag PT201 for the pressure transmitter measuring the lubricating oil pressure at engine inlet. The mnemonic represents the type of sensor. The numerical part indicates the location of the measurement point in the system. The mnemonic is built up according to ISO3511/2. The most common mnemonics are:

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CV Control Valve GS GT LS LT nY Level Switch PDS PDT PSZ PT ST TE TT UI SE Speed Emitter UT

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Position Sensor Position Transmitter Level Transmitter Calculated value Pressure Switch Pressure Transmitter Speed Transmitter Temperature Emitter Temperature Transmitter Universal Indicator Universal Transmitter

Pressure Differential Switch Pressure Differential Transmitter

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Wrtsil Operator Interface System

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TK

Thermocouple type K

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The first digit refers to the system. The system numbering is as follows: 0nn DWI water 1nn 2nn 3nn 4nn 5nn 6nn 7nn 8nn 9nn diesel fuel system lube oil system cooling water exhaust gas charge air miscellaneous control system compressed air

gas fuel system

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1.6 24

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The numerical part refers to the location in the system, which is Wrtsil specific. The sensor tags are described in the instrument list belonging to each engine.

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Control System

1.6.8.1.

System description

1.6.8.1.1. General

1.6.8.1.2. System structure

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CWCAN (500 kbit/s) J1939 (250 kbit/s) MCM700 TC & FE Acquisition Modules Local Display Unit Governor Junction box

The essential components of WECS 7000 are shown in fig. 1.6 11 . The WECS can be connected to service tool (laptop) for maintenance.
CANrepeater

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CCM10
Exh. temp.
LUBE OIL STOP SHUTDOWN RELA Y LUBE OIL LOCAL SHUTDOWN BLOCKIN BLOCKIN START G G OPTIONAL LOCAL SHUTDOWN START WECS START MCU STOP/SHUTDOW FUEL LIMITER N SLOW LOCAL STOP LUBE OIL SHUTDOWN TURNING RM11 FAILURE OVERSPEE FAILUR SWITCH SHUTDOWN E ALARMSWITCH D OPTIONAL SPEED SWITCH EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN 1 SPEED SWITCH FAILURE STOP WECS ENERGIZED STOP 2 FAILUR SPEED WATCHDOG SOLENOID STOP/SHUTDOW E OVERRID PULSE EMERGENCY STOP N FAILURE E SHUTDOWN SHORT RESET CIRCUIT

The Wrtsil Engine Control System (WECS) 7000 is a diesel engine automation system for monitoring and controlling the safety functions of the engine. WECS 7000 is not a ships alarm system. Generally, relevant engine data available in WECS is transmitted through serial line to the ships alarm system. Essential signals (e.g. engine start/stop, standby pump control, external shutdown, etc.) are hardwired to the ships automation system. The interface between WECS 7000 and the ships automation system(s) is accommodated in a dedicated Junction Box near the engine. An external governor, not part of WECS, generally accommodated in the Junction Box handles speed control of the diesel engine.

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Exh. temp. Liner temp.

Relay Module RM

Hardwired connections

Modbus (RS485, 9.6/19.2 kbit/s)

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Fig. 1.6 11 Structure of WECS

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Cylinders
Liner temp.

1.6.8.

WECS Control System

back up instruments Engine mounted

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Start, Stop and Slow turn Solenoids

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Ships Automation System

1.6 25

Here below a summary of the modules follows with their main functionality descriptions:

Cylinder controller:

Main controller MCM700: CANrepeater: RM:

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1.6 26

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LDU: LCP:

1.6.8.1.3. Signal conditioning

All applicable sensor signals are measured and processed individually. The sensor signals, excluding signals from backup safety sensors, are sampled with a sampling rate depending on the required accuracy. The sensor data (binary information) is monitored in the MCM700 main controller module for changes in status values, which occur whenever preset levels of alarms, safety stops, load reduction requests, prelub/standby pump control, etcetera, are exceeded. All relevant measured (and calculated) values can be shown locally on the LDU and are available for the ships alarm system. The signals from the backup safety sensors are measured and individually processed in the Relay Module for changes in status values, which occur whenever preset levels of safety stops are exceeded. Safety stop info is also relayed back to the MCM700 main controller and

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FE/TC acquisition modules: Data acquisition module, for measuring engine parameters not related to the cylinders Data acquisition module; for measuring cylinder related parameters (max. 3 cylinders per module). Main controller for safety, monitoring and control. Communication module for service.

Relay Module, Backup safety system, for engine speed, lubricating oil pressure, HTcooling water temperature/ pressure. Control system for start, stop and emergency stop. Local Display Unit; monochrome screen, shows engine parameters. Local Control Panel; panel with LDU, operating push buttons and backup indicators Junction box: Interface between WECS7000 and ships alarm systems.

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All sensors on the engine are connected to the Control Modules. The number of modules depend on the cylinder configuration. The signals to and from the external system have to be connected to the junction box terminals. The junction box consist of power supplies for the WECS7000 and a galvanic separation of I/O signals to and from WECS7000.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

1.6.8.1.4. Failure detection

1.6.8.1.5. Preventing unnecessary safety actions

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WECS 7000 has the following design features to ensure proper handling of the safety function: when sensor failure is detected, the related sensor is excluded from any safety action by the WECS proper filtering of sensor signals is utilised to avoid unnecessary safety actions (e.g. false stops) during fluctuations or transients in the sensor signal galvanic isolation of I/O signals to and from WECS 7000 to avoid electrical interaction Shutdownoverride, to disable shutdowns in critical situations The WECS design is failsafe with respect to the ships safety

1.6.8.1.6. Redundancy of sensor and WECS 7000


Redundant overspeed detection system Redundant safety system with respect to the safety functions in accordance with the classification demands Redundant emergency stop system Redundant power supply (24Vdc and 230Vac) circuitry with automatic changeover functionality

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The failure detection in WECS 7000 is based on the following principles: Sensor failure detection (analog), i.e. out of (sensor) range detection including wire break detection Monitoring of stop solenoid loops, i.e. open loop and short circuit detection Wire break detection of digital safety sensors, e.g. emergency stop loop Control loop failure detection (e.g. waste gate valve control and bypass valve control) based on evaluation of control valve feedback signals and engine data Module failure based on a CAN data frame detection scheme between data acquisition module (acquisition modules, cylinder controllers) and MCM700 main controller

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therefore can be shown locally on the LDU and is available for the ships alarm system.

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1.6 27

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.1.7. Diesel engine control principles

The control sequences are stepwise described in the tables below. Start sequence The control principles of the start sequence are outlined in table 1.6.2.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Ready to start, fuel control enabled Start command active Start solenoid activated

Fuel control to start fuel limit

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Engine running 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Engine running Stop command active Stop solenoid activated Fuel control to zero fuel Ready to start

Starting solenoid deactivated at n1 rpm Fuel control for running activated at n2 rpm

Shutdown sequence The control principles of the shutdown sequence initiated by a stop command are outlined in table 1.6.3. A description of the shutdown sequence initiated by a safety stop and emergency stop sequence can be found in section 1.6.8.4. In these cases, the shutdown sequence must be reset manually Table 1.6.3: Shutdown sequence

Stop solenoid deactivated when engine stands still Fuel control enabled when engine stands still after 10 sec.

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Table 1.6.2: Start sequence

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General The principles of the following diesel engine control functions are outlined in this section: Start sequence Shutdown sequence Speed control Bypass valve control Exhaust waste gate valve control A description of the failure aspects and safety override aspects can be found in section 1.6.8.4.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

Note!

The speed control is not part of the WECS

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1.6 29

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Exhaust waste gate valve control The WECS utilises a PID type of closed loop control with engine speed or engine load and charge air pressure as input signals. The control output is connected to the control valve positioner. Either the engine speed or the engine load is utilised to calculate the charge air pressure set point for the PID control.

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Speed control The speed is basically a PID type of closed loop control with engine speed and speed reference as (main) input signals. The fuel control output signal is connected to the fuel rack actuator on the engine. The WECS disables/enables the speed controller. Disabling the speed controller actually means set fuel control output to zero fuel position.

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.1.8. Main control software structure

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When the system is powered up, the default engine mode is set to stop mode. After this, the different control modes are activated according to the conditions defined for these modes. If an engine mode with a higher priority is triggered the engine mode will be changed to the mode with the highest priority. For operations control, the structure of the software program is not the most interesting part, but the structure of operations with as starting point the stop mode. Stop mode The stop mode is the basic engine mode when the engine is not running. The engine is "ready for start" as indicated on the Local Display Unit (LDU) or remotely, unless one or more start blockings are active. Possible start blockings are: Turning gear engaged Stop lever in stop position Low control air pressure Low lubricating oil pressure Low lubrication oil level in turbo charger Low (HT) cooling water temperature/pressure at engine inlet External start block The prelubrication pump runs continuously to prevent the start blocking of the "low prelubricating oil pressure" and " low lubrication oil level in the turbo charger" .

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The WECS7000 control software is structured around socalled engine modes, which reflect the main operational conditions of the engine. For all subfunctions related to the engine control, a specific behaviour related to the active engine mode is specified. Other software parts as the safety system, the I/O functions, the internal communications (between the different WECS7000 modules), the external communications (with the Local Display Unit and with the customer system) and information exchange with the control software runs independently. There is also an interaction between the WECS7000 main program and the safety backup module (RM11). The possible engine modes has been ordered in priorities from highest to lowest: Emergency mode: can be preceded by any other mode Shutdown mode : can be preceded by stop , start or run mode Run mode : must preceded by start mode Start mode : must be preceded by stop mode Standby mode : must be preceded by stop mode Stop mode : can be preceded by shutdownor emergency mode

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

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Start mode If the engine is in stop mode and no start blocking is active or the engine is in standby mode, then the start mode can be activated through a start command (local or remote pushbutton). The start command activates the start solenoid of the starting air valve , enabling starting air to entering into the cylinders. During the start up of the engine some safeties are temporary overruled. When the start mode is accomplished successfully within a certain time frame the main routine will be change over to run mode and the overruled safeties are enabled again. If the start mode is not accomplished successfully in that time frame the main routine detects a start failure. The main routine will change over to shutdown or emergency mode (depending of the trigger) and the monitoring sub routine will indicate the failure on LDU and MODBUS address. The blackout start skips all start blockings except the blockings for turning gear engaged and stop lever in stop position. However, skipping of the lubricating oil related start block is limited to 5 minutes. The main routine is not different as above. Run mode The main routine is switched to run mode if the start mode is accomplished successfully within a certain time frame. The engine will ramp up to idle speed approx. 320 rpm (or rated speed approx. 600 rpm if selected) and the safety control is active. With the speed controller it is possible to increase (up to max. rated speed) or decrease (down to min. idle speed) the speed of the engine with the digital speed setting. Of course only settings between idle and rated speed are possible. Also analog speed setting is possible (420 mA). If in run mode particularly measuring values exceeds the setpoints of load reduction level (see for that signals the column load reduction in

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Standby mode If the engine is in stop mode, no start blocking is active and the local remote switch is in the remote position, then the standby mode can be activated through a standby mode request. In the standby mode the engine is direct ready to start. The prelubricating pump is running continuously. If one of the start blocks becomes active then the main routine will change over to stop mode.

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For safety reasons, it is only possible to start the engine either from the remote control panel, or with the local start button : Remote start is only possible if the local/remote switch is in the remote position If the engine is not running the preheating unit for cooling water is set to independent temperature control for keeping the engine heated. This is not controlled by the WECS7000.

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1.6 31

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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1.6 32

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If the shutdown mode becomes active the common fuel rack is forced to zero position. The stop solenoid is energized and the pneumatic stop cylinders on the fuel pumps are activated. The engine will stop after running out time of the slowness mass. When the engine has stopped, the activation of the stop solenoid is released after about 10 seconds. If the shut down is triggered by exceeding the shutdown limit of a measuring value the engine will remain in shutdown mode until the cause has been solved and the system is reset. Thereafter the main routine will go to stop mode. Notice that a shutdown caused by the oil mist detector should be reset on the oil mist detector and at the WECS. If it was a normal stop the main control routine will automatically go to stop mode. Emergency mode. The emergency mode can be activated by triggering the emergency stop pushbuttons and will be shown on the LDU display and on the MODBUS address.

The fuel rack is forced to zero position and the stop solenoid is energized to activate the stop cylinders on the fuel pumps. The engine will stop after running out time of the slowness mass. The engine will remain in emergency mode until the cause has been solved and the system is reset. Thereafter the main routine will go to stop mode.

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Shutdown mode The shutdown mode of the main routine can be activated by a normal stop or through triggering by exceeding the shutdown limit of a measuring value. All shutdown values are mentioned in the project specific MODBUS list as a stop and will be shown on the LDU display and MODBUS address.

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This safety function can be overruled by the stop/shutdown override function but should only be used in case an engine stop would cause more damage than an overruled safety stop. During the time the function for stop/shutdown override is active the engine can be operated normal. Only a few shutdowns can not be overruled e.g. emergency stop and overspeed.

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project specific MODBUS list) than the engine load should be reduced within a certain time hence a shutdown might occur. The control will remain in run mode until a stop, shutdown or emergency request is activated and interrupts the main routine. The shutdown mode and emergency mode will interrupt the run mode if a shutdown value exceeds the limit or an emergency shutdown is given.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

1.6.8.1.9. Speed control in overall application

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I/O digital: Isoch/droop Clutch closed Etc. PID controller Rpm var.gain

The engine is delivered with an offengine speed controller related to the onengine actuator. The speed controller is intended for use in propulsion applications, where the engine is directly or via a clutch coupled to the mechanical drive of the propeller shaft. The speed controller is also used in auxiliary and diesel electric propulsion applications, where the engine is directly coupled to the generator. The control provides closed loop speed control. The speed controller can be build in the junction box or in the engine control or switchboard room. The principle diagram, see fig. 1.6 12 , shows the main functions of the speed controller: Speed controller PID dynamic settings Fuellimiter Torque limiter Idle or rated selection Ramp up and down functions Clutch/alternator status Load sharing Master / slave selection

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Speed cont roller Control logic
Speed setting

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LS S LSS
Torque lim iter Booster lim iter

mA

Hz

Actual speed

speedsensors

engine

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Fig. 1.6 12 Principle diagram speed control system

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Powe r suppl y 24 Vdc / 2 A
Vdc Vdc Actuator control
mA mA Receiver pressure

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Ac tuator Mechanical Governor

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6 33

Actuator without ballhead. This is a mechanical hydraulic governor with an electrohydraulic controlled actuator. This type is normally used in diesel electric installation or for an auxiliary generator set application. The actuator is available for use with either direct or reverse acting electronic controls. Actuator with ballhead This is a mechanical/hydraulic, pneumatic governor with a centrifugal flyweight valve assembly and an Electrohydraulically controlled actuator. To achieve backup control, the electronic system must be reverseacting. The speed setting of the mechanical governor is slightly higher than of the electronic governor system. In case of current fail (drop to zero) the electric actuator will call for an increased fuel position above setting of the mechanical governor. In this case the mechanical backup takes over, based on the LSS (Low Signal Select principle) Offengine speed controller (governor) The speed controller is operating together with the actuator as a balanced speed controller and actuator system. The signals between engine / WECS system and speed controller runs via the junction box. For the off engine speed controller consult the subsupplier manual delivered with the engine documentation.

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Note!

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Onengine actuator A selection can be made for:

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

1.6.8.2.1. WECS 7000 in overall system

Fig. 1.6 13 , illustrates a simplified version of a typical diesel engine application. Relevant engine data is transmitted through a serial line. Essential signals (e.g. engine start/stop, standby pump control, external shutdown, etc.) are hardwired to the ships automation system.

SHIPS AUTOMATION SYSTEM Including ALARM SYSTEM


INDICATION SIGNALS

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POWER SUPPLY LINES INDICATION SIGNALS CONTROL SIGNALS

JUNCTION BOX

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SERIAL DATA

CONTROL SIGNALS

WECS 7000

(mounted on engine)

ENGINE

SENSOR SIGNALS TO SPEED CONTROL

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Fig. 1.6 13 Signal block diagram of WECS 7000 in overall system

FUEL CONTROL SIGNAL TO ACTUATOR

SERIAL DATA

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POWER SUPPLY LINES

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Hard wired communication Serial line communication

1.6.8.2.

General application info

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1.6 35

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.2.2. Tasks of WECS 7000 in application

Warning!

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Note!

The WECS 7000 is also generating alarms which are visualised by the LDU. However, the ships alarm system is always responsible for the alarm handling where latching and acknowledgement are actually carried out in this application. In case of loss of the serial line to the ships alarm system, alarm information is still available on the LDU as backup.

1.6.8.3.

Local user interface description

System start up To startup the WECS 7000, the following circuit breakers has to be switched on: Circuit breaker Main supply" (inside junction box), to connect the 230Vac supply Circuit breaker Backup supply" (inside junction box), to connect the 24Vdc supply

The WECS 7000 will startup when at least one power supply is available. However, both power supply sources are required for failsafe operation.

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The WECS 7000 is handling the following tasks: Safety function, handling start blocks, reset safety system, safety stops, manual emergency stops Load reduction function, initiating request for load reduction to the ships automation system Diesel start/stop function, handling diesel start/stop commands and optional initiating standby mode Remote start interlock, i.e. blocking remote start when needed during local operation Control functions, handling bypass valve control, waste gate valve control, prelub pump start request and standby pump start requests to the ships automation system Digital indication of relevant engine parameters by panel meters Indication of relevant engine data by the LDU Indication of relevant engine data by the ships alarm & monitoring system

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Control System

1.6.8.3.1. Frontend cabinet overview

A quick reference is described below to provide a view of the available controls and indications at the frontend of the enginemounted WECS cabinet, see fig. 1.6 14 . The operator interface is described in the following categories: Local Display unit (LDU) Local control buttons / switches Local backup indicators

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ENGINE SPEED LUBE OIL PRESSURE

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Main pa ge
80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

Exhaust gastemperature 4835C


80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

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HT WATER TEMPERATURE START STOP

ng Mode: Runni

RE MOTE

SHUT DOW N RESET

ENGINE MODE

Emergency start button

Emergency stop button

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Fig. 1.6 14 Frontend cabinet overview

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AL O LOCA L

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Stop lever Locking pin stop lever 1.6 37

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.3.2. Local Display Unit (LDU)

The Local Display Unit (LDU) replaces the traditional pressure gauge panel, the thermometers and other instruments, see fig. 1.6 15 . It is connected to the MCM700 main controller, which sends the necessary data to the display.

Info History Shift

80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

Engine speed 720 rpm

Mode: Running

Engine performance

Exhaust gas

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Cylinder Crank liners case

Startblocks and air pressures

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Pages on LDU display Main page Help on using keys page History page Start Blocks & Air Pressures Engine Performance page Exhaust Gas Temp. page Crankcase page Liner Temperatures page Cooling Water Systems page Menu page Fuel & Lube Oil Systems page

Fig. 1.6 15 Local display unit

On the LDU, all relevant system data can be displayed. This system data can be retrieved via the pages given in table 1.6.4. Table 1.6.4. System data / information showed

The main engine data How to use the keys The last 100 events of the engine including date and time stamp The start block status and air pressure levels Engine performance related parameters Exhaust gas temperatures for each cylinder Liner temperatures for each cylinder Main bearing temperatures and OMD status HT & LT water related parameters Fuel oil & lube oil related parameters The list of dedicated pages

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80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

Main

Main page Exhaust gas temperature 483 5C

Fuel rack pos. 33 mm

A L O

Water system

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Up Enter Down Additional info Oil system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

Table 1.6.5. Menu page Automation System page Pump Control page Bypass control page Waste gate control page Cold air waste gate control page Wencom page FAKS page (* ) Miscellaneous page

Status / information showed Status of modules Status of pump control outputs

Note!

(* ) Option

depending if FAKS sensors are installed.

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Main Page, see fig. 1.6 16 , displays an example of the following data: Exhaust gas temperature deviation relative to cylinder 1. Engine speed Fuel rack position Start failure status Stop / Shutdown Override status Engine mode Common engine alarm indicated with A at the right bottom corner Common load reduction request status indicated with L at the right bottom corner Common shutdown status indicated with S at the right bottom corner

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Status of FAKS sensors

Status of valve control outputs, bypass valve position & related sensors Status of valve control outputs & related sensors Status of valve control outputs & related sensors Exhaust gas temperature deviations with respect to mean temperature Status of miscellaneous switches

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From the Menu page, a selection can be made to one of the following dedicated pages showed in table 1.6.5.

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fig. 1.6 16 Example view of main page

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Typical data showed on the information pages comprises of: Functional name of (engine) parameter Analogue value as number or in bar pattern or meter bar Status value Abnormal value inverted Sensor code (only on History page and dedicated pages) Examples of the typical data can be found in the following figures, 1.6 17 , 1.6 18 and 1.6 19 .

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Control System

Fig. 1.6 17 Example view of history page

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Fig. 1.6 18 Example view of Start Blocks & Pressures page

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Fig. 1.6 19 Example view of Menu page

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1.6.8.3.3. Local control buttons / switches

Fig. 1.6 20 , shows the following control button / switches which are provided for local operation: START button with green coloured button to initiate a local engine start STOP button with red coloured button to initiate a local engine stop SHUTDOWN RESET button with blue coloured button to reset WECS after a shutdown ENGINE (START) MODE selector switch to block a remote engine start

Fig. 1.6 20 View of control switches for local engine operation

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Control System

1.6.8.3.4. Local backup indicators

The engine parameters as shown in fig. 1.6 21 , are generated from backup sensors and backup circuitry independent from WECS main circuitry.

LUBE OIL PRESSURE

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HT WATER TEMPERATURE

Fig. 1.6 21 View of panel meters for digital indications

1.6.8.3.5. Emergency start / stop


Emergency operation For emergency operation, in case of complete loss of WECS system, the engine is provided with emergency push buttons direct on the starting and stopping solenoid valve. See fig. 1.6 14 . The engine speed can be controlled by the speed setting governor system. Local Display Unit and Backup instruments The Local Display Unit and backup instruments are situated on the WECS cabinet. The maximum distance between WECS cabinet and junction box is limited to 10meter cable length.

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1.6 43

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ENGINE SPEED

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.4.1. General

1.6.8.4.2. Control of prelubricating oil pump


The prelubricating pump is controlled by the WECS in conjunction with starter box of the pump. Generally, the following selections can be made at the starter box: At OFF position, the prelubricating pump is off At MANUAL position, the engine is manually lubricated before starting the engine At AUTOMATION position, prelubrication of the engine is controlled by the WECS. Consequently, at engine standstill, prelubrication is activated to remove the start blocks related to lube oil pressure. In addition, if the engine is running the prelubricating pump is automatically switched off at 400 rpm and switched on again at 320 rpm. If the engine is not running then prelubrication is constantly active.

Warning!

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Control of the prelubricating pump by the WECS is to be considered as an auxiliary function. Therefore, activation of the prelubricating pump will not generate an (common engine) alarm. When the engine stands still for a long period, its recommended to select the OFF position at the prelubricating oil pump starter box.

1.6.8.4.3. Control of preheater


Preheating of the cooling water is preferably controlled automatically and in conjunction with the WECS. Generally, the Engine Running output from the WECS is utilised in conjunction with the preheater unit to control the circulating pump automatically. Consequently, at engine standstill, preheating is activated to remove the start block related to cooling water. If the engine is running the preheating is deactivated. Temperature control is automatically controlled within the preheater unit and is independent from the WECS.

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All necessary instructions to operate the engine in conjunction with the WECS and external governor are described in this chapter. Both WECS and external governor are considered to be fully operational. If this is not the case, relevant instructions given in section 1.6.8.5. should be followed.

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1.6.8.4. Instructions for normal operating mode

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

1.6.8.4.4. Start blockings

In addition, an engine start attempt is blocked if the engine is already running. Start blocks can not be overridden except in the following cases: Blackout start, see section 1.6.8.5.2. for instructions Emergency start directly at engine, see 1.6.8.5.3. for instructions

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1.6.8.4.5. Local start

Note!

The engine is ready to start when no start block is activated A corresponding message Ready To Start is shown on the LDU main page and is also send to the ships alarm system through the serial link. If the engine is not ready to start the LDU main page will show the message Start Blocked.

When the engine is ready to start, a start attempt can be initiated by pushing the local button START located at the WECS cabinet frontend. See fig. 1.6 14 . During starting, the LDU main page will show successively Ready to Start > Starting > Running. The last message indicates that the engine is running. At this point, the WECS generates the Engine Running signal for the ships alarm and automation systems.

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At engine standstill, the WECS is constantly checking the start blocks to safeguard the diesel engine and the crew close to the engine. The responsible operator has to take care for removing all start blockings prior to start. An engine start attempt is blocked at the following basic conditions: low prelubricating oil pressure low prelubricating oil level at turbocharger low control air pressure low HT cooling water (preheating) temperature turning gear engaged stop lever in stop position external start block active active shutdown (i.e., the WECS is still waiting for the shutdown reset command) local/remote switch at LOCAL position (only blocks the remote start)

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.4.6. Remote start

When the engine is ready to start and the Local/Remote switch at the WECS cabinet frontend is at the REMOTE position, a start attempt can be initiated by pushing the button START located at the remote control stations on board. See fig. 1.6 20 .

Note!

After a successful start attempt, the Engine Running signal will be activated as described in section 1.6.8.4.5.

1.6.8.4.7. Start failure

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Note!

When the engine speed has not reached a certain value within 20 seconds, the start attempt is considered to be unsuccessful. The WECS interrupts the starting sequence and stops the engine. In addition a start failure (alarm) will be generated for the ships alarm and automation systems. The engine is ready to start after the WECS has released the stopping devices. At this point, the engine can be restarted. During the start attempt, the LDU main page will show successively Starting > Shutdown and Failed Start Attempt> Ready to Start. In case of a start failure the engine can be restarted after the WECS has released the stopping devices (indicated by ready to start).

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The Local / Remote switch at the WECS cabinet frontend only blocks the remote start command. It does not affect any transfer of speed control related functionality.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

1.6.8.4.8. Local stop

By pushing the local STOP button located at the WECS cabinet frontend the engine stops. See fig. 1.6 20 . During stopping, the LDU main page will show successively Running > Shutdown > Ready to Start. The engine is ready to start after the WECS has released the stopping devices.

1.6.8.4.9. Remote stop

Activation of the remote stop command can be observed on the LDU miscellaneous page. During stopping, the LDU main page will show successively Running > Shutdown > Ready to Start. The engine is ready to start after the WECS has released the stopping devices.

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1.6.8.4.10.

Note!

Restarting after a normal remote stop is only possible after the WECS has released the stop devices and no start blocks are existing.

A remote standby request from the ships automation (power management) system is needed to initiate standby operation of the engine. The WECS accepts the standby request only if the engine is ready to start and the Local/Remote switch at the WECS cabinet frontend is at the REMOTE position. During standby operation, the WECS sends a Standby Mode (active) message to the ships automation system through the serial link. The WECS disables standby operation when any of the following conditions is TRUE: Remote standby request is cancelled Local/Remote switch at the WECS cabinet frontend is at the LOCAL position. Engine is not ready for start During standby request, the LDU main page will show successively Ready to Start > Standby.

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By pushing the STOP button located at the remote control stations on board the engine will stop.

Standby engine mode selection

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Note!

Restarting after a normal local stop is only possible after the WECS has released the stop devices and no start blocks are existing.

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Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.4.11. Remote start during standby operation

During standby operation, a start attempt can be initiated by pushing the button START located at the remote control stations on board. When the engine is running, standby operation is deactivated. After a normal stop, standby operation will be restored if the conditions as stated in section 1.6.8.4.10. are still satisfied.

1.6.8.4.12.

Alarms

Note!

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Note!

In general, an alarm is generated for warning of an abnormal condition. Depending on the cause of the alarm, quick attention might be needed to solve the problem. The following type of alarms are generated in the WECS: Engine parameter related alarms Control loop failure related alarms Sensor failure alarms WECS module failure alarm Relay module failure alarm WECS failure alarm Common engine alarm Latching and acknowledge of alarms are exclusively handled in the ships alarm & monitoring system Engine parameter related alarms This type of alarms indicate abnormal conditions of the diesel engine parameters, e.g. temperatures, pressures, levels, etc. The WECS handles the following actions at an alarm condition: The measured value is shown inverted on the LDU An alarm message is shown on the history page of the LDU An alarm indication (A) is shown on the diesel parameter dedicated page of the LDU An alarm (active status) message is send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication Common engine alarm is activated

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General The WECS monitors the sensor data for changes in status values, which occur whenever preset levels of alarms are exceeded. The associated alarm messages are send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication. The alarm settings are stated in the Modbuslist.

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Note! Note! Note! Note!

Sensor failure alarms Generally this type of alarms indicates a failure in the sensor loop. The failure check covers detection of loop failure (short circuit, open loop) and detection of sensor failure (out of range detection). In case of speed measuring sensors, the WECS carries out a different failure detection scheme. Engine speed is measured with two speed sensors. Each turbocharger speed is measured with a single speed sensor. All speed related signals are processed in the MCM700 main controller module. In principle, sensor failure detection in this case is based on comparison of the available speed measuring data to determine which speed sensor loop(s) is (are) malfunctioning. The WECS handles the following actions at a sensor failure condition: An analogue value (900) indicating sensor failure alarm is shown on the diesel engine parameter dedicated page of the LDU An analogue value (900) indicating sensor failure alarm is send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication After solving the sensor failure, the sensor values shown on the LDU and which is also send through Modbus communication are restored to the actual valid values. When sensor failure is detected, the related sensor is excluded from any safety action by the WECS Sensor failure detection is available for all analogue sensors Sensor failure detection for digital sensors is only available for the level measurements and the shutdown related measurements Sensor failure related to digital sensors for start block (Turning Gear Engaged) and start block (Stop Lever in Stop Position) will cause an active start block instead of sensor failure alarm

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Control loop failure related alarms This type of alarms indicate abnormal conditions of control loops related to bypass valve control, waste gate valve control, etc. Details of this type of alarms can be found in the related sections.

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When the alarm condition is not valid anymore, the WECS handles the following actions: The measured value is shown as normal text on the LDU An alarm (notactive status) message is send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication The alarm indication on the diesel parameter dedicated page of the LDU is removed

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Warning! Warning!

Warning!

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Note! Note!

WECS module failure alarm In case a module, acquisition module or cylinder controller, is not communicating correctly with the MCM700 main controller module, a dedicated module failure alarm will be generated. The WECS handles the following actions at a module failure condition: A failure alarm message is shown on the history page of the LDU A failure indication is shown on the Automation System page of the LDU All sensor values related to the faulty module are set to the value 900 on the LDU indicating sensor failure (due to module failure) An analogue value (900) indicating module failure alarm is send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication All sensor values related to the faulty module are send as 900 values through Modbus communication indicating sensor failure (due to module failure) WECS failure alarm is activated When the module failure is solved, the related parameters are restored to the actual values. In general, a module failure is caused by a supply failure (broken fuse) or a CANfailure (broken wire or broken termination resistor) Module failure requires immediate repair where possible to restore safety and control related functionality Relay module failure alarm The relay module generates a RMfailure alarm at: Failure of power supply to relay module (main and/or backup) Internal power supply failure Broken fuses (F1 F5) Short circuit of I/O lines Loop failure of: Lubricating oil pressure switch Optional shutdown switch Emergency stop switch Stop solenoids All failures detected by the relay module are indicated by dedicated failure alarm LEDs on the relay module.

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Sensor failures related to essential safety functions, i.e. overspeed protection, lube oil pressure safety, emergency stop, oil mist detection, require immediate repair where possible Sensor failures related to essential control loops, e.g. waste gate valve control require immediate repair if engine power > 85% is required

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Note! Warning!

RMfailure including F16 supply failure require immediate repair where possible to restore backup safety functionality. WECS failure alarm The MCM700 main controller module generates WECS failure alarm at: FE/TC acquisition module (communication) failure; safety and control functionality is partly lost Cylinder controller module (communication) failure; cylinder related safety functionality is partly lost Relay module failure, including F16 supply failure; backup safety functionality is lost Breakdown of MCM700 main controller module; main safety and control functionality as well Modbus communication are lost

Warning!

Breakdown of the MCM700 main controller module requires immediate repair to restore the main safety and control functionality.

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Note!

Common engine alarm The WECS activates the common alarm output at: Active engine parameter related alarm Active control loop related alarm Active WECS failure alarm Active sensor failure alarms and active start blocks are excluded from the common engine alarm output.

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Relay module failure alarm is combined with F16 supply failure alarm. Supply F16 is handling direct stop order from MCM700 main controllerto stop solenoid.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.4.13.

Load reduction requests

The WECS monitors the sensor data for changes in status values, which occur whenever preset levels of load reduction are exceeded. The associated load reduction request messages are send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication. In addition, a (hardwired) common load reduction request signal is send to the ships automation system. The load reduction request settings are stated in the Modbus list

Note! Warning!

Latching and acknowledge of alarms are exclusively handled in the ships alarm & monitoring system In general, a load reduction request is generated for warning of an abnormal condition which requires a reduction of power. When a preset level of load reduction is exceeded, the associated engine parameter can be seen on the LDU history page. Corresponding messages are also send to the ships automation system through the serial link. A load reduction request can be followed by a shutdown if the relevant temperature or pressure exceeds the shutdown preset level. This is the case for liner temperatures, main bearing temperatures and also for HT cooling water temperature or pressure depending on the actual classification requirements.

Warning!

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1.6.8.4.14. Shutdowns Note! Note!

General The WECS monitors the sensor data for changes in status values, which occur whenever preset levels for shutdowns are exceeded. Consequently, the WECS initiates a safety action to result in shutting down of the engine. In addition, a (hardwired) common shutdown indication signal is send to the ships automation system. The WECS initiates safety actions to protect the engine from possible damage due to critical conditions. When a preset level of shutdown is exceeded, the associated shutdown indication can be seen on the LDU history page. Corresponding messages are also send to the ships automation system through Modbus communication. The shutdown settings are stated in the Modbuslist. Latching and acknowledge of shutdowns are exclusively handled in the ships alarm & monitoring system Shutdown due to loss of engine speed

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Note!

Note! Note!

Reset shutdown commands are only effective after the WECS has released the stop devices. Its not necessary to remedy the shutdown condition first before resetting shutdown mode. However shutdown override should be activated, to prevent a shutdown directly after a restart of the engine in this case. After a shutdown on high oil mist concentration, the safety circuitry of the oil mist detector must be reset separately by pushing the reset button near the detector.

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Note! Note! Note!

Remote shutdown override Safety stops initiated by WECS can be overridden to prevent shutting down of the engine in critical situations, e.g. in dangerous manoeuvring situations. Overriding safety stops actually means that only the stop order to the stop devices is disabled. Otherwise, the WECS operates as described in General and Shutdown due to loss of engine speed of this section. The shutdown override functionality in the WECS is to be considered as a preshutdown override facility. Consequently, once a shutdown has been initiated by the WECS, overriding this shutdown is not possible anymore and the engine will be stopped A shutdown override command can be given by pushing the Shutdown Override button at the remote control stations on the bridge Most of the engine parameters which are monitored for exceeding shutdown levels, e.g. main bearing temperature, cylinder liner

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A reset shutdown command can be given either locally by pushing the Reset Shutdown button on the WECS cabinet frontend or by pushing the remote Reset Shutdown button at the remote control stations.

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Reset shutdown During a shutdown sequence, the WECS activates all shutdown devices to stop the engine. When the engine stands still, the WECS releases the stop devices. However, shutdown mode is still active and needs to be reset in order to enable a restart of the engine. During a shutdown sequence, the LDU main page will show successively Running> Shutdown > Ready to start (after reset). The engine is ready to start after a shutdownreset command.

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In general, each shutdown condition is associated to a single sensor. However, the WECS also initiates a shutdown when the engine speed is completely lost. In this case, the shutdown is actually related to two sensors.

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Warning!

Procedure for releasing the shutdown override command 1 Observe the common engine alarm lamp at the remote stations on the bridge 2 If the alarm lamp is slowly blinking, then the shutdown override button can be safely released without danger for shutting down the engine > step 8 3 If the alarm light is fast blinking then try to reset the shutdown by pushing the reset shutdown button 4 In case the common engine alarm lamp is slowly blinking after the reset, then carry out step 2 5 In case the common engine alarm lamp remains fast blinking, then observe the cause of the shutdown condition at the ships alarm system

Warning!

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8 End of procedure

6 If the shutdown condition can not be cancelled, then the engine will be stopped after releasing the shutdown override button 7 Consider when it is safe to release the shutdown override button to stop the engine

Always release the shutdown override button when the critical situation is over to restore the full protection of the engine against possible damage due to critical conditions In case shutdown override is active, then the LDU main page will show the message Shutdown override active. Identified shutdown conditions will be displayed as well in this situation. Corresponding messages are send to the ships alarm & monitoring system through Modbus communication.

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Activating shutdown override is reflected in the common engine alarm output as follows: The common engine alarm output is slowly on/off switching when shutdown override is active The common engine alarm output is fast on/off switching when shutdown override is active and at least one shutdown condition has been identified The responsible operator should verify whether the WECS has identified a shutdown condition before releasing the shutdown override command. Follow the procedure for releasing the shutdown override command

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temperature and HT cooling water temperature, are also monitored for exceeding alarm and load reduction request levels. This 3stage safeguarding scheme supports the responsible operator in utilising the shutdown override functionality in the proper way when needed.

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1.6.8.4.15.

Emergency stop and overspeed safety trip

Note!

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Note! Note! Warning! Warning!

Latching and acknowledge of (emergency) shutdowns are exclusively handled in the ships alarm & monitoring system. Emergency stop In an emergency, the engine must be stopped by operating any of the emergency stop buttons located at the remote stations. The emergency stop chain is redundant and monitored for loop failures to secure the reliability. Reset (emergency) shutdown is only possible after releasing the emergency stop button first An emergency stop loop failure requires immediate repair to restore the emergency stop functionality Overspeed safety trip The WECS protects the engine against overspeed. The overspeed protection is separately handled by the main safety system (MCM700 main controller) and the backup safety system (relay module). Both overspeed settings are stated in the Modbus list. A single engine speed sensor failure requires immediate repair where possible to restore the overspeed protection and cancelling the risk of a shutdown due to loss of both engine speed sensors

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Reset shutdown commands are only effective after the WECS has released the stop devices. During an emergency shutdown sequence, the LDU main page will show successively Running> Emergency > Ready to start (after reset). The engine is ready to start after a shutdownreset command. When an emergency stop command is given, the associated shutdown indication can be seen on the LDU history page. Corresponding messages are also send to the ships automation system through Modbus communication.

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General Both emergency stop and overspeed safety trip are to be considered as emergency shutdowns. Emergency shutdowns can not be overridden. During an emergency shutdown sequence, the WECS activates all shutdown devices to stop the engine. In addition, a (hardwired) common shutdown indication signal is send to the ships automation system. When the engine stands still, the WECS releases the stop devices. However, emergency mode is still active and needs to be reset in order to enable a restart of the engine.

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1.6.8.4.16.

Control of standby pumps

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Note!

The following conditions will cause the start of stand by pumps: HT cooling water standby pump starts at low pressure high cooling water system LT cooling water standby pump starts at low pressure low cooling water system Lubricating oil standby pump starts at low pressure lubricating oil system Fuel oil standby pump starts at low pressure fuel oil system

Stop of the standby pump should ALWAYS be a manual operation. Before stopping the standby pump, the reason for the pressure drop must have been investigated and rectified. There are no standby pumps on multi engines installations, diesel electric installation or an auxiliary generator set .

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The WECS system has standby pump start outputs for: HT cooling water LT cooling water Lubricating oil Fuel oil (only if the engine equipped with a driven main pump) If pressure drops below a preset level when the engine is running, WECS activates the standby output. The outputcontact is available for the standby pump starter, and the standby pump should be started. An alarm on the MODBUS is raised. When the pressure is raised to normal or lower level by the standby pump, both the standby output and alarm from WECS are reset, thus meaning no latching of the output(s) is done in WECS. Latching must be done in the standby starter and alarm system respectively. The reason for the pressure drop should be investigated as soon as possible.

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1.6.8.4.17.

Exhaust waste gate valve control

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Note! Warning!

Operation of the waste gate valve is locally indicated on the LDU Bypass & Waste gate Control page. The %value of the valve control output is displayed. Waste gate failure alarm is active when the % value is replaced by the message FAILURE. Load reduction request indications are shown in case control loop failures are detected. Corresponding messages including waste gate failure alarm are also send to the ships automation system through Modbus communication.

Waste gate failure alarm is active when: 1 The difference between actual charge air pressure and desired charge air pressure at a certain engine speed (load / propeller curve) is too high 2 The receiver pressure measurement is not valid Failure condition #1 may be occur due to the following reasons: Waste gate valve is seized Control air supply pressure is too low Faulty valve control loop Failure condition #2 may be occur due to the following reasons: Faulty charge air pressure sensor loop Faulty FE acquisition module or communication with MCM700 main controller

The waste gate valve remains in closed position in case of a MCM700 main controller breakdown Waste gate valve failure condition requires the engine load to be limited to 85% and the control valve to be manually closed

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The WECS controls the waste gate valve based on engine speed and charge air pressure measurements. In addition, the WECS performs control loop failure detection to result in restricted valve control and generating a waste gate failure alarm. Basically, the failure detection is based on actual charge air pressure and the validity of the charge air pressure measurement. Furthermore, load reduction requests are activated in case control loop failures are detected.

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General Exhaust waste gate valve control is used for limiting the charge air pressure at high loads. The charge air pressure is limited to a constant level, typically to the level at 85% load by opening the waste gate valve gradually at loads over 85%. By opening the waste gate valve a part of the exhaust gas flows direct to the exhaust gas outlet pipe after the turbocharger

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1.6.8.4.18.

Speed control

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Speed control alarms The Major alarm will be activated when the engine is shutdown by the speed control, as a result of one of the following failures: If the Overspeed Trip level is exceeded, when immediate shutdown is enabled If both speed sensor inputs should fail The speed control activates a Minor Alarm as a result of one of the following failures: If one of the speed signals fails If the Charge air Pressure input fails; signal is below 2mA or above 22mA If the Analogue Speed Reference input fails; signal is below 2mA or above 22mA If the Analogue Speed Reference input fails; signal is below 2mA or above 22mA If the Synchrophaser Bias input fails; signal is below 2mA or above 22mA If the MW Load input fails; signal is below 2mA or above 22mA If the Modbus serial communication have failed Rectification and reset of the fault will reset the Minor Alarm. All alarms are selfresetting, once the fault has been rectified (except speed sensor fault), unless the reset function is configured for operation via the Modbus. Both alarms are connected to the ships alarm & monitoring system.

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General The external speed control basically maintains the preset engine speed or engine load by governing the actuator on the engine. The WECS disables or enables speed control. Consequently, when the engine is ready to start the WECS enables the fuel control. Otherwise, during a shutdown or emergency sequence the WECS is shutting down the fuel control. In general, the speed setting signal and idle or rated speed selection for the speed control are set at the remote stations located on the bridge and in the ECR (Engine Control Room).

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1.6.8.5.1. General

All necessary instructions to operate the engine in case of degraded operation of the WECS and/or external governor (speed control) and/or auxiliary systems are described in this chapter.

1.6.8.5.2. Blackout start

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Note!

Warning!

To prevent a possible shutdown on lubricating oil pressure directly after a blackout start, its highly recommended to utilise the Shutdown Override command prior to the start as well; release the shutdown override button when the engine is running The blackout start command can also be utilised to start the engine when only the start block for HT cooling water temperature can not be cancelled

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The WECS has a Remote Blackout Start input that can be activated to start the engine while certain start blocks are existing. Primarily, this function is intended to start the engine immediately after a blackout situation on the ship while auxiliary systems are not yet available due to this blackout. Therefore, the conditions for blackout start are restricted to the following start blocks: lubricating has been off for more than 5 minutes turning gear engaged stop lever in stop position active shutdown (i.e. the WECS is still waiting for the shutdown reset command)

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Instructions degrading operating mode

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1.6.8.5.3. Emergency start direct at the engine

The engine can be started by operating the masterstarting valve manually if the WECS fails. The emergency start is initiated by pushing the emergency start button direct on the start solenoid ,see fig. 1.6 14 . During the emergency start the stop lever can control the acceleration.

Note!

Note! Note! Note!

The start is mechanically blocked if the stop lever on the engine is in STOP position, or pneumatically blocked if the turning gear is engaged Emergency start can be utilised as a last option if blackout start is not possible anymore

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Note!

1.6.8.5.4. Emergency stop direct at the engine


The engine can be stopped by operating the stopping valve manually if the WECS fails. The emergency stop is initiated by pushing the emergency stop button direct on the stop solenoid, see fig. 1.6 14 . Emergency stop direct at the engine is only needed at a WECS failure due to total power supply failure ( main supply and backup supply are both missing)

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The status of the WECS is indicated as described in section 1.6.8.4.12., subsection Relay module failure alarm and WECS failure alarm

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Emergency start direct at the engine is only needed when the relay module totally fails or when the power supply to the WECS totally fails Normally, the speed control will also fail when the power supply to the WECS totally fails, unless an additional independent power supply has been installed. Consequently, if the speed control also fails in this situation, the engine can only be controlled if the engine is equipped with a mechanically driven hydraulic governor/actuator. (see section supsuppliers manual for instructions).

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1.6.8.5.5. Overriding WECS or its parts

Note!

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Turning off the MCM700 main controller does not give any help if problems occur with the Relay Module. In that case the only reliable way to solve the problem is to replace the faulty module with a spare Relay Module. Turning off subsystems(s) If WECS problems are limited to one acquisition module or cylinder controller, it is also possible to turn off the relevant acquisition module or cylinder controller by disconnecting the main and back up power supply of one single bank. That is: Fuse F2.1 for turning off main power supply of Abank Fuse F2.2 for turning off backup power supply of Abank Fuse F3.1 for turning off main power supply of Bbank Fuse F3.2 for turning off backup power supply of Bbank The fuses are located inside the WECS cabinet. This way of working guarantees that monitoring, safety and control functions needed for safe operation of the engine are minimally influenced. All signals connected to the disconnected acquisition modules or cylinder controllers will give an alarm (900 value) over Modbus to the LDU and to the ships alarm system. The disconnected acquisition modules or cylinder controllers will also cause a dedicated module failure alarm (900 value) over Modbus to the ships alarm system. In LDU module failure alarms are indicated on the Automation page.

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Note!

There is no automatic check for start conditions when the MCM700 main controller is turned off. The operator must personally ensure that all start conditions are met and that its safe to start the engine.

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Turning off main system If there are serious WECS problems the functionality of the system can be reduced into minimum by turning off the MCM700 main controller. Disconnecting fuse F1 inside the WECS cabinet can do this. After this action only the minimum safety functionality of the Relay Module is available; i.e. backup overspeed trip, backup lube oil pressure shutdown, optional shutdown and emergency stop. Turning off the MCM700 main controller will naturally stop the Modbus communication to the external alarm system. On the LDU all values will be shown inverted because they are no more updated. It is anyhow possible to operate the engine with local start, stop and reset buttons. Also backup instrumentation is still operational.

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1.6 62

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Note! Note! Note!

Mechanical backup speed control Normally, the external speed control maintains the preset engine speed or engine load by governing the actuator on the engine. In case the control current loop between the speed control and actuator fails, then the mechanical hydraulic governor automatically controls the engine speed instead. The speed setting of the mechanical hydraulic governor is slightly higher than the speed setting of the electronic speed control when set at rated speed (600 rpm). Control current loop failure can be caused by one of the following reasons: Broken or short circuit wiring Faulty speed control Speed control power supply failure The engine can run on the mechanical hydraulic governor in case of total power supply failure If both speed signals to the electronic speed control are faulty, then the control current loop must be disconnected (preferably at engine side) to enable fuel control by the mechanical hydraulic governor The speed setting of the mechanical hydraulic governor can be set to lower values if needed; however, restore the previous speed setting (slightly above 600 rpm) of the mechanical hydraulic governor if the electronic speed control is operating again A faulty electronic speed control system requires immediate repair where possible to restore the full speed control functionality

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Note!

Signals indicating sensor failure are ignored when start conditions are checked. The operator must personally ensure that disconnected signals are not in a critical situation when the engine is started. Initial reason for the problem should be investigated immediately and needed actions to cure the problem should be taken as soon as possible. Once the problem is solved the system should be returned to normal operation.

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Disconnecting sensors(s) If problems are limited to one signal or sensor only, it is possible to disconnect the signal. The exact connection can be found on the wiring diagram drawings supplied with each engine. A sensor failure code (900 value) will be indicated over Modbus to the LDU and to the ships alarm system for the disconnected sensor. Pressure signals from ratiometric pressure sensors and temperature signals from thermistors are depending on the sensor supply voltage. The pressure signals might exceed shutdown levels in case of sensor supply failure. In this case, the sensor that is causing the shutdown (PT201.1 and PT401, depending on classification requirements) can be disconnected to avoid false shutdowns related to this sensor.

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1.6.8.6.1. General

1.6.8.6.2. Overview of sensors for each WECS module


The system layout is shown in fig. 1.6 22 .

RM

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CAN CWCAN

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MCM 700 modbus #1 modbus #2 modbus #3 CAN repeater

Relevant information to identify the failures is described in this chapter. Basically, an overview is given describing which sensor signals a certain module handles. In addition, an overview is given describing the effects of certain failures on safety and control functionality (short form failure description). The typical system layout of the WECS as shown in fig. 1.6 11 , illustrates all the subsystems and the internal and external signal links.

Hard wired info signals

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Acq Mod FE RS232 for programming Acq Mod TC RS232 for programming CCM 10

Fig. 1.6 22 System layout Referring to fig. 1.6 22 , all sensor signals connected to a certain module are given in the following tables.

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LDU System data for external systems System data for external systems CW/CAN for programming

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Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6 63

Sensor ID PT311 GS171 GS792 GT165 NS700 QS700 QS701 SE167 PT700 TE231 LS108A LS108B TE272 TE282 TE601 TE401.1 TE651

Measurements Control air pressure Stop lever position Turning gear position Fuel rack position Oil mist detector failure Oil mist alarm Engine speed Oil mist shutdown

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Cranckcase pressure

Lube oil temperature LOC inlet Fuel oil leakage dirty fuel DE Fuel oil leakage dirty fuel DE

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Lube oil temperature TC / A outlet Lube oil temperature TC / B outlet Charge air temperature

HT water temp. engine outlet

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Sensor ID PT101 PT301 Measurements TE101 PT401 PDS243 TE401 TE201 TE432 TE471 TE472 PT201.1 PT601.1 LS103A LS103B 1.6 64

Suction air temperature TCA input Option

Table 1.6.7: Inputs to FE acquisition module ACQ700 L38B X X X X X X X X X X X X X V38B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Fuel oil pressure engine inlet Starting air pressure Fuel oil temperature engine inlet Lube oil filter pressure difference HT water pressure engine inlet HT water temperature engine inlet Lube oil temperature, engine inlet HT water temp. CAC outlet LT water temp. CAC inlet LT water temp. CAC outlet Lube oil pressure, engine inlet Charge air pressure Fuel oil leakage injection pipe Fuel oil leakage injection pipe

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L38B X X X X X X X X V38B X X X X X X X X Option Option X X X X X X X X X Option Option Option X

Table 1.6.6: Inputs direct to MCM700 main controller

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LS107B

Fuel oil leakage dirty fuel FE

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L38B X X X X Option X X X Option Option L38B X Option X X L38B X Option X Option

LS107A

Fuel oil leakage dirty fuel FE

Table 1.6.8: Inputs to TC acquisition module CCM10 TC Sensor ID PT471 PT432 TE517 TE527 TE511 TE521 TE621 TE631 SE518 SE528 LS271 LS281 PT271 PT281 GS643C Measurements V38B X X X X X X Option X X X X X X X Option Option LT water pressure CAC inlet

HT water pressure CAC outlet

Exhaust gas temp. TC / A outlet Exhaust gas temp TC / A inlet 1

Exhaust gas temp. TC / B inlet 1 Charge air temp. before cool. / A Charge air temp. before cool. / B

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GS643O Sensor ID TE70i TE711 TE7ijA TE7ijB TE50iA TE50iB Sensor ID PSZ201.1 PSZ401 ST174 TSZ402

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TC speed turbo B Lube oil level TC / A Lube oil level TC / B Measurements Measurements Engine speed

TC speed turbo A

Lube oil pressure a. orifice TC A Lube oil pressure a. orifice TC B Bypass feedback CLOSE position Bypass feedback OPEN position Table 1.6.9: Inputs to CCM10

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Exhaust gas tem. TC / B outlet

Main bearing i temperature PTO bearing temperature Cylinder liner Ai temperature j Exhaust gas temp. cylinder Ai Cylinder liner Bi temperature j Exhaust gas temp. cylinder Bi

Table 1.6.10: Inputs to RM (relay module) V38B X Option X Option Lube oil pressure, engine inlet HT water pressure, engine inlet (only for GL) HT water temp. engine outlet (only for LR)

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X X X V38B X Option X X X X 1.6 65

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Manual Wrtsil 38

1.6.8.6.3. Sensor signals to external speed control

All sensor signals connected to the external speed control are given in table 1.6.11. Table 1.6.11: Inputs to External Speed Control Sensor ID SE167.2 SE168.2 PT601.2 Measurements Engine speed, flywheel Engine speed, flywheel Charge air pressure, for external governor

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1.6.8.6.4. Sensors to external system


All sensor signals connected to the external system are given in table 1.6.12. Table 1.6.12: Inputs to External System

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GT165.2 PS210.1 PS210.2 PS410 PS460 1.6 66

Sensor ID

Measurements

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Fuel rack position to CPP Lube oil pressure, standby pump control (highspeed) Lube oil pressure, standby pump control (lowspeed) HT water pressure, standby pump control LT water pressure, standby pump control

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L38B X X X V38B X X X L38B X GL only GL only GL only GL only V38B X GL only GL only GL only GL only

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1.6.8.6.5. Trouble shooting guide

An overview of possible failures with the associated failure indications and effects including recommendations is given in the table 1.6.13. This overview is to be considered as a guide for troubleshooting. The following failure types are considered: Power supply failures WECS module failures Speed control failures Sensor failures related to engine safety Sensor failures related to external safety Sensor failures related to engine control Sensor failures related to speed control Sensor failures related to CPP system Sensor failures related to start blocks

Table 1.6.13: Trouble shooting guide Cause Failure indication Effect Recommendation Main power supply Main supply failure WECS remains fully Repair faulty supply failure alarm active operational for failsafe operation

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Dual power supply Both supply failure failure alarms active. WECS failure active. Relay module failure alarm active. Major alarm from speed control.

Backup power sup- Backup supply fail- WECS remains fully Repair faulty supply ply failure ure alarm active operational for failsafe operation Completely loss of WECS functionality Engine speed control handled by mechanical hydraulic governor actuator; speed setting only directly on governor. Engine is stopped in case of actuator without mechanical backup In case of mechanical hydraulic governoractuator: Stop engine with stop lever when possible and restart engine after repair of at least one supply to restore functionality. In case of actuator without mechanical backup: Immediate repair of at least one power supply to restore system functionality and startup of engine

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Faulty FE acquisition module due to fuse failure, CAN failure or internal failure

Faulty TC acquisition module due to fuse failure, CAN failure or internal failure

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Faulty Cylinder controller xx module due to fuse failure, CAN failure or internal failure (xx refers to A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3)

WECS failure alarm active. Cylinder controller xx module failure alarm active. Associated sensor failure signals are active. Blown fuse F2.1, F2.2, F2.3, F3.1, F3.2, F3.3 indication in case of fuse failure

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WECS failure alarm active TC acquisition module failure alarm active. Associated sensor failure signals are active. Blown fuse F3.1, F3.2 indication in case of fuse failure

All sensor signals in listed in table 3 are not available. Associated safety functionality is disabled. Associated control functionality is disabled or restricted

All sensor signals in listed in table 4 are not available. Associated safety functionality is disabled. Each Cylinder controller module failure effects 3 main bearing temperature measurements and cylinder temperature related measurements for 3 cylinders. Oil Mist Detection is operational

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WECS failure alarm active FE acquisition module failure alarm active. Associated sensor failure signals are active. Blown fuse F2.1, F2.2 indication in case of fuse failure

All sensor signals in listed in table 2 are not available. Associated safety functionality is disabled. Associated control functionality is disabled or restricted

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

Recommendation

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

MCM700 main controller module due to fuse failure, CAN failure or internal failure

WECS failure alarm active. Blown fuse F6 indication in case of fuse failure

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Faulty relay module WECS failure alarm due to fuse failure active. Relay module failure active. Blown fuse F1 indication

Faulty relay module WECS failure alarm Backup safety and due to internal failure active. starting control are Relay module failure not available. Resultactive ing in: Emergency start directly on engine is the only way to start the engine. Available functionality: Main WECS functionality except starting is fully operational.

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Main WECS functionality is not available. Resulting in: Only local start/ stop operations Maximum allowable engine load is 85%. Loss of Modbus communication. Available (backup) functions: Local start/stop. Emergency stop. Lubricating oil pressure safety. Overspeed protection. Optional shutdown. Standby pump logic (only for GL).

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WECS remains fully Requires immediate operational. repair where possible Backup safety still to restore full funcoperational tionality Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality 1.6 69

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

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Recommendation Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality and maximum allowable engine load

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Faulty speed signal Sensor failure indica- WECS remains fully Requires immediate SE167 tion (900) operational repair where possible to restore full functionality Faulty speed signal Sensor failure indica- WECS main functionST174 tion (900) ality remains fully operational. Backup safety is restricted due to: Loss of overspeed protection. Loss of lubricating oil safety. Loss of speed switch logic e.g. engine running). Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

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Dual speed signal fail Major speed control Speed control (both SE167.2 and alarm active stops the engine. In SE168.2) case of mechanical hydraulic governoractuator, the engine can be re started safely after disconnecting fuel control signal from actuator/governor.

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Faulty speed signal Minor speed control Speed SE167.2 or SE168.2 alarm active mains ational

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Faulty speed control Major speed control Engine speed control due to fuse failure or alarm active handled by mechaninternal failure ical hydraulic governor actuator; speed setting only directly on governor. Engine is stopped in case of actuator without mechanical backup

control re- Requires immediate fully oper- repair where possible to restore full functionality Stop engine with stop lever when possible and restart engine after repair of at least one speed signal to restore speed control functionality

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

Recommendation

In case of mechanical hydraulic governoractuator: Stop engine with stop lever when possible and restart engine after repair of faulty speed control In case of actuator without mechanical backup: Immediate repair of faulty speed control to startup of engine

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

Dual speed signal fail Sensor failure indica- Engine is stopped. Requires immediate (both SE167 and tion (900), 2x Overspeed safety is repair to restore full ST174) completely lost. functionality and safely restart the engine Faulty OMD (Oil Mist Detector failure in- OMD functionality is Detector) due to fuse dication (900) not available. The failure or internal failmain bearing safety ure is operational. Faulty signal Sensor failure indicaPT201.1 due to tion (900) broken wiring or FE acquisition module failure Faulty PSZ201.1 Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

signal WECS failure alarm active. Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated LED on module is active)

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Faulty signal WECS failure alarm TE402.2 due to active. broken wiring Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated optional shutdown input LED is active) Faulty signal PT401 Sensor failure indicadue to sensor failure, tion (900) broken wiring or FE acquisition module failure

Faulty signal Sensor failure indicaTE402.1 due to tion (900) broken wiring or TC acquisition module failure

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Main lubricating oil safety including start block is not available. Backup lubricating oil safety is operational. Backup lubricating oil safety is not available. Main lubricating oil safety is operational. Main safety stop on HT water temperature is not available. Backup HT water temperature safety stop is operational Backup HT water temperature indication is not available Backup HT water temperature safety stop is not available. Main safety stop on HT water temperature is operational Main safety stop on HT water pressure is not available. Back up HT water pressure safety is operational.

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

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Recommendation Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality related to LR requirements Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality related to LR requirements Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality related to GL requirements 1.6 71

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Faulty signal PSZ401 WECS failure alarm due to broken wiring active. Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated optional shutdown input LED is active) Faulty signal OS735 between Junction Box and engine due to broken wiring WECS failure alarm active. Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated emergency stop input LED is active) WECS failure alarm active. Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated emergency stop input LED is active) WECS failure alarm active. Relay module failure alarm active (dedicated optional shutdown input LED is active)

Backup HT water pressure safety stop is not available. Main safety stop on HT water pressure is operational

Faulty optional shutdown signal (often gearbox lubricating oil safety trip) due to broken wiring

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signal Part of CPP system Sensor failure indication (900). BP valve failure (CVS643) indication (900). WG valve failure (CV519) indication (900).

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Faulty signal OS735 between Junction Box and emergency stop button due to broken wiring

Emergency stop related to specific emergency stop button not available. Other emergency stop buttons are operational Optional shutdown (often gearbox lubricating oil safety trip) not available

Faulty signal Sensor failure indicaGT165.1 due to sen- tion (900) sor failure or broken wiring Faulty GT165.2

Overload alarm is not available which effects engine load control by CPP system

Effects engine load Requires immediate control by CPP sys- repair where possible tem to restore full functionality Waste gate valve control disabled. Load reduction requested to minimise engine load up to 85% Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full allowable engine power

Faulty signal PT601.1 due to sensor failure, broken wiring or TC acquisition module failure

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Emergency stop Requires immediate not available. repair where possible Normal stop com- to restore full funcmands are oper- tionality ational

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

Recommendation

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality related to GL requirements

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

Faulty signal TE401 Sensor failure indicadue to sensor failure, tion (900) broken wiring or FE acquisition module failure

Associated safety functionality not available. Associated start block not activated

Faulty signal PT311 Sensor failure indica- Associated safety due to sensor failure, tion (900) functionality not broken wiring available. Associated start block not activated

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Faulty signal GS171 due to broken wiring

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Faulty signal GS792 due to broken wiring

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Faulty signal Sensor failure indica- Associated start Requires immediate LS271/LS281 due to tion (900) for each block not activated repair where possible broken wiring sensor to restore full functionality. Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality.

Associated start Requires immediate block activated repair to enable an engine start attempt. Emergency start directly on engine can be utilised when needed. Associated start Requires immediate block activated repair to enable an engine start attempt. Emergency start directly on engine can be utilised when needed.

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Cause

Failure indication

Effect

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Recommendation Requires immediate repair where possible to restore full functionality. 1.6 73

Control System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Control System

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2.3 1

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2.3. Start, Operation and Stop

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Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

Before an operator takes an engine into operation for the first time, he should be acquainted with the location and function of the components of the installation.

Air should be purged from liquid systems by means of ventilation devices at the highest point while filling or circulating the liquid. The engine should be cranked a few revolutions to ensure there are no restrictions. After all necessary settings have been made prior to starting, the engine should run at the idle speed/load recommended in the main data, see chapter 1.0. The engine speed/load should be increased gradually while observing pressures and temperatures to make sure all parts are working properly. Wrtsil Corporation issues instructions for each engine and such instructions are the result of wide experience. To secure the utmost in reliability and efficiency these instructions should be read, understood, and followed. All wellmanaged installations maintain engine room logs. The logs should have provision for recording the starting and stopping time of each engine, the loads, pressures and temperatures. These logs are usually based on a 24hours operating period and provide space for each of the shift engineers. Well maintained logs will provide an valuable record of the performance of the engines and all maintenance made or needed.

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Note!

If the engine is intended to run on HFO it is recommended to start, run and stop the engine on HFO.

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Before starting completely new installations or those which have been out of service for some time, the operator is advised to test all fuel, lubricating oil, water and air lines to check if they are tight and functional.

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2.3.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

2.3.2.1.

Preheating

Before a trial run and after maintenance/repairs or a prolonged stop, the engine and system should be thoroughly inspected and prepared for operation. Before an engine is started, pay attention to: Levels in tanks. Vented systems. Check the correct valves positions in supply and discharge lines on the engine. Observe the system diagrams. Required coolers are in service. Leaking pipes. Safety systems tested and operational. Check crankcase for possible water leakages from liner walls. Cooling water has preheated the engine. Fuel is circulating at the required pressure and viscosity. The prelubricating to the engine is correct. Filters on differential pressures. Starting air vessels are on pressure and drained from water and oil. Gauges for normal readings. Prohibiting tags removed. Start blocking is released. Engine and engine shafting clear for rotating. Engine room is free of obstructions. Have two crankshaft revolutions by means of the turning gear while keeping the indicator cocks open.

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Note!

Check if there is air supply to the stop device and leave valve (15) always open during engine operation for air supply to the oil mist detector. See fig. 2.3 2 .

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2.3.2.2.

Putting the engine into operation

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In a standby preheated mode the engine is ready to accept load instantly. Standby preheated conditions means: Fuel must be of the correct viscosity in the internal engine system. Circulating HT cooling water temperature at a minimum of 60 C. Cooling water must flow in a reversed way through the engine for an optimum engine preheating result. Lubricating oil temperature should be at least 40 C. Water temperature of the LT section of the charge air cooler should not be below 10 C.

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2.3.2.

Start

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2.3 3

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Depending on the system, start the prelubricating oil system and obtain a minimum pressure of about 0.8 bar. If an external full flow lubricating oil pump is installed adjust the pressure at nominal. See section 1.0.5.

Warning!

2 Set speed setting to idle speed/low load. In case of marine application disconnect the propeller shaft or place the propeller blades in vane position. 3 4 Follow the instructions in section 2.3.2.2.

5 Crank the engine two revolutions by means of the turning gear. Observe if any water or oil are escaping from the indicator cocks while cranking. 6 7 8 9 Close the indicator cocks. Disengage the turning gear.

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ENGINE SPEED LUBE OIL PRESSURE HT WATER TEMPERATURE START STOP

Check if the automatic alarm and stop devices are in service. Switch the engine control to the local one.

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Main page
80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

Open the indicator cocks.

Fig. 2.3 1 Local control panel

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2.3 4

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Mode: Running
REMOTE LOCAL

If a standby pump is used for prelubricating purposes, prevent a continuous operating in order to avoid excessive fouling of the turbocharger. See also the suppliers turbocharger manual.

Exhaust gas temperature 483 5C


80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

SHUTDOWN RESET

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ALO

2.3.2.3.

Local start

ENGINE MODE

CRANK TEST

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

10 Push the start button at the local control panel for a while, see fig. 2.3 1 , and observe the crankshaft starts to rotate; soon combustions are going to take place, no additional action is needed as the complete procedure is automised. 11 During the starting procedure a fuel limiter controls the fuel rack movement in order to avoid excessive fuel injection and unnecessary smoke. The limiter is automatically released after the engine reaches idle speed/low load. 12 Direct after engine start check:

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Note!

In case of an emergency, it is possible to start the engine manually. The stop lever (1) must be in normal operation position. Activate the start solenoid at the local start / stop unit on the engine manually by pushing the start button (2). Push the start button until the engine starts. See fig. 2.3 2 . Take notice of the following consequences: During an emergency start the start inhibit logic is bypassed in the automation system. For proper handling of the (electronic) speed control the speed control unit has to be set in the RUN position by the automation system.

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The starting air manifold on the cylinder heads is not hot. (this could happen wether the starting air valve remains open and the hot combustion gases are flushing back to the manifold, so please check the starting air valves do not remain in open position). Levels in tanks and sumps remain normal. Combustion is occurring into all cylinders; thats indicated by an exhaust gas temperature rise up. The HP fuel system is free of leakages. No engine alarm is appearing. The engine and system for anomalies. The engine gauges for deviations. The actuator stability and the uniformity of crankshaft rotation.

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2.3 5

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

STOP

02

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04

03

Fig. 2.3 2 Local control stand

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2.3.2.4. 2.3.2.5.

Remote or automatic start

A remote or automatic start of an engine requires the same preliminary settings as for a normal (local) start with the exception the engine is not under maintenance for any reason. To start the engine remotely it should first have been started locally under full supervision of the operator. After performing a successful start and having the engine left in a stand by mode, it is allowed to switch the engine controls from local to remote. After switching to remote or automatic engine control, every person within the engine room must to be aware of an eventual engine start without any notice.

Start after a stop

1 After a stop if the engine is expected to run again by few hours, the following rules must be observed:

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

Pressures, flows and fuel viscosity remain at nominal values as required for a normal (local) start. No maintenance is carried out. The turning gear is not engaged. 2 If an engine start is not performed within a 8 hours period, before a new start sequence the engine should be cranked 2 revolutions with open indicator cocks in order to be sure no liquid is collected on top of the pistons. The conditions which are applicable for a normal start must still be verifyed. 3 Keep the fuel and lubricating oil separators in operation when a restart is expected by few hours.

2.3.2.6.

In general, an overhaul indicates the engine is out of service for some purpose. The more extensive the overhaul, the more carefully the operator has to be during the following startup procedure.

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Note!

General 1 After any kind of maintenance the operator should be fully informed regarding the results of the maintenance in order to operate the engine accordingly. 2 Full attention must be paid for pipes systems cleaning between filters and engine. 3 Depending on the specific maintenance, safety devices setting and function must be tested. 4 Activate the stop solenoid with the governor power shaft at the maximum load position and the stop lever in operating position in order to check all HP fuel pump racks move to zero at once. 5 Prelubricate the engine. Check, where possible, if all the points to be lubricated are going to receive oil. Test run After maintenances and/or repair works on the engine parts run the engine at idling speed/low load. If anything anomalous is suspected during the test run procedure, stop the engine immediately.

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Start after overhaul

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The engine is left in the preheating mode, the cooling water and the lubricating oil still keep on circulating in order to mantain the engine preheated.

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2.3 7

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

After 5 minutes test run stop the engine,

Warning!

The crank case covers removal, immediately after an engine stop, is only allowed if a maximum 5 minutes test run has been performed. 4 Open the crank case covers.

5 Check the main and connecting rod bearing temperatures, in particular the bearings which have been object of maintenance. Check if the connecting rod big end moves easily in axial direction.

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2.3 8

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Check the cylinder pressures.

6 Inspect during cranking liners and pistons for normal pattern from the crankcase side.

7 Check if the cylinder liners bottom part is showing traces of water leakages. Operating check 8 If the 5 minutes test run is ok, start the engine and pay attention to the following points: Check the readings and alarms of safety and alarm system. Check the automatic alarm and stop devices.

Check the pressure and temperature gauges.

Check the pressure drop over fuel filter and lubricating oil filter. Check the oil level in the oil sump/oil tank. Make some simple quality checks of the oil.

Check the vent system of the engine cooling water systems. Check the quantity of fuel leakages. Check the presence of water at the condense water drain holes of the charge air receiver.

Check the circulating water quality.

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Start the engine. Immediately after the start up check: Leakage of air, water, fuel or lubricating oil. Especially, observe fuel lines, HP fuel pumps and injectors. Excessive amounts of the leakage from oil pipes. Pressures. Temperatures. Strange noises. Fluid levels. 2 Check all cylinders combustion condition which is indicated by an increased exhaust gas temperature.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

Listen for strange noises. Check the crankcase pressure.

Check the maximum cylinder pressures, see section 2.3.3.5. After checking, continue with local start procedures as mentioned in section 2.3.2.

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Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

General The normal operation and supervision include all the activities in order to assure a smooth and trouble free operation of the complete installation against the lowest costs as well as to guarantee the safety of operators who are attending that plant.

Golden rule

Successful operation of a diesel engine mainly depends on the quality of the systems which are supporting the engine itself. To guarantee a trouble free and smooth plant operation the following remarks should be taken into account: 1 There is no automatic supervision or control arrangement that replaces an experienced engineer observations. It is not only a matter of FEEL, LOOK and LISTEN, but also a correct interpretation of signals from monitoring devices. Do not jumper safety devices in case of malfunction but make the safety equipment reliable. In case the malfunction can not locally be solved contact Wrtsil Corporation, Service department. 2 Keep the engine installation in operation in a way as that it is designed for. 3 The operator is supposed to know what normally can be expected from a plant in operation and ought to have admission to all relevant technical data which are part of the installation such as: Testbed and commissioning protocols. Manual, parts catalogue and subsuppliers manuals. Engine log book for each engine etc. 4 The operator must have full confidence of the process values.The indicated process values must be in accordance to the specified operating data. 5 By constantly keeping the engine and/or installation logs the operator must be aware in time about all changes at the engine and installation processes level and, at the same time, be able to take necessary corrective actions. 6 Operators involved should have more than marginal knowledge of the ongoing processes in the engine and the installation. The basic knowledge is supposed to be gained by intensive basic studies, by long term practical experiences on comparable installations and studies of relevant manuals available. The Training Center of Wrtsil Italia Service department is capable to offer adequate courses of any level in order to form the skill and the knowledge which is required to the involved personnel.

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2.3.3.

Operation

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

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Note!

9 Always manage the engine and the installation in a safe way. That purpose can be reached when the following issues are kept in mind: The installation is assembled and put into operation accordingly to manufacturers prescriptions. Specified genuine parts have been used as spares. The operator is interacting with the systems and their safeties. The working reliability of all the safety systems is periodically approved. 10 Loading The engine output increase procedure depends largely on the engine preheating time and load level. See also section 2.3.3.2. 11 Idling should be avoided as much as possible.

12 Check if condense water drain holes in the charge air receiver are open. 13 Continuous operation at loads in the range between 5 and 20 % of rated output should be limited to maximum 100 hours. If a prolongued use is needed at those conditions, load the engine above 70 % of rated load for one hour before restoring the low load operation. 14 Never try to align the exhaust gas temperatures of all the cylinders to the same level by adjusting the rack positions of the relevant HP fuel pumps. The maximum deviation between fuel rack positions is  0.5 mm.

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7 Operators safety should be guarantied without restriction while they are attending the installation. Only under operators safe working conditions an installation safe running operation can be reached. Unsafe locations must be avoided in general. Operators safety includes also the use of adequate clothes and shoes completed with helmets, glasses, gloves and ear protections. Furthermore, the operators safety depends largely by the rules observation. 8 Sufficient means and tools should to be available in order to provide the operators with optimum working conditions for uninterrupted operation of the engine and the installation.

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Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.3.3.1.

Maintenance points during operation

The following notes give some additional information about maintenance points mentioned in the maintenance schedule.

Note!

For the complete maintenance schedule see section 2.4.1.3.

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1 Observe all temperature and pressure readings. To keep a close surveillance on the engine in operation it is advised to keep a log book for temperatures, pressures and other parameters. This provides a good overview of the normal values and trends. Deviations can be detected early. 2 Temperature and pressure readings. Check daily the proper working of temperature and pressure sensors. Defective instruments should be replaced as soon as possible. 3 Check the engine circulating water venting system on working. 4 Fluid levels. Checks should include the following list: lubricating oil level level of fresh cooling water system(s) level of daily service fuel tank. 5 Leaks During operation check the following systems for eventual leaks: fuel system lubricating oil system cooling water system charge air system (condense water drain holes must be open) and exhaust gas system start, stop and pneumatic control system. 6 Draining The daily fuel service tank must regularly be drained at the lowest points for water and sludge. If water or sludge of any importance appears, investigate the origin. Air vessels and water separators in air lines should be regularly drained. 7 Keep the HP fuel pump racks clean (free from sticky components), check is the rack linkage connections are moving easyly or have excessive clearances. 8 Circulate the lubricating oil once a week on a stopped engine. This reduces the risk of CORROSION on the engine parts. 9 Check the cylinder firing pressures. At the same time record the engine load, the fuel rack position, the turbine speed, the charge air pressure and the inlet air temperature. All offer information about the engine performance. 10 Record lube oil analysis and lube oil service time. 11 Record the cleaning frequency of the engine mounted centrifugal lubricating oil filters.

2.3 12

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

12 Record the frequency of lubricating oil filter candles replacements.

2.3.3.2.

Loading performance

Note!

Maximum loading speed should be performed when absolutely necessary only. Before any operation the engine should be at least properly preheated which means: Fuel oil must be at correct viscosity HT cooling water temperature must be 60 C minimum Lubricating oil temperature must be 40 C minimum

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Note!
Step1: Step2: Step3: Step4: 0 28 55 85 28 % 55 % 85 % 100 %

2.3.3.2.1. Gradual load increase


Load the engine as gradually as possible. The following curves show the maximum permissible load steps at certain engine conditions as a function of time [s].

Fast loading creates larger thermal load strain and reduces considerably the engine components life time. The engine loading should be performed in a minimum of four steps:

Wrtsil Corporation recommends to apply the load even in a more gradual way during the normal operation.

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The increase load steps must be controlled in order to let the charge air system provide the cylinders with sufficient air for a complete combustion. Expecially turbocharged engines should be stepwise loaded due to the air deficit which is evident until the turbocharger has reached the relevant rated speed. The engine loading should preferably be controlled by a load/speed increase program included in the control system.

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Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

75

50

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210 240 270 300 330

0 0 30 60 90 120 150 180

Fig. 2.3 3 DE (Marine), gradual load increase

2.3.3.2.2. Sudden load increase

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Load increase [%] 50 40
Maximum sudden load increase

Limiting curves for step loadings as a function of engine % load are shown in fig. 2.3 4 . The maximum sudden power increase fulfils the requirements of ISO 85285.

30 20

10 0

20

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40 60

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Fig. 2.3 4 Maximum sudden power increase

2.3 14

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Preheating temperature Operating temperature Emergency at operating temperature 360 Time [s]

Engine load [%] 100

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80 100 Engine load [%]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

2.3.3.3.1.

Restrictions for operation at excessive suction air temperature

In case the engine loading is required at excessive ambient conditions, consider that derating may be required, see section 1.0.3.

2.3.3.3.2. Restrictions for low load and idling


During idling and low load operation, also depending on the fuel quality and combustion, more soot and sludge will be formed than during higher loads. These combustion products will contaminate the internal urfaces and components of the engine. Lubricating oil filters and separator will be harder loaded during such periods as well. When the engine is put into operation after a stop, piston ring sticking and valve stem sticking may occour and lead to dangerous damages. Furthermore, combustion products, not sufficiently neutralised by the lubricating oil, may cause corrosion. At higher engine loads the concentration of all kind of combustion products automatically reduces. That is really important if the engine is going to be stopped. The following recommendations must be applyed to idling and low load operation. Idling (declutched main engine, unloaded generator): Maximum 15 min, ( recommended minimum 10 minutes ) if the engine is expected to be stopped after idling. Maximum 6 hours if the engine is expected to be loaded after idling.

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Note!

Unnecessary idling should be avoided as much as possible. Operation between 5...20% load: A 100 hours maximum continuous operation. At intervals of 100 operating hours and also before a planned engine stop a minimum 70% load must be kept for 1 hour.

2.3.3.3.3. Load decrease before a planned stop


For a planned stop decrease the engine load 20% every minute.

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The lowest suction air temperature during idling is 5 oC. For operation with temperatures below 0 oC a special nonstandard equipment is requiredon the engine.

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2.3.3.3.

Wrtsil 38B operating areas

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2.3 15

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

To keep a close surveillance on the engine in operation it is advised to keep a log book for temperatures, pressures and other parameters. This provides a good overview of the normal values and trends. Deviations can be detected early.
WEEK .. YEAR .. Time Engine speed Turbocharger speed Fuel rack position Load Load indication actuator HT cooling LT cooling Lubricating oil Fuel Charge air receiver Exhaust gases after turboch. Barometer Crankcase pressure Ambient air Air after turbocharger Air in receiver Water before air coolers Water before oil coolers Lubricating oil before coolers Lubricating oil after coolers Lubricating oil before engine HT water before the engine HT water after the engine HT water after the HT cooler ... ... rpm ... rpm ... mm ... kW ... ... ... bar ... bar ... bar ... bar ... bar ... m.bar ... m.bar ... m.bar ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ... oC ...
oC

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Fuel before the engine Fuel after the engine Exhaust gases cyl.1, A1 / B1 cyl.2, A2 / B2 cyl.3, A3 / B3 cyl.4, A4 / B4 cyl.5, A5 / B5 cyl.6, A6 / B6 cyl.7, A7 / B7 cyl.8, A8 / B8 cyl.9, A9 / B9 Exhaust gases before turboch. Exhaust gases after turboch.
oC oC oC oC oC oC oC oC oC oC oC oC

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ...

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... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ...

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2.3 16

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... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ./. ... ...

2.3.3.4.

Engine log sheet (example)

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

Note!

Cylinder pressure measurement at the indicator cock is useful for individually comparison, however, the value measured is not representative for the real cylinder pressure. More sophisticated instruments can plot the cylinder pressure / crank angle diagram while showing the combustion starting point, the angle of maximum pressure and its rising trend. However, the mean indicated pressure and the heat release, as calculated from those data, dont represent the engine performance as measured at the indicator cock. The data which have been read at the indicator cocks should not be used for that purpose since:

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Note! Note!

The cylinder pressure indicator is placed on the cylinder head top at the end of a narrow bore in the combustion chamber roof. Whitin thas bore the pressure is rising steeper with pressure fluctuations, at the same time higher maximum values are read than those which are effective within the cylinder space.

Due to the length of the indicator channel the pressure pulse is delayed giving a wrong pressure/time diagram monitoring.

It is strictly not allowed to switch off the fuel injection of a cylinder to measure compression pressure. Checking cylinder firing pressure Check cylinder firing pressures. At the same time record engine load, fuel rack position, turbine speed, charge air pressure and inlet air temperature. All offer information about the engine performance. Recording cylinder combustion pressures without simultaneously recording engine load is practically worthless.

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General The cylinder pressure is measured by means of a peak pressure meter connected to the indicator cock on the cylinder head top. The read pressure values can only be used for comparison to those pressures from the remaining engine cylinders. Depending on the fuel type, the engine load and rpm, the pressure measured at the indicator cock differs from the maximum pressure in the cylinder and can be 515 bar higher.

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2.3.3.5.

Measurement of cylinder pressure

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2.3 17

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

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80

Engine load % 100

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3A a b c 4 3 2
2 3 4 5

The runningin procedure is mainly intended for piston rings and liners adjustment after an overhaul. In order to perform a good runningin it is important to apply different load levels during that period. The piston ring grooves have different tilting angles at each load and consequently the piston rings have different contact lines on the cylinder liner walls. Runningin may be performed either on distillate or heavy fuel while using the proper lubricating oil for the specific fuel. (Keep BN value in mind). 1 Carry out the start after an overhaul procedure (except the operating check), see section 2.3.2.6.. 2 Start the runningin procedure. a = gradual load increase 30 minutes. b = constant load period 30 minutes. c = recovery period 5 minutes. 1..7= load steps to be followed after changing piston rings, pistons or cylinder liners. 1A ..3A = load steps to be followed after piston overhaul.

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5

60

2A

40

1A

20

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Fig. 2.3 5 Runningin diagram (n = constant 600 rpm) 3 Record data on the engine log sheet at the end of each load step. Use the test report as a reference.

2.3 18

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7 6
6 7 8 Operating hours

2.3.3.6.

Runningin

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

2.3.3.7.

Operating Troubles

Some operating troubles require a prompt corrective action. Operators should be acquainted with the contents of this section for immediate action.

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Action 1. Crankshaft does not rotate in a start attempt on air

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2. Crankshaft rotates however the engine does not fire a) Too low speed. b) Stop solenoid in actuator is activated. c) Load limiter is set incorrect. d) Fuel limiter is set incorrect. e) Fuel pump rack blocked. f) In case of starting on HFO, too low engine and/or fuel temperature. g) Too low compression pressure. j) Vapour in fuel booster line. h) Combustion air temperature too low.

a) Turning gear is engaged. b) Starting air pressure too low. c) Starting air valve kept closed by Locate the problem. safety system. d) Engine in overspeed stop position. e) Main starting air valve jams. f) Incorrect adjustment of the pilot starting air system.

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See 1b.

Locate the problem.

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2.3.2. 2.9.

Never try to adjust the cylinder exhaust gas temperatures by readjusting fuel rack position. 4 Finally the engine is ready for operation.

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Chapter / section 2.3 19

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

3.

Engine fires irregularly

Check compression pressure.

4.

Engine speed not stable

a) Big end bearing clearance excessive. b) Valve springs or cam follower spring broken. c) Excessive valve clearance. d) Valve(s) jams. e) HP fuel pump drive spring broken f) One or more cylinders too much fuel. h) Piston seizure. j) Ignition delay.

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2.3 20

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a) Actuator setting incorrect. b) See point 3b. b) Control mechanism jams. c) Too much clearances in control mechanism. d) Water in fuel. e) Automatic load control mechanism faulty. 5. Knock or detonation

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Find cause of excessive wear. Readjust valve clearance. See 3b, 3c. Locate the problem.

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a) See points 2e, 2f, 2g, 2h 2j, 4d. b) Fuel pump rack is set incorrectly or jams. c) HP pump operates improper. d) Bad working fuel injector. e) Piston rings do not seal properly. f) Fuel booster pressure too low. g) Valves in supply/return manifold to HP fuel pump closed.

Readjust fuel rack.

Nozzle holes clogged.

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2.9.

Action

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Chapter / section

Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

6.

Exhaust gases dark coloured

a) Engine overloaded.

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b) Delayed injection, wrong setting. c) See points 3b, 3c. d) Insufficient charge air pressure due to: clogged air filter of turbocharger dirty compressor section clogged nozzle ring turbine speed too low too much clearance between rotor and shroud ring. e) Deteriorated injectors. f) Too fast engine loading e.g. during start up. 7. Exhaust gases bluewhitish or greywhitish coloured

Check HP fuel pump rack positions, exhaust gas temperatures and charged air pressure/temperature. Check timing.

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a) Excessive lubricating oil consumption Endoscopic inspection of the due to gas blowby of piston rings, or cylinder liner. broken sticking piston rings or too much wear of rings / liners. b) Greywhitish gases due to water leakage in the combustion chamber. Note: Bluewhitish smoke appears when running at low load or at low ambient temperature shortly after starting.

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2.9.

Action

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Chapter / section Test Records 2.3 21

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

8.

Exhaust gas temperatures of one or more cylinders too high

a) Engine overloaded. b) See points 3c and 4g. c) Charge air temperature too high. d) Exhaust valve leaking. e) Turbocharger contaminated. f) Malfunctioning of exhaust gas temperature measuring equipment. g) See point 3d. 9. Exhaust gas temperature of one cylinder below normal

See engine log sheet, test bed protocol. Inspection air cooling system. Inspection/overhaul exhaust valve.

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Test Records

a) Malfunctioning of exhaust gas temperature measuring equipment.

b) Leaking of fuel injector or HP fuel pipe.

d) See points 3b, 3d.

10. Exhaust gas temperatures very unequal

a) Too low fuel booster feed pressure.

b) See points 2g, 3b and 6b when idling.

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2.3 22

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c) Malfunctioning of HP fuel pump plunger. Inspection/overhaul HP fuel pump.

Insufficient filling of HP fuel pumps (see points 2j, 2k), which may cause great load differences between cylinders although HP fuel pump rack positions are equal. Dangerous ! Causes high thermal overload in individual cylinders.

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Action

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Chapter / section

Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

11. Lubricating oil pressure too low a) Malfunctioning of pressure gauge / transmitter. b) Lubricating oil level in oil tank too low. c) pressure too high.

See trouble shooting of automatic backflushing filter

d) Filter contaminated.

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a) See point 11f. 13. Lubricating oil temperature: too high a) Wrong temperature indication. b) Disturbance of cooling water system. c) Too high LT water temperature. d) Oil cooler contaminated. e) Malfunction of thermostatic valve. f) Insufficient heat transferred to coolant to maintain temperature. too low g) See points 13a and 13e.

e) Lubricating oil temperature too high. f) Lubricating oil seriously diluted with fuel or water. g) Malfunctioning of lubricating oil pressure Inspection/overhaul pressure control valve. control valve. h) Lubricating oil suction pipe leakage. i) Suction strainer dirty or blocked. j) Malfunctioning of lubricating oil pump. k) Lubricating oil pipes inside engine damaged. 12. Lubricating oil pressure too high

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Check working automatic backflushing filter

Check temperature reading.

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Action

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Chapter / section 2.3 23

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

14. Cooling water: temperature too high a) Malfunctioning of pump. b) Water cooler contaminated. c) Malfunction of thermostatic valve. d) Incorrect valve position in the system. difference between inlet and outlet temperature too high e) See point 14a. f) Water cooler clogged or contaminated. g) Insufficient flow of cooling water through engine, air in system, valves leaking. 15. Water in lubricating oil a) Leaking oil cooler.

b) Leakage along cylinder liner Orings.

c) Wrongly adjusted water seal of the oil separator.

d) Defective cylinder liner or cylinder head. 16. Charge air receiver temperature too high a) Insufficient performance of the charge air cooler(s).

b) HT and/or LT cooling water temperature too high. 17. Water in charge air receiver a) Charge air coolers leakage. b) Condense water (charge air temperature too low)

18. Engine looses speed at constant or increased load

a) Engine overloaded. A further increase of fuel supply is prevented by the mechanical load limiter. b) See points 2c, 2e, 4e and 4f.

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2.3 24

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Inspect cooler

See separator instruction book!

Vent the water side of the charge air cooler and/or clean the charge air cooler.

Increase charge air temperature

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Action

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Chapter / section

Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

19. Engine stops a) Shortage of fuel. See point 4d. b) Overspeed trip device is activated. c) Automatic stopping device is activated. d) Malfunctioning of actuator. 20. Engine does not stop although stop lever is set in stop position or remote stop signal is given a) HP fuel pump control rack wrongly set (3b, 3c).

b) Malfunction remote engine stop.

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21. Engine continuous running with activated overspeed trip device a) HP fuel pump control rack wrongly set (3b, 3c).

c) The engine is driven by generator, propeller or other source.

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Activate overspeed trip device manually. If the engine does not stop immediately, close the fuel supply to the engine. Before starting the engine, the fault must be located and corrected. Great risk of overspeed. Use stop lever on the engine.

Load the engine, if possible. Close fuel supply to engine. Make proper adjustment fuel racks.

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Action

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Chapter / section 2.3 25

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.3.3.8.1.

Operation with defective charge air cooler(s)

2.3.3.8.2. Operation with defective turbocharger Note!


In case of a defective turbocharger and the turbo charger has to shut down execute all measures according the Operation Manual of the turbocharger supplier. In case the turbocharger is blocked or the cartridge is removed the compensator between the compressor outlet and the charge air cooler inlet should be removed to allow more air to the engine. Permissible output with a defective turbocharger is approx. 10% load. In case of HFO operation it is advised to change over to light fuel oil.

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2.3 26

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Operation with one turbocharger defective In case one turbocharger is blocked or the cartridge is removed the compensator between the compressor outlet and the charge air cooler inlet should be removed and a blind flange should be fitted at the charge air cooler inlet. The air to engine is supplied to both banks by the turbocharger which is still working . It might be possible in such a case to run the engine at a output higher than 10% , but the restrictions for exhaust gasses should be observed.

Restrictions for exhaust gas temperatures With a blocked turbocharger the exhaust gas temperatures increase very steep at higher output! Of all exhaust gas temperature alarms specially the exhaust gas temperature TC inlet should be maintained. (Alarm settings exhaust gas temperature cylinder and TC outlet will be trespassed in these circumstances.

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Leaking cooling water tubes of a charge air cooler permit cooling water entering the cylinders. Water in the charge air receiver can be indicated by the condense water drain holes. If water or water mist escapes the hole, check whether it is cooling water or condense water. If condense water drains, see section 1.5.4.1.4. If cooling water drains, stop the engine as soon as possible and plug off the leaking tube. If cooler leakage cannot be remedied by tube plugging exchange cooler for a spare.

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2.3.3.8.

Emergency operation

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

2.3.3.8.3. Operation with one cylinder misfiring

Eventual restrictions, from point of view of torsional vibration behaviour, mentioned in a torsional vibration analysis report, have to be obeyed! Otherwise, especially in emergency operation one cylinder unit out of operation critical components as torsional vibration damper, crankshaft, torsional elastic coupling, gearwheel, propeller shaft etcetera, are subjected to not allowable torsional vibration loads.

Note!

Engine operation, with one cylinder out of service, is only allowed in case restrictions, mentioned in a report concerning torsional vibration behaviour of this particular installation, are observed!

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2.3.3.8.4. Operation with WECS / Governor problems


All necessary instructions to operate the engine in case of degraded operation of the WECS and / or external governor (speed control) and / or auxiliary systems are described in section 1.6.8.5.

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A torsional vibration analysis is made for each installation and all possible modes of operation. This is done for as well normal conditions as for so called misfire conditions. With misfire conditions we mean: no combustion in one cylinder, only compression and expansion. This can occur due to for instance a defect HP fuel pump. In case there is also no compression and expansion, Wrtsil Corporation has to be consulted.

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2.3 27

Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

The engine can always be stopped: remotely, locally or manually. The local(/remote) stop involves the following devices: Stop cylinders on fuel pumps. Stop signal to the actuator controller.

ENGINE SPEED

LUBE OIL PRESSURE

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80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

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Main page

Local stop Push the stop button on the local control panel (see fig. 2.3 6 ). The engine stops hard wired via the relay module.

Exhaust gas temperature 483 5C


80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80

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HT WATER TEMPERATURE START STOP

Mode: Running

REMOTE

SHUTDOWN RESET

Fig. 2.3 6 Local stop

Note!

Before a planned stop decrease the engine load 20% step wise every minute and idle engine for 10 minutes at least and 15 minutes maximum.

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Remote stop: Push the stop button in the control room, the engine stops by means of a complete electronically managed procedure.

2.3 28

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ALO
LOCAL

2.3.4.

Stop

ENGINE MODE

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CRANK TEST

Manual Wrtsil 38

Start, Operation and Stop

STOP

02

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Fig. 2.3 7 Manual stop
04

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01

Manual stop Move the stop lever (1) on the engine control unit into STOP position. See fig. 2.3 7 . Lock the handle with the locking pin (4).

03

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Note!

Valve (15) should always be open during engine operation to ensure sufficient control air to the start / stop unit. Emergency stop Local emergency stop: In case of an electric power failure it is possible to stop the engine bypassing the WECS control system. By pushing the emergency stop button (3) on the local start / stop unit, see fig. 2.3 7 , the stop cylinders on the HP fuels are activated. Keep the emergency stop button pressed until the engine has completely stopped. Remote emergency stop: If the emergency stop button on the automation system is activated, the following devices are involved: Emergency stop solenoid valve. Speed control unit. Actions after final stop of the engine For safety reasons the following actions have to be performed after the complete stop of the engine: 1 Open the indicator cocks. 2 Close the shut off valve in the starting air system.

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Start, Operation and Stop

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.3 29

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2.4 1

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2.4. Maintenance

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.4.1.1.

General

The needed engine maintenance depends mainly on the operating conditions. The intervals stated within the following tables are guidance values only and must not be exceeded ; the same schedule is strongly adviced to be always observed in order to keep the same engine efficiency. See also the suppliers manuals for additional information.

2.4.1.2.

Rules for inspection and maintenance

Read carefully the following rules before performing any inspection and/or maintenance action.

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2.4 2

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General 1 When the engine is under any overhaul make sure the remote or automatic start device and the external pumps are out of operation and provided with prohibiting tags.

2 In order to perform any job in safety conditions engage the turning gear; close the main valve in the starting air (30 bar) supply line, pressure release the starting air system on the engine and put the fuel rack manual control lever in stop" position. 3 Provide the engine parts with reference marks for easy reassemblying at the same position. Reference marks on the engine parts must be copied on new parts to be installed for replacements. Every exchange should be recorded in the engine log book while mentioning the reason too. 4 Use this INSTRUCTION MANUAL during maintenance actions in combination with the SPARE PARTS CATALOGUE. 5 During all the maintenance actions, observe the utmost cleaning and order.

6 Be aware of the risk of the crankcase or the camshaft case explosion! Before performing any maintenance or inspection action on the engine, always let the engine cool down sufficiently. A 10 minute cooling period is a minimum requirement after a normal stop.

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This section describes when and which inspection and maintenance actions have to be carried out. In case you need more information, please contact the Service department of Wrtsil Corporation.

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2.4.1.

Maintenance Schedule

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

8 Always replace locking washers, copper rings, split pins, locking wires, self locking nuts and Orings while assembling. In case copper rings have to be reused, please take care of a preliminar proper annealing. 9 In general never leave Orings mounted on spares; store Orings in a dry, cool and dark place.

Removal 1 Before using the hydraulic tools read section 2.4.3. carefully.

3 If heavy parts are removed from the engine, e.g. a piston or a connecting rod, the crankshaft may start turning due to unbalanced weights; for safety reasons always keep the turning gear engaged throughout the jobs.

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4 2 6

In many cases it is advised to record clearances before disassembling.

Mounting 1 Make sure all parts have been carefully cleaned (free of carbon deposit) before mounting. Do not use cotton waste for inside cleaning of engine but use lint free cleaning rags. Before using the hydraulic tools read section 2.4.3. carefully. 3 Never use other lubricants for bolt connections of engine components than those advised, tightening torques will strongly differ if lubricants of different brand or type are used. In case of doubts contact the technical service of Wrtsil Corporation. 4 Before fitting spare parts, available as complete subassemblies, all the integrated Orings must be inspected on ageing and damages, and replaced if necessary. 5 In general, all the pipes should be carefully cleaned before installing. The fuel, lubricating oil and air lines should be acid cleaned and neutralized. After pipe sections heating, the iron oxidation must be removed by pickling (acid cleaning). Please contact our technical service department for detailed information. Fit all the pipes stress free.

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2 Before dismantling, check all the pipe systems concerned to be drained and pressure released. After dismantling, cover immediately all holes for lubricating oil, fuel oil and air with a tape, plugs, clean cloth or similar. Open the indicator cocks.

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10 Its strongly advised to avoid any electric welding on the engine or using the engine as a conductor for welding.

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7 Observe the fire precautions when engine maintenance jobs or cleaning are going to be performed.

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2.4 3

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Last check 1 It is important no tool, part or other foreign matter to be left in or on the engine and all parts have been thoroughly cleaned before closing the engine. 2 Due to the compression behaviour of some gasket material the prestress of some flange connections must be checked after about 24 running hours after the maintenance. 3 4 Record the renewed engine parts. Record the engine running hours.

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2.4 4

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

2.4.1.3.1. General

The total running hours between overhauls as well as the effective life time of components depend generally on the following aspects:

The intervals stated in the maintenance schedule are guidance values only, but must not be exceeded during the whole engine life. Everyone who is concerned with the maintenance of the engine must be qualified and have adequate training for the proper job to be performed. The engine documentation should always be available. In order to ensure the efficiency, reliability and lifetime of the engine and its components, only genuine spare parts should be used. The common load of the engine should be in the range between 60% and 100% of the maximum output, which is indicated on the engine plate, about from 3,000 up to 6,000 hours are supposed to be annually run. The buildon components which are supplied by third party should be maintained accordingly to the suppliers instructions.

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Inspection

The quality and the treatment of the lubricating oil, fuel, cooling water and air should be in accordance with the rules; refer to the related chapters for detailed specifications. Deviation from the above mentioned factors may result in related adaptation of the running hours between overhauls and/or the effective life time of the components.

2.4.1.3.2. Procedure for inspection and maintenance

For example, if the valve rotators, related to a certain cylinder unit, have to be replaced, then inspect also the rotators of another cylinder unit; if the result of this second inspection is also negative replace all valve rotators.

The results of the first 4.000 running hours inspection are aimed to establish the further service intervals.

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The operation and the maintenance of the engine should be in accordance with the instructions as specified in the engine documentation.

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2.4.1.3.

Maintenance schedule

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2.4 5

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

S P E C I A L

Check the telltale hole of the charge air receiver for possible water. Record performance data in the engine log sheet.

Check fluid levels of: Engine lube oil Cooling water systems Governor/Actuator Record combustion pressures. * * * *

Check foundation bolts and chocks / girders. For stationary, the first year every 2 months. Check foundation bolts and chocks / girders.

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Engine arrangement

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*

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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Check the engine on leakages, bolt connections, cables and wiring.

Inspect elastic engine mounting elements (if applicable).

Check reference points of epoxy resin chocks (if applicable). Inspect elastic elements and membrane plate of flexible coupling according manufacturers instruction. Renew elastic elements of flexible coupling

Measure axial displacement and crankshaft deflections of crankshaft.

Check alignment between engine and engine driven machinery.

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2.4 6

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Every
4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

General maintenance points

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

on
S P E C I A L

Fuel System (Chapter 1.1.)

5 0 0

1 0 0 0

Check the leak fuel quantity of the fuel system. Drain impurities and condensate of fuel day tank.

* *

Renew Orings of low pressure fuel supply and return lines every 8000 runnyng hours. Inspect one fuel pump drive after the first 4000 running hours Inspect all fuel pump drives

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* * * * * * * *

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Lubricating oil system (Chapter 1.2.) Remove commissioning lube oil filters after the first 100 running hours. Inspect / overhaul the thermostatic valves. Renew the thermostatic valves.

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Clean centrifugal filter. Renew all sealing rings of centrifugal filter. Inspect / overhaul lubricating oil pump(s).

Sample / analyze lubricating oil; record analyze results, lubricating oil service time consumption and charge changes. Lubricating oil filter check functioning of external lubricating oil filter, according the suppliers instructions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

* *

* *

2.4 7

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

S P E C I A L

Inspect / overhaul the starting air valves. Inspect / overhaul the main starting air valve. Inspect the starting air distributor and drive.

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* * * * * * *

Drain starting air vessels and air treatment unit(s). Check the entire system on leakages, oxidation and water.

Check cooling water quality.

Clean the cooling water system and check on corrosion.

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Cooling water system (Chapter 1.4.)

Check working of cooling water venting system. Inspect / overhaul HT/LT thermostatic valves. Renew HT/LT thermostatic valves.

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Inspect / overhaul HT and LT cooling water pumps and renew seals.

Renew bearings and impeller HT/LT cooling water pump Renew HT/LT cooling water pump at 48,000 running hours.

Engine driven Pumps Driving Gear

Inspect driving gear of the builton pumps after the first 4,000 running hours.

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2.4 8

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Every
4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Starting air system (Chapter 1.3.)

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* * * * * * * *

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

on
S P E C I A L

Charge air and exhaust gas system (Chapter 1.5.)

5 0 0

1 0 0 0

Clean compressor by water injection.

Inspect and clean the compressor and turbine mechanically depending on turbocharger performance. Check plain the bearings of the turbocharger

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* * * * * * * *

Clean turbine every 150 operating hours. Clean turbine by water injection.

Overhaul turbochargers and renew bearings.

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Overhaul turbocharger and renew plain bearings and check balance of rotor shaft. Renew compressor and turbine wheel after 50,000 running hours. Check functioning of exhaust waste gate. Check functioning of bypass valve. Inspect / clean air filter.

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Renew filter material if applicable. Overhaul the charge air cooler. Inspect / repair the exhaust gas lines, expansion bellows, insulation etc.

Renew exhaust expansion bellows after 48,000 running hours

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4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

* * *

* * *

2.4 9

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

S P E C I A L

Check and lubricate the control mechanism. Inspect / overhaul the control mechanism. Keep electrical and electronic equipment clean,free of moisture,overheating and static electricity. Keep or make the sensors clean

Check settings of the alarm and safety system. Check the measuring devices on proper working. Calibrate the measuring devices. Turn on all screws in terminals.

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* * *

Check the alarm and safety system in operation and after every start.

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* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Check mounting of sensors and cabinets.

Check all connectors on properly connection. Check functioning of the oil mist detector.

Test start process in standby position. Carry out load performance test

Carry out a test run ( after overhaul ).

Carry out a runningin program and record readings.

Check functioning of turning and start interlock device. Refresh lube oil of turning device.

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Operation (Chapter 2.3.)

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2.4 10

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4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Control system (Chapter 1.6.)

* *

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

on
S P E C I A L

Engine block with bearings and cylinder liner (Chapter 2.5.)

5 0 0

1 0 0 0

Overhaul of cylinder liners including honing and renew antipolishing rings. Renew cylinder liners after 60,000 running hours Inspect the crankcase visually. Inspect the cooling water spaces.

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*

Inspect one cylinder liner after the first 4,000 running hours.

* *

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Inspect one main bearing and one main journal. Renew main bearings and inspect the main journals. Inspect one camshaft bearing and journal.

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Renew camshaft bearings and inspect journals.

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4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

* * * * * *

2.4 11

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

S P E C I A L

Inspect the PTO bearing after the first 4,000 running hours. Inspect the PTO bearing and replace the sealing ring Inspect gudgeon pins and bearing.

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* * * * *

Inspect one gudgeon pin and bearing after the first 4,000 running hours.

Renew gudgeon pins and bearings after 60,000 running hours. Inspect one connecting rod after the first 4,000 running hours. Inspect one connecting rod. Inspect / overhaul connecting rods.

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Inspect one crankpin journal and crankpin bearing. Inspect crankpin journals.

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Renew crankpin bearings.

Inspect one piston with piston rings, without dismantling of piston rings after the first 4,000 running hours. Inspect / overhaul pistons and renew piston rings. Renew pistons after 60,000 running hours Renew crankshaft sealing

Sample fluid of vibration damper(s).

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2.4 12

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Every
4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Crankshaft, PTO shaft, connecting rod, piston (Chapter 2.6.)

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* * * * * * * * * *

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

on
S P E C I A L

Cylinder head with valves (Chapter 2.7.)

5 0 0

1 0 0 0

Inspect one cylinder head after the first 4,000 running hours. Overhaul cylinder heads. Inspect safety valves. Check valve clearances.

se
* * * * * * *

Check valve clearances after the first 100 operating hours in new and overhauled engines.

Check function of valve rotators. Inspect / overhaul valves.

lu

Renew exhaust valves and rotators. Renew inlet valve rotators. Renew inlet valves

int ern a
Inspect / overhaul all fuel pump drives. Inspect one inlet and exhaust tappet guide block and tappet after the first 4,000 hrs. Inspect / overhaul all inlet and exhaust tappet guide blocks and tappets. Check pushrod pivots. Check bearing clearances of rocker arms. Inspect / overhaul rocker arms and bracket. Inspect camshaft sections. Inspect camshaft driving gear after the first 4,000 running hours. Inspect camshaft driving gear. Renew bearings intermediate gearwheel

Camshaft and valve drive mechanism (Chapter 2.8.)

Inspect one fuel pump drive and roller after the first 4.000 running hours.

for

ly
Every
4 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

* *

* * * *

* * * *

* *

2.4 13

Description

D A I L Y

W E E K L Y

S P E C I A L

Check the fuel oil leakages quantity. Inspect / test fuel injectors. Renew fuel injector nozzles. Renew inner parts of injector holder.

se
* * * * *

Renew nozzle holder complete after 48,000 running hours. Inspect HP fuel lines.

Inspect one HP fuel pump, after the first 4,000 running hours. Renew fuel pump elements.

lu

Check the HP fuel pump timing

int ern a

Inspect / overhaul HP fuel pumps and renew anticavitation plugs.

Renew HP fuel pump after 48,000 running hrs.

Renew Orings in supply and discharge pipe of HP fuel pumps.

for

2.4 14

on
Every
4 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0

Injection system (Chapter 2.9.)

ly
* * * * * *

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

2.4.2.1.

General

Tools requirements for particular installation may vary greatly depending on the use and service area. Standard tool sets are therefore selected to meet basic requirements.

Note!

This section represents a comprehensive selection of tools for the Wrtsil 38B engines. These tools are not all described in the related sections. The tool set depends on the scope of supply. The following lists of tools are grouped in order to facilitate the selection for specific service operations. Miscellaneous tools, as mentioned in section 2.4.2.3., are concerned in various chapters.

int ern a
2.4.2.2. Tool set
2. Optional tools

Depending on the scope of supply the following tool set and lists are available: 1. Tool set for unrestricted area Standard Set" Special Tools lists"

for

lu

For a specific installation the tool requirements may vary greatly depending on the use and the service area. Special tools are therefore selected to meet basic requirements.

se

The maintenance of a diesel engine requires a certain number of special tools which are developed in the course of engine design. Some tools are supplied with the engine as prescribed ones and some more ones are available through Wrtsil service stations or for direct purchase by the customer.

on

2.4.2.

Maintenance Tools

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2.4 15

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Basic common tools list" Article number 9622DT384 9622DT803 9622DT805 9612SW510 9612DT212 9622DT804 9622DT801 9612DT246 9622DT242 9612DT100 9622DT133 9622DT911 (9622DT910) 9612DT974 9622DT812 9622DT250 9622DT257 9622DT356 9612DT961 9622DT162 9612DT965 9622DT385 9622DT216 9622DT800 9622DT147 9622DT146 9622DT171 9622DT179 9612DT760 Description

for

2.4 16

int ern a

Socket for nozzle tip Cleaning tool for injector sleeve Clamp nozzle holder Twrench for indicator cock Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump Lifting/extracting device for nozzle holder Compress tool for valve springs Crow foot wrench 41 mm Lifting tool for fuel pump Pin tool Hydraulic hand pump + hose Tool set for cylinder head Hydraulic jack set (included in 9622DT911) Lifting tool for cylinder head Injector testing device Socket 36 mm Torque spanner 854 Nm Protecting ring for cylinder head Hydraulic hose set Valve clearance feeler gauge Lever fuel cam roll Torque spanner 40200 Nm Torque wrench 200800 Nm Lifting tool for rocker arm bracket Hydraulic jack 12 ton Hydraulic hose set + distribution block Tappet blocking plate Grease pump Blocking pin for fuel pump tappet

lu

se

on

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Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

1.

Standard Set" Articlenumber: 9654DT902

Note!

Only for L38B engines consists of:

the above described list of basic common tools extended with the following tools Articlenumber 9622DT149 9622DT150 9622DT148 9622DT224 9622DT260 9622DT152 9622DT919 9622DT926 9622DT923 9622DT922 9622DT924 9622DT168 9622DT170 9612DT907 9622DT915 9622DT901 9622DT921 9622DT163 9612ZT334 9653DT903 9622DT914 9622DT178 9622DT928

se
Description

for

int ern a

Tool set for main bearing studs Spare seal set Hydraulic jack 20 ton Spare seal set Piston ring pliers Main bearing shell driver Dis/assembling tool for anti bore polishing ring Positioning tool for cylinder liner Lifting tool for piston Protecting plate for connecting rod foot Guide ring for piston rings Piston support in liner Big end bearing lock Hydraulic twin jack for connecting rod Extracting tool for cylinder liner Trolley for main bearing Frame+support for connecting rod caps Tap M16 for piston crown Air tool 3/8" Hydraulic jack for side studs Lifting tool for cylinder liner Circlip pliers for piston Connecting rod fixating tool

on

lu

ly
Number 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2.4 17

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Articlenumber: 9654DT903

Note!

Only for V38B engines consists of:

the above described list of basic common tools extended with the following tools Articlenumber 9622DT149 9622DT150 9622DT148 9622DT224 9622DT260 9622DT152 9622DT919 9622DT926 9622DT923 9622DT922 9622DT924 9622DT168 9622DT170 9612DT907 9622DT915 9622DT901 9622DT920 9622DT163 9612ZT334 9653DT903 9622DT914 9622DT178 9622DT928 9612DT901 9651DT901 Description

se

for

2.4 18

int ern a

Tool set for main bearing studs Spare seal set Hydraulic jack 20 ton Spare seal set Piston ring pliers Main bearing shell driver Dis/assembling tool for anti bore polishing ring Positioning tool for cylinder liner Lifting tool for piston Protecting plate for connecting rod foot Guide ring for piston rings Piston support in liner Big end bearing lock Hydraulic twin jack for connecting rod Extracting tool for cylinder liner Trolley for main bearing Frame+support for connecting rod caps Tap M16 for piston crown Air tool 3/8" Hydraulic jack for side studs Lifting tool for cylinder liner Circlip pliers for piston Connecting rod fixating tool Low pressure hand pump plus hose Support for exhaust manifold

lu

on

ly
Number 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 9

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Workshop tools list"

consists of a number of additional tools not delivered as standard with the engine delivery. They have been designed for advanced maintenance actions.

Article number 9612DT234 9612DT257 9622DT929 9622DT912 9612DT911 9622DT988 9612DT801 9612DT963 9622DT931 9612DT969 9612DT976 9612DT977 9622DT806 9622DT811 9622DT908 9612DT401 9622DT800 9622DT808 9622DT810 9612DT479 9622DT807 9612DT936 9622DT959 9622DT960 9622DT802 9612DT968 9622DT961 9622DT962 9653DT902

Description

for

Jack bolt for camshaft thrust journal Pin for camshaft bearing bush Measuring strip for cylinder liner Tool set for counter weight studs Suction cup for valves Valve guide extractor Pillar bolt for camshaft sections/gearwheel assembly Fixating tool for camshaft Hydraulic nipple for gearwheel Remover for connecting rod studs M36x3 Remover for cylinder head studs M64x4 Remover for main bearing cap studs M72x4 Tilting frame for cylinder head Tool for mounting valve seats Extractor for camshaft bearing bush Micrometer gauge for cylinder liner Valve seat cutter tool set Extractor for exhaust valve seat Extractor for inlet valve seat Lapping ring for cyl.linercyl. block contact face Lapping ring for cyl.headcyl. liner contact face Tool for intermediate gearwheel shaft Disassembling tool for fuel pump Compress tool for fuel pump bracket spring Extractor for injector sleeve Hydraulic nipple for camshaft end journal Lifting eye for fuel pump drive Measuring tool for fuel pump drive adjustment Mounting tool for Oring cylinderhead stud

se

on

int ern a

lu

ly
Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2.4 19

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Extended Workshop lists"

consists of a supplementary number of tools not delivered as standard with the engine delivery. They have been designed for even extended maintenance actions.

Note!

In common for all L38B engines. Article number Description

se

int ern a
Note!
Article number 9651DT907

In common for all L38B engines with turbocharger at free end. Description Number

Dis/mounting tool for lube oil & cool. water pumps

lu
Description

9622DT927 9612DT988 9612DT985 9612DT986 9622DT319 9612DT570 9612DT938

Disassembly tool for camshaft section Dis/assembly tool for camshaft journal Dis/assembly tool for camshaft gearwheel Dis/assembly tool for intermediate gearwheel Counter weight dummy Torque spanner 260/800 Nm Extension for torque spanner (camshaft section)

Note!

In common only for 6L38B engines. Article number Number

9651DT908

Dis/assembly tool for charge air cooler

Note!

In common only for 8/9L38B engines. 9651DT909 Dis/assembly tool for charge air cooler 1

for

2.4 20

on

ly
Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Note!

In common for all V38B engines Article number Description

Note!

In common for all V38B engines with turbochargers at free end. Article number Description Number

int ern a
9622DT971 9651DT904

lu
Description

9612DT989 9612DT990 9612DT937 9612DT930 9651DT902 9651DT906 9612DT570 9612DT938 9651DT903 9612DT938

Dis/assembly tool for camshaft journal Disassembly tool for camshaft section Dis/assembly tool for intermediate gearwheel Dis/assembly tool for camshaft gearwheel Dis/assembly tool for charge air cooler Maintenance kit for cooling water pump Torque spanner 260/800 Nm Extension piece for torque wrench Lifting tool for charge air cooler Extension piece for torque wrench

on

Lifting tool for cooling water pump Dis/assembly tool for lubricating oil pump

se

Note!

Only for 18V38B engines. Article number

9651DT906 9612DT551

Maintenance kit for cooling water pump Dis/Assembly tool for vibration damper

for

ly
Number 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Number 1 1 2.4 21

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Special Tools list"

consists of a supplementary number of tools not delivered as standard with the engine delivery. They have been designed for even extended maintenance actions and measurements. Article number Description Number

for

9622DT906 9652DT801 9650DT801 9650DT802 9650DT803 9650DT806 9622DT943 9622DT945 9622DT946 9622DT939 9622DT948 9622DT965 9622DT936 9622DT952 9650DT807 9622DT813 9622DT275 9612DT215 9612ZT867 9612ZT868 9622DT969 9622DT967 9612ZT871 9622DT966 9622DT975 9653DT801 9653DT802 9651DT154 9653DT903 PAAE073585

Honing machine Honing machine for cylinder liner Valve grinding tool Valve grinding tool Valve grinding tool Valve seat grinding machine Non contact thermometer Digital crankshaft deflect.gauge Digital hand tachometer Water test pressure tool for cyl.head Revise tools for cylinder head Fuel pump / calibration / timing tool Tools set in trolley Digital peak pressure meas. tool (250 bar) Surface grinding machine for cyl. head / liner Pneumatic atomizer test unit Magnetic stand + dial indicator Depth gauge Mechanic stethoscope Endoscope Service box for oilmist detector Water test pressure tool for cyl.head. (mobile) Control tools for WECS Table for piston plus conn. rod Checking tool for cylinder Crankshaft Vring assembly kit Crankshaft Vring rubber splicing Pressure gauge Hydraulic jack for side bolts Centring tool for cylinder head

se

2.4 22

int ern a

lu

on

ly
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump

Code number 9612DT212

Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Hydraulic hand pump + hose 9622DT133

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 23

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.3.

Miscellaneous tools

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Hydraulic hose set

9612DT961

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT146

lu
Dimensions Hydraulic hose set + distribution block 2.4 24

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Tool pin

9612DT100

int ern a
Description Code number Air tool 3/8 9612ZT334

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 25

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Crow foot wrench 41 mm

9612DT246

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT250

lu
Dimensions Socket 36 mm 2.4 26

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Torque spanner ( 150800 Nm)

9622DT216

int ern a
Description Code number Torque spanner (40200 Nm) 9622DT385

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 27

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Torque wrench (8 54 Nm)

9622DT257

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT910 9622DT232 9622DT233 9622DT149 9622DT912 9622DT911 9622DT913 (alternative to 9653DT903)

lu
Dimensions Hydraulic jack set (included in 9622DT911) consisting of: 1. hydraulic jack 2. nut is used in the following combinations: Tool set for main bearing studs Tool set for counter weight studs Tool set for cylinder head studs Additional tool set for Side studs 2.4 28

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Grease pump

9622DT179

for

int ern a
2.4 29

lu

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 1.2.)

Description Lifting tool lubricating pump

Code number 9651DT904

Weight kg

for

2.4 30

int ern a

lu

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.4.

Lubricating oil system

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 1.4.)

Description Dis/assembly tool cooling water pump

Code number 9622DT971

Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Maintenance kit cooling water pump 9651DT906 9651DT905 9651DT132 9651DT133 9651DT134 consisting of: 1 extractor impeller 2 tool roller bearing 3 tool oil seal 4 tool ceramic ring

lu
Weight kg Dimensions
1 2 4 3

for

se
2.4 31

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.5.

Cooling water system

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 1.5.)

Description Dis/assembly tool Charge air cooler consisting of a frame with: 1 guide pin (4x) 2 jack bolt (4x)

Code number 9651DT902

Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9651DT903

lu
Dimensions Lifting tool charge air cooler 2.4 32

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.6.

Charge air and exhaust gas system

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Description Fitting tool for removal/ mounting charge air cooler stack.

Code number 9651DT908

Weight kg

for

int ern a
2.4 33

lu

se

on
Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 2.5.)

Description Tool set for side studs, (complete)

Code number 9653DT903

Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT913 9622DT126 9654DT115 9622DT910

lu
Dimensions Tool set for side studs Consist of: 1 tie rod 2 distance piece in combination with: hydraulic jack set 2.4 34

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.7.

Engine block, main bearing, cylinder liner

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Trolley for main bearing

9622DT901

Description Tool set for main bearing studs consisting of: 1 tie rod 2 distance piece

for

int ern a
9622DT149 9622DT237 9622DT236 in combination with: hydraulic jack set 9622DT910

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions 2.4 35

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Main bearing shell driver

9622DT152

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT908 9622DT148

lu
Dimensions Extractor camshaft bearing bush in combination with: hydraulic jack 20 ton 2.4 36

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Hydraulic jack 20 ton is used in the following combinations: extractor camshaft bearing sleeve bush extractor exhaust valve seat extractor injector sleeve extracting tool cylinder liner extractor valve guide extractor inlet valve seat

9622DT148

9622DT908 9622DT808 9622DT802 9622DT915 9622DT930 9622DT810

for

int ern a
Pin camshaft bearing bush 9612DT257

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions 2.4 37

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Dis/assembling tool anti bore polishing ring

9622DT919

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT914 9622DT915

lu
Dimensions Lifting tool for cylinder liner in combination with: .Extracting tool cylinder liner 2.4 38

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Extracting tool cylinder liner in combination with: lifting tool cylinder liner hydraulic jack 20 ton

9622DT915

9622DT914 9622DT148

int ern a
Description Code number Positioning tool for cylinder liner 9622DT926

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 39

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Measuring strip cylinder liner

9622DT929

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9612DT977

lu
Dimensions Remover main bearing cap studs M72x4 2.4 40

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Lapping ring contact face cylinder linercylinder block

9612DT479

for

int ern a
2.4 41

lu

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 2.6.) Description Hydraulic twin jack for connecting rod consisting of: 1 nut 2 hydraulic jack 3 tie rod 4 tool pin Code number 9612DT907 Weight kg

9622DT231 9622DT234 9622DT230 9612ZT125

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT923

lu
Dimensions Lifting tool piston 2.4 42

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.8.

Crankshaft, connecting rod, piston

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Tap M16 for piston crown

9622DT163

int ern a
Description Code number Protecting plate connecting rod foot consisting of: 1 pen 2 protecting plate 9622DT922 9622DT165 9622DT166

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 43

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Big end bearing lock

9622DT170

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT178

lu
Dimensions Circlip pliers for piston 2.4 44

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Piston ring pliers

9622DT260

int ern a
Description Code number Guide ring piston rings 9622DT924

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 45

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Frame+support connecting rod caps consisting of: 1 support 2 frame 3 support 4 carrier 5 carrier

9622DT920

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number 9622DT912 9622DT124 9622DT123 9622DT910

Tool set for counter weight studs consisting of: 1 tie rod 2 distance piece in combination with: hydraulic jack set

for

2.4 46

se
Dimensions Dimensions

9622DT156 9622DT154 9622DT155 9622DT158 9622DT157

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Remover connecting rod studs M36x3

9612DT969

int ern a
Description Code number Piston support in liner including: 1 bolt M16x30 9622DT168

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 47

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fixating tool connecting rod

9622DT928

for

2.4 48

int ern a

lu

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 2.7.)

Description Valve clearance feeler gauge

Code number 9622DT162

Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Twrench indicator cock 9612SW510

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 49

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.9.

Cylinder head with valves

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Tool set cylinder head consisting of: 1 shackle 2 tie rod 3 hydraulic jack set 4 distance piece 6 frame

9622DT911

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9612DT974

lu
Dimensions Lifting tool cylinder head 2.4 50

for

se

9622DT122 9622DT121 9622DT910 9622DT120 9622DT119

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Protecting ring cylinder head

9622DT356

int ern a
Description Code number Compress tool valve springs 9622DT801 in combination with: hydraulic jack 12 ton 9622DT147

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 51

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Extractor exhaust valve seat in combination with: hydraulic jack 20 ton

9622DT808

9622DT148

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT810 9622DT148

lu
Dimensions Extractor inlet valve seat in combination with: hydraulic jack 20 ton 2.4 52

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Hydraulic jack 12 ton is used in the following combinations: compress tool valve springs lifting/extracting device nozzle holder

9622DT147

9622DT801 9622DT918

int ern a
Description Code number Suction cup for valves 9612DT911

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 53

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Extractor valve guide consisting of: 1. nut 2. tie rod 3. tube in combination with: hydraulic jack 20 ton

9622DT930 9622DT113 9622DT181 9622DT180

9622DT148

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9612DT976 9612DT390 9612DT389

lu
Dimensions Remover cylinder head studs M64x4 consisting of: 1. stud remover 2. bolt 2.4 54

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Tool for mounting Oring cylinderhead stud consisting of: 1. cap 2. ring 2/2 3. pipe

9653DT902

se int ern a
Description Code number Lapping ring contact face cylinder headcylinder liner 9612DT807

on
3

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 55

for

ly
1 2

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Tilting frame cylinder head

9622DT806

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT811 9622DT380 9622DT379

lu
Dimensions Tool for mounting valve seats including adaptor for: 1 exhaust valve seat 2 inlet valve seat 2.4 56

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Exhaust pipe support 1 support Abank 2 support Bbank

9651DT901 9651DT108 9651DT109

int ern a
Description Code number Tool for cylinder head plugs 9632DT906

lu
Weight kg 18 40 Dimensions

se
A
Hexagon 80 2.4 57

on
AA A

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

for

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Centring tool for cylinder head including: 1 4 centring tools 2 a pin

PAAE073585 9622DT473

se
2.4 58

for

int ern a

lu

on
9622DT473

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 2.8.) Description Lifting tool rocker arm bracket Code number 9622DT800 Weight kg

int ern a
Description Code number Dis/assembly tool camshaft section 9612DT990

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 59

for

se

on
Dimensions

2.4.2.10. Camshaft and valve drive

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Jack bolt camshaft thrust journal

9612DT234

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT931

lu
Dimensions Hydraulic nipple for gearwheel 2.4 60

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Hydraulic nipple for camshaft end journal

9612DT968

int ern a
Description Code number Fixating tool camshaft 9612DT963

lu
Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 61

for

se

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Tool for intermediate gearwheel shaft

9612DT936

Dis/assembly tool camshaft journal

for

2.4 62

int ern a
9612DT989

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Dis/assembly tool camshaft journal

9612DT988

for

int ern a
Dis/assembly tool camshaft gearwheel 9612DT930

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions 2.4 63

on

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

ly

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Description Dis/assembly tool camshaft gearwheel

Code number 9612DT985

Weight kg

Dis/assembly tool intermediate gearwheel

for

2.4 64

int ern a
9612DT937

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions

on
Dimensions

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Dis/assembly tool intermediate gearwheel

9612DT986

for

int ern a
Blocking plate tappets inlet exhaust 9622DT171

Description

Code number

lu
Weight kg

se
Dimensions 2.4 65

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Pillar bolt camshaft sections/gearwheel assembly combination item 1 and 2 for camshaft sections: 1. press piece 2. threaded rod combination item 3 and 4 for camshaft gearwheel: 3. press piece 4. threaded rod

9612DT801

9612DT804 9612DT805

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Description Code number Weight kg 9612DT965

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Dimensions Lever fuel cam roller 2.4 66

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9612DT802 9612DT803

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Blocking pin fuel pump tappet

9612DT760

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2.4 67

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 2.9.) Description Testing device injector Code number 9622DT812 Weight kg

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Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT802 9622DT212 9622DT207 9622DT350 9622DT352 9622DT351 9622DT148

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Dimensions Extractor injector sleeve consisting of: 1. Threaded bar 2. nut 3. disc 4. disc 5. plug in combination with: hydraulic jack 20 ton 2.4 68

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Dimensions

2.4.2.11. Injection system

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Lifting / extracting device nozzle holder in combination with: hydraulic jack 12 ton

9622DT804

9622DT147

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Description Code number Socket for nozzle tip 9622DT384

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Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 69

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Lifting tool fuel pump

9622DT242

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Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT805

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Dimensions Clamp nozzle holder 2.4 70

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Press tool spring fuel pump drive consisting of: 1. Depth gauge 2. Press piece

9622DT962

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Description Code number Disassembling tool fuel pump 9622DT959

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Weight kg Dimensions 2.4 71

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2

Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Cleaning tool injector sleeve

9622DT803

int ern a
Description Code number Weight kg 9622DT961

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Dimensions Lifting tool fuel pump drive 2.4 72

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Disassembly/ assembly tool fuel pump drive

9622DT960

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2.4 73

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Description

Code number

Weight kg

Dimensions

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.4.3.1.

General

In order to perform proper procedures it is necessary to understand the working principle of the hydraulic tools, for this reason an explanation is given.

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2.4 74

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Rolled thread The thread of important connections studs is manufactured with a cold rolled" process in order to have the stud thread strong and high fatigue resistant. Due to this process the circumference of the thread becomes smooth and hard but as a consequence the studs are also sensitive to breakage in case of damages; therefore the studs must always be carefully handled. Always replace a stud when it is damaged. The easy going nut While loading, due to elongation, the stud becomes a little bit longer over its entire length; thus also the pitch of the thread is shortly extended; however, the pitch of the mounted nut is not extended. In order to turn the nut on the elongated stud a certain clearance" must exist between the nut thread and the stud thread. That clearance can be felt while turning the nut on; for that reason it must be possible, without any restriction, to turn a nut on by hand. Studs of engine component connections All the hydraulically stretched studs are made of high tensile strength steel. To obtain the correct force in the studs they have to be stretched up to approximately the 90% of the material yield point. That means a force 11% higher than the stated tightening force will overstretch the stud; overstretched studs becomes very sensitive to fatigue and may break without any notice" in advance. Therefore overstretched studs must be replaced.

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For safety reasons it is important the tools are correctly used. The tightening procedures have to be carried out in strict accordance with the instructions of this manual. For the following subjects general background information are described:

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A number of important engine components are fitted by means of bolts connections. With an hydraulic tool it is possible to stress a bold or a stud up to a very high tension; that tightening process can be done within a very accurate tension tolerance and with a great force.

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2.4.3.

Background information for hydraulic tools and torque spanners

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Use genuine parts There is a real danger while employing studs which are not delivered by Wrtsil Corporation, in particular with regards to studs which are supposed to be hydraulically stretched. If these studs are not made from the same high tensile strength material and are not provided with cold rolled threads", problems might occur. The studs which are not provided by Wrtsil Corporation could have a wrong working behaviour even if the correct oil pressure is applied while tightening. Use of locking fluids Clean carefully all the parts with a degreasing agent and dry before applying any locking fluid.

Note!

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2.4.3.2.

The hydraulic tool set consist of : A pneumatically driven hydraulic pump and a manually operated pump. A number of hydraulic jacks, distance pieces, tie rods, knurled nuts, high pressure hoses with quick release coupling and tool pins to tighten or to loosen the nuts of the relevant components.

Figure 2.4 1 illustrates the main components and the working principle a connection (7) for service air supply (min. 5.5 and max.7 bar). a filter / water separator (12). an air lubricating unit (13). a reducing valve (6) to adjust the service air pressure between 0 and 6 bar. a manometer (5) direct mounted after the service air reducing valve. an air valve (4) to control the pump. an airoperated piston (3) (large surface) which is connected to a piston in the lower section (small surface) in order to pressurize the hydraulic oil. a container (1) for hydraulic oil with a level indicator. a double pointer manometer (8) to indicate the hydraulic jack pressure. a quickrelease couplings with non return valve (10). a valve (9) in the HP oil return line. a reset valve (16).

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In case of any doubt, contact the technical service department of Wrtsil Corporation for the proper specification of fluids to be used.

Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump unit

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2.4 75

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

The manometer (8) indicates the pressure in the HP hydraulic system, that calibrated manometer contains two independently working measuring mechanisms, each of them is provided with a scale and a pointer. A manometer reset is necessary when the indication of both pointers differs more then 10 %.

1 2

14 3 16

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4 5 6 8 10

a) Pump components

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2.4 76

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b) Pressurising c) Releasing the pressure Fig. 2.4 1 Diagram of pneumatically driven hydraulic pump unit

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12 13 7 11 9

The manometer (5) is connected to the air pressure line after the reducing valve (6). The manometer scale converts the air pressure in a comparable oil pressure and makes it possible to set the required oil pressure before pressurizing the hydraulic jacks.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

1 2 3 4

Check if the oil supply valve (14) is open. See fig. 2.42 Connect at (10) the HP hose(s) (11) to the hydraulic jacks (15). Connect the service air at (7).

6 Slowly turn the spindle of the reducing valve (6) clockwise, that way the hydraulic oil pressure will increase. 7 Continue increasing the pressure slowly until the reading on the manometer of the hydraulic system (8) shows the required oil pressure. 8 After the correct oil pressure has been reached, push down the locking ring over the reducing valve spindle to fix the setting of the reducing valve. Every time the pump is operated, the pressure will rise automatically and accurately up to the fixed pump setting. When the hydraulic stretching procedure is completed close valve (4) and always open valve (9) slowly. A quick valve opening (9) might damage the hydraulic pressure manometer. 9 At the end of the complete procedure turn the reducing valve spindle (6) counter clockwise to discharge the air pressure. If there is sufficient air pressure and the pump will not start after opening valve (4) push the button on the reset valve (16).

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Note!

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5 After adjusting the air pressure" by means of the reducing valve (6) at a value of 10% lower than the required oil pressure, start the pump by opening air valve (4). The hydraulic system will be pressurized, it is visible on manometer (8). The pump will stop at a value of approx. 10% below the required oil pressure.

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Close the valves (4) and (9),

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Operating The highest working pressure of the hydraulic pump is 2500 bar. Always keep the pump unit horizontal and maintain sufficient hydraulic oil in the container in order to avoid any air content in the system. The container can be filled through the filling plug (2). For specification of the hydraulic oil, see chapter 1.2. For the lubrication of the pump adjust the lubricating unit to 1 drop of oil for every 20 pump strokes.

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2.4 77

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Remark When the required pressure is reached and the pump still keep on working slowly, the hydraulic system is commonly leaking (e.g. there is a leaking coupling or a leaking hydraulic jack). When the hydraulic system has air contamination, disconnect the hose at (10). Press the small valve in the coupling by means of a pin and run the pump slowly. Let the oil escape as long as it has an air content.

Warning!

Always check the correct connection of the hose couplings to the pump unit and the jacks especially when several jacks are connected at the same time. A wrong connection may lead to a not properly pressurized jack although the manometer indicates the correct pressure.

14

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11

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15

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16 6 4 9 Fig. 2.4 2 2.4 78

Pneumatic driven hydraulic pump and jacks

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7 10

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Note!

It is very important the jack piston is always at the bottom position before pressurizing The piston is at the bottom position for the single jack when no clearance exists between housing and piston at (11). The pistons for the twin jack are at bottom position when the top faces of the pistons are aligned to the housing top face. After the nut (10) is fastened or loosened with the tool pin (12) and the oil pressure is released, the stretching process can be repeated. Every time the oil pressure is released the jack piston must be forced to the bottom position by turning the knurled nut with the tool pin. Because of the hydraulic oil viscosity, the oil back flow to the container of the hydraulic pump is somehow difficoult and thus the knurled nut must be firmly tightened. If the jack piston is not forced to the bottom position, for instance if the hoses have been quickly disconnected from the jack, the piston finally has a limited or even no residual working stroke. A dangerous situation arises if the thread of the nuts and the studs is not fully used which could lead to damages to the stud and the sealings.

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From the hydraulic pump the pressurised oil enters between piston and housing via connection (8), the result is a stretching force in the tie rod (6) and the stud (9); as a consequence of the applied force the stud is lengthened and the nut (10) becomes free from the contact face. Every time the same force (oil pressure) is applied, the same stud elongation is achieved. In order to get the required stress in the stud only a limited elongation is required due to the high value of the steel elastic module. The available jack stroke depends on the specific application and thus on the required stud elongation.

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For the hydraulically tightened components two different types of hydraulic jacks are used. A single jack see fig. 2.43 and a twin jack see fig 2.44. The single jack is used for the cylinder head studs and the main bearings studs. The twin jack is used for the connecting rod studs. The hydraulic jack consists basically of a housing (1), a piston (2), and a knurled nut (3). The piston is placed in a recess of the housing and is sealed with sealing rings (4) and (5). Another part of the tool set consists of the tie rod (6) and the distance piece (7)

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2.4.3.3.

Hydraulic tool set

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2.4 79

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

3 1 8 2 6 7 4 5 11

12

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3 6 2 1 10 9 2.4 80

Fig. 2.4 3 Single hydrauli jack cross section

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12 4 5

10

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Fig. 2.4 4 Twin hydraulic jack cross section

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

For some power demanding operations an hydraulic extractor jack is applied; the jack is utilized in combination with the manual operated pump, see fig. 2.4 5 . Stroke : 50 mm 75 mm

9622DT147

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Fig. 2.4 5 Hydraulic jack

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9622DT133 2.4 81

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9622DT148

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2.4.3.4.

Hydraulic extractor

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

The hydraulic hoses are devided in:

The high pressure hydraulic hoses which are used in combination with the H.P . pump 9612DT212 at a maximum working pressure of 2500 bar.

Note!

Never change the combination of the pump and the hoses

2 Ensure the quickrelease couplings are thoroughly clean before the use. Any dirt can cause damages to the quickrelease couplings and lead to leakages.

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2.4 82

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4 5 6 never twist the hose 7 it 8 9

After the use, seal the quickrelease couplings with dust caps.

Never work with damaged hoses! The hoses will remain in good condition if you: never try to remove the clamp fitting from the hose never bend the hose into a radius smaller than 160 mm never damage the hose, for instance, by placing heavy objects on never apply a tensile load to the hose, for example, by pulling never use any oil other than that which is specified

10 never use the hose for different purposes.

Note!

Damaged hoses and quickrelease couplings should be scrapt. DO NOT TRY TO PERFORM REPAIRS!

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Work safely! 1 Check the hose and the quickrelease couplings for eventual damages before use.

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The hydraulic hoses which are used in combination with the hand pump 9622DT133, the jacks 9622DT147 and 9622DT148, at a the maximum working pressure of 700 bar.

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2.4.3.5.

Hydraulic hoses

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

A complete quickrelease couplings consists of: 1. a male connector 2. a female connector 3. a spring controlled valve

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2

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3 5

Fig. 2.4 6

H.P. quickrelease coupling (example)

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Fig. 2.4 7

The quickrelease couplings are used in order to have easy and fast connections between the hydraulic tool parts and, in addition, are selfclosing, it means that it is impossible for the air to enter the hose or the jacks, and the oil losses are minimal as well. In order to guarantee an efficient valves function, the couplings should be thoroughly clean before use; for that reason the quickrelease couplings must always be sealed with dust caps (4) and (5).

Dust caps H.P. quickrelease coupling (example)

for

The couplings have a conical (NPT) thread which is self-sealing when the coupling is mounted on the hose fitting or the jack. Do not use any sealing tape; tape pieces in the hydraulic system could impair a regular procedure.

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1 3 4 2.4 83

2.4.3.6.

Quickrelease coupling

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

The hydraulic pump consists of the following main components. 1. an oil container 2. a pump element 3. an hose connection 4. a release valve 5. a filling plug with a dip stick 6. a pump handle

7. an hydraulic hose which is delivered with the pump (not on drawing) 6 5

4 3 Fig. 2.4 8

Hydraulic hand pump

for

2.4 84

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2 3

Operating 1 Before using check if there is sufficient hydraulic oil in the container (1) in order to avoid air bubbles in the system. (Always use oxidation resistant oil, see chapter 1.2.1.1.) Connect the pump to the jacks by means of the hose connection (3). Close the release valve (4) of the pump.

Note!

Never apply pressure to a jack which is not in use for any extraction otherwise the plunger will exceed its maximum stroke. 4 Always reduce the pressure slowly to zero in order to avoid any oil foam formation. Deaerating of the hand pump 5 Connect the pump with the jack and place the jack up side down at a lower position than the pump is, close the release valve. Pull the plunger of the jack completely out in order to reach the end of the stroke. Remove the filling plug, open the release valve and push the piston backwards. The air in the system is going to escape through the hose and the pump. Repeat the procedure if necessary.

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2.4.3.7.

Hydraulic hand pump

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

The following general instructions and guides are helpful to determine if your system components are properly connected. 1 Be sure all hydraulic hoses and fittings are connected to the correct inlet and outlet ports of the pump, cylinders, valves and other system components. A wrong connection might cause an improper jack operation although the manometer indicates the correct pressure. 2 Be sure all threaded connections are fully tightened and free from leakages. Seal threaded connections with a highgrade thread sealer. Do not overtighten any connection. 3 Excessive tightening could cause strain on threads and castings which, as a consequence, could lead to fitting failure even at pressures below the rated capacity. 4 Fully tighten hydraulic connectors (avoid excessive force). Loose connectors acts as a partial or a complete line restriction while causing little or no oil flow as well as equipment damages or failures. 5 If the maximum stroke is exceeded the sealing rings of the piston will be damaged, pressurized oil will escape and the pressure will drop down. If that happens the jack must be disassembled, the sealings inspected and/or replaced. 6 Do not drop heavy objects on hydraulic hoses. A sharp impact may cause bends or breaks to the hose internal wire strands. The application of pressure to a damaged hoses could lead to an internal flexing and an eventual hose strands break. 7 Do not use the hydraulic hose to carry an hydraulic component (i.e. pumps, cylinders and valves). 8 Avoid sharp bends and kinks while routing hydraulic hoses. If pressure is applied to a bend or kinked hose, the oil flow will be restricted and cause severe backpressure. Also sharp bends and kinks will internally damage the hose and could lead to a premature failure. 9 Avoid any situation where the loads are not directly centered on the cylinder plunger. Offcenter loads produce considerable strain on the cylinder plungers and may slip or fail while causing potential dangerous results. Avoid point loading, distribute the load evenly across the entire saddle surface.

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2.4.3.8.

Safety instructions for hydraulic tools

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2.4 85

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

11 Use hydraulic gauges which indicate safe operating loads in the hydraulic system. Do not exceed the safe limit of the lowest rated component used in the system. 12 Keep the hydraulic equipment far from flames and heat. Excessive heat (above 70C) will soften packings and seals which could cause fluid leaks.

14 Do not overextend the hydraulic jack; the cylinder will support the load on the plunger stop ring. However, using the full stroke does not supply an additional power and only adds unnecessary strain to the cylinder.

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2.4 86

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2.4.3.9.
Note!

Loosening of hydraulically tightened connection

Loosening pressure = tightening pressure. In order to loosen a connection the same oil pressure, or somewhat lower than the final pressure which the connection has been tightened with, is required. Overstretching prevention In order to prevent any overstretching, the hydraulic pressure applied to the studs must never exceed the 105% of the prescribed tightening pressure value. Furthermore, operate the pneumatic driven hydraulic pump accordingly to the instructions. There is no reason to apply a higher pressure than the prescribed tightening value. When the studs have been tightened to the stated value, the prestress in the studs may slightly decrease due to the material elastic release of the parts and the tightening device, as well as during the engine running as a result of the forces incurred in the engine components. Therefore, the oil pressure in the hydraulic jacks, required for disassembly will be the same or somewhat lower than the

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15 Keep oil lines clean. When connecting halves are disconnected, always put dust caps on. Use every precaution to guard the unit against entrance of dirt; dirt and foreign inclusions may cause pump, cylinder and valve failures.

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13 Never attempt to lift a load which exceeds the capacity of the cylinder or the jack. Overloading causes equipment failure and a possible personal injury.

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10 Always provide hoses and connectors with clearance in order to avoid any contact with moving objects, polishing or sharp objects.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

If one or more nuts cant be loosened at the stated value, check with a feeler gauge of 0.05 mm if the nut is free from the contact surface; if the nut is free but it is still impossible to turn it then the nut is supposed to be sticked due to dirt, corrosion or damages. In such case try to turn the nut by using a copper pin and a hammer. If the mentioned emergency procedure is not successful yet, dont increase the oil pressure further on because it has no benefit; the application of an higher oil pressure introduces the risk of the thread damaging If the nut is not free 1 Check if the oil supply and pressure is correct to each and every jack. 2 3 Check the quickrelease couplings and the non return valves.

4 Increase the oil pressure by maximum 5% of the nominal value (total 105%).

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Note!
2

If the nuts cant be loosened yet, the connection could have previously been tightened with a too high oil pressure resulting in possible overstretched studs. In this case increase the oil pressure till final setting value + 10% (total 110%). More than 10% is not allowed as other construction parts can be damaged. If, at 10% overpressure, the nuts can not be loosened always replace the studs as they may be overstretched. If the nuts even at an increased oil pressure are still tight, remove the tools, cut the nuts off and remove the studs. Fit new studs and nuts. Make sure no iron parts enters the engine. If e.g one cylinder head nut has to be cut, leave the remaining three nuts tightened to prevent any damage to the cylinder head and the liner If, due to any cause, any doubt exist with regards to the stress in hydraulically tensioned studs, the loosening value must be found. 1 Increase the oil pressure in the hydraulic jacks in steps e.g. of 50 bar. Check after each step whether the nuts can be turned.

3 If this value is more than 10% below the stated value investigate the reason.

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Check if the nut is free from the tools.

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tightening pressure. For those reasons never try to apply different tightening values to the connections.

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2.4 87

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

In order to describe the tightening and checking procedure the following is defined: Checking the procedure by counting the number of holes A certain number of holes are in the circumference of the nut, those are ment to be used in order to shift it by means of a tool pin which fits in the holes. A stetching procedure check must be performed by counting the numbers of holes the nut is shifted. The correct numbers of holes is mentioned in chapter 2.4.4 in the figures of the related connections. The gap between to adiacent holes correspond to a certain angle rotation of the nut. First step, positioning of engine components ( prestress ) Turn manually the nuts on the studs and check if the nuts move easily without feeling any restriction. Tighten the nuts with the tool pin, mount the hydraulic tools and pressurize the hydraulic jacks to the setting value for the prestress. This pressure is just applied to place the engine components and prepare them in order to be assembled. Turn the nuts on with the tool pin. Release slowly the oil pressure in the hydraulic jacks to prevent damage to the calibrated oil pressure gauge. Now we have obtained a basis for the tightening procedure. Second step, setting of materials Pressurize the jacks up to the stated value of the final stress. Turn the nuts with the tool pin and count the number of holes the nuts can be shifted. When all the nuts, of the same connection, can be shifted with the same number of holes and the value correspond to the one which is mentioned in the chapter 2.4.4. the proper and common elongation has been reached. In case one or more nuts cant be turned with the same number of holes, when compared to the other ones, remove and inspect the tools for proper service and check the engine components for the correct position. After releasing the jack pressure the force will force the engine components to a certain adjustment, thus as a consequence the residual stress in the studs becomes somewhat lower. Third step, obtaining the correct final stress To take into account the materials adjustment" the jacks must be pressurized again up to the pressure of the value setted for the final

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2.4 88

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2.4.3.10. Tightening of hydraulically tightened connection

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

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2.4 89

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Warning!

If it is possible to tighten the nuts more than the correspondent prescribed number of holes or there is still clearance between the nut and the contact surface, the connection is NOT safe. In such a case all components have to be disconnected and examined: on deviation in material wrong assembling wrong assembling procedure.

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Fourth step, checking the correct final stress In order to be absolutely sure the connection is properly tightened a check" step must be performed. Pressurize the jacks again up to the value for the final stress and try, with the tool pin, to turn the nuts any further; no additional movement must be possible. In that case the studs have the required final stress and the components are correctly connected.

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stress. The engine components are finally placed, it could be possible to turn all nuts a little further. After the jack pressure is released the correct final stress in the studs will exist.

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Modern technology requires more and more accuracy for threaded connections; thus in order to make this possible a torque spanner is necessary. For a torque spanner application the following rules must be known to avoid mistakes which could result in unsafe connections.

The spanner should be kept clean, not dropped and free from water or dirty oil. The spanner is calibrated between the 20% and 100% of its scale and has a tolerance within 4% of its readings. Take care the spanner is periodically recalibrated. Calibrate the torque spanner always in the horizontal plane in order to avoid the influence of the spanner weight. Never use the spanner over the 100% scale because of distortions which might exist, as a consequence the readings may become inaccurate.

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2.4 90

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Note!

Always apply force on the centre of the torque spanner handle. Only apply force in the direction shown on the spanner. When the desired torque is reached the spanner clicks and gives a few degrees of free movement. The spanner automatically resets for the next torque application if no force is exerted on the handle. A high degree of torque accuracy can be obtained by the application of the proper lubricant on the connection thread. If there is no specification at all, only use engine lubricating oil.

Never use a torque spanner to loosen connections.

Keep the torque spanner in line while tightening. The tightening torques are torque spanner readings and should be performed by an even tightening of bolt and nut (if applicable, crosswise). Always apply the force on a torque spanner with a slow ongoing movement in order to avoid the required setting to be trepassed. The rachet requires periodic cleaning and lubrication to ensure proper operation. Lubricate with a light oil. DO NOT USE GREASE.

Torque spanner in combination with extension When using a torque spanner (1) with an extension (2), the torque spanner setting depends on the lengths extension piece.

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A torque spanner is a precision instrument that should be handled with utmost care; every time after it is used the tension of the spanner should be released before storing in its box.

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2.4.3.11. Torque spanner

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Torque spanner setting with extension piece in line Required torque = 550Nm Setting = 550 x 950 / (950 + 350) = 402 Nm Fig. 2.4 9 Torque spanner extension

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2.4 91

Note!

10Nm = 1 Kgm

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Example for tightening the camshaft sections: Required torque = 550 Nm. Length of the torque spanner 950 mm. Length of the extension piece 350 mm. Setting = 402 Nm.

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Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

Before taking any maintenance action be wise to have the right tools and to follow the corresponding use instructions. Mixing tools and procedures could lead to dangerous damages.

2.4.4.1.
(Chapter 1.2.)

Lubricating oil system components

Pos. 1.

Connection for: Gear wheel on shaft

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1

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2.4 92

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Fig. 2.4 10 Lubricating oil pump assembly

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Torque Nm 79

2.4.4.

Tightening torque and jack pressure

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 1.4.)

Pos. 1.

Connection for: Gear wheel on shaft

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2.4.4.2.

Cooling water system components

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1

Fig. 2.4 11 Cooling water pump gear wheel assembly

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2.4 93

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Torque Nm 17

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 2.5.) Pos. Connection for:

Torque / Jack pressure 400 Nm

1.

Main bearing stud in block Main bearing stud first step ( prestress )

Toolnr. : 9622DT232 560 bar 2170 bar 2170 bar 2170 bar

second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) 3. 4. Side stud in main bearing cap Side stud fourth step ( final stress )

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0 Nm (20 back) Toolnr. : 9653DT903 400 bar 1550 bar 1550 bar 1550 bar 1 2

first step ( prestress )

second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) fourth step ( final stress )

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Note!
4 3 Fig. 2.4 12 Main bearing 2.4 94

The sequence of stretching side studs and main bearing studs is important and is described in section 2.5.2.4.

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Nut shifting 4.0 4.5 holes None Equal (few degrees) 2.5 3.0 holes Equal (few degrees) None

2.4.4.3.

Engine block with bearings

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Note!

In addition for toolnr. 9622DT913

Pos.

Connection for:

Torque / Jack pressure 0 Nm (20 back)

3. 4.

Side studs Side studs

first step ( prestress )

second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) fourth step ( final stress )

Pos. 1.

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Connection for:

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Toolnr. : 9622DT913 180 bar 680 bar 680 bar 680 bar

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Cylinder liner clamp Fig. 2.4 13 Cylinder liner clamp

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2.5 3.0 holes None 1

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Nut shifting Equal (few degrees) Torque Nm 145 2.4 95

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.

Explosion valve to cover

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2.4 96

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Fig. 2.4 14 Explosion cover

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25

Pos.

Connection for:

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Torque Nm

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 2.6.) Pos. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Connection for: Vibration damper and pump drive Split gear wheel on crankshaft Turning wheel bolt / crankshaft Split gear wheel

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2 3 4 5

Flywheel on turning wheel (if applicable)

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int ern a
Fig. 2.4 15 Crankshaft 2.4 97

lu

on

2.4.4.4.

Crankshaft, connecting rod, piston

ly
Torque Nm 4600 540 540 7500 570

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1. 2.

Big end stud in upper part Big end stud first step ( prestress ) second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) fourth step ( final stress )

200 Nm

Toolnr. : 9612DT907 700 bar 2050 bar 2050 bar 2050 bar 200 Nm

se
Toolnr. : 9612DT907 700 bar 2050 bar 2050 bar 2050 bar 4 3

3. 4.

Connecting rod stud

Connecting rod stud

second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) fourth step ( final stress )

lu

first step ( prestress )

for

2.4 98

int ern a
2 1

Fig. 2.4 16 Big end bearing and counter weight

on
2.5 3.0 holes Equal (few degrees) None 1.0 1.5 holes Equal (few degrees) None

Pos.

Connection for:

Torque / Jack pressure

Nut shifting

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 2.7.)

Pos. 1. 2.

Connection for:

Vclamp; exhaust to cylinderhead

for

int ern a

Fig. 2.4 17 Exhaust connection cylinder head

lu
2 2.4 99

se

Vclamp; exhaust to compensator see procedure in section 1.5.5.1.

on

2.4.4.5.

Cylinder head with valves

ly
Torque Nm 85 1014

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1. 2.

Cylinder head stud in block Cylinder head stud first step ( prestress ) second step ( final stress ) third step ( final stress ) fourth step ( final stress )

660 Nm

Toolnr. : 9622DT911 190 bar 1245 bar 1245 bar 1245 bar

se
1 2

int ern a
Fig. 2.4 18 Cylinder head Pos. 1. 2. Starting valve Starting valve spindle 1 2 Fig. 2.4 19 Starting valve 2.4 100

lu
Connection for: Torque Nm 79 28

for

on
6.0 6.5 holes Equal (few degrees) None

Pos.

Connection for:

Torque / Jack pressure

ly
Nut shifting

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

1. 2. 3. 4.

Rocker arm bracket Locking nut valve clearance Cylinder safety valve Locking nut bridge piece guide

lu
2

int ern a

Fig. 2.4 20 Cylinder head upper side

for

se
4 3 2.4 101

on

Pos.

Connection for:

ly
Torque Nm 560 500 150 220

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

(Chapter 2.8.) Pos. 1. 2. 3. Camshaft flange Camshaft end journal Camshaft end journal cover 1 Connection for:

se
2

for

2.4 102

int ern a
Fig. 2.4 21 Camshaft

lu

on
Torque Nm 550 200 200 3

2.4.4.6.

Camshaft and Valve drive

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

1.

Drive shaft for mechanical actuator

se int ern a
Fig. 2.4 22 Actuator drive shaft

for

lu
2.4 103

on
1

Pos.

Connection for:

ly
Torque Nm 78

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1.

Clamp bush air distributor drive shaft

for

2.4 104

int ern a

Fig. 2.4 23 Starting air distrubutor drive on camshaft

lu

se

on
170

Pos.

Connection for:

ly
Torque Nm

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

(Chapter 2.9.)

Pos. 1. Injector gland 1

Connection for:

for

int ern a

Fig. 2.4 24 High pressure fuel injector

lu
2.4 105

se

on

2.4.4.7.

Injection system components

ly
Torque Nm 140

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Sleeve nut injector Connecting piece Sealing flange fuel pipe HP fuel pipe to connecting piece HP fuel pipe to fuel pump

se
3

lu int ern a
2 2.4 106 Fig. 2.4 25 Injector, HP fuel pipe

for

on
450 200 200 180 80 4 5 1

Pos.

Connection for:

ly
Torque Nm

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

HP fuel pump cover HP fuel pump cover Stop cylinder bolt Stop cylinder piston bolt HP fuel pump to engine block Bolt connection fuel rack

on
1 6

Pos.

Connection for:

for

int ern a
5 Fig. 2.4 26 HP fuel pump 2.4 107

lu

se

ly
Torque Nm 200 100 30 80 20 330

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

When the tightening torque is not specified, use the values from the table below. Unless stated otherwise all threads and contact surfaces of the nuts and bolts should be sparingly lubricated with engine oil before tightening. For general information, see also: DIN 13 "VDI Richtlinin 2230" DIN 912 931 933 6912 7984.

int ern a
M4 0,7 M5 0,8 M6 1,0 M8 1,25 M10 1,5 M12 1,75 2.4 108

Thread Dim.

lu
Pitch

Norm bolt connections Bolt class 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 Torque Nm 2,8 4,1 4,8 5,5 8,1 9,5 9,5 14,0 16,5 23,0 34,0 40,0 46,0 68,0 79,0 79,0 117,0 135,0

for

se

on

2.4.4.8.

General table of tightening torques for not specified bolt connections

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Thread Dim. M14

Pitch 2,0

se
12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9 12.9 2,5

M16

2,0

M18

M20

lu
2,5 2,5 3,0 3,5

M22

int ern a
M24 M30

for

on
Bolt class 8.8 125,0 185,0 215,0 195,0 280,0 330,0 280,0 390,0 460,0 390,0 560,0 650,0 530,0 750,0 880,0 670,0 960,0 1120,0 1350,0 1900,0 2250,0 10.9 12.9 8.8 10.9

Norm bolt connections

ly
Torque Nm 2.4 109

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.4.5.1.

Adjustments

Timing, clearances and settings Valve clearances engine: Inlet valve Exhaust valve 1.0 mm 1.0 mm

Fuel delivery commencement See test records Opening pressure of a new fuel injector needle 450 bar Nominal speed 600 rpm Speed reduction at 660 + 10 rpm Overspeed stop at 690 + 10 rpm

for

2.4 110

int ern a

lu

se

on

2.4.5.

Adjustments and Tolerances

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Part, measuring point Sleeve bearings

for

int ern a
Note!

A bearing is suitable for use as long as: the shell thickness is expected to stay within the given tolerances, until the next inspection, (see this chapter). the inside diameter is within the given tolerances, until the next inspection, (see this chapter). the bearing shell is free of any damage. the bearing shell is free of any corrosion. the wear pattern is equal. the running layer is not overloaded. An overloaded bearing shell can be recognized by locally melted or smeared lining. New bearings are treated with a corrosion protection oil that has to be removed before mounting. Where bearings show heavy wear grooves in the running layer, the quality of the lubricating oil cleaning process should be observed more carefully.

For determination of wear, engine components and measuring equipment should for some hours first be acclimated at room temperature ( 20 C).

lu

se

The engine bearings consist of a steel shell onto which a very tiny bonding of almost pure Aluminium. On this bonding is a running layer of Aluminium alloy. It concerns bearings for: crankshaft connecting rod big end camshaft

on

2.4.5.2.

Tolerances

ly
2.4 111

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Max. Backlash driving gear wheel (1) lubricating oil pump gear wheel (2)

Min.

Lubricating oil pump (chapter 1.2.)

Cooling water pump (chapter 1.4.) Backlash driving gear wheel (1) H.T. cooling water pump gear wheel (3) Backlash driving gear wheel (1) L.T. cooling water pump gear wheel (4)

for

2.4 112

int ern a
3 1 2 Fig. 2.4 27 Gear wheel train

lu

se

on
Clearance 0.410.58 0.440.58 0.440.58

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Max.

Min.

Cylinder liner (chapter 2.5.) Cylinder liner diameter: (fig.2.4 27 )Level: I, II, III, IV, V I II III, IV, V Cylinder liner cylindricity at TDC Cylinder liner height A (incl. E) Cylinder liner height B (incl. E) Anti polishing ring height C Anti polishing ring wall thickness D Notch height E 380.057

380.000

349.10 961.1 78.0 1.6

se
349.00 960.9 77.8 1.4 10.693 E A B C D

0.02

10.740

for

int ern a
0 92 147 202 9612DT401 568 9622DT929 872

Fig. 2.4 28 Measuring the cylinder liner bore

lu

on
Clearance

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] > 380.900 > 380.600 > 380.300 > 0.06 > 348.75 > 10.65 2.4 113

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Max.

Min.

Main bearing (chapter 2.5.) Crankshaft journal diameter Crankshaft journal straightness Crankshaft journal coaxially Main bearing housing.bore Main bearing shell thickness Assembled main bearing bore Main bearing clearance (also 0bearing) Crankshaft thrust bearing ring thickness Crankshaft thrust bearing axial clearance 380.000 0.015 0.025 400.036 9.883 380.352 379.964 400.000 9.858 380.266

15.000

lu
250.000 265.032 7.415 250.247 249.971 265.000 7.395 250.175 12.000 11.950

Camshaft bearing (chapter 2.5.) Camshaft journal diameter Camshaft bearing housing bore Camshaft bearing bush thickness Assembled bearing bore

Camshaft bearing clearance (also 0bearing)

int ern a

Camshaft thrust bearing ring thickness

Camshaft thrust bearing axial clearance

for

2.4 114

se
0.266 0.388 14.950 0.25 0.50 0.175 0.276 0.350.55

on
Clearance

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Crankshaft deflection criteria (chapter 2.6.)

se
1)

While measuring the cranckshaft deflections the commissioning report is considered as a reference. The dial gauge center point on the counterweight is situated 10 mm from the counterweight / cranckweb mounting face. Check the cranckshaft alignement accordingly to the procedure in chapter 2.6. All mesurements are to be recorded on the special cranckshaft alignement document which is supplied by Wrtsil. Its important each and every data is recorded in the document. Before taking cranckshaft deflections on an hot engine 2), the dial gauge should be warmed up to the same temperature of the engine in order to avoid temperature influence on the readings. For instance the dial gauge could be warmed up by placing it on the engine feet for a while. Following limits of misalignement are given for both cold and hot engine. Cold Engine Description Hot Engine
2)

Max difference between to opposite readings 3) on the same cranck 4). Max difference between the same readings on two adjacent crancks 4).

lu
0,050 0,035 0,100 0,070
E F A B C

Acceptable [mm]

int ern a
Max difference between to opposite readings 3) on the end cranck if coupled to the installation (vertical direction). Max difference between to opposite readings 3) on the end cranck and its adjacent cranck when coupled to the installation (vertical direction).
operating side D

nonoperating side

for

on
Acceptable [mm] 0,080 0,060 0,100 0,070

Part, measuring point

ly
Recommended realignement [mm] 0,100 0,070 0,120 0,080 2.4 115

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1) At ambient temperature. 2) At normal operation temperature,

which means within 40 minutes after engine running for more than 6 hours at 60 % load at least. 3) The opposite reading to C is F, between A and E. 4) Except for a coupled end cranck.

for

2.4 116

int ern a

lu

To investigate the cause for too high deflection values, please note the following matters: Temperature level of the crankcase, in relation to the temperature level in the upper part of the engine block, have to be observed, big temperature differences causes bending of the engine block. The coupling alignment have to be checked or otherwise the cranckshaft should be uncoupled from its driven equipment.

se

NOTE: Not coupled to the installation means both the free and driving end of the engine must be free from extra loads as for instance the weight of elastic couplings. If the values are exeeding the limits: Check measurement tool and procedures, see section 2.6.1. Check foundation and engine alignement to the driving shaft. Realign if needed.

on

Part, measuring point

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Max.

Min.

Big end bearing (chapter 2.6.) Crank pin diameter Crank pin straightness Crank pin coaxially Connecting rod big end bore * Big end bore circularity * Big end bearing shell thickness Assembled bearing bore * Difference between bore A and B * Big end bearing /.crank pin clearance 360.000 0.015 0.015 378.036 0.020 8.916

359.964

378.000 > 0.050 8.891

360.319

se
360.234

Note!

* Big end bores only to be measured with assembled connecting rod.

int ern a
A Fig. 2.4 29 Measuring the big end bore

lu

for

on
Clearance 0.234 0.355 B

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] > 0.020 2.4 117

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Max.

Min.

Piston / Gudgeon (chapter 2.6.) Gudgeon pin diameter Connecting rod small end bore Small end bearing bush thickness Assembled small end bearing bore Gudgeon pin bearing clearance Gudgeon pin bore in piston Clearance gudgeon pin piston Axial clearance small end bearing piston Piston Compression ring 1 gap Compression ring 2 gap Oil scraper ring gap Piston ring height: Piston ring groove height: Groove 1 Groove 2 Groove 3 175.075 175.000 195.029 9.940 175.179 174.988 195.000 9.925 175.120

se
175.050 0.050 0.087 0.4 0.7 0.81.2 2.02.4 1.21.65 9.965 10.20 10.15 10.06 0.213 0.265 0.163 0.215 0.073 0.125 379.750 0.220 0.307

int ern a
10.23 10.18 10.09 379.780

lu
9.987

Piston ring axial clearance: Compression ring 1 Compression ring 2 Oil scraper ring

Piston diameter at bottom in cross direction of engine Corresponding clearance piston liner

for

2.4 118

on
Clearance < 174.970 0.120 0.191 >175.077 > 10.50 > 10.50 > 10.20

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Max. Valves (chapter 2.7.) Exhaust valve guide inner diameter Inlet valve guide inner diameter Valve stem diameter level: I, II, III Exhaust valve stem clearance Inlet valve stem clearance Inlet Valve disc hight at A Exhaust Valve disc hight at A Valve disc burning in wear at B Oscillation of valve stem and disc at C Free length of valve springs 28.161 28.161 28.000

Min.

28.134 28.134 27.979

se
12.90 11.90 199.00
C

13.00 12.00 0.03

int ern a
C

lu
201.00

on
Clearance 0.134 0.182 0.134 0.182 > 1.0 III

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] > 28.300 > 28.300 < 27.900 > 0.350 > 0.350 < 12.00 < 11.00 > 0.06
A C B

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

II

66

110

325

Fig. 2.4 30 Valve stem and valve disc burning in wear

for

2.4 119

D 118 D 106

+0,0

D 118 D 141

0,2 +0,0 0,2

lu
20

se
0,2 0,3

30

D 116

D 141

int ern a
D 104 (D 99)
+0,0 0,2

Fig. 2.4 31 Inlet valve and valve seat in cylinder head

0,1

40

0,2

D 111

+0,2

D 133

0,0

for

Fig. 2.4 32 Exhaust valve and valve seat in cylinder head

2.4 120

on
0,03

D 28

+0,0 0,1

30

+0 0,1

+0,0 0,1 0,5

+0,2 +0,0 0,1 0,0

D 28h7
0,03

4016

+3
3

D 109 D 131

+0,0 0,5 +0,2 +0,0

ly
13
+0,0 +0,0 0,1

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

12

+0,0 0,0

Max.

Min.

Gearwheel train (chapter 2.8.) Backlash crankshaft gear wheel (1) large intermediate gear wheel (2) Backlash small intermediate gear wheel (3) camshaft gear wheel (4) Axial clearance intermediate gearwheel

Note!

* Clearance measured with engine at ambient temperature.

for

int ern a
3 2 1 Fig. 2.4 33 Driving gear 2.4 121

lu

se

on
Clearance 0.210.47 0.130.34 0.500.99

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] < 0.50 > 1.10 *

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Max.

Min.

Governor drive (chapter 2.8.) Backlash worm (1) worm wheel (2) Axial clearance worm shaft (3)

Note!

* Clearance measured with engine at ambient temperature.

int ern a
3 1 Fig. 2.4 34 Governor drive 2.4 122

lu
2

for

se

on
Clearance 0.10.4 0.20.5

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Max.

Min.

Valve mechanism (chapter 2.8.) Tappet guide bore (1) Tappet diameter (2) Clearance tappet / tappet guide Pin diameter (3) Pin bore in the tappet (4) Clearance pin / bore in the tappet Roller bore (5) Bearing bush outer diameter (6) Clearance bearing bush /.roller Bearing bush bore (6) 40.000 40.020 92.035 91.928

92.000 91.893

50.041 49.947

se
40.005 50.025 49.930 40.030 85.050 84.978 25.028 25.065

39.984

lu
40.050 85.102 85.000 25.041 25.098

Clearance bearing bush bore /.pin Rocker arm bearing bore (9)

int ern a
Rocker arm shaft diameter (10) Clearance shaft / rocker arm bearing Bridge piece pin diameter (11) Pin bore in bridge piece (12) Clearance pin / bore bridge piece

for

on
Clearance 0.072 0.142 0.005 0.036 0.078 0.111 0.030 0.066 0.050 0.124 0.0240.06

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] > 92.100 < 91.850 > 0.200 < 49.900 > 0.150 > 40.080 > 0.100 > 85.170 > 25.158 2.4 123

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

1,2

9,10

se
4,5

Fig. 2.4 35 Valve drive mechanism

for

2.4 124

int ern a

lu

3 6

on
12 11

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Max.

Min.

Fuel pump bracket (chapter 2.9.) Tappet diameter (2) Tappet guide bore (1) Clearance tappet / tappet guide Pin diameter (3) Pin bore in tappet Clearance pin / pin bore in tappet Roller bore (4) Clearance pin / roller bore 50.000 50.020 114.928 115.035 114.893 115.000

50.105

se
50.005 50.080

49.989

for

int ern a
1 2 3 4 Fig. 2.4 36 Fuel pump bracket 2.4 125

lu

on
Clearance 0.072 0.142 0.005 0.031 0.080 0.116

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm] < 114.80 >. 115.10 > 0.200 > 0.150

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

Max.

Min.

Injection system (chapter 2.9.) Nozzle needle lift A Distance X fuel pump 0.87 44.05 0.83 43.95

Fig. 2.4 37 Nozzle

for

2.4 126

int ern a
x See chapter 2.9

Fig. 2.4 38 HP fuel pump adjustment

lu

se

on
Clearance > 0.93

Part, measuring point

Design measurements [mm]

ly
No Go [mm]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

Item

Description

[kg] 7 612 690 6+6 3 1 6

Item

on
Description 4. 5. 9. 10. 14.

2.4.6.

Dimensions and masses

1. Main bearing shell 2. Cylinder liner 3. Cylinder head 4. Inlet and exhaust valve 5. Valve spring 6. Fuel injector 7. Piston pin bearing bush

8. Crank pin bearing shell 9. Piston + pin 10. Connecting rod

11. Crankshaft gearwheel

se
14. Fuel pump 3. 8. 13.

12. Camkshaft gearwheel 13. Intermediate gearwheels

1.

2.

for

int ern a
6. 7. 11. 12. Fig. 2.4 39 Engine components

lu
2.4 127

ly
[kg] 11 195 304 219 147 202 58

Maintenance

Manual Wrtsil 38

TPL 65 TPL 69 TPL 73

890 1045 1220

870 1025 1195

Fig. 2.4 40 Turbochargers

Charge air cooler insert 6L38B 8L38B 9L38B

lu
D [mm] 690 690 690 670 670 670 E [mm] 850 850 850 810 810 810
ooooo

se
F [mm] 1220 1220 1220 1255 1255 1255 Weight [kg] 550 650 650 700 750 750 D F

for

2.4 128

int ern a
12V38B 16V38B 18V38B E

Fig. 2.4 41 Charge air cooler inserts

on
1545 1855 2155 835 1475 2170 C

Turbocharger

A [mm]

B [mm]

C [mm]

ly
Weight [kg]

Manual Wrtsil 38

Maintenance

for

int ern a
2.5 1

lu

se

on

2.5. Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

ly

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

The engine block is a one piece stiff nodular cast iron component able to absorb internal forces. The engine block carries the underslung crankshaft. The nodular cast iron main bearing caps (1) are tightened by hydraulically tensioned studs, two vertically (main bearing cap) studs (2) and two horizontally (side) studs (3). Together they provide a very rigid crankshaft bearing construction.

lu
Nonoperating side Operating side

se

Camshaft bearing pockets (4), charge air receiver (5) and main lubricating oil supply manifold (6) are incorporated in the engine block. The sump mounted under the engine block is sealed by a rubber string gasket. The crankcase covers are also sealed by a rubber string gasket. A number of crankcase covers are equipped with explosion relief valves.

int ern a
6 2 3

Fig. 2.5 1 Engine block (view freeend side)

for

Note!

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, tools and hydraulic tightening procedures, see chapter 2.4.

2.5 2

on
4 1

2.5.1.

Engine block

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

2.5.2.1.

General

Note!

It is essential to follow the sequence described in this chapter of the manual to avoid bearing and crankshaft damages.

for

int ern a

Main bearing shells are axially guided by lugs to obtain a correct position during assembly. The crankshaft axial locating bearing, number 0, differs from the other bearings. The axial forces of the engine are taken by two sets of thrust rings to limit the axial displacement of the crankshaft. Bearing shells are of a bimetal type. All main bearing caps are provided with a temperature sensor. If abnormal temperatures appear the suspected bearing and crankshaft deflections and the alignment have to be checked. For maintenance intervals, tolerances, inspections and background information of hydraulic tightening procedures, see chapter 2.4.

lu

se

In order to mount the bearing caps always in the same position, it is necessary to pretighten the side stud at the Bbank side first, before tightening the main bearing cap studs.

on

2.5.2.

Main bearings

ly
2.5 3

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

Warning!

Never remove two main bearings mounted side by side at the same time.

Remove the protecting caps from the side studs concerned.

3 Disconnect the temperature sensor from main bearing cap. Remove bolts holding the temperature sensor cable. Take care not to damage the cable and sensor, see fig. 2.5 2 .

for

2.5 4

int ern a

Fig. 2.5 2 Position bearing temperature sensor

lu

se

Removal side stud nuts 1 Remove the crankcase covers on both sides of the main bearing to be inspected.

on

2.5.2.2.

Removal of a main bearing

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

5 Connect HP hoses 9612DT961 between jacks 9653DT903 and hydraulic pump 9612DT212. Open the release valve at the pump.

9612DT212

9653DT903

lu int ern a
Note!
8 9 Fig. 2.5 3 Positioning jack on side stud

se
9612DT961 X 9653DT903 2.5 5

6 Check if there is no clearance at X" between the distance sleeve and the jack. If there is any clearance turn the jack further on with the hydraulic hoses connected until jack pistons are forced at bottom position. After the pistons are at bottom position turn the jacks one full turn counter clockwise. See section 2.4.4.3. for jack pressures and nut shifting. 7 Pressurise jacks till final stress value, see section 2.4.4.3. Check at which pressure the nut comes loose. Loosen side stud nuts with tool pin 9612DT100 about 5 to 6 holes. Open release valve and slowly lower pressure till zero.

10 Check if the jacks and the nuts of the side studs are loose and remove the tool set

for

Note!

Do not remove the side studs yet.

on

4 Turn the hydraulic bolt tensioner 9653DT903 on the side studs completely.

ly

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

12 Place in the recesses in the top plate of the trolley the hydraulic jacks 9622DT232 from tool set 9622DT910. 13 Place one by one from tool set 9622DT149 the distance pieces 9622DT236 on the jacks and the tie rods 9622DT237 into the distance pieces. The lifting tool can be raised and lowered with spindle (1) to facilitate the insert of the tools. 14 Raise the lifting tool by means of the spindle (1) till the tie rods are just a few mm free from the main bearing cap stud. 15 Level with adjusting bolts (2) the trolley in such a way that the distance X is equal on both sides of the distance pieces. See fig. 2.5 4 . 17 Raise the lifting tool further till the distance pieces are just touching the bearing cap. Check if the tie rods are completely on the studs. 18 Turn the knurled nuts 9622DT233 on the tie rods and tighten with tool pin 9612DT100. 19 Lower the lifting tool

for

2.5 6

int ern a

20 Connect the hoses 9612DT961 to the hydraulic pump 9612DT212, open the release valve on the pump and tighten the knurled nuts firmly to force the jack pistons in bottom position. 21 After the jack pistons are in bottom position turn both knurled nuts one full turn counter clockwise.

22 Close the release valve on the pump and pressurise the jack till final stress value. See section 2.4.4.3. 23 The main bearing cap nuts should now be free from the bearing caps. Loosen the nuts one full turn (8 holes). 24 Slowly lower the hydraulic pressure till zero and check if the knurled nuts and the main bearing cap nuts are loose. 25 Remove the main bearing jacks using the trolley.

lu

16 Turn the tie rods completely on the studs.

se

on

Removal of main bearing cap nuts 11 Place trolley 9622DT901 on the sliding bars in the crankcase, see fig. 2.5 4 .

ly

Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

se
X X 2 AA

2
A

for

int ern a
9622DT236 9622DT232 9622DT233 9622DT237 9622DT901 Fig. 2.5 4 Positioning the main bearing jacks

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9622DT236 9622DT232 1 9622DT233 9622DT236 9622DT901 2.5 7

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Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

27 Hold bearing cap in position and remove the bearing cap nuts. 28 Remove carefully the side studs. 29 Lower main bearing cap.

Removal of the bearing shells 30 With the main bearing cap in lowest position the lower bearing shell can be taken out of the main bearing cap manually

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2.5 8

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9622DT152

Fig. 2.5 5 Bearing shell driver 32 Bar the crankshaft to make the lube oil hole in the crankshaft journal fully visible. 33 Insert bearing shell driver into the lube oil hole. 34 Carefully bar crankshaft till driver starts pushing against the bearing shell and turn slowly further. 35 After most of the bearing shell is pushed out of the housing the remaining part can be slide out manually.

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31 In some cases the upper bearing shell can be pushed out manually. If the bearing shell cannot be pushed out manually, then make use of the bearing shell driver 9622DT152, see fig. 2.5 5 .

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Note!

If it is not possible to lower the main bearing cap loosen the side studs of the adjacent main bearing caps.

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Lowering main bearing cap 26 Turn the lifting tool spindle (1) by hand to elevate the main bearing cap a little, see fig. 2.5 4 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Main Bearings 1 Clean bearing shells and check for wear, scoring and other damages. Journals 2 Main bearing journals should be inspected for surface finish. Damaged journals, i.e. rough surface, scratches, marks, indents etc. should be polished.

Note!

No scraping of bearing shells, caps and housings is permitted.

2.5.2.4.

Main bearing assembling

Bearing shell mounting 1 Clean both main bearing shells, cap and journal very carefully. Degrease new bearings before mounting.

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Note!

2 Oil upper bearing shell only at running side. Avoid any oil at the back side of the shell and bearing cap. 3 Place end of bearing shell in slot of housing with lug guiding in oil groove and push shell manually as far as possible. Usually it is possible to mount bearing shell manually in position. Support shell sufficiently by hand, see fig. 2.5 6 . Take care part no. on main bearing shell is facing the driving end of the engine and the location lug is in the correct position. PUSH BY HAND

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Fig. 2.5 6 Inserting main bearing shell

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PUSH BY HAND

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2.5.2.3.

Inspection of main bearings and journals

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2.5 9

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

5 Bar crankshaft carefully until bearing shell is pushed into position. Take care not to damage the bearing shell lug during turning in. 6 Remove driver.

Fig. 2.5 7 Pushing the upper main bearing shell into position 7 Oil the lower bearing shell only at the running side. Avoid any oil at the back side of the bearing shell.

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2.5 10

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12 Lower the lifting tool.

8 Place lower bearing shell in main bearing cap with part no. facing to the driving end of the engine. Make sure the bearing shell positioning lug fits in the recess of the bearing cap, and contact faces are free from damages and indents. Lifting the bearing cap 9 Lubricate the bearing cap guiding sides. 10 Use trolley for main bearing 9622DT901 to elevate main bearing cap against cylinder block, see fig. 2.5 4 . 11 With main bearing cap in top position turn on bearing cap nuts. Tighten nuts firmly with tool pin 9612DT100.

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9622DT152

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4 If the bearing shell cannot completely be inserted manually, insert driver 9622DT152 into the lube oil hole. See fig. 2.5 7 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

14 After the studs are completely turned in, turn the studs about 20 counter clockwise. The side studs should not touch the main bearing cap studs 15 Tighten the nuts at both side studs by hand, with tool pin 9612DT100

Side stud non operating side 16 1st step Turn tie rod 9622DT126 of tool set 9622DT913 completely on side stud at non operating side only, see fig. 2.5 3 .

Connect hose 9612DT961 between jack and pump 9612DT212, open release valve at pump and tighten knurled nut further to force the jack piston in bottom position.

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Note!

See section 2.4.4.3. for jack pressures and nut shifting. Pressurize jack till prestress value of the first step and tighten side stud nut firmly with tool pin.

Check with feeler gauge of 0.05 mm for any clearance between nut and contact face. Clearance should not exist. Slowly lower pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nut to force the jack piston to bottom position.

Do not remove the hydraulic tools from the side stud.

Main bearing cap studs 17 Fit the main bearing cap tool set 9622DT149 and jacks 9622DT232 with knurled nuts 9622DT233 as mentioned in section 2.5.2.2. and take care the jack pistons are in bottom position before pressurizing. 18 1st step Close the release valve at the hydraulic pump and pressurize the jacks till the prestress value of the first step. Tighten the bearing cap nuts with the tool pin. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nuts firmly to force the jack pistons in bottom position.

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Place distance sleeves 9622DT125 and jack 9622DT232 over the tie rod and tighten knurled nut 9622DT233 with the tool pin 9612DT100

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Mounting side studs 13 Fit both bearing cap side studs after cleaning and oiling.

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2.5 11

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

Close the release valve at the hydraulic pump and pressurize the jacks till final stress value of the second step. While firmly tightening the nuts, count and note the number of holes the nuts can be shifted. The nut shifting should be equal for all the nuts. Check if the number of holes which the nuts are shifted are within the values mentioned in section 2.4.4.4. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nuts firmly to force the jack pistons in bottom position. 20 3rd step Close release valve and pressurize the jacks till final stress value of the third step and tighten the nuts with the tool pin further. This should be possible over a few degrees only. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. 21 4th step Close release valve and pressurize the jacks till final stress value of the fourth step and try to tighten the nuts with the tool pin further. This should not be possible.

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2.5 12

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Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero.

Disconnect the hoses and use the trolley to remove the tool set.

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19 2nd step Check if the jack pistons are completely in bottom position.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Close the release valve at the pump and pressurize the jack till prestress value of the first step. Loosen the side stud nut. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Check for clearance between hydraulic tools and engine block, so the side stud finds its own stressfree position. Tighten the side stud nut again with the tool pin. Close the release valve at the pump and pressurize the jack again till prestress value of the first step. Firmly tighten the side stud nut.

Close the release valve at the hydraulic pump and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the second step.

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While firmly tightening the nut, count and note the number of holes the nut can be shifted.

Check if the number of holes which the nut has shifted is within the value mentioned in section 2.4.4.4. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nut to force the jack piston in bottom position. 23 3rd step Close release valve and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the third step and tighten the nut with the tool pin further. This should be possible over a few degrees only.

Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressures till zero. 24 4th step Close release valve and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the fourth step and try to tighten the nut with the tool pin further. This should not be possible.

Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero.

Disconnect the hose and remove the tool set.

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Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nut to force the jack piston in bottom position.

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Side stud non operating side continued 22 2nd step Connect the jack with the pump and open release valve tighten the knurled nut to force the jack piston to bottom position and loosen knurled nut one full turn.

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2.5 13

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

Place distance sleeves 9622DT125 and jack 9622DT232 over the tie rod and tighten knurled nut 9622DT233 with the tool pin 9612DT100 Connect hose 9612DT961 between jack and pump 9612DT212, open release valve at pump and tighten knurled nut further to force jack piston into bottom position.

Note!

See section 2.4.4.4. for jack pressures and nut shifting. Pressurize jack till prestress value of the first step and tighten side stud nut firmly with tool pin.

Slowly lower pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nut to force the jack piston to bottom position. 26 2nd step Check if the jack piston is completely in bottom position.

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2.5 14

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Close the release valve at the hydraulic pump and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the second step.

While firmly tightening the nut, count and note the number of holes the nut can be shifted.

Check if the number of holes which the nut is shifted is within the values mentioned in section 2.4.4.4. Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nut firmly to force the jack piston in bottom position. 27 3rd step Close release valve and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the third step and tighten the nut with the tool pin further. This should be possible over a few degrees only.

Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressures till zero.

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Check with feeler gauge of 0.05 mm for any clearance between nut and contact face. Clearance should not exist.

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Side stud operating side 25 1st step Turn tie rod 9622DT126 of tool set 9622DT913 completely on side stud at operating side. See fig. 2.5 3 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Open release valve at the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure till zero. Disconnect the hose and remove the hydraulic tools from the side stud. Check if it is possible to move the connecting rod easily in axial direction. If not the cause must be found 29 Fit the protecting caps on the side studs concerned. 30 Reinstall the bearing temperature sensor and check the proper indication. 31 Inspect the crankcase for cleanness e.g. forgotten rags or tools. 32 Run the prelubricating oil pump and check the bearing lubrication. 33 Close the crankcase.

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2.5 15

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28 4th step Close release valve and pressurize the jack till final stress value of the fourth step and try to tighten the nut with the tool pin further. This should not be possible.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

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1 2 3 2.5 16

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Driving end 4

Main bearing no. 1

Main bearing no. 0

Fig. 2.5 8 Crankshaft axial locating bearing

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The axial crankshaft locating bearing is located at the driving end of the engine. This bearing is further referred as the 0bearing (zero bearing). The construction is similar to other main bearings however the 0bearing cap and bearing shells are different in dimensions. The axial forces of the engine are taken by two sets of thrust rings (1), which are accommodated in recesses on both sides of the the bearing housing of the engine block and bearing cap. The axial movement of the crankshaft is limited by these thrust rings. The lower thrust rings are held in position against rotation by a locating pin (2) in the cap (3). The 0bearing cap is axially guided during lifting by four guiding strips (4), mounted on the cap. See fig. 2.5 8 .

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2.5.3.

Crankshaft axial locating bearing

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Warning!

Never remove the main bearing next to the 0bearing at the same time and never move the crankshaft in axial direction by exerting a force on the counter weights.

Before removal of the 0bearing, first measure the axial clearance of the crankshaft. To be able to measure this clearance it is necessary to move the crankshaft to and fro in axial direction. The removal procedure for the crankshaft axial locating bearing is the same as for the other main bearings. Measuring the axial clearance. 1 Prelubricate the engine for a few minutes. 2 Move the crankshaft to and fro in axial direction e.g. with a jacking bolt between flywheel and engine block or foundation.

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4

Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the driving end side.

Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the free end side.

5 Move the crankshaft again as far as possible to the driving end side to be sure there is no oil film between the axial bearing rings. 6 Place a dial gauge between engine block and flywheel and adjust it to zero. 7 Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the free end side and read the dial gauge. 8 Note the value found, and verify the clearance with the commissioning report, see also chapter 2.4.5.2. for the nominal clearance. Removal of 0bearing. 9 Remove the 0bearing cap and bearing shells according to the procedure mentioned in section 2.5.2.2. Inspect bearing and journal according to section 2.5.2.3. 10 With the 0bearing cap in lowest position both axial lower thrust rings (1) can be removed. The lower thrust rings are secured by locating pins (2) in the main bearing cap. See fig. 2.5 8 . 11 Slide the upper thrust rings downwards, these rings are not secured.

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2.5.3.1.

Removal of the 0bearing

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2.5 17

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

Clean the thrust rings and check for wear, scoring and other damages.

2 Clean running surfaces of the crankshaft and inspect for surface finish, scoring and wear. See chapter 2.4.5.2. for tolerances and wear.

2.5.3.3.
1 2

0bearing assembling

Mount upper and lower bearing shells. See chapter 2.5.2.4. Slide the clean upper thrust rings in the recesses.

Note!

Check if strips (4) on the bearing cap are still tightened and if locking plates are in good condition, see fig. 2.5 8 . 4 Lift the 0bearing cap into position and tighten bearing cap studs and side studs by hand using the tool pin. 5 Position the axial lower and upper thrust rings in line by moving the crankshaft to and fro in axial direction e.g. with a jacking bolt between flywheel and engine block or foundation. 6 Place a dial gauge between engine block and flywheel and make sure that there is axial clearance. 7 Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the driving end side and keep it in position and adjust the dial gauge on zero. 8 Tighten the side studs and bearing cap studs according to the sequence mentioned in section 2.5.2.4. 9 Move the crankshaft to and fro in axial direction. 10 Check the axial clearance, note the value found and verify the clearance with the commissioning report, see also section 2.4.5.2. for the nominal clearance.

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2.5 18

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15 Close the crankcase.

11 Reinstall the bearing temperature sensor and check the proper indication. 12 Fit the protecting caps on the side studs concerned. 13 Inspect the crankcase for cleanness e.g. forgotten rags or tools. 14 Run the prelubricating oil pump and check the bearing lubrication.

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3 Fit the lower thrust rings in the recesses of the bearing cap. Take care the locating pins fit properly.

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2.5.3.2.

Inspection of axial thrust rings and thrust collars on the crankshaft.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

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Note!
3 1

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2

The camshaft bearing bushes (1) are shrunk in housings machined in the engine block. The bearing bushes can be inspected and measured after removing the camshaft section (2) and journal (3). In this section only the removal and mounting procedure of the camshaft bearing bushes located in the engine block are described. The camshaft bearing bush (0) at the driving end is the 0bearing bush, the next is bearing bush is number 1 etc. For camshaft and camshaft drive see section 2.8.1.

Fig. 2.5 9 Camshaft and axial bearing assembly

2.5.4.1. Inspection of the camshaft bearing bush

1 Remove the camshaft section and journal of the bearing bush to be inspected, see section 2.8.2. In case of the 0bearing the camshaft gearwheel (4) with shaft has to be removed, see section 2.8.1.2. 2 Clean the camshaft bearing bush and check for wear, scoring or damages. See chapter 2.4.5.2. for measurements and tolerances. Camshaft bearing bushes are made of bimetal. If the inspected bearing bush is worn the others will most probably be in the same condition and have to be inspected as well. 3 The camshaft bearing journals should be inspected for surface finish. Damaged journals, i.e. rough surface, scratches, or other damages. See section 2.4.5.2. for measurements and tolerances.

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4 0

2.5.4.

Camshaft bearings

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2.5 19

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

If the camshaft bearing bush has to be renewed it is necessary to remove the camshaft sections on both sides of the bearing concerned. 1 2 Mount the extracting tools according to fig 2.5 10 . Connect hydraulic jack 9622DT148 with hose to pump 9622DT133.

3 Tighten nut (1) and pressurize the jack to extract the bearing bush out of the housing.

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Note!
6 2.5 20 Remove the tool set and bearing bush.

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1 9622DT148 9622DT908 9622DT133 Fig. 2.5 10 Connect the hoses to the pump 4 Stop extracting when the jack piston protrudes 48 mm (which is nearly the max. stroke of the jack). At this point open the release valve at the pump and push down the jack piston by tightening nut (1). 5 Pressurize the jack again and force the bearing bush in this second stroke completely out of the housing. Take care for the weight of the tool and bearing bush. Take care for the weight of the tools when the bearing comes free.

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2.5.4.2.

Removal of the camshaft bearing bush

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

1 Clean the camshaft bearing bush housing in the engine block and check the bore carefully for any damage. 2 Cool the new bearing bush in liquid nitrogen till a temperature of approx. 180C. This temperature is achieved on the moment the liquid nitrogen stops bubbling.

Note!

4 The lube oil supply hole in the bearing bush has to come in line with the lube oil supply hole in the engine block. Use tool pin 9612DT257 to position the bearing bush.

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6

5 Mount the camshaft journal and camshaft sections, tappets, push rods, and fuel pumps. See the chapters concerned. Remove tool set and adjust valve clearances. 7 Check the camshaft spaces for cleanness and lubrication and close the camshaft covers.

Fig. 2.5 11 0bearing bush in engine block

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Note!

The lube oil supply hole of the 0bearing should have the same position as the other bearing bushes, but tool pin 9612DT257 can not be used. There is no supply hole in the engine block, but a groove. Keep the outside of the bearing bush in line with the outside of the engine block, see fig 2.5 11 .

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Wear special low temperature resistance gloves and safety glasses! 3 Insert the bearing bush by hand in the camshaft bearing bush housing.

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2.5.4.3.

Mounting the camshaft bearing bush

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2.5 21

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

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The cylinder liner (1) is centrifugally cast of a special cast iron alloy. The collar is equipped with bores (2) for cooling of the upper part. The inner part of the collar is provided with an anti polishing ring (3). The liner is secured during maintenance by clamps (4).The cooling water space (5) is sealed by sealing compound between engine block and liner at (6), and by Orings at (7). The bottom part of the liner is supported by a rim (8). Space (9) is not specially cooled, but is in open connection to the crankcase via two flat sides (10) at the lower part of the liner. The liner temperature is monitored by 2 sensors fitted in drillings (11) at the exhaust side. 3 1

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2.5.5.1.
2.5 22

5 7

Fig. 2.5 12 Liner in engine block

Inspection of the cylinder liner

The inside of the cylinder liner can be inspected by endoscope, or after removal of the cylinder head. For complete maintenance the cylinder liner has to be removed. For maintenance schedule see chapter 2.4.1. Clean the cylinder liner cooling water spaces and inspect the contact faces in the engine block during cylinder liner overhaul.

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4 9 10 8

2.5.5.

Cylinder liner

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

1 Drain the engine cooling water and remove the cylinder head and piston with connecting rod. See chapter 2.6. and 2.7. 2 3 Remove the cylinder liner clamps (2).

Disconnect the plug of the cylinder liner temperature sensors.

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Fig. 2.5 13 Liner lifting device 5 Remove eye bolt (4) and place extracting tool 9622DT915 and hydraulic jack 9622DT148. Secure the jack and connect with pump 9622DT133. See fig 2.515 6 Apply plastic lining to prevent that water or dirt can enter the engine sump or the oil supply holes in the crankpin when the liner comes free.

7 Pressurize the jack and pull the cylinder liner free from the joint faces. The maximum stroke of the jack is 48mm. If necessary shorten the effective tie rod length. When the liner starts to move freely, remove the extracting tool and fit eye bolt in the correct position 8 Use a crane to lift the liner further carefully out of the cylinder block.

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3 2.5 23

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4 1 2

4 Fit the cylinder liner lifting device 9622DT914 in position and tighten the nuts (1) lightly. Check that the lower part (3) of the lifting device fits properly in the bore and against the bottom part of the liner.

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2.5.5.2.

Removal of the cylinder liner

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Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

9622DT148 9622DT915

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Fig. 2.5 14 Lifting the cylinder liner 9 Remove the tools. 2.5 24

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Note!
CENTRE OF GRAVITY

Mind the centre of gravity during handling of the cylinder liner and take care of damage. Free standing liners must be properly supported.

Fig. 2.5 15 Centre of gravity

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9622DT133

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Measuring of the cylinder liner can be done in the engine as well as detached. 1 Measure the cylinder liner inner diameter with tool 9612DT401 and record readings. Use the liner measuring strip 9622DT929 for the required reference heights.

9612DT401

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92 147 202 568 1 872 2.5 25

9622DT929

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Fig. 2.5 16 Measuring the cylinder liner bore 2 Clean the sealing faces of engine block and liner carefully. If necessary the sealing faces can slightly be lapped with a lapping ring. 3 In case of indents or other damages of the sealing faces of the engine block and\or liner, they have to be reconditioned by grinding. 4 Clean the grooves for the Orings (1) and replace both Orings, apply a thin layer of silicon grease on the Orings and Molycote TP 42 at rim (2). See fig. 2.5 17 5 Clean and inspect the sealing face locations of the liner Orings in the engine block. Lubricate the topside edge of the engine block with silicon grease.

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2.5.5.3.

Mounting the cylinder liner

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Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

9622DT926

Fig. 2.5 17 Marks on cylinder liner

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2.5 26

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9

7 Apply a thin layer of sealing compound on the engine block sealing face. For sealing compound see the Parts Catalogue. 8 Let the tool bar slide between cylinder head stud (3), at inlet side, and stud (4) during lowering of the liner. See fig. 2.5 17 . Lower the liner carefully into the bore of the engine block.

10 Apply a little force to press the liner Orings in the engine block bore till the collar rests on the engine block. 11 Mount clamps (2) see fig 2.5 13 and tighten the cylinder liner clamp bolts to the stated torque according the table of section 2.4.4.8. 12 Connect the plug of the temperature sensors. 13 Mount the piston with connecting rod. Mount the cylinder head and refill the engine with cooling water. See chapters 2.6. and 2.7. 14 Check the Oring seals on water leakage.

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6 Place positioning tool 9622DT926 with positioning pins in the cooling bores marked with X. Marks X on the tool must correspond with the marks X on the liner rim. See fig. 2.5 17 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

1 Fit tool 9612DT976 onto the stud and tighten the bolt on top of it. Loosen the stud by using a spanner(46mm) on the bolt (the bolt is provided with lefthanded thread).

9612DT976

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Fig. 2.5 18 Replacing cylinder head stud 2 Clean thread and recess in top of the engine block and check for corrosion. 3 Clean both thread ends of the stud and check the thread ends are free of damage by using cylinder head nut and by turning the stud in and out the threaded hole in the engine block. 4 Grease the thread of the lower part of the stud and turn the stud into the threaded hole in the engine block. For grease see parts catalogue. 5 Tighten the stud with a torque spanner and socket of 55 mm, see section 2.4.4.5. 6 Fill the gap (1) between engine block and stud with storage oil till measurement Y" (50 mm from top side cylinder block). Place the Oring at (2) with the aid of tool 9653DT902 between the stud and engine block to avoid liquids penetrating and causing corrosion, see fig. 2.5 18 . For storage oil see parts catalogue.

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2 1 2.5 27

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9653DT902

2.5.6.

Replacing cylinder head stud

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Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankcase explosions result from ignition of a combustible mixture of lubricating oil, fuel oil or gas and air. Combustion pressure, which develops following ignition within the confined space, frequently exceeds the strength of the crankcase housing or covers, causing destructive failure. The ignition source may be gas blowby or an overheated engine part. Any part moving relative to another potentially can become excessively hot through friction to initiate combustion if not lubricated or cooled properly. All bearings, bushing, thrust surfaces, pistons, etc. as well as the surfaces these parts touch, are included. Broken piston or rings that allow fire in the combustion chamber to blow through to the crankcase is also a source of crankcase ignition.

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2.5 28

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Engine stop / cool down period If a crankcase explosion occurs, allow the equipment to cool down at least 15 minutes before attempting to open any crankcase cover doors. The heat inside the crankcase will promote an inrush of fresh air when cover doors are removed and hot spots remaining from the explosion may cause a violent secondary explosion. If smoke is observed coming from crankcase vents ore breathers, safely shut down the equipment and vacate the area. Smoke from vents or breathers (especially white smoke) is an indication that a hot spot is vaporizing lubricating oil and is often observed as a precursor to a crankcase explosion. A sudden increase in crankcase pressure is an indication of gas blowby probably caused by broken piston rings indicates an increased risk of a crankcase explosion. Working A corrugated plate valve (1), see fig. 2.5 19 , is by a conical shaped spring (2) forced on an Oring seat (3) closing the crankcase to the outside. In case of an excessive overpressure (explosion) the plate valve is forced into open position allowing gasses to escape through a number of baffle plates (4). The baffle plates extinguish the flames. The conical shape spring closes the plate valve and avoids the entering of fresh air.

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Operators must recognize that all engine/compressors have the potential to develop hot spots capable of igniting crankcase vapours and producing a crankcase explosion. The potential can be reduced or safely contained by attention to good maintenance practices.

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2.5.7.

Crankcase safety valves

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

1 Periodically open the plate valve manually over the full stroke and check plate valve returns to its seat without hamper, see section 2.4.1. 2 3 Check conical spring on spring force. Renew oxidised springs. Periodically renew all Orings, see chapter 2.4.1..

4 Check by feeler gauge if plate valve is resting on the Oring and not on the steel Oring housing.

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Fig. 2.5 19 Crankcase safety valve

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Closed position 4 3 1 2

5 After Oring renewal move plate valve manually over the full stroke, see point 1.

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Open position

Maintenance

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2.5 29

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

Manual Wrtsil 38

ooooo

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2.5 30

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Engine Block with Bearings and Cylinder Liner

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2.6 1

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2.6. Crankshaft, intermediate (PTO) shaft, connecting rod, piston

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

The crankshaft design features a very short cylinder distance with a maximum bearing width resulting in a short engine. The crankshaft is forged from one piece of high tensile steel. Counterweights are mounted hydraulically onto the crankshaft webs. Main bearings and big end bearings are of the bimetal type with a steel back and a soft running layer with excellent corrosion resistance. At the drivingend the crankshaft is provided with a Vring for crankcase sealing. The spilt gear wheel for the camshaft driving is mounted on the crankshaft by a flange connection. The crankshaft could be provided with a torsional vibration damper at the free end of the engine depending on the specific configuration of the engine.

Note!

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, and hydraulic tightening procedures, see chapter 2.4.

2.6.1.1.
1 2 3

Crankshaft deflections check

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2.6 2

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Prelubricate the engine for a few minutes. Remove crankcase covers at both sides. Mount dummy 9622DT319 on the crankweb.

4 Start turning the crank of the first cylinder near the bottom dead center (BDC). Fit the dial gauge to the center marks in the crank web (on some inline engines the deflections are measured between the counterweight and a dummy counterweight). The cranks should be in such a position that the shaft can be rotated almost a full turn in clockwise direction, without removing the dial gauge. This position is marked by A" in fig 2.6 1 . Turn the crankshaft until the distance between the dial gauge and the connecting rod is as small as possible, but be careful to not make them touch.

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2.6.1.

Crankshaft

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Fig. 2.6 1 Taking crankshaft deflection readings 5 Place dial gauge 9622DT944 at position A in between the centre points of the counter weight and the dummy and adjust dial gauge at zero. Rotate dial gauge a few times between the centre points and check if the reading is still at zero. This is starting point A for the dial gauge reading. 6 Turn crankshaft till dial gauge is in position B and record dial gauge reading in protocol. 7 Turn crankshaft till dial gauge is in position C and record dial gauge reading in protocol. 8 Turn crankshaft till dial gauge is in position D and record dial gauge reading in protocol. 9 Turn crankshaft till dial gauge is in position E and record dial gauge reading in protocol. 10 Repeat procedure for remaining cranks. 11 Compare crankweb deflection readings with readings of installation protocol or engine test bed report. In case deviations are out of tolerance, investigate reason. If no improvements can be obtained, consult the nearest Wrtsil Network Company. 12 Place crankcase covers.

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2.6.1.2.
1

Prelubricate the engine for a few minutes. 2 Move the crankshaft to and fro in axial direction e.g. with a jacking bolt between flywheel and engine block or foundation.

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Measurement axial clearance crankshaft thrust bearing

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9622DT319 9622DT944 2.6 3

operating side

nonoperating side

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

3 4

Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the driving end side. Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the free end side.

5 Move the crankshaft again as far as possible to the driving end side to be sure there is no oil film between the axial bearing rings. 6 Place a dial gauge between engine block and flywheel and adjust it to zero. 7 Move the crankshaft as far as possible to the free end side and read the dial gauge.

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2.6 4

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8 Note the value found, and verify the clearance with the commissioning report, see also chapter 2.4.5.2. for the nominal clearance.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Note!

(*) This section has been included for those engines with the PTO shaft arrangement at free end. The intermediate (Power Take Off) shaft is an additional power take off installed on the engine at free end, the current installations are provided with an internal bearing to support radial loads on the shaft and to increase the stiffness of the assembly. The PTO shaft (01) is directly coupled to the crankshaft (02) (see fig. 2.6 2 ) by means of a filling plate or a vibration damper (03) accordingly to the features of each and every specific installation. In case of any doubt check the related section on the Spare Parts Catalogue which is delivered for the proper engine. The PTO bearing is supplied by lubricating oil trought the crankshaft coupling, see section 1.2.2.1. for more details. Outwards lubricating oil leakage is avoided by means of a sealing ring (05) and a leakage pipe (06) in the bearing cap.

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03 02

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05 04 06

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Fig. 2.6 2 PTO shaft arrangement at free end.

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2.6.2.

Intermediate (PTO) shaft*

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2.6 5

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.6.3.1.

General

Note!

Always handle pistons and connecting rods with care.

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1 2 3

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2.6 6

Fig. 2.6 3 Connecting rod and piston assembling

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6 5 4

The connecting rod of the "Marine type" consists of a connecting rod (1) with a big end which consists of a big end upper part (2) and a big end lower part (3). Between the big end upper part and connecting rod foot an intermediate plate (4) is mounted. The piston is of the composite type with a nodular cast iron skirt (5) and steel crown (6).

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2.6.3.

Connecting rod and piston

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Removal of of the piston 1 Turn the crankshaft 45 out of TDC.

3 Fit the free ends of tool 9622DT919 in the grooves of the antiborepolishing ring (8). See fig. 2.6 4 .

Remove the ring from the liner.

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6 9622DT919

4 Tighten bolt (6) and slowly turn the piston through TDC forcing the antibore polishing ring out of the liner top.

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9

2 Remove cylinder head, see chapter 2.7., and scrape off the carbon deposits around the upper part of the cylinder liner. It is advisable to cover the piston top with cloth or paper, pressed tightly against the cylinder wall to collect the deposits removed. The liner must be free of carbon to protect the piston rings when removing the piston out of the liner.

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Fig. 2.6 4 Removal of antibore polishing ring 6 Remove cloth or paper protection with the collected carbon from the piston crown.

7 Clean the threaded holes in the piston crown with tap 9622DT163 and fasten lifting tool 9622DT923 with the bolts to the piston crown see fig. 2.6 7 .

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2.6.3.2.

Removal and dismantling of piston and connecting rod

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2.6 7

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

9 Place from the hydraulic tool set 9612DT907 the tie rods 9622DT230 on each of the 4 studs of the connecting rod / big end bearing connection. See fig. 2.6 5 . 10 Place at each side of the connecting rod the jacks 9622DT234 over the tie rods and turn on the knurled nuts 9622DT231. See fig. 2.6 5 . 9622DT230 9622DT231 9612ZT125

9622DT234

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2.6 8

Fig. 2.6 5 Hydraulic tool connecting rod studs 11 Connect the HP hoses 9612DT961 between pump 9612DT212 and jacks 9622DT234, open the release valve at the pump and tighten the 4 knurled nuts by means of tool pin 9612ZT125 until the jack pistons are fully forced in bottom position.

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Fig. 2.6 6 Connection of the hydraulic tools

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9612DT961 9612DT212

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A A

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8 Turn the piston in bottom position. Remove at both sides of the engine the crankcase covers.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

12 Loosen the knurled nuts 9622DT231 one full turn.

13 Close the release valve and pressurise the jacks till final stress value, see section 2.4.4.4. fig. 2.4 16 . 14 Loosen the connecting rod nuts 3/4 turn (6 holes). 15 Release the jack pressure slowly till zero and check if the knurled nuts and the connecting rod nuts are loose. Disconnect the hoses and remove the tool set. 16 Remove the four nuts from the connecting rod studs.

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Fig. 2.6 7 Hoisting tool

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17 Connect the crane with lifting tool 9622DT923.

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9622DT923

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2.6 9

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

18 Hoist the pistonconnecting rod assembly a few cm free from the studs and fit the protecting device 9622DT922 against the connecting rod foot. See fig. 2.6 8

Note!

During hoisting of the piston and connecting rod assembly hold connecting rod free and take good care not to damage anything. Check also if the connecting rod foot slides easily into the bottom side of the liner and the piston comes easily out of the liner without excessive force .

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2.6 10

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22 Remove lifting tool.

Fig. 2.6 8 Fitting the protecting device

19 Mark the intermediate plate for remounting at the corresponding connecting rod and remove the plate. 20 Hoist the piston / connecting rod assembly out of the liner, see fig. 2.6 9 21 Seal the lubricating oil holes in the big end upper part.

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9622DT922

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

96922DT923

96922DT922

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9622DT928

Fig. 2.6 9 Hoisting the piston For temporarily storing and handling of the piston and connecting rod use fixating tool 9622DT928.

Fig. 2.6 10 Piston with fixating tool

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2.6 11

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Manual Wrtsil 38

2 Remove the retainer spring (9) out of the gudgeon pin hole by using pliers 9622DT178.

9922DT178

Fig. 2.6 11 Removal of the retainer spring

Note!

Never compress the retainer spring more than necessary. 3 Control the strain in the sling in such a way that the gudgeon pin becomes floating" in piston and connecting rod bore. Slide the gudgeon pin carefully out of the piston. See fig. 2.6 12 Be careful!! The gudgeon pin is heavy and should be supported during sliding out.

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2.6 12

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Note!

Fig. 2.6 12 Removal of gudgeon pin

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Separating connecting rod / piston 1 Place the piston/connecting rod assembly top side down on a flat ply wood surface holding the connecting rod with sling and crane vertical.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

1 Clean all parts carefully. Remove the piston rings with pliers 9622DT260. Remove carbon deposits from the piston and piston ring grooves. Special care should be taken not to damage the piston material. Never use emery cloth on the piston skirt.

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5

2 Measure the height of the piston ring grooves and height clearance of the rings in their respective grooves. See clearances and wear limits in section 2.4.5.2. Rings, once taken from the piston, should not be mounted again. Piston rings should not definitely be replaced during a piston inspection as long as the rings are not damaged and not taken from the piston. The liner surface should be in a good condition. Check of the gudgeon pin 3 Check the gudgeon pin bearing clearances by measuring the gudgeon pin diameters and bearing bores separately. Measure the gudgeon pin bearing diameter at four different places and in four directions. 4 Check the plugs at both ends of the gudgeon pin are properly secured. Check the oil bores in the gudgeon pin are in good condition.

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Check of the piston rings When a piston inspection is carried out according the maintenance program the piston rings may be worn and need to be replaced.

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For cleaning from carbon deposits it is advised to immerse the material in kerosene or fuel oil. Use a carbon solvent e.g. ARDROX No. 668 or similar for cleaning of the piston crown. Do not clean the piston skirt with chemical cleaning agents as such agents may damage the phosphate / graphite overlay.

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2.6.3.3.

Inspection and maintenance of piston rings and gudgeon pin bearing

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2.6 13

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

During assembling of piston and connecting rod be sure that identification marks of components are according to fig. 2.6 13 . The number of the cylinder concerned is indented in the upper part of the piston and in the connecting rod. See fig. 2.6 13 . When the piston has to be changed for a new one the same marks have to be indented at the same position as in the previous one.

Note!

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(towards the driving end for inline engines) Numbers on the same side 2.6 14

All marks on the same side

Fig. 2.6 13 Marks on piston and connecting rod

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Classification society and factory marks VIEW A

2.6.3.4.

Assembling and mounting of piston and connecting rod

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

2 Lift the connecting rod by a sling and crane top side down and lower the connecting rod slowly into the piston.

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3

Fig. 2.6 14 Moving the connecting rod into the piston Line up the gudgeon pin holes of connecting rod and piston.

4 Insert the gudgeon pin into the piston gudgeon pin bore by carefully lining the bore in the connecting rod. Push the gudgeon pin completely in the bore. 5 Refit the retainer spring (9) with pliers 9622DT178. See fig. 2.6 11 6 Lift the connecting rod together with piston. Mount the piston lifting tool 9622DT923 and turn the piston / connecting rod assembly carefully over. Mounting of piston / connecting rod assembly 1 Turn the crankshaft to BDC. During turning of the crankshaft make sure that the big end bearing cap assembly is in its normal running position (standing vertical). 2 Mount the piston rings by using the pliers 9612DT250. When new rings are mounted, check the height clearance with a feeler gauge with the rings fitted into their grooves.

Note!

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2.6 15

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Assembling of piston and connecting rod 1 Place the piston top side down on a flat piece of ply wood.

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

TOP

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2.6 16

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5 8

Fig. 2.6 15 Piston on connecting rod

3 Shift the piston rings with slots equally divided over the circumference 180 opposite to each other. Ample lubricate the piston rings with engine oil. Note that the mark "TOP" near the piston ring slot is pointing upwards.

4 Clean the cylinder liner bore carefully and lubricate the surface with engine oil. Place guide ring 9622DT924 on top of the liner, see fig. 2.6 16 . 6 Clean and check the contact surface of the connecting rod foot. Be sure the oil drillings are open and clean. Make sure the markings on the connecting rod foot are on the same side as at the big end bearing caps. See Fig. 2.6 13 . 7 Check and clean the big end bearing upper cap contact surface. Be sure the surface is dry and clean. Check condition of both locating pins and holes. 9 Check if the position of the locating pins correspond with the counter bore holes in the connecting rod foot.

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Make sure the marks TOP or the part numbers near the piston ring slot is pointing upwards

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

13 Lower the piston carefully into the cylinder liner.

Note!

Take good care not to damage anything when the connecting rod foot comes free from the liner

9622DT923

9622DT924

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9622DT922 10 5

Fig. 2.6 16 Lowering the piston and connecting rod into the cylinder liner 16 Lower the piston completely and take care the foot of the connecting rod slides easily over the studs (10) without hampering. See fig. 2.6 16 .

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2.6 17

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14 Remove the protecting plate 9622DT922 after the connecting rod foot has passed the liner. 15 Make a final check to the contact surfaces of the connecting rod foot and intermediate plate are clean and free from oil.

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10 Place the intermediate plate (5) clean and free from oil in position. See fig. 2.6 16 . 11 Mount protecting plate 9622DT922 against the connecting rod foot to protect the liner surface. 12 Lubricate the piston skirt with engine oil.

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

17 Remove the lifting tool and the guide ring.

18 Fit the connecting rod nuts and tighten the 4 nuts with the tool pin. 19 Fit from the hydraulic tool 9612DT907 the tie rods 9622DT230 on the connecting rod studs. Place both jacks 9622DT234 over the tie rods and fit the knurled nuts 9622DT231. See fig. 2.6 5 . 20 Connect the HP hoses 9612DT961 to the hydraulic pump 9612DT212 according to fig. 2.6 6 and open the release valve on the pump.

See section 2.4.4.4. for jack pressure and nut shifting. 22 1st step Close the release valve and pressurise the jacks till the value of the first step ( prestress ). Tighten the bearing cap nuts by means of the tool pin. Open the release valve slowly to lower the pressure till zero. Tighten the knurled nuts completely by means of the tool pin to force the jack pistons to bottom position.

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2.6 18

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23 2nd step Increase the hydraulic pressure till the value of the second step ( final stress ).

While firmly tightening the nuts with the tool pin count and note the number of holes the nuts can be shifted. The nut shifting should be equal.

Check if the numbers of holes the nuts are shifted is within the values mentioned in section 2.4.4.4. Tighten the knurled nuts completely on by means of the tool pin to force the jack pistons to bottom position.

Open the release valve slowly to lower the pressure till zero.

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21 Tighten the knurled nuts completely by means of the tool pin 9612ZT125 to force the jack pistons to bottom position.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Release the hydraulic jack pressure slowly.

Release the hydraulic jack pressure slowly till zero, disconnect the hoses and remove the jacks and tie rods. 26 Fit the anti bore polishing ring with the aid of tool 9622DT919 see fig. 2.6 4 27 Fit cylinder head see chapter 2.7

2.6.4.

Big end bearing

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Note!

For removal of the big end bearing shells without removal of connecting rod and piston see section 2.6.4.2.

2.6.4.1.

1 2

Remove the cylinder head and piston, see chapter 2.7. Remove the piston and connecting rod, see section 2.6.3.2.

3 Turn the crank pin to B.D.C. and turn the big end bearing top side down. 4 Place from hydraulic tool set 9612DT907 the tie rods 9622DT230 on each of the 4 studs of the big end . See fig. 2.6 17 . 5 Place at each side of the big end the jacks 9622DT234 over the tie rods and turn on the knurled nuts 9622DT231 and tighten with tool pin 9612ZT125.

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Removal of big end bearing after removal of piston and connecting rod
2.6 19

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25 4th step Increase the pressure till the value of the fourth step ( final stress). Try to tighten the nuts any further. Further shifting of the nuts should not be possible.

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24 3rd step Increase the pressure till the value of the second step ( final stress ). Tighten the nuts with the tool pin. Further shifting of the nuts should be possible over a few degrees only.

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

9622DT230 9622DT231 9612ZT125

9622DT234

Fig. 2.6 17 Hydraulic tool big end bearing studs

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7 2.6 20

6 Connect the jacks 9612DT234 with HP hoses 9612DT961 and to the hydraulic pump 9612DT212 open the release valve at the pump and tighten the knurled nuts with tool pin 9612ZT125 to force the jack pistons to bottom position. See fig. 2.6 18 . Loosen the knurled nuts 9622DT231 one full turn.

Fig. 2.6 18 Connection HP hoses big end bearing

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9612DT961

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9612DT212

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

See section 2.4.4.4. for jack pressure and nut shifting.

8 Pressurise the jacks till final value and use tool pin to loosen the big end bearing cap nuts 1 turn (8 holes). 9 Open the release valve and slowly lower the hydraulic jack pressure to zero and check if the knurled nuts and the big end bearing cap nuts are loose. Do not yet remove the nuts. 10 Disconnect the hoses and remove the tool set. 11 Turn the crankshaft slowly till T.D.C.

12 Turn the big end bearing assembly till the bottom end studs are pointing to the engine operating side. 13 Place from tool 9622DT921 the two supports 9622DT161 over the crankcase door studs at each side of the crankcase opening and secure the supports with nuts. 14 Place frame 9622DT160 in between the supports see fig 2.6 19 . Turn the crankshaft slowly in clockwise direction till about 60 after T.D.C. and leave the big end bearing assembly a few mm free from the frame.

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9622DT161 9622DT160 9622DT158 Fig. 2.6 19 Frame and support big end bearing caps

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9622DT161 9622DT157 2.6 21

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

15 Remove first the 2 lower nuts and place carrier 9622DT157 on support and slide carrier under the lower big end bearing cap. See fig. 2.6 19 . 16 Place carrier 9622DT158 under the upper bearing cap and secure the carrier with two bearing cap nuts. Let both bearing caps rests on the carriers. 17 Remove the upper nuts and separate the bearing caps by sliding them outwards till the end of the support.

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9622DT158

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9622DT157 Fig. 2.6 20 Carriers of the big end bearing caps

Note!

Take good care for not damaging the bearing shells during removal of the big end bearing caps. Upper and lower bearing shells are not identical! 18 Take the bearing shells out of the caps. The big end bearing shells, crank pin journal and caps can be inspected. 19 Remove the big end bearing caps by using a sling. 20 Cover the bores in the crank pin journal.

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2.6 22

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Remove the connecting rod nuts. See 2.6.3.2.

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9622DT168

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2 Turn the piston in top and fit the two supports 9622DT168 against the bottom rim of the liner. See fig. 2.6 21 . 3 Slowly turn the crankshaft and let the disconnected piston / connecting rod assembly rest on the supports 9622DT168.

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For inspection of only the connecting rod bearings it is not always necessary to remove the cylinder head and piston. For this purpose supports 9622DT168 are available to keep the piston and connecting rod in position in the liner with the connecting rod disconnected from the big end.

Fig. 2.6 21 Mount piston support

4 Continue turning and take care the connecting rod foot comes free from the big end. Take care the connecting rod is not damaging anything when it comes free from the big end.

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Note!

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2.6.4.2.

Removal of the big end bearing shells without removing piston / connecting rod

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9622DT168 2.6 23

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

Slowly turn the crankshaft with big end to B.D.C.

6 Place the hydraulic tools according to fig.2.6 22 , loosen the big end bearing cap nuts, separate the big end and remove the bearing shells. See section 2.6.4.1.

9622DT230 9622DT231 9612ZT125

9622DT234

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Fig. 2.6 23 Positioning device 2.6 24

Fig. 2.6 22 Fit hydraulic tightening tool

In case other big ends have to be disconnected from the piston / connecting rod assembly and the crankshaft has to be turned, use tool 9622DT170 to fixate the individual big end to the crankweb. This to avoid damage during turning of the crankshaft .

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9622DT170

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

1 Remove the protection from the crank pin journal. Clean and lubricate the journal properly with clean engine oil. 2 Place the big end bearing lower cap on carrier 9622DT157 into the support, see fig. 2.6 20 3 Fit the big end bearing upper cap to carrier 9622DT158 with two bearing cap nuts and place into the support see fig. 2.6 20 4 Clean both bearing shells at both sides and lubricate only the running side of the shells with engine oil. Check if the bore and joint faces of the cap are not damaged. 5 Place the upper bearing shell (1) into the bearing cap upper part (2).

Note!

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TEXT

Check carefully that the positioning lug of the shell fits properly in the recess of the bearing cap. See fig. 2.6 24 .

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Positioning Lug

Fig. 2.6 24 The big end 6 Slide the big end bearing capshell assembly carefully to the crank pin journal. Note that the crankshaft is turned to the right position,

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2 Upper Shell 1) Lower Shell 4) 6

2.6.4.3.

Assembling the big end bearing

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2.6 25

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

7 Place the lower bearing shell (4) into the bearing cap lower part (6). Note the lower shell has holes for the oil flow.

Note!

Check carefully that the positioning lug of the shell fits properly in the recess of the bearing cap. See fig. 2.6 24 8 Slide the big end bearing lower part together with carrier over the studs towards the big end journal. The locating pin in the lower bearing cap fits in the counter hole of the upper part. Check proper positioning of bearing caps and bearing shells. 9 Turn on the 2 nuts on the upper studs tighten with the tool pin and remove carrier.

11 Bar the big end to B.D.C. Turn the big end bearing cap assembly with the 4 bottom end studs pointing vertical upwards. 12 Place from hydraulic tool set 9612DT907 the tie rods 9622DT230 on each of the 4 studs of the big end . See fig. 2.6 17 .

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2.6 26

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13 Place at each side of the big end the jacks 9622DT234 over the tie rods and turn on the knurled nuts 9622DT231 and tighten with tool pin 9612ZT125. 14 Connect the jacks 9612DT234 with HP hoses 9612DT961 and to the hydraulic pump 9612DT212 open the release valve at the pump and tighten the knurled nuts with tool pin 9612ZT125 to force the jack pistons to bottom position. See fig. 2.6 18 .

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10 Turn on the 2 nuts on the lower studs tighten with the tool pin and remove. Remove carrier frame and both supports.

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approx. 60 after T.D.C. Observe the correct position of the shell in the cap again, see fig. 2.6 19

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

See section 2.4.4.3. fig 2.4 16 for jack pressure and nut shifting.

15 1st step Close the release valve and pressurize the jacks till the value of the first step ( prestress ). Use the tool pin to tighten the bearing cap nuts completely on. The nut shifting is not always equal during the first step. Open the release valve slowly to lower the pressure till zero.

16 2nd step Close the release valve and pressurize the jacks till the value of the second step ( final stress ). While firmly tightening the nuts with tool pin count the number of holes the nuts can be turned further. The nut shifting should be equal. Check if the total numbers of holes the nuts are shifted are within the values mentioned in fig . 2.4 16 .

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Release the hydraulic pressure slowly. Tighten the knurled nuts further by means of the tool pin to force the jack pistons into bottom position.

17 3rd step Pressurize the hydraulic jacks till the value of the third step ( final stress ) and tighten the nuts firmly with the tool pin. This should be possible over a few degrees only.

Release the hydraulic pressure slowly till zero.

18 4th step Pressurize the hydraulic jacks again till the value of the fourth step ( final stress ) and try to turn on the nuts any further. This should not be possible.

Release the hydraulic pressure slowly. Disconnect the hoses and remove the tool set.

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Tighten the knurled nuts by means of the tool pin to force the jack pistons into bottom position.

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2.6 27

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.6.5.1.

General

2.6.5.2.

Maintenance

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2.6 28

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The viscous damper fluid is subject to ageing during engine operation. In sending fluid samples on a regular base to Wrtsil Corporation the rate in reduction of the viscosity can be determined. In the analysis the quality of the fluid is mentioned and a forecast can be given of the number of running hours still to go. Dampers with a viscosity out of range may cause crankshaft breakdown. The damper cover has two filling holes located 180 opposite each other and closed by plugs. If one of the plugs is accessible, a fluid sample can be taken with the damper in situ. For liquid sampling, a kit can be ordered from Wrtsil Corporation service department under part no. 176309622DT472.

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The vibration damper serves to reduce the torsional vibration. The damper consists of a housing and a free rotating inertia ring supported by an axial and radial bearing. It forms a totally enclosed unit. The free space between inertia ring and damper housing is filled with a high viscosity fluid. The combustion pressure, exerted on the pistons, causes vibration in the crankshaft and each variation, produced by such a vibration, will affect the movement of the inertia ring. The resulting displacement of the ring to the damper housing is opposed by the viscous fluid by which the vibration will be reduced. The energy, absorbed during the process, is converted into heat and cooled by lubricating oil.

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2.6.5.

Vibration damper crankshaft

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

1 Turn the crankshaft until a drain plug is easy accessible, preferably in vertical position. 2 Unlock the drain plug , using a punch and unscrew plug. Do not yet remove the plug!

Remove drain plug and screw liquid container instead.

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Fig. 2.6 25 Liquid sampling

5 Remove outer cap nut from liquid container. Make sure no engine oil or dirt can enter the liquid container! 6 Again screw on outer cap nut once the liquid has reached the open end of the liquid container. The filling period of the container may take from a few seconds up to more than an hour depending on the liquid condition.

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2.6 29

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3 Unscrew one cap nut from the (plastic) liquid container, the thread of which corresponds to that of the drain plug in the damper. The sides of the liquid container have various threads for other damper types.

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2.6.5.3.

Liquid sampling

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fit second cap on container.

If a sample can not be taken in this way proceed as follows:

If after a while no liquid appears remove second drain plug too.

Supply nitrogen of 3.5 bar maximum pressure through the drain hole. If no nitrogen is available air may be used provided this air is properly filtered and dry. Once liquid has reached the open end of the container cut off the nitrogen and fit cap on container. After the nitrogen supply is stopped unscrew the container, screw on the second cap and fit both drain plugs. If a liquid sample can not be obtained this way either it can be assumed the damper liquid has thickened to an inadmissible value necessitating replacement of damper.

Note!

Replace any damaged drain plug. 9 Renew the Orings, tighten the drain plugs at a torque of 35 Nm and lock the drain plugs. 10 After sampling, provide the sample with a label (included in the sampling kit) showing the following data : serial number of the vibration damper (if possible) engine type engine number number of operating hours date of sampling Forward the sample to : Wrtsil Italia S.p.A. Service Department Bagnoli della Rosandra, 334 34018 S. Dorligo della Valle Trieste Italy Once the sample is examined the result will be reported to you in writing. This report will also include our recommendation. 11 A max. of 10 liquid samples of 1 cm3 each are allowed to be taken.

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2.6 30

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7 Unscrew container from the damper and fit drain plug using a new joint ring supplied with the mounting kit.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

2.6.6.1.

General

The turning device consists of an electric motor which drives the turning gear through a gear drive and a worm gear. A remote control box, including a cable, makes turning from any position near the engine possible. The turning speed is about 3 rpm.

An interlock prevents starting in case the turning gear is engaged. For fine adjustment of the crankshaft position use the hand wheel (2).

Note!

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3 5 1 7 6 2 4

Always keep turning gear engaged when piston(s) is removed during inspection.

Fig. 2.6 26 Electrically driven turning device

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Engaging and disengaging of the turning gear is made possible by lever (1). The lever is secured by a locking pin (6). See fig. 2.6 26 .

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Engine cranking is done by means of an electrically driven device built on the engine.

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2.6 31

2.6.6.

Turning gear

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Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

Manual Wrtsil 38

The turning device needs no maintenance but a change of lubricating oil once during the first year of operation. After that the oil should be changed according the intervals mentioned in section 2.4.1.3. Check also if the filler vent cap (3) is open. 1 2 Drain old oil, preferably warm, through drain hole (4). Rinse the gear box with clean gas oil.

4 5

Place the filling cap and run the turning gear a few revolutions. Check the oil level and fill if necessary.

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2.6 32

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3 Fill the gear box with oil through the filling hole (5) until the oil level reaches the sight glass (7). Utmost cleanliness must be observed.

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2.6.6.2.

Maintenance turning device

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Crankshaft, Intermediate Shaft, Connecting Rod, Piston

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2.7 1

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2.7. Cylinder Head with Valves

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

The cylinder head is provided with two inlet and two exhaust valves (1), four valve rotators (2), two bridge pieces (3), a fuel injector (4), a safety valve, an indicator cock and a starting air valve for each cylinder head on the Abank. The starting air valve is described in chapter 1.3. On the Bbank of Vengines the starting air valve is replaced by a dummy valve.

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7 5

The valve lifting gear is mounted on the cylinder head by means of six bolts as described in chapter 2.8. A single pipe connects the cylinder head with the engine lubricating oil system and takes care for the lubrication of the valve lifting gear, bridge pieces and valve stems.

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3

The cylinder head and the exhaust valve seats (5) are cooled by the HT cooling water. The HT cooling water flows from the engine block via drillings in the cylinder liner collar to the cylinder head through several water bores (6). The HT cooling water flows through an outlet channel (7) at the top side of the cylinder head and via a flexible pipe connection to the HT cooling water outlet manifold.

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6 4 6

Fig. 2.7 1 Cross section cylinder head

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Note!

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, tools and hydraulic tightening procedures, see chapter 2.4.

2.7 2

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2.7.1.

Cylinder head

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

A comfortable maintenance of the cylinder heads could be performed with the aid of a tilting frame 9622DT806. After placing the cylinder head onto the tilting frame fixate the cylinder head by means of the nuts (9) with threaded rods. The cylinder head can be turned over and fixed in position by means of locking pin (10) in one of the holes (11).

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9 10 11 9622DT806 Fig. 2.7 2 Tilting frame cylinder head Cylinder head inspection After dismantling, visually inspect the cylinder head with care for any damage. Clean the gas sealing surfaces between the cylinder head and the cylinder liner. Check with the polishing ring 9622DT807 and the grinding paste the condition of the sealing surfaces on the cylinder head and the cylinder liner. If reconditioning is necessary, that must be done by an authorized Wrtsil Workshop. 2.7 3

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Cylinder head hoverhaul consists mainly of measures checks, cleaning, grinding of sealing surfaces and maintenance of cylinder head components. Scale formation in cooling water spaces will disturb the cooling effect; cleaning can be performed by means of chemical solvents. Contact a specialised company for chemical cleaning agents. When scale formation exists, verify the cooling water treatment.

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2.7.1.1.

Maintenance of the cylinder head

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Before starting any maintenance action, drain the cooling water system. See section 1.4.5.4. 2 Remove the "hot box" panels at the operating side, by taking the pin (1) out from the support (21) and pressing the pin into the clip (22), so the panel has no support any more, see fig. 2.7 3

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1 21 Fig. 2.7 3 Removal of the hotbox panels

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3 Now push both the lugs (2) of the panel towards each other and the panel will be loose.

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2.7 4

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2.7.1.2.

Removal of the cylinder head

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22

Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

5 Loosen the flexible pipe connection of the outlet cooling water pipe and slide the connection backwards. 6 Exhaust manifold correction: VEngines: On the ABank connect the exhaust manifold section to the charge air receiver by means of tool 9651DT108 with two bolts M12X25 (4) and two bolts M16X50 (3). See fig. 2.7 4 . Use for Bbank tool 9651DT109 with two bolts M12 X35 (7) and two bolts M12 X30 (9). LEngines: Connect with two M12 bolts (12) the exhaust manifold section (13) to the cooling water outlet manifold (14). See fig. 2.7 4 .

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3 4 5 9651DT108 ABANK 14 12 15 BBANK 13

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4 Remove the protecting plates from the exhaust gas connection between cylinder head and exhaust manifold.

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16 8

Fig. 2.7 4 Removal of cylinder head 7 Remove the four bolts of the Vclamp (10) from the cylinder head exhaust connection and remove the upper part of the Vclamp. Remove the bolts in the cylinder head from the inlet air bend.

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7 9 10 9651DT109 2.7 5

Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

Remove the upper part of the cylinder head protecting cover.

10 Turn the crankshaft until the piston is at T.D.C. for combustion. Check correct position (the inlet and exhaust valves are closed and both the push rods should rotate freely). 11 Loosen and remove the valve lifting gear (8), see fig. 2.7 4 . and section 2.8.3.1. 12 Remove the lower part of the cylinder head protecting cover and the pushrods.

14 Disconnect the connector at (16) for the exhaust gas temperature monitoring sensor, see fig. 2.7 4 .

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2.7 6

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13 Disconnect the fuel drain lines, the HP fuel line, the pilot starting air line, the cylinder head lubricating supply pipe and cover all the holes against dirt penetration.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

16 Fit the hydraulic tool set 9622DT911 in position accordingly to fig. 2.7 5 and connect the HP hoses 9612DT961 and the HP hose set 9622DT146 to the hydraulic pump 9612DT212. 9612DT100

17 18 9622DT911

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9622DT146 9612DT961

Fig. 2.7 5 Loosening the cylinder head nuts

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9612DT212 2.7 7

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15 Remove the protecting caps from the cylinder head studs. Be sure the thread of the cylinder head studs are clean and without damages.

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

18 Pressurise the hydraulic jacks to the setting value and loosen the cylinder head nuts a 3/4 turn (6 holes) with the tool pin 9612DT100. 19 Open the release valve and slowly lower the pressure down to zero and remove the hoses. Check if the knurled nuts and the cylinder head nuts are loose and then remove the tool set. 20 Remove the cylinder head nuts. 21 Fit the lifting tool 9612DT974 on the cylinder head. Lift the cylinder head a bit to drain the possible remaining water outside the cylinder liner While lifting push the push rod protecting pipes downwards into the cylinder block. Slide the push rod protecting pipes out from the cylinder head Check if the starting air pipe is free as well. Hold both the push rod protecting pipes in situ till the cylinder head is completely removed to avoid any possible damage.

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2.7 8

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9612DT974

Fig. 2.7 6 Lifting the cylinder head

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17 Open the pressure release valve on the hydraulic pump and tighten completely the knurled nuts (17) to force the pistons (18) of the jacks at the bottom position. When the four pistons of the jacks are at bottom position turn the knurled nut one full turn counter clockwise (8 holes loose).

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

Fig. 2.7 7 Cylinder head on liner

23 Remove the gas sealing ring (20), see fig. 2.7 7 . 24 Remove both the push rod protecting pipes. 25 Cover the cylinder opening and holes to the camshaft space with a piece of plywood or similar.

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Fig. 2.7 8 Protecting ring for cylinder head

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9622DT356 2.7 9

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19 20

22 Remove the "O" ring (19), see fig. 2.7 7 . Fit the protecting ring 9622DT356, see fig. 2.7 8 , in order to protect the gas sealing and the injector tip when the cylinder head is directly placed onto the floor. Lower vertically the cylinder head.

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Renew the sealing rings of the inlet air bend, the starting air line and the push rod protecting pipes. 2 Place a new gas sealing ring (20) on the top of the cylinder liner. 3 Turn the crankshaft until the piston is at T.D.C. for combustion and be sure the valve tappets for the inlet and the exhaust rest on the base circle of the cams.

5 Lift the cylinder head and remove the protecting ring 9622DT356. Clean the sealing surfaces and use a new cylinder head Oring (19), see fig. 2.7 7 . Lubricate the Oring with silicon grease.

7 Lower the cylinder head onto the liner and take care the starting air connecting pipe and the push rod protecting pipes slide into the Orings without any friction. 8 Take care of the proper alignment of the cylinder head. The istruction for the centring tool kit PAAE073585 usage are presented in section 2.7.1.4. 9 Tighten the cylinder head nuts by means of the tool pin 9612DT100.

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2.7 10

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Note!
12 1st step

10 Place the hydraulic tool set 9622DT911 in position and connect the HP hoses accordingly to fig. 2.7 5 . 11 Open the pressure release valve on the hydraulic pump and tighten completely the knurled nuts to force the pistons of the jacks at the bottom position.

See section 2.4.4.5. for jack pressure and nut shifting.

Close the pressure release valve on the pump and pressurize the jacks up to the value of the first step (prestress). Tighten the nuts by means of the tool pin untill a firm contact between the nuts and the cylinder head is obtained.

Open the pressure release valve on the pump and slowly lower the jack pressure down to zero. Turn the knurled nuts downwards by means of the tool pin in order to force the jack piston at the bottom position.

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6 Lubricate the Orings for the push rod connecting pipes with silicon grease. Slide the push rod protecting pipes into the cylinder head.

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4 Mount the lifting tool 9612DT974 to the cylinder head. See fig. 2.7 6 .

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2.7.1.3.

Mounting of the cylinder head

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

13 2nd step

Close the pressure release valve and increase the hydraulic pressure up to the value of the second step (final stress). While firmly tightening the nuts by means of tool pin. Count the number of holes which the nuts can be turned further of. The nut shifting should be the same for all the nuts. Check if the total number of holes which the nuts are shifted of is within the values range which is mentioned in fig 2.4 18 .

Turn the knurled nuts further downwards in order to force the jack piston at the bottom position. 14 3rd step

Close the pressure release valve and increase the jack pressure up to the value of the third step (final stress). Try to tighten the nuts by means of the tool pin any further. Eventually, this should be possible over few degrees only.

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15 4th step

Slowly open the release valve and lower the hydraulic jack pressure down to zero.

Close the pressure release valve and increase the jack pressure up to the value of the fourth step (final stress)

Try to tighten the nuts by tool pin any further. This must not be possible.

Slowly open the pressure release valve and lower the hydraulic jack pressure down to zero. 16 Disconnect the HP hoses and remove the hydraulic tools. 17 Fit the protecting caps over the cylinder head studs.

18 Connect the connector of the exhaust gas temperature sensor to the cylinder head. See fig. 2.7 4 . 19 Connect the pilot starting air line, the cylinder head lubricating supply pipe, the HP fuel line and the fuel drain lines.

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Open slowly the pressure release valve and lower the hydraulic jack pressure down to zero.

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

21 Remove, depending on the Aor B Bank, tool 9651DT108 or 9651DT109 while holding the exhaust manifold in place. See fig. 2.7 4 . 22 Tighten the 4 bolts of the clamping rings crosswise up to the correct torque, see section 2.4.4.5. 24 Mount the protecting plates for the exhaust gas manifold. 25 Renew the gasket of the outlet cooling water pipe and fit the flexible pipe connection. 26 Check if the piston is in T.D.C. position. 27 Fit the valve lifting gear on the cylinder head. Observe the mounting torques mentioned in the settings. See also section 2.8.3.3. 28 Mount the lower part of cylinder head protecting cover. 29 Adjust the valve clearance. See section 2.7.2. 30 Refill the engine cooling water system and check for leakages. 31 Prelubricate the engine, check the connections for leakages and check valve lifting gears for proper lubrication. 32 Mount the cylinder head protecting cover upper part and the Hot box" panels. 33 Before starting the engine make the crankshaft perform two revolutions with the indicator cocks open in order to ensure there is no liquid on the top of the piston.

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2.7 12

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2.7.1.4.
1

Centring the cylinder head.

The tool kit PAAE073585 consists in four centring tools 9622DT473 and one pin. Make sure that the thread of every stud is clean and not damaged.

2 Make sure that the inner thread of each tool is clean and not damage. If necessary, lubricate it with engine lubricating oil.

3 Lubricate slightly the external of each tool in the cone with engine lubricating oil or normal grease. 4 Mount a tool for every stud as in fig. 2.7 9 . If the tool cannot be fitted, move carefully the cylinder head.

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23 Mount the bolts of the inlet air bend.

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20 Apply high temperature resistant lubricant at the inside of the Vclamping ring and at the four bolts. Mount the upper part and the lower part of the clamping ring on the exhaust connection.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

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7

Fig. 2.7 9 Centring tool usage 5 Screw manually all the 4 tools crosswise, using a pin that operates in the holes of the tools. 6 Once all the tools are screwed and the cylinder head has been aligned, loose and remove all of them. Tigthen the cylinder head as described in section 2.7.1.3., point 9.

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2.7 13

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

Note!

Adjust the valve clearance only after a cooling down period of 30 minutes. Adjust the inlet and exhaust valves as set. Checking the valve clearance 1 Remove the cylinder head upper part cover.

3 Remove the oil film between the pivots by tapping few times with a plastic hammer on the ends of the valve levers of the rocker arms.

Lower the bridge piece and check if the feeler is not movable.

6 Lift the bridge piece, remove the feeler gauge and repeat the same procedure at (5) between the adjustable pivot (6) and the valve stem. 7 If the difference between (4) and (5) is more than 0.05 mm the bridge piece has to be levelled, continue with point 10.

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2.7 14

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8 If the clearance is less than 0.05 mm place the feeler gauge 9622DT162 at (8) between the bridge piece (3) and the thrust cup (9). Check if the valve clearance is correct. For the valve clearance see section 2.4.5.1. 9 If the valve clearance is more than 0.1 mm out from the permissible range, the valve clearance must be adjusted, continue with the point 17.

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4 Lift the bridge piece (3) a little bit and place a 0.05 millimeters feeler gauge at (4) between the fixed pivot and the valve stem.

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2 Turn the crankshaft untill the piston in TDC position and check the valve spring load is taken off from the pushrods. (Push rods should rotate freely)

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2.7.2.

Adjusting the valve clearance

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

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8

Fig. 2.7 10 Valve clearance adjustment Levelling the bridge piece 10 Loosen the locking nut (7) of the adjustable pivot (6) on the bridge piece (3). 11 Turn the adjustable pivot (6) few turns outwards so far that it is free from the valve stem. 12 Place the dial gauge on the bridge piece and adjust it to zero see fig. 2.7 10 . 13 Turn the adjustable pivot (6) inwards untill the pointer of the dial gauge just starts to move. 14 Tighten the locking nut (7) by hand without turning the adjustable pivot. 15 Check the clearance accordingly to the procedure of points from 4 upto 7. 16 Tighten the locking nut (7) further on, up to the correct torque, without turning the adjustable pivot. For the torque setting see section 2.4.4.5.

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Note!

Adjusting the valve clearance The bridge piece (3) must be levelled before adjusting the valve clearance. 17 Loosen the locking nut (1) and adjustable pivot (2) few turns outwards. 18 Place the feeler gauge 9622DT162 at (8) between the bridge piece (3) and the thrust cup (9). For the valve clearance see section 2.4.5.1.

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2 6 7 3 5 2.7 15

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

20 Tighten the locking nut (1) up to the correct torque without turning the pivot. For torque settings, see section 2.4.4.5.. 21 Remove the feeler gauge and repeat the complete procedure for the other pair of the valves. 22 Fit the cylinder head upper part protecting cover.

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2.7 16

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19 Turn the adjustable pivot (2) downwards with the feeler gauge inserted until the feeler is just tight and still movable.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

The valve stem is guided by the valve guide (4) where it is lubricated and sealed with the aid of an Oring (5) The valve guides and seats are cold fitted into the related housing on the cylinder head. The valve is fixed to the valve rotator by means of two semicones (7). Valve rotators are further described in section 2.7.4.

Note!

The exhaust valves (1) and the inlet valves (2) are different for the material and the design, thus they must not be mixed. The inlet valves can be identified for the concentric recess (3) in the valve disc and for the notation on the valve stem top.

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5 4 2 3 1 Fig. 2.7 11 Valves 2.7 17

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2.7.3.

Exhaust and inlet valves

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

The valves can be removed if the cylinder head has been taken off the engine and the injector removed. See section 2.9.4.1. 1 Place the tool assembly 9622DT801 in place and mount it on the cylinder head with two M16 nuts. See fig. 2.7 12 . 2 Mount the hydraulic jack 9622DT147 on the tool assembly with the stud and the eye nut. Leave about 40 mm distance between the jack and the nut in order to allow the springs to expand after the cones removal.

40 mm

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2.7 18

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9622DT133 Fig. 2.7 12 Removal of valves

3 Use the hydraulic pump/hose set 9622DT133 to press the spring assembly downwards far enough to remove the valve semicones (7). See fig. 2.7 11 . 4 Open slightly the pressure release valve on the pump to unload slowly the valve springs. Take care the springs are fully discharged before removing the tools. 5 All the four rotators and the springs can now be removed. Take care to keep the cones, the springs and the rotators pair by pair. Take care to avoid any damage at the spring coating.

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9622DT147 9622DT801

2.7.3.1.

Removal of the valves

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

1 Checking; If any pitting trace exists over nearly the entire sealing face or if an imperfect sealing is observed, the valve discs and the valve seat rings must be machined. 2 Machining: The inlet and the exhaust valve seat rings can be machined by means of grinding or cutter tools up to a maximum permissible diameter. For the tolerances and the angles see section 2.4.5. Replace the valve seat rings after the maximum diameter has exceeded.

Note!

Any emery grinding is not permitted in order to maintain the desired angles for the valve seat ring and the valve disc. The tools and the related instructions for the reconditioning of valve discs and seat rings are available through Wrtsil Corporation Service Department or through your local Wrtsil service agent. 3 Blueing test: Apply a Prussian Blue thin coating on the contact surface of the valve disc. Place the valve in the own guide on the cylinder head and make a contact print by slamming the valve onto the valve seat ring. Do not rotate the valve. The obtained contact area must be as shown for the inlet and the exhaust valve seats rings, see fig. 2.7 13 . outer contact
1050%

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Inlet Fig. 2.7 13 Blueing test

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inner contact
1020%

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Exhaust

2.7.3.2.

Check and reconditioning of valve disc and valve seat

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2.7 19

Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

The valve seat rings are cold fitted into the housing on the cylinder head and, after thermal expansion, they are high force locked in the cylinder head. Removing of the exhaust valve seat 1 Turn the cylinder head up side down. Clean the inner side of the valve seat and, from tool set 9622DT808, place the disc set (1) (consisting of 4 tightening pieces), the tie rod (2) together with the nut (3) into the valve seat. Be sure the rim on the outside of the four tightening pieces fits in the recess between the valve seat and the cylinder head. Secure the discs set by tightening the nut (3) up to a 100 Nm torque. See fig. 2.7 14 .

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2.7 20 5 2 3 4 1 Fig. 2.7 14 Removing the exhaust valve seats

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2 Place the largest diameter pin of the bridge piece (5) into the injector sleeve hole. Connect the hydraulic jack 9622DT148 and connect the pump 9622DT133. 3 Apply a pressure up to 500 bar, if necessary release it and, afterwards, slowly increase it once more up to max 550 bar. If needed

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9622DT148 9622DT808 9622DT133

2.7.3.3.

Valve seats

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

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Removal of the inlet valve seat 1 Turn the cylinder head up side down. Clean the inner side of the valve seat ring and, from tool set 9622DT810, place the disc set (5) (consisting of 4 tightening pieces), the tie rod (2) together with the nut (3) into the valve seat. Be sure the outside rim of the four tightening pieces fits properly under the valve seat ring (7). Secure the disc set by tightening the nut (3) with a 100 Nm torque. See fig. 2.7 15 .

Fig. 2.7 15 Removing inlet valve seats 2 Place the largest diameter pin of the bridge piece (5) into the injector sleeve hole. Connect the hydraulic jack 9622DT148 and connect the pump 9622DT133. 3 Apply a pressure up to 500 bar, if necessary release it and, afterwards, slowly increase it once more up to max 550 bar. If needed repeat that procedure few times in order to loosen the seat. Pull the valve seat (7) out from the cylinder head. 4 Loosen the nut (3) and remove the seat ring from the tool.

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9622DT148 5 2 3 7 6 9622DT133

repeat that procedure few times in order to loosen the seat. Pull the valve seat (4) out from the cylinder head. 4 Loosen the nut (3) and remove the valve seat ring from the tool. 5 Clean and degrease the valve seat recesses in the cylinder head and measure the diameter in two crosswise directions at two different heights. Compare the values to the nominal dimensions which are mentioned in section 2.4.5.

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

Mounting of the exhaust and inlet valves

Note!

Wear low temperature resistant gloves and safety glasses while handling liquid nitrogen and deep frozen engine parts; be informed on the safety measures about the liquid nitrogen handling from the supplier. Before mounting a new valve seat, check the valve guide condition, see section 2.7.3.4. 1 Degrease the valve seat rings. 2 Procedure for the exhaust valve seat ring: Heat slowly and equally the cylinder head up to 90C. Cool the exhaust valve seat ring (e.g. in a deep freeze unit down to 50C). Lubricate the Oring (12) with a silicon grease and place it into the groove of the valve seat, see fig. 2.7 16 . Apply a sealing compound on the biggest outer diameter of the valve seat. Continue with mounting the seat in the cylinder head. 3 Procedure for the inlet valve seat: Heat slowly and equally the cylinder head up to 90C. Cool the inlet valve seat in liquid nitrogen down to 180C. Continue with mounting the seat in the cylinder head. 4 Place the cooled inlet valve seat (8) or the exhaust valve seat (9) onto tool 9622DT811 and immediately into the cylinder head recess. Fixate the tool with the plate (13) and the nut (14) and keep the tool tight for at least 5 minutes to keep the seat at the proper position while warming up. The inlet and exhaust valve seats require different counter plates, the exhaust (10) and inlet (11) ones, see fig. 2.7 16 . 5 After mounting the exhaust valve seats and cooling down the cylinder head, it is strongly advised to make a water pressure test (10 bar).

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2.7 22

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Note!

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

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11 9622DT811

10

9 12

Fig. 2.7 16 Mounting valve seats

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Note!

Machining of the valve seat 6 Although the valve seat ring angle is accurately machined, due to the shrinking process into the cylinder head, the seat will slightly deform while resulting in small deviations from the required valve seat angle. Every time a new valve seat is mounted it must be machined and the blueing test must be carried out for final inspection, see section 2.7.3.2. For the valve seats machining see the instruction which is delivered with the valve seat cutter tool (set 9612DT807, electricdriven) or with the valve seat grinding machine (9612DT369, airdriven).

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14 13 2.7 23

Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

Clean and inspect the valve guide. Measure the valve guide inner diameter, see section 2.4.5.2. Renew if necessary.

9622DT988

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2.7 24

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9622DT148

Fig. 2.7 17 Extracting the valve guide 2 Connect the jack 9622DT148 to the hydraulic pump 9622DT133 and apply pressure, continue untill the guide is extracted from the cylinder head. 3 Clean and degrease valve guide recess in the cylinder head. Mounting the valve guide The mounting procedure for the inlet and exhaust valve guide (8) is similar. 1 Heat cylinder head slowly and equally upto 90C. 2 Cool the valve guide in liquid nitrogen untill it stops bubbling (180C). Wear low temperature resistance gloves and safety glasses while handling deep frozen engine parts and be informed about the safety measures from the suppliers of the liquid nitrogen.

Note!

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Extracting the valve guide 1 Place the cylinder head on a side and fit the extractor 9622DT988 in conjunction with the jack 9622DT148.

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2.7.3.4.

Valve guide

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

Note!

If the valve guide is renewed the contact surface of the valve disc with the seat must be inspected by means of the prussian blue test, see section 2.7.3.2.

2.7.3.5.

Valves assembling

1 Inspect the valve springs for cracks and wear marks. Replace the springs in case of wear marks or any other damage. 2 Clean the valve guides thoroughly and fit new Orings (9).

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8 Fig. 2.7 18 Valve guide detail 3

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9 Lubricate the valve stems with clean engine oil. 2.7 25

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3 Place the valve guide into the cylinder head. Check the valve guide is completely inserted.

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

perform the prussian blue test, see section 2.7.3.2.

6 Install the springs and rotators, be sure the springs and valve rotators contact surfaces are undamaged and clean. 7 Place the assembling tool 9622DT801 in combination with the jack 9622DT147 in place, see fig. 2.7 12 . 9 Open slowly the pressure release valve. Check if the valve semicones are properly fitting while releasing the pressure and if clearances between the two valve halves are equal.

2.7.4.

Valve rotators
2.7.4.1.

General

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2.7 26

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The exhaust and inlet valves are provided with valve rotating devices. These devices slightly rotate the valves at every valve opening stroke. The valve rotation results in an even heat distribution with a better metallic contact between the valve and the valve seat. That improves the wear behaviour which patterns and considerably extends the period between the valve maintenance. During maintenance only an engine lube oil should be used. Do not grease the steel balls of the valve rotator bearings as that could result in a less effective rotator working. Valve rotators should periodically be checked for working (i.e. the valve spindle should rotate slowly). At each valve maintenance the valve rotator should be checked for wear. During maintenance activity the rotator components should be kept as a set and all steel balls should be kept into their original pocket as well.

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Compress the valve springs and fit the valve semicones.

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4 Fit the valves and check the free movement. Before the valve touches the valve seat be sure the seat surfaces are absolute clean. Replace valves in their original locations.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

Fig. 2.7 19 Valves rotators

2.7.4.2.

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2 3 4 5 7 9

1 After the removal of the valve semicones (7) the inlet valve rotator assembly can be removed. Turn the assembly top side down on a workbench. Remove the retaining circlip (6). Remove the cover plate (2). Remove the spring disc (3).

6 Remove the steel balls (4) with springs while marking their position in the rotator body. Clean the rotator body (1) and the other components. 8 Inspect the components for any wear and damages. Renew the entire unit in case a single component is worn. Assemble the parts with clean engine oil. Do not use grease. 10 After mounting on the engine check if the valve rotator revolves.

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Maintenance of the inlet & exhaust valve rotators

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4 6 2.7 27

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

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1 2.7 28

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Indicator cock Each cylinder head is provided with an indicator cock (1). The inside construction is such that pressure in the cylinder closes the valve. Consequently the needed force in order to close the valve is relatively low. 1 Previous to an engine start close the indicator cocks with just enough force to close the sealing surfaces. The cylinder pressure will further close the valve. 2 After an engine stop open the indicator cocks only half a turn. In that way the tightening effect due to the temperature decrease will not occur. 3 Avoid any inadvertent tightening during measuring cylinder pressures. 4 Add high temperature resistant lubricant (up to 1000C) to the spindle threads when they produce excessive friction. 5 Always use the tool 9612SW510 to open and close the indicator cocks (1), see fig. 2.7 20 .

Fig. 2.7 20 Indicator cock / safety valve

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Safety valve Each cylinder head is provided with a spring loaded safety valve (2) , see fig. 2.7 20 . That valve emits an alarming sound in case of an excessive cylinder pressure. The blowoff set pressure is stamped on the valve. Replace at onces leaking safety valve during operation. Mount valve with a high temperature resistant lubricant.

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2.7.5.

Indicator cock and safety valve

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Cylinder Head with Valves

2.7.6.

Starting air valve

The starting air valve is explained in chapter 1.3.

2.7.7.

Fuel injector

The fuel injector is explained in chapter 2.9.

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2.7 29

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Cylinder Head with Valves

Manual Wrtsil 38

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2.8 1

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2.8. Camshaft and Valve Drive

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Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.8.1.1.

General

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2.8 2

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2 1 Fig. 2.8 1 Gearwheel drive camshaft The camshaft is assembled of camshaft sections (4) and camshaft journals (5) which are connected by bolts (6), see fig. 2.8 2 . The camshaft sections are per camshaft identical.

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The camshaft is driven by the crankshaft through gear wheels. The gearing consists of a split gear wheel (1) on the crankshaft, an intermediate gear wheel (2) and a camshaft gear wheel (3), see fig. 2.8 1 . The camshaft rotates in the same direction as the crankshaft at half the speed. 3

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0

2.8.1.

Camshaft driving gear

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

It is therefore that the camshaft journals have to be remounted to their original position or replaced by a similar camshaft journal. For the correct position and part numbers of the camshaft journals consult the parts catalogue. 5 7

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6 4 fuel exhaust inlet

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Note!

Fig. 2.8 2 Camshaft section

At the driving end the camshaft is provided with an axial thrust bearing, the zerobearing. This bearing consists of two identical bearing rings (0), see fig 2.8 1 . At the free end the camshaft is provided with an extension shaft to drive the starting air distributor, see chapter 1.3, fig. 1.3 2 . For lubrication of camshaft and camshaft drive see chapter 1.2. Inspection of camshaft driving gear Inspect the gear wheels, camshaft sections and camshaft journals according the maintenance schedule for clearance and possible wear, see chapter 2.4. Early detection and replacement of damaged parts will prevent serious damage. For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, tools and tightening procedures, see chapter 2.4.

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6 5 7

Each cylinder has its own camshaft section in which is integrated the fuel, exhaust and inlet cam. The camshaft journals are not identical in relation to the position of the locating pins (7) on both sides of the camshaft journal. The position of the locating pins determine the firing order.

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2.8 3

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

Warning!

Turning of the crankshaft with disconnected camshaft results in damaging of inlet and exhaust valves, push rods, etc.

Removal of camshaft gear wheel 1 Bar the crankshaft in TDC at firing of cylinder number 1 and place proper markings on camshaft gear wheel and intermediate gearwheels. 2 Remove from all the cylinder units the valve lifting gear, push rods and lift the tappets from inlet and exhaust according to points 5, 6 and 7 of the procedure of section 2.8.2.1. 3 Lift fuel cam rollers according to points 2 and 3 of the procedure of section 2.8.2.1. 4 Remove speed pickup sensors (if applicable) out of camshaft gear wheel cover and remove cover. 5 Remove cover (1) and outer thrust ring (2). See fig. 2.8 3 .

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8 10 6 9 2.8 4

6 Loosen connecting bolts (5) from end journal to the camshaft gear wheel. 7 Remove bolts (6) except two bolts, one next to the locating pin and one 180 opposite, just loosen these bolts.

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Fig. 2.8 3 Axial bearing camshaft 8 Insert hydraulic nipple 9612DT968 in the centre hole of the camshaft end journal. Connect the adapter with hose 9612DT961 to hydraulic pump 9612DT212. See fig. 2.8 4 .

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1 3 5 11 2 13

2.8.1.2.

Camshaft gear wheel

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

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9612DT212 Fig. 2.8 4 Removal of camshaft end journal

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12 11 9

9 Increase slowly the hydraulic pressure until the end journal (11) is forced from the camshaft gear wheel shaft (9). In case the hydraulic pressure is not sufficient to separate the parts completely use jack bolt 9612DT234 for the last few mm. See fig. 2.8 5 .

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9612DT968 9612DT961 2.8 5

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

Fig. 2.8 5 Position of jack bolt

11 Remove inner thrust ring (12), see fig 2.8 4 .

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8
AA

12 Loosen the bolt next to the locating pin and the one 180 opposite about 10 mm outwards. See fig. 2.8 3 . 9612DT804 9612DT805

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Fig. 2.8 6 Position of pillar bolt 13 Place tool 9612DT804 and 9612DT805 between camshaft gearwheel and the bolt next to the locating pin. See fig. 2.8 3 .

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2.8 6

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11 9
A A

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9612DT234

10 Slide the end journal partly out of the bearing bush and use a sling to remove the end journal completely out of the bearing bush.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

14

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Fig. 2.8 7 Removal of the camshaft gear wheel 15 Extend the tool by turning part 9612DT805 so far that the locating pin (8) see fig. 2.8 3 , is just free and the camshaft gear wheel shaft is loose from the journal. See fig 2.8 6 . 16 Remove the cover (38) from the starting air distributor. See fig 1.3 3 , the cover is the one mounted on the top of the air distributor. 17 Shift the complete camshaft about 10 mm towards the free end side.

18 Move camshaft gearwheel with shaft out of the engine and use clamp (14) for lifting, see fig. 2.8 7 .

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2.8 7

9612DT985

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14 Fit tool 9612DT985 to the engine block for support of the camshaft camshaft gear wheel . See fig. 2.8 7 .

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Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

20 Place inner thrust ring (12), mind the position of the locating pins. 21 Fit the end journal (11) with tap bolts (5) to the camshaft gear wheel (if bolts (5) are too short use threaded rods and nuts). Pull them together and tighten bolts to the correct torque. Check with feeler gauge of 0.05 mm that all parts fit properly. See fig. 2.8 3 and section 2.4.4.

24 Fit cover (1) with new Orings for cover and lube oil drain pipe (13), see fig 2.8 3 . 25 Check the axial bearing clearance of the camshaft and backlash of the gear wheels. See section 2.4.5.2.

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2.8 8

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26 Check the fuel pump timing of one cylinder and compare with testbed protocol. If not correct check the mounting procedure and marks. In case of a new gearwheel contact the nearest Wrtsil service station.

27 Mount camshaft gear wheel cover and speed pickup sensors (if applicable).

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23 Place the outer thrust ring, mind the position of the locating pins (3), see fig. 2.8 3 .

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22 Insert all the socket head bolts (6) in the journal (10) and tighten 4 bolts cross wise hand tight ( 40 Nm). Tighten first the bolt next to locating pin. Tighten the second bolt 180 opposite the first bolt and the third bolt 90 opposite the second bolt and the fourth bolt 180 opposite the third bolt. Before final torque check with a feeler gauge of 0.05 mm that all parts fits properly. Tighten all the bolts to the correct torque setting. See section 2.4.4.

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Mounting of camshaft gear wheel 19 Use tool 9612DT985 to move the camshaft gear wheel into the correct position. Mind the marks as placed before removal.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Removal of intermediate gear wheel If the intermediate gear wheel has to be removed for maintenance, the camshaft gear wheel with shaft has to be removed first, see previous section.

Note!

Place proper markings on camshaft gear wheel, intermediate gear wheel and crankshaft gear wheel for reassembling into the correct position. 1 Fit tool 9612DT986 to the engine block.

24

21 22

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9612DT986 23 20

Fig. 2.8 8 Tool for intermediate gear wheel

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2 Lower the trolley (21) over the intermediate gear wheel and fixate with bolts (22). See fig. 2.8 8 .

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2.8.1.3.

Intermediate gear wheel

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2.8 9

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Fig. 2.8 9 Intermediate gear wheel section 2.8 10

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6 10

4 Remove cover (5), mount tool 9612DT936 and pull shaft (6) with the use of three jack bolts (10). Remove the shaft out of the intermediate gear wheel, see fig. 2.8 10 . 5 Use winch (23) to pull the intermediate gear wheels out of the engine. If necessary lift the intermediate gear wheel with spindle (20) free from the crankshaft gear wheel teeth. See fig. 2.8 8

Fig. 2.8 10 Removal of intermediate gear wheel shaft

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9612DT936

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3 5 4 7 8 9 6 2 1

3 Remove bolts (3), (4) and make use of tool 9612DT936 to pull cover (5) together with shaft (6) free from the engine block. See fig. 2.8 9 .

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Note!

7 Insert shaft (6), mind the position of the threaded holes in the shaft. See fig. 2.8 9 . 8 Mount tool 9612DT936 together with distance pieces (13) on shaft (6) with tool bolts (10). See fig. 2.8 11

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Fig. 2.8 11 Mount shaft intermediate gear 10 Remove the tools 9612DT986 from the engine block see fig. 2.8 8 . 11 Remove tools 9612DT936 from the intermediate shaft.

12 Apply new Orings (7) and (8) with silicon grease to shaft (6). See fig. 2.8 9 13 Apply new Oring (9) with silicon grease to cover (5) and tighten cover and shaft with bolts (3) and (4), to the correct torque. See chapter 2.4.4. 14 Check the axial clearance by moving the gear wheels and measure the movement with a dial indicator. See chapter 2.4.5.2.

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6 13 10 11 12

9 Mount the plate with tool bolts (11) on the engine block and push shaft (6) into position with nuts (12). See fig. 2.8 11 .

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9612DT936

Mounting of intermediate gear wheel 6 Use tool 9612DT986 to move the intermediate gear wheel into the correct position. See fig. 2.8 8 .

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Do not separate the intermediate gear wheels unless absolutely necessary. If the gear wheels have to be separated place proper markings for reassembling into the correct position, in relation to the oil supply.

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2.8 11

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

The crankshaft gear wheel (split gear wheel) consists of two parts connected together with bolts (1) and to the crankshaft flange with bolts (2).

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2.8 12

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Fig. 2.8 12 Crankshaft gear wheel assembly

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driving end

2.8.1.4.

Crankshaft gear wheel

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

2.8.2.1.

Removal camshaft section / journal

Removal of camshaft section 1 Remove covers from cylinder head and camshaft covers concerned. 2 Turn the fuel cam, adjacent to the camshaft journal to be inspected, into top position. 3 Lift with lever 9612DT965 the fuel tappet roller (1) a little and turn the locking pin 9612DT760 completely in. The fuel tappet roller will be secured in top position and will be free from the fuel cam. See fig. 2.8 13 . 4 Repeat this procedure for all cylinder units of the camshaft sections which are not connected to the driving side of the camshaft, after removal of the camshaft section.

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9612DT760 9612DT965

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To remove the camshaft section and journal it is necessary to shift the camshaft sections and journals to the driving, or to the free end side. To prevent damages of the fuel, inlet and exhaust rollers, cams and valves, the rollers have to be lifted from the camshaft sections which have to be shifted.

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Fig. 2.8 13 Securing fuel tappet

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1

2.8.2.

Camshaft

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2.8 13

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

9622DT171

Fig. 2.8 14 Tappet securing plate 6

Remove the push rods out of the protecting pipes.

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2.8 14

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9

7 Turn the crankshaft in TDC for scavenging. Fit securing plate 9622DT171 on top of the tappets (2). The tappet rollers will be kept free from the cams. See fig. 2.8 14 . 8 Repeat this procedure (points 5, 6 and 7 ) for all cylinder units of the camshaft sections which are not connected to the driving side of the camshaft, after removal of the camshaft section. Remove the starting air distributor cover (9) See fig. 1.3 2 .

10 Remove on both sides of the camshaft section concerned, all the bolts except two bolts (3) and (4) at each side of the upper part of the camshaft section and two bolts (5) and (6) at the lower part. If available use extension 9612DT938. Turn these four bolts 10 mm loose, see fig. 2.8 15 . 11 Place tool 9612DT802 and 9612DT803 between bolts (5) and (6).

12 Extend the tool by turning part 9612DT802 so far that the locating pins (7) see fig. 2.8 2 , are free and the camshaft section is loose from both journals. Push remaining camshaft sections and journals to the freeend side. See fig. 2.8 15 . 13 Remove the tools and bolts (5)) and (6), see fig. 2.8 15 .

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2

5 Remove the valve lifting gear from the cylinder head, see fig. 2.8 20 of section 2.8.3.1. Take care the rollers for inlet and exhaust are resting on the base circle of the cams.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Fuel 3 8

Exhaust

Free end

Fig. 2.8 15 Position of pillar bolt

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14 Mount tool 9622DT927 to the engine block for support of the camshaft section. See fig. 2.8 16 . 15 Remove bolts (3)) and (4), see fig. 2.8 15 .

16 The camshaft section is now fully resting on tool 9622DT927 and can be moved to the outside. Use sling and crane to lift camshaft section.

Fig. 2.8 16 Removal of camshaft section

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9622DT927

5 9612DT802

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9612DT803

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Inlet 4 6 2.8 15

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Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Mark the position of the journal in relation to the camshaft bearing bush number. 2 Mount tool 9612DT988 according to fig. 2.8 17 against the cylinder block with 2 bolts. 3 Fit with two M20 bolts tool 9612DT988 to the journal and move lever with journal outwards.

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2.8 16

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4

Fig. 2.8 17 Removal of camshaft journal Fit clamp (9) for removal of the camshaft journal.

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9612DT988

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Removal of camshaft journal Before removal of the camshaft journal first remove the camshaft sections at both sides of the journal according to the previous description.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Warning!

Not all camshaft journals are identical! Before mounting check the parts catalogue for the correct location of the camshaft journal in the engine block. 1 Inspect the camshaft bearing bush for measurements and damage. Inspection and mounting of the bearing bush is mentioned in section 2.5.4. Check that the lube oil supply bore is clean.

3 Lubricate the journals and bearing bushes and use tool 9612DT988 to place the journal in the camshaft bearing bush. See fig 2.8 17 . 4 Use tool 9612DT927 to install the camshaft section and start with the section nearest to the driving end to prevent turning during tightening, see fig. 2.8 16 . 5 Take care that the locating pin holes in the journal and the locating pins of the camshaft section are in line before inserting the connecting bolts. Check that the locating pin (8) is pushed completely in the locating pin hole. See fig. 2.8 2 .

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6 Insert all the socket head bolts in the journal and tighten first 4 bolts crosswise handtight ( 40 Nm). Start with the bolts nearest to the driving end of the engine, so that the camshaft is blocked during tightening. Tighten first the bolt next to the locating pin. Tighten the second bolt 180 opposite the first bolt and the third bolt 90 opposite the second bolt and the fourth bolt 180 opposite the third bolt. Before final torque check with a feeler gauge of 0.05 mm that all parts fit properly. Tighten all the bolts to the correct torque setting, see section 2.4.4. and section 2.4.3.11. for the use of extension 9612DT938.

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Fig. 2.8 18 Tightening camshaft section / journal

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9612DT938

2 Clean the journals and the threaded holes in the journals. Check for wear and damages.

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9622DT216

2.8.2.2.

Mounting camshaft section / journal

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2.8 17

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

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7 4 5 2.8 18

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3 1 2 Fig. 2.8 19 Valve drive mechanism

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6

The valve drive mechanism consists of a tappet assembly, push rods and valve lifting gear. Tappet assembly The tappet assembly consists of a tappet guide block (1) with tappets (2) for inlet and for exhaust. The tappets are of the plunger type and follow the cam profiles and transfer the vertical movement through push rods (3) to the rocker arms (4) , see fig. 2.8 19 . Valve lifting gear The valve lifting gear consists of a bracket (5) with a rocker arm shaft (7) and rocker arms (4) secured by a locking ring and a bolt. The rocker arm operates via bridge piece (6) the in and exhaust valves.

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2.8.3.

Valve drive mechanism

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Note!

Mark parts properly before removing.

2 Turn crankshaft in TDC at firing for cylinder concerned. Inlet and exhaust rollers are now on base circle and push rods rotate freely. 3 Loosen the six bolts (8) completely and leave them in the bracket. Use tool 9622DT800 to lift the valve lifting gear. See fig. 2.8 20

9622DT800 8

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Fig. 2.8 20 Valve lifting gear

Tappet guide block assembly 5 Remove first the push rods (3) and secondly the push rod protecting pipes (12). See fig. 2.8 21

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Remove the bridge pieces (6), see fig. 2.8 19 .

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Valve lifting gear 1 Remove the cylinder head cover upper and lower part the hot box shields and the camshaft cover from the cylinder concerned.

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2.8.3.1.

Removal of valve drive mechanism

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2.8 19

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

12

Fig. 2.8 21 Push rod assembly 6 Remove socket head bolts (14) and (15). See fig. 2.8 22 . 7 Fit tappet locking plate 9622DT171 See fig. 2.8 14 .

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15 2 15 14 16 15 2.8 20

8 Remove the tappet guide block assembly from the engine block for inspection of the components.

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2

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Fig. 2.8 22 Tappet guide block assembly

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1 20 15 15 19 17 18 20 21

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13

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

10 Slide the tappets (2) out of the guide block (1), push the spring loaded locking pin (16) fully into the roller shaft (17), pull the roller shaft out of the tappet (direction R). Remove rollers (18) and bearing bushes (19). See fig. 2.8 22

2.8.3.2.

Inspection of valve drive mechanism

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6

4 Measure diameters of bore and shaft. Replace parts outside tolerance, see chapter 2.4. Push rods 5 Clean and inspect running surfaces of the pivots. Check if the push rods are straight.

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Valve lifting gear 1 Clean rocker arms and rocker arm shaft and measure for wear. After cleaning check oil channels. Refer to chapter 2.4. for clearance and wear limits. Pivots 2 Inspect running surfaces of pivots in rocker arms and valve adjusters. Tappet assembly 3 Clean and inspect all parts of tappet assembly for wear. Check if oil channels are open.

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Tappet roller and shaft 9 Take care that all parts are properly marked.

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2.8 21

Camshaft and Valve Drive

Manual Wrtsil 38

1 Lubricate parts of tappet assembly with clean engine oil and assemble. 2 Slide roller shaft (17) into tappet (2) and roller (18) with bearing bush (19), observing spring loaded locking pin (16) clips into corresponding hole of the tappet, see fig. 2.8 22 .

Fit tappet lifting tool 9622DT171, see fig. 2.8 14 .

5 Place tappet guide assembly on the locating pins (21) in the engine block and fit bolts (14) and (15). See fig. 2.8 22 . 7 8 9 Renew Oring (13), see fig. 2.8 21 . Insert both push rods.

Slide pushrod protecting pipes from top side down.

10 Place both bridge pieces.

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2.8 22

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Note!
ooooo

11 Clean top side cylinder head and bottom side valve lifting gear. Check if locating pins and counter bores are undamaged.

Take care rollers are resting on base circle of the cams before mounting the valve lifting gear. 12 Lift valve lifting gear in position, mind if locating pins are fitting properly in counter bores, fit and tighten all bolts of the valve lifting gear to the correct torque, see section 2.4.4. 13 Check free movement of rocker arms. 14 Check and adjust valve clearances according chapter 2.7. and check lubrication. Mount cylinder head covers, hot box shields and camshaft cover.

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Remove tappet lifting tool 9622DT171, see fig. 2.8 14 .

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3 Check if lube oil channel in engine block is clean and place new Oring (20), before mounting in recess of engine block.

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2.8.3.3.

Mounting valve drive mechanism

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Camshaft and Valve Drive

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2.9 1

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2.9. Injection System

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Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

On the engine, the entire fuel system is basically situated inside the insulated hot box where the circulating fuel as well as the heat radiation from the engine make the whole space really hot. Every cylinder is provided with a HP (High Pressure) fuel pump, a HP fuel line and a fuel injector. The fuel injector is situated in the middle of the cylinder head. The leak fuel from the injectors is drained into a fuel leak monitoring device. In case a HP fuel line breaks, the leaking fuel is collected in a shielded pipe which is mounted all around the HP fuel line. This fuel leakage fuel is also drained to the monitoring device which will alarm in case of excessive quantities.

2.9.2.

HP fuel pump
2.9.2.1.

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2.9 2

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General

Each HP fuel pump (1) (See fig. 2.9 1 ) supplies a high pressurised fuel to a single cylinder and has a separate drive (2). The mono element type pump is self lubricated by the fuel oil. Each pump is equipped with a combined maindelivery/constantpressure valve and a pneumatic operated stop cylinder (3). The fuel supply (4) and the return channels (5) are integrated in the HP fuel pump housing. Main delivery valve / constant pressure valve The main delivery valve (23) will close when the fuel delivery stops. The constant pressure valve (25) will maintain a residual pressure in the HP pipe after a single fuel injection is completed, see fig. 2.9 4 . Stop cylinder The pneumatic operated stop cylinder (3) is mounted at the end of the HP fuel pump rack (6) and will force the fuel rack to zero" load after a shutdown command, see fig. 2.9 1

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Note!

For maintenance background information, safety aspects, intervals, tolerances, tools and tightening torques, see chapter 2.4.

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2.9.1.

General

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Inspect the HP fuel pump accordingly to the maintenance intervals. See section 2.4.1.3. In order to properly complete a camshaft or a gear train maintenance it is always advised to check the HP fuel pump adjustments.

1 9

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Fig. 2.9 1 HP fuel pump and drive

3 8 7

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4 6 5 2

2.9.2.2.

HP fuel pump maintenance

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2.9 3

Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

Only in case of an extensive maintenance it is advised to switch over distillate fuel operation and flush the fuel system. If only the HP fuel pump has to be changed keep the system on HFO service. 1 Close the fuel supply to the engine and switch the prelube oil pump off. 2 Drain the LP fuel system, see section 1.1.4., and, if possible, use pressurised air to blow and empty the complete system. 3 Remove the HP fuel pipe between the pump and the connecting piece on the cylinder head. 4 Disconnect the air supply line to the stop cylinder (3), see fig. 2.9 1 . 5 Disconnect the fuel rack from the common fuel control shaft. 6 At both sides of the pump remove the bolts, which are holding the flanges (14) and the pipes for the LP fuel supply and return lines, see fig. 2.9 2 . 7 Slide the flanges (14) few millimeters over the supply and return fuel pipe sections, see fig. 2.9 2 8 Rotate the crankshaft untill the fuel roller is on the cam base circle and remove the four nuts at the fuel pump foot. 9 Lift the HP fuel pump from the engine by means of tool 9622DT242.
14 11

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2.9 4

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12 13 10

Fig. 2.9 2 Removing the HP fuel pump

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2.9.2.3.

Removing HP fuel pump

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Note!

HP fuel pump parts should be kept matched during any overhaul. 1 2 Before dismantling clean the pump externally. Place the pump up side down on a stand.

Note!

The plunger (19) is spring loaded. See fig. 2.9 3 3 Mount the tool 9622DT959 on the pump base and turn the spindle (15) inwards untill the the circlip (16) is free and remove it with the plier 9612DT251. See fig. 2.9 3 . 4 Release the spring (18) by turning the spindle (15) outwards. 5 Remove the tool 9612DT959, the spring disc (17), the spring (18), the plunger (19) and place the pump in the correct vertical position.

9622DT959 15

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16 17 18 19 Fig. 2.9 3 Tool dis/assembling HP Fuel pump 2.9 5

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2.9.2.4.

HP fuel pump disassembling

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Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

7 Remove the main delivery valve (23) with the spring (24) and the constant pressure valve (25) with the spring (26).

24 23 22 36 32 27 25 26 21 20

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6 28 31 34 19 35 16 Fig. 2.9 4 HP Fuel pump 2.9 6

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8 In order to remove fuel rack (6), first disconnect the stop cylinder (3) by removing bolts (51), then remove the plate (7) by removing the bolt (8), see fig. 2.9 1 .

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33 29 30 18 17

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6 Remove the bolts (20) and (21) and lift carefully the cover (22). Remove the Oring (32). See fig. 2.9 4

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Note!

11 Remove the sealing ring (33). 12 Flush the plunger and the barrel with clean fuel before the inspection and keep the plunger and the liner as a set.

Note!

While handling injection equipment components keep your hands absolutely clean. For item numbers see fig. 2.9 4 . 1 Wash the components in absolutely clean diesel oil and lubricate the internal parts with clean engine oil. 2 Reinstall the main delivery valve (23) and the constant pressure valve (25) with their springs into the cover (22). 3 Connect the barrel (27) to the cover (22) with handtightenned bolts (21). Check if the locating pin (36) is properly fitting on the cover. 4 Fit a new Oring (32) on the top of the fuel pump housing. 5 Fit a new sealing ring (33) with silicon grease into the fuel pump housing, make sure the ring is fully inserted into the recess and mind the position of the sealing ring. 6 Fit the cover (22) together with the barrel (27) in the pump housing with the recess in the cover over the locating pin at the top of the pump housing. 7 Tighten the assembly with handtightened bolts (20) on the housing. 8 First tighten crosswise the bolts (20) up to the set torque in three steps and then the bolts (21) at the same way. See section 2.4.4.7.. 9 Lubricate with engine oil and mount the fuel rack (6). Fit the guide plug (31) together with a new Oring and lock the plug by means of the circlip (28). 10 Place the pump upside down and fit the control sleeve (29) with the fuel rack in a middle position (aroun 35mm). The control sleeve is

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2.9.2.5.

Assembling of the HP fuel pump

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Protect the parts against rust and dont touch plunger element surfaces with bare fingers. Plungers, elements and discharge valves are matched and must be kept together during any overhaul.

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9 Place the fuel rack (6) in a middle position (arount 35 mm) and remove the control sleeve (29) together with the support ring (30). Remove the circlip (28) for the guide plug (31) and slide the fuel rack (6) out from the pump housing, see fig. 2.9 4 . 10 In order to remove the fuel pump barrel (27), place a synthetic driver against the bottom part of barrel, with few light hammer hits the barrel comes free.

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2.9 7

Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

12 Insert the plunger (19) with the disc (17) and the compensation plate (35). 13 Use the tool 9622DT959 to load the spring (18) and insert the circlip (16) in position, see fig. 2.9 3

Note!

14 Release slowly the spring compression, remove the tool and check if the fuel rack moves easily in the pump housing. 15 Unless the pump is immediately mounted on the engine it must be well oiled. All the openings in the pump house should be covered by safe plastic caps, tape, or similar.

2.9.2.6.

HP fuel pump adjustment

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2.9 8

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Note!

The injection timing is determined when the plunger top is in line with the top side of the suction holes in the plunger housing The timing may deviate due to manufacturing tolerances. To obtain the best possible performance of the engine it is important the injection timing is in accordance with the test bed protocol. See test records. The injection timing check is always necessary after major components have been replaced, e.g. HP fuel pump, pump element, pump drive, camshaft section or some maintenance has been performed on gearwheels, especially on the intermediate gearwheels. Checking the adjustment of the fuel pump drive pushrod 1 Remove the HP pump. See section 2.9.2.3. 2 Make sure the drive is properly mounted and no clearance exists between the drive and the engine block. See fig. 2.9 6 . 3 Turn the flywheel in the normal engine rotation direction, first by the turning gear motor and then just by hand for the fine adjustment in order to reach the exact injection starting time. 4 Push on top of pivot (37) by hand. Place the clamp from tool set 9622DT962, see fig. 2.9 6 . Make sure the push rod (38) is completely down against the force of spring (39) and measure the distance X" (it must be within the range of 44 0.05 mm) between push rod and pump drive upper surface . See fig. 2.9 6 . 5 If distance X" is out of range: Remove the pivot (37) of the push rod (38). Fit the correct distance plate (40) between the push rod and the pivot to fix the measurement X". See fig. 2.9 6 .

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The protruding vanes have to slide into the grooves of the control sleeve on both sides of the plunger lower side.In order to make that easy move the fuel rack to and fro at the same time.

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provided with a pin (34) which must fit between the marks on the fuel rack. 11 Reinstall the support, the ring (30) and the spring (18).

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Checking the fuel pump timing 1 Remove the HP fuel pump, see for reference section 2.9.2.3.

45.5 45.0 44.5 44.0 43.5 43.0

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42.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5

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0.0

2 Turn the flywheel in the normal engine rotation direction, first by the turning gear motor and then just by hand for the fine adjustment in order to reach the exact injection starting time. 3 Measure the distance X"; if that value is within the tolerance range (44 0.05 mm) it means the real injection start matches the nominal one; on the contrary, the following graph must be used in order to evaluate the effective status and the fuel pump adjustment is required. Enter into the vertical axis of the diagram below with the measured value X" and read the degrees deviation which is expected from the nominal timing on the horizontal axis.

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0.5

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1.0 1.5

Check again if the distance X" is within the tolerance as it has been specified. See fig. 2.9 6 . Remove the clamp of the tool set 9622DT962.

Fig. 2.9 5 Injection timing deviation graph With regards to the above figure 2.9 5 , on the vertical axis millimeters values are reported and on the horizontal axis angular degrees are given. For the deviation from the nominal injection timing, negative values are indicative of an advanced injection while positive ones are indicative of a delayed injection.

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Note!

In order to check the whole engine injection timing each fuel pump timing must be verified. For the maintenance of the fuel pump drive unit see section 2.9.3.

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2.0 2.9 9

Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

From 4.80 upto 5,80 mm

37 40 41 38

42

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2.9.2.7.

The cam is at the injection starting point

Fig. 2.9 6 HP fuel pump drive adjustment

HP fuel pump mounting

Be sure the HP fuel pump to be mounted is ready for the use. This means the pump internal parts are properly and clean assembled and the fuel pump is calibrated. 1 Verify the correct injection starting point, see for reference the procedure in section 2.9.2.6. 2 Rotate the camshaft untill the fuel roller is on the cam base circle. 3 Clean the HP fuel pump from preservation oil and check if the fuel rack moves freely. 4 Clean carefully the HP fuel pump drive surface. 5 Renew the Oring (41) on the top of the fuel pump drive unit, see fig. 2.9 6 6 Place the HP fuel pump on the fuel pump drive by means of the tool 9622DT242, carefully mind the position of the locating pins.

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9622DT962 X = 440.05 43 39 44

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

7 8

Tighten the nuts up to the correct torque. See section 2.4.4.7.. Connect the fuel rack to the common fuel control shaft.

9 Rotate the common fuel control shaft and check if all the pumps follow the shaft movement. Check if the fuel rack position of all the pumps is adjusted within a 0.5 mm tolerance. 10 See section 2.9.5. for the connection of the HP fuel pipe . 11 See section 1.6 for the maintenance of the stop cylinder.

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2.9 11

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12 See section 1.6.4.5. for the adjustment of the linkage to the common fuel control shaft.

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The fuel pump drive (2), see fig. 2.9 1 , consists of a tappet housing (43) and a tappet (44). The plunger type tappet is lubricated by the engine lubricating oil system, see chapter 1.2. for the description of the oil flow.

Note!

Do not mixup parts of different fuel pump drives and place the fuel pump drive back in the same position to avoid readjustment needs.

Fuel pump drive 1 Remove the fuel pump see section 2.9.2.3.

2 Remove the nuts (46), fit the eye bolts 9622DT961 in the threaded holes (47) and lift the fuel pump drive out from the cylinder block.

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46 40 54 55 38 52 39 51 50 49 48

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Disassembling the fuel pump drive

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Fig. 2.9 7 Fuel pump drive 2.9 12

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2.9.3.

Fuel pump drive

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Injection System

2 Slowly release the force on the tappet roller and remove the tappet assembly out from the housing. 3 Push the spring loaded locking pin (49) fully into the shaft (50), push the shaft out from the roller (48) , see fig. 2.9 7

5 Clean and inspect all the parts of the tappet assembly for wear. Check if all oil channels are open. 6 Measure the diameters of the bore and the shaft. Replace the parts which are eventually outside the tolerance range, see chapter 2.4.

2.9.3.2.
1

Lubricate the parts of the tappet assembly with clean engine oil.

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2 Slide the tappet roller shaft (50) together with the tappet roller (48) into the tappet (44), carefully mind the spring loaded pin (49) fits into the corresponding hole of the tappet roller shaft, see fig. 2.9 7 .

3 Check if the lube oil channels in cylinder block are clean. Fit a new Oring (53) and a new sealing ring (54). 4 Place the push rod (38) together with the spring (39) and the spring disc (52) into the housing. Place the spring (51) and the tappet assembly (44) into the housing.

6 Apply some force on the tappet roller (48), see fig. 2.9 7 and fit the securing plug (42) , see fig. 2.9 6 . 7 Renew the Oring (55), place the fuel pump drive into the cylinder block and fit the nuts (46). Take care for dowel pins (56), see fig. 2.9 7 . 8 Turn the flywheel in the normal engine rotation direction, first by the turning gear motor and then just by hand for the fine adjustment in order to reach the exact injection starting time. Measure the X" value which must be within the tolarance range (see fig. 2.9 6 ), otherwise follow the adjusting procedure in section 2.9.2.6.

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Mounting the fuel pump drive

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4 Remove the spring (51), the push rod (38), the spring (39) and the spring disc (52).

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Tappet disassembly 1 Use the compress tool 9622DT960 and apply some force on the tappet roller (48), see fig. 2.9 7 , then remove the securing plug (42), see fig. 2.9 6 .

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Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

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Fig. 2.9 8 Cylinder head with injector

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The fuel injector (1) is connected to the HP fuel pump by means of a HP fuel line outside the cylinder head, then a connecting piece (3) enters the injector sideways at (2) and finally the fuel injector holder. See fig. 2.9 8 . Leak fuel from the nozzle can escape halfway the injector holder at (5) and along the side space around the connecting piece it is drained at (4). the Orings avoid fuel leakages to the lower and the higher sections of the injector. In case of blowby gas is passing the sealing surfaces between the injector and the sleeve, the gas will escape at (6) and can be detected at the hole in plug (7).

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2.9.4.

Fuel injector

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Remove the cylinder head upper cover and open the hot box cover.

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27 23

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12 13 3 14 2.9 15

Fig. 2.9 9 Fuel injector assembly 6 Place the extracting tool 9622DT804 and pull the injector by means of the eye bolt or, in case the injector is too tight, use the hydraulic jack 9622DT147 in combination with the hydraulic pump 9622DT133. See fig. 2.9 10 . 7 Protect all the holes on the HP pump, the fuel discharge, the lube oil supply line and the injector housing in the cylinder head against dirt.

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2 Remove the leak fuel line from the HP fuel line and remove the HP fuel line between the pump and the cylinder head. 3 Loosen the bolts of flanges (23 and 27). Remove the HP fuel connecting piece (3). See fig. 2.9 9 4 Disconnect the lube oil supply line (32) in order to avoid any lube oil flow enter the combustion space after the injector is removed. 5 Remove the nuts (11), the distance sleeves (12) and the gland (13). See fig. 2.9 9 .

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2.9.4.1.

Removing the fuel injector

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Injection System

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Fig. 2.9 10 Extracting the fuel injector

2.9.4.2.

Fuel injector maintenance

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The fuel injector maintenance must be performed accordingly to the maintenance schedule or when the engine performance are supposed to give an indication of low quality injection (e.g. large deviation from normal exhaust gas temperature). 1 Inspect immediately the nozzle after the removal from the engine. The carbon deposits presence could be caused by a poor condition nozzle or a broken spring. 2 Test the injector with regards to the fuel spray pattern and the opening pressure by means of test equipment 9622DT812 before dismantling, see section 2.9.4.3. 3 Clean externally the injector holder, except the nozzle, with a brass wire brush and diesel fuel. 4 Release the nozzle spring tension by loosening the counter nut (16) and the adjusting screw (17), see fig. 2.9 11 .

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9622DT147 9622DT804

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Injection System

18

22 19

21

20

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Fig. 2.9 12 Protecting the nozzle tip 6 Check the nozzle needle movement which may vary as follows: needle moves freely over the full length needle moves freely within the normal lifting range needle is sticking. Do not use any force to free the needle because this often results in a complete jamming. Unless it can be easily removed, immerse the nozzle in lubricating oil and heat the oil up to 150...200 C. Normally, the needle can be removed out from the hot nozzle. 7 Cleaning of the components. If possible, use a chemical carbon dissolving solution, If it is not available, immerse the components in clean fuel oil, white spirit or

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5 Remove the nozzle (18) from the holder by turning off the sleeve nut (19) by means of the socket 9622DT384. If there is coke between the nozzle and the nut it could be difficult to remove the nozzle. In such a case, place the nozzle with the nut on a soft support and knock the nozzle out from the injector sleeve by using a piece of pipe. Never knock directly on the nozzle tip. See fig. 2.9 12 .

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Fig. 2.9 11 Fuel injector cross section

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Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

2.9 17

similar to soak the carbon, then clean the parts carefully. Do not use steel wire brushes or hard abrasive tools. Clean the nozzle orifices with needles which are provided for that specific purpose. After cleaning, widely flush the parts to remove carbon residues and dirt particles. Before inserting the needle in the nozzle body, immerse the components in clean fuel oil or special oil for injection systems. The seat surfaces, the sliding surfaces (needle and housing) and the sealing faces in contact to the nozzle holder should be carefully checked.

Clean and check carefully the parts. Do not mixup nozzle parts.

11 Check the holder bottom surface for the nozzle needle indentation. 12 Check the maximum needle lift A" of the nozzle. If the lift is out of the permissible value range, which is given in fig. 2.4 37 , the nozzle must be replaced.

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Note!

13 Put in place the push rod (21), the spring (20), the spindle (17) and the nut (16). 14 Place carefully the nozzle onto the injector body. Turn on the sleeve nut (19) and check the position of the locating pins (22). See fig. 2.9 11 .

Use Molycote G between the contact surfaces of the cap nut and the nozzle as well as in the thread. 15 Use the socket 9622DT384 and a torque spanner to tighten the sleeve nut up to the correct torque value. See section 2.4.4.7.

16 If the tests, which have been performed accordingly to section 2.9.4.3., are supposed to give satisfactory results then the injector can be mounted in the engine. Otherwise, replace the nozzle.

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10 Check the nozzle holder HP sealing faces (i.e. the contact face to the nozzle and the bottom of the fuel inlet hole).

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8 Dismantle the nozzle holder by removing the counter nut (16) and the adjusting spindle (17). Remove the spindle guiding screw and turn the injector body up side down to remove the spring (20) and the push rod (21).

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Injection System

Checking the opening pressure

Warning!

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Fig. 2.9 13 Testing fuel injectors 1 Fill the pump reservoir (of the test equipment 9622DT812) with an absolute clean fuel or a calibration fluid, although a filter is mounted in the reservoir. Connect the injector to the test equipment.

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2.9 19

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Be utmost careful while testing a fuel injector because the fuel is sprayed in a fine mist which could penetrate directly into the underlying skin layers and the blood. Such an accident is directly demanding a specialist treatment; if this aid is not available, rinse the affected part of the body with lukewarm water for a long time. However, it is necessary to meet a specialist.

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2.9.4.3.

Testing of fuel injectors

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Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

4 5

Tighten the connection. Open the manometer valve.

6 Increase the pump pressure slowly and read the manometer pressure when the nozzle opens.

8 Tighten the nut (16) and check if the opening pressure is kept at the required setting. Check spray pattern 1 Close the manometer valve to protect the manometer. 2 Hold a paper dry sheet below the nozzle and give the pump a quick stroke by means of the handle. 3 Check the uniformity of the spray pattern. 4 If the spray pattern is not symmetrical, it means that some impurities are obstructing the nozzle spray holes. Repeat the test after cleaning.

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2.9 20

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Check of the needle seat tightness 1 Increase the pressure up to a value approximately 20 bar below the injector opening pressure. Keep the pressure constant for about 10 seconds. 3 Check if no fuel drops occur on the nozzle tip. A slight wetting is acceptable. 4 If drops are formed the nozzle has to be checked for proper cleaning or replaced by a new one. Some spill fuel may appear from the nozzle holder due to leak along the needle side. Check the needle spindle tightening 1 Raise the injector pressure up to approximately 20 bar below the opening pressure. 2 Measure the time for a pressure fall of 200 bar. Quick pressure fall indicates excessive wear of the needle spindle and/or the housing. The nozzle has to be replaced for a new one. More than 25 seconds indicates a fouled spindle. Both the needle and the body have to be cleaned. Never recondition or repair the nozzle by lapping it into its seat

Note!

Note!

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7 Adjust the opening pressure of the nozzle (see section 2.4.5.1.) with the spindle (17) on the top of the injector, see fig. 2.9 11 .

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3 Before the final tightening of the connecting line between the pump and the injector fill the connecting line with fuel and vent the air by means of few pump strokes.

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

2.9.4.4.

Mounting the fuel injector

2 Fit new Orings around the injector body. Lubricate the injector body. 3 Fit the injector body into the cylinder head housing. 4 Place the gland (13) over the injector and the distance sleeves (12) over the studs. Fit the nuts (11), hand tighten them and afterwards loosen them a half turn. See fig. 2.9 9 . 5 Renew the Orings and fit the gland (23) and plate (27) with bolts (25), do not tighten the bolts yet. See fig. 2.9 14 . 6 Fit the fuel connecting piece (3) in the injector with the socket 9622DT250 and tighten it upto the correct torque, see section 2.4.4.7. 7 Keep on mounting the parts accordingly to the section 2.9.5.

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1 Check if the bottom of the stainless sleeve (14) in the cylinder head is clean. If necessary, clean or lap the bottom sealing surface by means of the tool 9622DT803. For the lapping procedure a fine lapping compound should be used. See fig. 2.9 9 .

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Before mounting an injector, test the injector with regards to the required opening pressure, the spray pattern and the internal leak of the nozzle needle. See section 2.9.4.3. The injector seals directly to the bottom of the stainless sleeve without a sealing washer.

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Check the tightness of sealing surfaces If leakages occurs on the high pressure sealing surfaces, the damaged part should be replaced with a new one or a reconditioned one.

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2.9 21

Injection System

Manual Wrtsil 38

The connecting piece seals (3) on plain metallic surfaces and these surfaces condition must be checked before mounting. Always tighten the connecting piece up to the correct torque before the HP fuel line is mounted and also when only the HP fuel line has been removed.

2.9.5.1.

Connection HP fuel line

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23 27 25 3
ooooo

1 Check if the injector and the connecting piece (3) are tightened accordingly to section 2.9.4.4. 2 Place the HP fuel line (29) in the proper position and make sure that the conical connections are straight mounted into the conical seats. See fig. 2.9 14 . 3 Hand tighten the both sleeve nuts (30 and 31) of the HP fuel line to the HP fuel pump and to the connecting piece (3). 4 Mount definitely the injector holder by tightening the nuts (11) equally in steps of 10 Nm up to the correct torque. See section 2.4.4.7. fig. 2.4 24 and fig. 2.9 14 . 5 Tighten the sleeve nut (30) on the pump side with the crowfoot wrench 9612DT246 and the torque spanner up to the correct torque, see section 2.4.4.7. fig. 2.4 25 . 6 Tighten the bolts (25) of the gland (23) and the plate (27) up to the correct torque. See section 2.4.4.7. fig. 2.4 25 . 7 Tighten the sleeve nut (31) on the cylinder head side with the crowfoot wrench 9612DT246 and the torque spanner up to the correct torque, see section 2.4.4.7. fig. 2.4 25 . 8 Fit the fuel leak line to the HP fuel line.

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29 30

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Fig. 2.9 14 HP fuel pipe connection

2.9 22

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25 31

2.9.5.

HP fuel line

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Manual Wrtsil 38

Injection System

Note!

This chapter just includes the printed copies of the below mentioned lists of drawings.

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3.1. Instruction Drawings

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Instruction Drawings

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Instruction Drawings

9507DT437 Internal Cooling Water System 9507DT439 Internal Fuel System 9507DT441 Internal Lube Oil System

9507DT724 Internal Charge & Exhaust Gas System

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9507DT716 Internal Start/Stop Air System

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3.1.1.

Internal Systems & Pipes Connections

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Instruction Drawings

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Instruction Drawings

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Instruction Drawings

Manual Wrtsil 38

9510DT148 Connection Diagram 9510DT370 Wiring Diagram 9510DT399 Wiring Diagram 9510DT404 Wiring Diagram 9530DT317 Code List 9560DT369 Code List

9570DT175 Terminal Box

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Wiring Diagrams & Configuration Lists

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Instruction Drawings

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Modbus communication link Communication speed: 9600 bauds Commands in use: 02 and 04 Communication mode: RTU Physical interface: RS-485 2-wire

Modbus addresses 30xxx signals to be used for AL&MONIT 30xxx


optional addresses

Engine number 24154 24155 24156 24157 24158 24159

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Page Document No Rev

Title
Code Name BL Type Range / Unit Set point - Alarm Set point - Alarm - Delay Set point - Stop Set point - Stop - Delay Set point - L.red. Set point - L.red. - Delay Modbus addresses - Anal. Modbus addresses - Alarm Modbus addresses - Stop Modbus addresses - L.red. Scale Alarm cond. ABBREVIATIONS A B CAC H HT IND L LT NC NO MPU SW TC A-bank B-bank Charge Air Cooler High High Temperature Inductive Pick Up Low Low Temperature Normally Connected Normally Open Magnetic Pick Up SoftWare Turbo Charger

Explanation

rn a
C B A 03-04-2006 M.Glavina Kocevar 03-02-2006 16-12-2005 M.Glavina M.Glavina Kocevar Kocevar Appd. Rev. Date Made

WNS ISO code Signal description / Measured quantity Alarm blocking: X = alarm is blocked at standstill; value = blocking time after start Signal type Signal range and engineering unit Set point for alarm condition Set point for alarm delay Set point for stop / shutdown condition Set point for stop / shutdown delay Set point for load reduction request condition Set point for load reduction request delay On analog addresses (30xxx) integer value = measured value x scale factor. Value -900 (note the scaling) indicates sensor/module failure On alarm addresses (10xxx) 0 = normal and 1 = alarm ON On stop addresses (11xxx) 0 = normal and 1= stop ON On load reduction addresses (12xxx) 0 = normal and 1 = load reduction request ON Scale factor for analog addresses (30xxx) Condition for alarm / stop / load reduction activation

nt e

Wrtsil Nederland BV Technology

This drawing is property of Wrtsil Nederland B.V. and shall neither be copied, shown nor communicated to a third party without the consent of the owner.

Subtitle

ALL SEAS AUDACIA

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Explanation Made Appd. 03-10-2005 27-10-2005

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Cylinder liner temperature threshold updated M.Glavina S.Kocevar

The analogue signals will generate the relating alarms, LR and stop indications Implemented priority of addresses, two engines added, LR on cyl lin added.

CODE LIST MODBUS W38B DIESEL ELECTRIC

9530DT369

fo ri

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

Page 1 (7)

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MB ID Rev. C B B

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

Revision C

Code Fuel oil LS103A LS107A LS108A PT101 TE101 Lube oil PXK201 PXM201 PDY243 PDY243.1 PDY243.1 PDS243 TE201 PT271

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Alarm -Delay

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2)

Fuel oil leakage, injection pipe A-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, FE A-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, DE A-bank Fuel oil pressure, engine inlet Fuel oil temperature, engine inlet Lube oil pressure alarm setpoint Lube oil pressure shutdown setpoint Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil temperature, engine inlet Lube oil pressure, TC A inlet

X NC-switch NC-switch NC-switch X Ratiometric X Resistive Calculated Calculated SW-function Calculated Calculated X NC-switch Resistive 100 Ratiometric SW-tunable SW-tunable SW-tunable Resistive Ratiometric Ratiometric

0-1 0-1 0-1 0-16 bar 0-160 C


18) 18)

1 1 1 4 145

1 1 1 5 2

on
10003 10004 10005 30010 10010 30011 10011 1 1 1 10 1 high high high low high 12018 12039
29)

se
3 30039 10039 30171 30173 30172 30021 30024 10024 30025 10025 5 30027 10027 30234 30235 30028 30029 10029 30237 30030 10030 107 3 30031 10031 30032 30033 30034 30035 30036 30038 10038 30042 10042
19) 17)

30231 30233 1 = PDS243 (digital), 2 = PDY243 (calc. analog), 3 = PDx fail, 99 = no filter 30013 0-10 bar 0.8 3 30015 10015 0-10 bar 1.8 3 10017 0-1 1 3 10016 40 (L) 3 75 (H) 3 30018 10018 0-160 C 70 (H)
29)

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Ratiometric Calculated Calculated Ratiometric Ratiometric Calculated 0-6 bar
19)

LO pressure, TC A inlet, high alarm setpoint 100 PXK271 LO pressure, TC A inlet, low alarm setpoint 100 PXK271 LO pressure, TC A inlet, LR setpoint 100 PXL271 Lube oil temperature, TC A outlet TE272 Starting air Starting air pressure X PT301 Control air pressure X PT311 Cooling water HT water pressure, engine inlet 10 PY401 HT water pressure alarm setpoint PXK401 HT water pressure load reduction request setpoint PXL401 HT water pressure, CAC Outlet PY432 PY451/471 LT water pressure, CAC inlet 10 LT water pressure alarm setpoint PXK471

0-160 C 0-40 bar 0-40 bar

lu
2500 (H) 1300 (L) 800 15 15 2 2 2
20)

0-6Bar

12027

19) 19)

0-6 bar 0-6 bar

20)

TE401 TE402 PH402/432 PH471 TE432A TE451/471 TE472 Charge air PT601 TE601

HT water temperature, engine inlet HT water temperature, engine outlet HT water static pressure LT water static pressure

X Resistive

0-160 C 0-160 C

nt e

HT water temperature, CAC outlet LT water temperature, CAC inlet LT water temperature, CAC outlet Charge air pressure

X Resistive SW-tunable SW-tunable Resistive Resistive Resistive X Ratiometric X Resistive

60(LL) 70(L) 103

12031

0-160 C 0-160 C 0-160 C 3,6 35 (L) 60 (H) 1 0 5 3 10

0-6 bar

12038

fo ri

Charge air temperature

0-160 C

Crankcase NS700 QS700 QS701 QS701 TE700

Oil mist detector failure Oil mist alarm Oil mist load reduction Oil mist shutdown

Main bearing 0 temperature

NC-switch X NC-switch NO-switch NO-switch X NiCr/NiAl

0-1 0-1 0-1000 0-1000 0-220 C

0 0 800 0 2 800 120 0 2

10045 10046 12047 11047 30049 10049 11049 12049

100

2 Page 2 (7)

110

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

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Scale Alarm cond. Note C C 10 10 1 1 1 1 high low / 1 high low / 100 high 100 100 100 1 10 low 10 low 10 low 10 10 10 10 low 10 1 low 1 high 10 10 1 1 1 1000 high low / 1 high 1 1 1 1 1 failure open closed closed high
25)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

C C B,C

25) 25)

26)

C C
24) 24)

C C

C C C Revision C

Code

Name

B L X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Type NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl MPU 0-1000Hz SW-tunable Calculated NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl

Range / Unit 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-30000 rpm

Alarm -Delay 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 580 500 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 21060 21060 21481 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 160 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 5

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) 30050 30051 30052 30053 30054 30055 30056 30057 30058 30059 10050 10051 10052 10053 10054 10055 10056 10057 10058 10059 10060 10064 10065 10066 10067 10068 10069 10070 10071 10072 10073 10074 11050 11051 11052 11053 11054 11055 11056 11057 11058 11059

on
12050 12051 12052 12053 12054 12055 12056 12057 12058 12059 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 high high high high high high high high high high 30060 30064 30065 30066 30067 30068 30069 30070 30071 30072 30073 30074 30112 30113 30079 30080 30081 30082 30083 30084 30085 30086 30087 30088 30089 30090 30091 30092 30093 30094 30095 30096 12065 12066 12067 12068 12069 12070 12071 12072 12073 12074 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 high high high high high high high high high high high high in rpm 3) 3) in rpm high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high 10079 10080 10081 10082 10083 10084 10085 10086 10087 10088 10089 10090 10091 10092 10093 10094 10095 10096 11079 11080 11081 11082 11083 11084 11085 11086 11087 11088 11089 11090 11091 11092 11093 11094 11095 11096 11138 11140 11141 12079 12080 12081 12082 12083 12084 12085 12086 12087 12088 12089 12090 12091 12092 12093 12094 12095 12096 1 low 1 high
8),27)

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Main bearing 1 temperature TE701 Main bearing 2 temperature TE702 Main bearing 3 temperature TE703 Main bearing 4 temperature TE704 Main bearing 5 temperature TE705 Main bearing 6 temperature TE706 Main bearing 7 temperature TE707 Main bearing 8 temperature TE708 Main bearing 9 temperature TE709 Main bearing 10 temperature TE710 Exhaust gas, A-bank Exhaust gas temperature, TC A inlet 1 TE511 Exhaust gas temperature, TC A outlet TE517 Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A1 TE5011A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A2 TE5021A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A3 TE5031A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A4 TE5041A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A5 TE5051A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A6 TE5061A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A7 TE5071A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A8 TE5081A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A9 TE5091A TC speed, turbo A SE518 SXK518/528 TC speed alarm setpoint SXL518/528 TC speed load reduction request setpoint Cylinder liners, A-bank Cylinder liner A1 temperature 1 TE711A Cylinder liner A1 temperature 2 TE712A Cylinder liner A2 temperature 1 TE721A Cylinder liner A2 temperature 2 TE722A Cylinder liner A3 temperature 1 TE731A Cylinder liner A3 temperature 2 TE732A Cylinder liner A4 temperature 1 TE741A Cylinder liner A4 temperature 2 TE742A Cylinder liner A5 temperature 1 TE751A Cylinder liner A5 temperature 2 TE752A Cylinder liner A6 temperature 1 TE761A Cylinder liner A6 temperature 2 TE762A Cylinder liner A7 temperature 1 TE771A Cylinder liner A7 temperature 2 TE772A Cylinder liner A8 temperature 1 TE781A Cylinder liner A8 temperature 2 TE782A Cylinder liner A9 temperature 1 TE791A Cylinder liner A9 temperature 2 TE792A Backup system

se
550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 21481 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 0,5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 3 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 165 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1,8 690 112

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X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C bar 0-700 rpm 0-1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 180 10 NO-switch IND 0-362 Hz 10 NO-switch Page 3 (7)

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PSZ201

Lube oil pressure, engine inlet, backup shutdown (> 300rpm) Engine speed trip, backup HT water temp., engine outlet

SEZ174 TEZ402

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

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Scale Alarm cond. Note C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C B,C Revision C

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

Code

Name
Optional shutdown

B L

Type

Range / Unit 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-10 bar 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-40 bar 0-6Bar

Alarm -Delay

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay 1 1 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 1

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) 11141

10 NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function NO-switch Ratiometric NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch Ratiometric Ratiometric

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Stop/shutdown inputs Local stop HS722 Remote stop OS734 Emergency stop OS735 External shutdown OS739 Engine status indications Start mode IS871 Ready for start mode IS872 Start blocking mode IS880 Local start mode HS724 Failed start attempt mode IS875 Run mode IS877 Stop mode IS878 Shutdown mode IS879 Slow turn mode Standby mode Slow turn failure Stop/shutdown override OS736 Status of start blockings Lube oil pressure, engine inlet PT201 Stop lever position GS171 Turning gear position GS792 External start block OS740 Control air pressure PT311 Lube oil pressure, TC A inlet PT271 Fuel control related parameters Fuel rack position GT165 Overload switch IS166 Engine speed, flywheel SE167 Engine speed, camshaft ST174 General engine speed, by evaluation speed info ST175 UT793_mBar Actual BMEP Mean Output (in kW) UT793 Pump start requests Prelube oil pump control CV223 Automation system Remote start OS732 Local start HS721 Relay Module Failure NS711 Internal temperature MCM700 1 TE802 Internal temperature in FE Acq. Module TE831 Internal temperature TC Acq. Module TE832 Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A1 TE841A Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A2 TE842A Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A3 TE843A NS888
Engine mode

on
11142 11143 11144 11145 1 1 1 1 closed closed closed closed
27)

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1 0 1 2 0,5 1 1 1 10 0,6 0 0 0 0 0 0 101 1 30 30 620 0 660 0
17) 7)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

30147 30148 30149 30150 30151 10151 30152 30153 30154 30155 30156 30158 10158

se
11157 10159 10161 10162 10164 10166 10181 30174 10174 10175 30176 11176 30177 11177 30178 10178 11178 30240 30242 30188 10169 11169 10170 11170 10190 10191 10192 10193 10194 10195 10196 12242 30191 30192 30193 30194 30195 30196 30200 30201 10201 11201 12201

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X Ratiometric X SW-switch MPU 0-1925 Hz IND 0-362 Hz SW-function Calculated Calculated SW-switch 0-110% 0-1 0-700 rpm 0-700 rpm 0-700 rpm 0-X mBar 0-X kW 0-1 X X X X X X NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive 0-1 0-1 SW-function SW-switch 0-1 Page 4 (7)

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1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 5 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 22) -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 0-255: 0=stop, 1=ready to start, 8=standby, 16=start, 32=run, 64=shutdown, 128=emergency, 255=start blocked

NS885

Common (engine) alarm

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

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Scale Alarm cond. Note
14),27)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

C C

1 1 1 1 1 active 1 1 1 1 1 1 active 1 closed 1 1 1 1 1 1 low stop engaged closed low low

1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1)

C
1)

1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1)

C C C C C C C C C C C

1 high 1 high 1 1 1 high 1000 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 closed closed closed high high high high high high

6) 15) 15)

C C C C C C

1 high

9)-12)

Revision C

Code

Name

B L

Type SW-function Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function

Range / Unit 0-1 0-800 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C
21) 21)

Alarm -Delay

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) 30202 10202 30203 30204 30205 30206 30207 30208 30209 30210 30211 30212 30224 30225 30251 30252 30253 30254 30255 30256

Time to slow turning (in percentage) Time to slow turning (in seconds) Remaining slow turning pre-warning time (in percentage) Remaining slow turning pre-warning time (in seconds)

0-100% 0-X seconds

Exhaust wastegate valve control Wastegate valve control, A-bank CV519


Wastegate function Wastegate control action

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10 4-20mA out SW-function SW-function Page 5 (7)

23) 0-100% 0-99: 0=closed, 1=EWGCppFpp, 2=EWGPump, 3=AWG, 99=open 0-99: 0=disable_closed, 1=forced_closed, 2=normal_action, 50=frozen_position, 99=forced_open

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10

Commnon failure alarm NS890 Exhaust gas deviations Average exhaust gas temperature TY500 Exhaust gas temperature deviation A1 10 TY517A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A2 TY527A 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation A3 10 TY537A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A4 10 TY547A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A5 10 TY557A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A6 TY567A 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation A7 10 TY577A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A8 10 TY587A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A9 TY597A 10 Exh. gas temp. dev. alarm setpoint TXK500 Exh. gas temp. dev. load reduction request setpoint TXL500 Slow Turning Slow turning ready IS331 Slow turning pre-warning XS331

21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21)

0-1 0-1 0-100% 0-X seconds

se
21) 21) 21)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21)

on
1 high 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
28)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

10204 10205 10206 10207 10208 10209 10210 10211 10212

12204 12205 12206 12207 12208 12209 12210 12211 12212

30075 10075 30243 30244

12075

fo ri

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

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Scale Alarm cond. Note high high high high high high high high high C C C C C C C C C 10
15) 15)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

Revision C

Code

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Alarm -Delay

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2)

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File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

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Page 6 (7)

Notes: 1) Status information, NOT to be treated as alarm. 2) When load reduction request is active, the external system is supposed to reduce engine load in accordance with the load levels given in the engine manual. 3) Alarm set point = nBmax, L.red set point = 1.02 * nBmax for ABB TC, L.red set point = 1.05 * nBmax for Napier TC 6) Alarm just above max droop =3%, WECS-stop at 110%. 7) Pump OFF at 400 rpm (increasing) and pump ON at 310 rpm (decreasing) 8) Backup switch according to rules LR: TEZ402. See also note 14. 9) Address 30201: common engine alarm is ON in case at least one alarm or load reduction request or shutdown is active. It is blinking in certain engine modes (see engine manual). 10) Address 10201: common alarm (any setpoint alarm active or due to essential failure) 11) Address 11201: common shutdown (any setpoint shutdown active or due to essential failure) 12) Address 12201: common load reduction request (any setpoint load reduction request active or due to essential failure) 14) Utilised as combined shutdown input for TEZ402 and any external shutdown (except emergency stop) 15) Used internally by WECS 17) Load reduction request due to (strategic) sensor failure related to valve control failure handling 18) Variable set point, see chart 1 next page. 19) Variable set point, see chart 2 next page. 20) Variable set point, see chart 3 next page 21) Variable set point, see chart 4 next page 22) Load reduction request due to (strategic) module failure related to valve control failure handling 23) Load reduction request due to control valve failure 24) Ps refers to the static pressure in the installation at site 25) PY refers to dynamical pressures (PT sensor reading - static pressure) 26) LL-setpoint refers to pre-heat alarm (only active during ready for start) 27) The External shutdown input can only be utilised for external shutdown indication on modbus. See also note 14. 28) Address 30202, 10202: common failure alarm is ON in case at least one sensor failure or module failure is active. 29) Alarm / load reduction setpoints turbocharger type dependant

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se

on
Revision C

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Scale Alarm cond. Note

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

Code

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Alarm -Delay

Set points Stop -Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2)

Others_start_chart Overview variable setpoints valid for: ABS, BV, CCS, DNV, LR and RINA Chart 1: Lube oil pressure safety
4

Chart 2: HT cooling water pressure safety


5 4,5

3,5

alarm load reduction standby pump autostop

alarm
PT201 pressure [bar]

standby pump autostop autostop backup switch load reduction

PY401 pressure [bar]

2,5

1,5

1
200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 Engine speed [rpm]

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1,5 1 0,5
650 700

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3,5 3 2,5 2 0 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700
Engine speed [rpm]

Chart 3: LT cooling water pressure safety


4 3,5 3
PY471 pressure [bar]

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700
PY471=PT471-Pstatic Pstatic=600mbar (default)

Chart 4: Exhaust gas cylinder temperature deviation safety

alarm standby pump

600

nt e

500

TY5xxx [dgC]

2,5 2

400

300

1,5 1 0,5

200

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100

0 200

250

300

350

400

450

500

550

600

650

700

10

on
PY401=PT401-Pstatic Pstatic=600mbar (default)

load reduction alarm

15

20

Engine speed [rpm]

Output bmep [bar]

File name: 9530DT369_C.xls

Page 7 (7)

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Scale Alarm cond. Note
25 30 35

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for: 9L38, LRS

Revision C

Title
Code Name BL Type Range / Unit Set point - Alarm Set point - Alarm - Delay Set point - Stop Set point - Stop - Delay Set point - L.red. Set point - L.red. - Delay Modbus addresses - Anal. Modbus addresses - Alarm Modbus addresses - Stop Modbus addresses - L.red. Scale Alarm cond. ABBREVIATIONS A B CAC H HT IND L LT NC NO MPU SW TC A-bank B-bank Charge Air Cooler High High Temperature Inductive Pick Up Low Low Temperature Normally Connected Normally Open Magnetic Pick Up SoftWare Turbo Charger

Explanation

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a 04/05/2005 Dno / D. Novak Rev. Date Made Appd.

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Sca / S. Casini Made Appd. 24-09-2004 24-01-2005

WNS ISO code Signal description / Measured quantity Alarm blocking: X = alarm is blocked at standstill; value = blocking time after start Signal type Signal range and engineering unit Set point for alarm condition Set point for alarm delay Set point for stop / shutdown condition Set point for stop / shutdown delay Set point for load reduction request condition Set point for load reduction request delay On analog addresses (30xxx) integer value = measured value x scale factor. Value -900 (note the scaling) indicates sensor/module failure On alarm addresses (10xxx) 0 = normal and 1 = alarm ON On stop addresses (11xxx) 0 = normal and 1= stop ON On load reduction addresses (12xxx) 0 = normal and 1 = load reduction request ON Scale factor for analog addresses (30xxx) Condition for alarm / stop / load reduction activation

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Wrtsil Nederland BV Technology

This drawing is property of Wrtsil Nederland B.V. and shall neither be copied, shown nor communicated to a third party without the consent of the owner.

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07878 D-message D. Novak S. Casini

CODE LIST MODBUS W38B MAIN ENGINE

Subtitle

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File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

Page 1 (9)

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PT271/PT281 setpoints added Explanation Page Document No Rev

Modbus communication link Communication speed: 9600 bauds Commands in use: 02 and 04 Communication mode: RTU Physical interface: RS-485 2-wire

Engine number

9530DT317

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MB ID Rev.

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

Revision -

Code Fuel oil LS103A LS107A LS108A LS103B LS107B LS108B PT101 TE101 Lube oil PH201 PT201.1 PT201.1 PXK201 PXL201 PXM201 PDY243 PDY243.1 PDY243.1 PDS243 TE201 LS271 PT271 PXK271 PXK271 PXL271 TE272 LS281 PT281

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale

Fuel oil leakage, injection pipe A-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, FE A-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, DE A-bank Fuel oil leakage, injection pipe B-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, FE B-bank Fuel oil leakage, dirty duel, DE B-bank Fuel oil pressure, engine inlet Fuel oil temperature, engine inlet Lube oil pressure, engine inlet, static Lube oil pressure, engine inlet Lube oil pressure, engine inlet Lube oil pressure alarm setpoint Lube oil pressure load reduction setpoint Lube oil pressure shutdown setpoint Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil filter pressure difference Lube oil temperature, engine inlet Lube oil level TC A Lube oil pressure, TC A inlet LO pressure, TC A inlet, high alarm setpoint LO pressure, TC A inlet, low alarm setpoint LO pressure, TC A inlet, LR setpoint Lube oil temperature, TC A outlet Lube oil level TC B Lube oil pressure, TC B inlet

SW-tunable 10 Ratiometric 10 Ratiometric Calculated Calculated Calculated SW-function Calculated Calculated X NC-switch Resistive X NC-switch

0-10 bar 0-10 bar 0-10 bar


18) 18) 18)

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2
29)

X NC-switch NC-switch NC-switch X NC-switch NC-switch NC-switch X Ratiometric X Resistive

0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-16 bar 0-160 C

1 1 1 1 1 1 4 145

1 1 1 1 1 1 5 2

18) 18)

2 2

18) 18)

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29)

1 = PDS243 (digital), 2 = PDY243 (calc. analog), 3 = PDx fail, 99 = no filter 0-10 bar 0.8 3 0-10 bar 1.8 3 0-1 1 3 40 (L) 0-160 C 3 75 (H) 3 30018 10018 70 (H) 0-1 0 1 10020 0-6Bar 3 3 30039 10039 30171 30173 30172 30021 10022
29)

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29) 29) 29)

100 Ratiometric

on
10003 10004 10005 10006 10007 10008 30010 10010 30011 10011 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 1 high high high high high high low high 30012 30014 10014 11014 30014 10014 11014 12014 30231 30232 30233 30013 30015 10015 10017 10016 12018 10 10 low 10 low 10 10 10 1 1 1 1 high low / 1 high 1 low low / 100 high 100 100 100 1 1 low low / high 1 10 low 10 low 12027 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 low
25)

12039

100 SW-tunable 100 SW-tunable 100 SW-tunable Resistive X NC-switch 100 Ratiometric Resistive

0-160 C 0-1 0-6Bar

29)

3 30040 10040 30023

12040

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Lube oil temperature, TC B outlet TE282 Starting air Starting air pressure PT301 X Control air pressure X PT311 Cooling water HT water pressure, engine inlet 10 PY401 HT water pressure alarm setpoint PXK401 HT water pressure load reduction request setpoint PXL401 HT water pressure, engine inlet PY401 10 HT water pressure alarm setpoint PXK401 HT water pressure load reduction request setpoint PXL401 HT water pressure, engine inlet 10 PY401 HT water pressure alarm setpoint PXK401 HT water pressure load reduction request setpoint PXL401 HT water pressure shutdown setpoint PXM401 HT water pressure, CAC Outlet PY432 PY451/471 LT water pressure, CAC inlet 10

nt e

0-160 C 0-40 bar 0-40 bar


19)

Ratiometric Ratiometric

15 15

2 2 2
19)

30024 10024 30025 10025 5 30027 30234 30235 5 30027 30234 30235 5 30027 30234 30235 30236 30028 30029 10027

Ratiometric Calculated Calculated Ratiometric Calculated Calculated Ratiometric Calculated Calculated Calculated Ratiometric Ratiometric

0-6 bar

19) 19)

0-6 bar

19)

19)

10027

12027

19) 19)

0-6 bar
19) 19) 19)

19)

19)

19)

10027 11027 12027

0-6 bar 0-6 bar

20)

2 Page 2 (9)

10029

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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Alarm cond. Note a a a a a low
25)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

low

25)

25)

low

25)

Revision -

Code PXK471 TE401 TE402 PH402/432 PH471 TE432A TE451/471 TE472 Charge air PT601 TE601

Name
LT water pressure alarm setpoint HT water temperature, engine inlet HT water temperature, engine outlet HT water static pressure LT water static pressure HT water temperature, CAC outlet LT water temperature, CAC inlet LT water temperature, CAC outlet Charge air pressure Charge air temperature

B L

Type Calculated

Range / Unit
20)

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale 30237

X Resistive X Resistive SW-tunable SW-tunable Resistive Resistive Resistive X Ratiometric X Resistive NC-switch X NC-switch NO-switch NO-switch X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X X X X X X X X X X X X

0-160 C 0-160 C

60(LL) 70(L) 103

3 3 107

0-6 bar 0-160 C 0-1 0-1 0-1000 0-1000 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C

3,6 35 (L) 60 (H) 1 0

5 3 0 0

se
17)

0-160 C 0-160 C 0-160 C

3 30031 10031 30032 30033 30034 30035 30036

10 30038 10038 30042 10042

fo ri

Crankcase Oil mist detector failure NS700 Oil mist alarm QS700 Oil mist load reduction QS701 Oil mist shutdown QS701 Main bearing 0 temperature TE700 Main bearing 1 temperature TE701 Main bearing 2 temperature TE702 Main bearing 3 temperature TE703 Main bearing 4 temperature TE704 Main bearing 5 temperature TE705 Main bearing 6 temperature TE706 Main bearing 7 temperature TE707 Main bearing 8 temperature TE708 Main bearing 9 temperature TE709 Main bearing 10 temperature TE710 PTO bearing temperature TE711 Exhaust gas, A-bank Exhaust gas temperature, TC A inlet 1 TE511 Exhaust gas temperature, TC A outlet TE517 Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A1 TE5011A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A2 TE5021A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A3 TE5031A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A4 TE5041A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A5 TE5051A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A6 TE5061A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A7 TE5071A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A8 TE5081A Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder A9 TE5091A TC speed, turbo A SE518 SXK518/528 TC speed alarm setpoint SXL518/528 TC speed load reduction request setpoint Cylinder liners, A-bank Cylinder liner A1 temperature 1 TE711A Cylinder liner A1 temperature 2 TE712A Cylinder liner A2 temperature 1 TE721A

lu
800 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 580 500 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 800 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110
3) 3) 3)

0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 30049 30050 30051 30052 30053 30054 30055 30056 30057 30058 30059 30061 30060 30064 30065 30066 30067 30068 30069 30070 30071 30072 30073 30074 30112 30113 10049 10050 10051 10052 10053 10054 10055 10056 10057 10058 10059 10061 10060 10064 10065 10066 10067 10068 10069 10070 10071 10072 10073 10074 11047 11049 11050 11051 11052 11053 11054 11055 11056 11057 11058 11059 11061

rn a
NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl MPU 0-1000Hz SW-tunable Calculated 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-30000 rpm 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 5 X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl X NiCr/NiAl 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 140 140 140 3 3 3 Page 3 (9)

nt e

550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550


3)

30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 0,5

on
10 30030 10030 1 low
26)

12031

12038

10045 10046

12047 12049 12050 12051 12052 12053 12054 12055 12056 12057 12058 12059 12061

12065 12066 12067 12068 12069 12070 12071 12072 12073 12074

155 155 155

3 3 3

145 145 145

3 30079 10079 11079 12079 3 30080 10080 11080 12080 3 30081 10081 11081 12081

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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Alarm cond. Note 1 high 10 10 1 1 1
24) 24)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

1000 high low / 1 high 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 failure open closed closed high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high in rpm 3) 3) in rpm a a a Revision -

1 high 1 high 1 high

Code

Name

B L X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Type NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl MPU 0-1000Hz NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl NiCr/NiAl

Range / Unit 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-800 C 0-30000 rpm 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C 0-220 C

Set points Alarm -Delay 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 580 500 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 530 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Stop 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale 30082 30083 30084 30085 30086 30087 30088 30089 30090 30091 30092 30093 30094 30095 30096 10082 10083 10084 10085 10086 10087 10088 10089 10090 10091 10092 10093 10094 10095 10096 11082 11083 11084 11085 11086 11087 11088 11089 11090 11091 11092 11093 11094 11095 11096 12082 12083 12084 12085 12086 12087 12088 12089 12090 12091 12092 12093 12094 12095 12096

on
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high 30097 30101 30102 30103 30104 30105 30106 30107 30108 30109 30110 30111 30116 30117 30118 30119 30120 30121 30122 30123 30124 30125 30126 30127 30128 30129 30130 30131 30132 30133 10097 10101 10102 10103 10104 10105 10106 10107 10108 10109 10110 10111 10116 10117 10118 10119 10120 10121 10122 10123 10124 10125 10126 10127 10128 10129 10130 10131 10132 10133 11116 11117 11118 11119 11120 11121 11122 11123 11124 11125 11126 11127 11128 11129 11130 11131 11132 11133 12102 12103 12104 12105 12106 12107 12108 12109 12110 12111 12116 12117 12118 12119 12120 12121 12122 12123 12124 12125 12126 12127 12128 12129 12130 12131 12132 12133 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high

fo ri

Cylinder liner A2 temperature 2 TE722A Cylinder liner A3 temperature 1 TE731A Cylinder liner A3 temperature 2 TE732A Cylinder liner A4 temperature 1 TE741A Cylinder liner A4 temperature 2 TE742A Cylinder liner A5 temperature 1 TE751A Cylinder liner A5 temperature 2 TE752A Cylinder liner A6 temperature 1 TE761A Cylinder liner A6 temperature 2 TE762A Cylinder liner A7 temperature 1 TE771A Cylinder liner A7 temperature 2 TE772A Cylinder liner A8 temperature 1 TE781A Cylinder liner A8 temperature 2 TE782A Cylinder liner A9 temperature 1 TE791A Cylinder liner A9 temperature 2 TE792A Exhaust gas, B-bank Exhaust gas temperature, TC B inlet 1 TE521 Exhaust gas temperature, TC B outlet TE527 Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B1 TE5011B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B2 TE5021B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B3 TE5031B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B4 TE5041B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B5 TE5051B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B6 TE5061B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B7 TE5071B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B8 TE5081B Exhaust gas temperature, cylinder B9 TE5091B TC speed, turbo B SE528 Cylinder liners, B-bank Cylinder liner B1 temperature 1 TE711B Cylinder liner B1 temperature 2 TE712B Cylinder liner B2 temperature 1 TE721B Cylinder liner B2 temperature 2 TE722B Cylinder liner B3 temperature 1 TE731B Cylinder liner B3 temperature 2 TE732B Cylinder liner B4 temperature 1 TE741B Cylinder liner B4 temperature 2 TE742B Cylinder liner B5 temperature 1 TE751B Cylinder liner B5 temperature 2 TE752B Cylinder liner B6 temperature 1 TE761B Cylinder liner B6 temperature 2 TE762B Cylinder liner B7 temperature 1 TE771B Cylinder liner B7 temperature 2 TE772B Cylinder liner B8 temperature 1 TE781B Cylinder liner B8 temperature 2 TE782B Cylinder liner B9 temperature 1 TE791B Cylinder liner B9 temperature 2 TE792B Backup system

lu
550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550
3) 3)

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140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 Page 4 (9)

se
30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 0,5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

nt e

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Alarm cond. Note a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a Revision -

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

Code PSZ201 PS210 SEZ174 PSZ401 TEZ402

Name
Lube oil pressure, engine inlet, backup shutdown (> 300rpm) Lube oil standby pump control, (> 300rpm) Engine speed trip, backup HT water pressure, engine inlet (> 300rpm) HT water temp., engine outlet Optional shutdown

B L

Type

Range / Unit bar 1-10 bar 0-700 rpm 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-4 bar 0-4 bar 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-1

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop 1,8

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay 3 0 3 3 3

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale 11138

10 NO-switch 10 NO-switch IND 0-362 Hz 10 NO-switch 10 NO-switch 10 NO-switch 10 NO-switch 10 NO-switch

2,2

0 690 0,25+Ps 112 1

fo ri

HT water standby pump control (> 300rpm) PS410 LT water standby pump control (> 300rpm) PS460 Stop/shutdown inputs Local stop HS722 NO-switch Remote stop NO-switch OS734 Emergency stop OS735 NO-switch External shutdown NO-switch OS739 Engine status indications Start mode IS871 SW-function Ready for start mode IS872 SW-function Start blocking mode IS880 SW-function Local start mode HS724 SW-function Failed start attempt mode IS875 SW-function Run mode IS877 SW-function Stop mode IS878 SW-function Shutdown mode IS879 SW-function Slow turn mode SW-function Standby mode SW-function Slow turn failure SW-function Stop/shutdown override NO-switch OS736 Status of start blockings Lube oil pressure, engine inlet Ratiometric PT201 Stop lever position GS171 NO-switch Turning gear position GS792 NO-switch External start block OS740 NO-switch Control air pressure PT311 Ratiometric Lube oil level TC A LS271 NC-switch Lube oil pressure, TC A inlet PT271 Ratiometric Lube oil level TC B LS281 NC-switch Lube oil pressure, TC B inlet PT281 Ratiometric Fuel control related parameters Fuel rack position X Ratiometric GT165 Overload switch IS166 X SW-switch Engine speed, flywheel MPU 0-1925 Hz SE167 Engine speed, camshaft IND 0-362 Hz ST174 General engine speed, by evaluation speed info SW-function ST175 UT793_mBar Actual BMEP Calculated Mean Output (in kW) UT793 Calculated Pump start requests Lube oil standby pump control 10 SW-switch CV210 Lube oil standby pump activation level Calculated CVK210 HT water standby pump control CV410 10 SW-switch

0,55+Ps 0,4+Ps

0 0

se
1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 30147 30148 30149 30150 30151 10151 30152 30153 30154 30155 30156 30158 10158 10159 10161 10162 10164 10166 10167 10181 10168 10182 1 0 660 0
17)

rn a
1 2 0-10 bar 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-40 bar 0-1 0-6Bar 0-1 0-6Bar 0,5 1 1 1 10 0 0,6 0 0,6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-110% 0-1 0-700 rpm 0-700 rpm 0-700 rpm 0-X mBar 0-X kW 0-16 bar
18) 18)

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

lu
101 1 30 30 620 0 0
19)

nt e

on
1 low
8)

11140 11141 11141 11141

11142 11143 11144 11145

11157

30174 10174 10175 30176 11176 30177 11177 30178 10178 11178 30240 30242 12242 10185 30185 10186

0-6 bar

0 Page 5 (9)

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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Alarm cond. Note 1 high
8), 24),27) 8),27) 14),27) 8) 8)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

1 1 1 1

closed closed closed closed

27)

1 1 1 1 1 active 1 1 1 1 1 1 active 1 closed 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 low stop engaged closed low low low low low

1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1)

1)

1) 1) 1) 1) 1) 1), 30) 1) 1), 30) 1)

a a

1 high 1 high 1 1 1 high 1000 1 1 active 10 1 active

6) 15) 15)

Revision -

Code

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit
19)

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale 30186 30187 30188

NS888

Engine mode

SW-function SW-switch SW-function Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated Calculated

lu
21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21)

HT water standby pump activation level CVK410 LT water standby pump control CV460 LT water standby pump activation level CVK460 Prelube oil pump control CV223 Automation system Remote start OS732 Local start HS721 Relay Module Failure NS711 Internal temperature MCM700 1 TE802 Internal temperature in FE Acq. Module TE831 Internal temperature TC Acq. Module TE832 Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A1 TE841A Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A2 TE842A Internal temperature Cylinder Controller A3 TE843A Internal temperature Cylinder Controller B1 TE841B Internal temperature Cylinder Controller B2 TE842B Internal temperature Cylinder Controller B3 TE843B

Calculated 10 SW-switch Calculated SW-switch NO-switch NO-switch NO-switch Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive Resistive

0-6 bar
20)

20)

0-1 0-1 0-1

7)

X X X X X X X X X

1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 5 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 22) -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 -50..160 C 85 3 0-255: 0=stop, 1=ready to start, 8=standby, 16=start, 32=run, 64=shutdown, 128=emergency, 255=start blocked 0-1 0-1

se
30200 30201 10201 11201 12201 10202 30203 30204 30205 30206 30207 30208 30209 30210 30211 30212 30213 30214 30215 30216 30217 30218 30219 30220 30221 30224 30225 30251 30252 30253 30254
21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21) 21)

on
10187 10 1 active 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 30191 30192 30193 30194 30195 30196 30197 30198 30199 10169 10170 10190 10191 10192 10193 10194 10195 10196 10197 10198 10199 closed closed closed high high high high high high high high high a 1 high 1 high 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
9)-12) 28)

fo ri

Common (engine) alarm NS885 Commnon failure alarm NS890 Exhaust gas deviations Average exhaust gas temperature TY500 Exhaust gas temperature deviation A1 10 TY517A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A2 10 TY527A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A3 10 TY537A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A4 10 TY547A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A5 10 TY557A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A6 TY567A 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation A7 10 TY577A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A8 10 TY587A Exhaust gas temperature deviation A9 10 TY597A Exhaust gas temperature deviation B1 TY517B 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation B2 TY527B 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation B3 10 TY537B Exhaust gas temperature deviation B4 10 TY547B Exhaust gas temperature deviation B5 TY557B 10 Exhaust gas temperature deviation B6 10 TY567B Exhaust gas temperature deviation B7 10 TY577B Exhaust gas temperature deviation B8 10 TY587B Exhaust gas temperature deviation B9 10 TY597B Exh. gas temp. dev. alarm setpoint TXK500 Exh. gas temp. dev. load reduction request setpoint TXL500 Slow Turning Slow turning ready IS331 Slow turning pre-warning XS331 Time to slow turning (in percentage) Time to slow turning (in seconds)

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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0-800 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C -100..100 C

rn a
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
21) 21)

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

10204 10205 10206 10207 10208 10209 10210 10211 10212 10213 10214 10215 10216 10217 10218 10219 10220 10221

12204 12205 12206 12207 12208 12209 12210 12211 12212 12213 12214 12215 12216 12217 12218 12219 12220 12221

SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function

0-1 0-1 0-100% 0-X seconds

Page 6 (9)

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Alarm cond. Note high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high Revision -

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

Code

Name
Remaining slow turning pre-warning time (in percentage) Remaining slow turning pre-warning time (in seconds)

B L

Type SW-function SW-function

Range / Unit 0-100% 0-X seconds 0-100%

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale 30255

Exhaust wastegate valve control Wastegate valve control, A-bank CV519


Wastegate function Wastegate control action

10 4-20mA out SW-function SW-function 10 4-20mA out Resistive SW-function SW-function 10 SW-switch SW-function SW-function SW-function SW-function 10 SW-switch NO-switch NO-switch SW-function SW-function Resistive Ratiometric Ratiometric Ratiometric

23)

Air wastegate valve control Air wastegate valve control, A-bank CV656 Charge air temperature TC A inlet TE651
Wastegate function Wastegate control action

0-100% 0-160 C

se
23) 17)

0-99: 0=closed, 1=EWGCppFpp, 2=EWGPump, 3=AWG, 99=open 0-99: 0=disable_closed, 1=forced_closed, 2=normal_action, 50=frozen_position, 99=forced_open

10 30075 10075 30243 30244 10 30075 10075 30043 30243 30244

0-99: 0=closed, 1=EWGCppFpp, 2=EWGPump, 3=AWG, 99=open 0-99: 0=disable_closed, 1=forced_closed, 2=normal_action, 50=frozen_position, 99=forced_open

Cold air wastegate control action

0-1 0-50: 0=disabled, 1=forced_closed, 2=normal_action, 4=Error AWG, 50=frozen_position -127..126 C -127..126 C 0-1: 0=disabled, 1=selected 0-1 0-1 0-1 1

lu
5 Page 7 (9)

Cold air wastegate valve control Cold air wastegate valve control (digital) CV667

CV667_open Open temperature limit for cold AWG CV667_close Close temperature limit for cold AWG
Cold air wastegate function

rn a
0..150 C -8..52 mbar -38..262 C -38..262 C

Bypass valve control Bypass valve control (digital) CVS643 Bypass position (open) GS643O Bypass position (closed) GS643C
Bypass function Bypass control action

0-99: 0=closed, 1=automatic, 2=disabled, 99=open 0-99: 0=disable_closed, 1=forced_closed, 2=normal_action, 50=frozen_position, 99=forced_open

fo ri

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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Additional signals for FAKS Lube oil temperature, LOC inlet TE231 Crank case pressure PT701 Charge air temperature, before cooler A-bank TE621 Charge air temperature, before cooler B-bank TE631

on
30256 12075 10
15) 15)

12075 12043

30134 10134 30135 30136 30137 30139 30076 10076 30077 30078 30260 30259 30019 30048 30222 30223

ly
Alarm cond. Note 10 1
16) 15) 15)

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
4), 5)

15) 15)

Revision -

Code

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale

fo ri

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

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Notes: 1) Status information, NOT to be treated as alarm. 2) When load reduction request is active, the external system is supposed to reduce engine load in accordance with the load levels given in the engine manual. 3) Alarm set point = nBmax, L.red set point = 1.02 * nBmax for ABB TC, L.red set point = 1.05 * nBmax for Napier TC 4) Bypass control configuration is dependent on actual application. 5) Alarm in case of valve position feedback and valve command do not match. 6) Alarm just above max droop =3%, WECS-stop at 110%. 7) Pump OFF at 400 rpm (increasing) and pump ON at 310 rpm (decreasing) 8) Backup switches according to rules GL: PSZ401, PS210.1, PS210.2, PS410, PS460. Connected to external system, except for PSZ401, see also note 14. No modbus address. 8) Backup switch according to rules LR: TEZ402. See also note 14. 9) Address 30201: common engine alarm is ON in case at least one alarm or load reduction request or shutdown is active. It is blinking in certain engine modes (see engine manual). 10) Address 10201: common alarm (any setpoint alarm active or due to essential failure) 11) Address 11201: common shutdown (any setpoint shutdown active or due to essential failure) 12) Address 12201: common load reduction request (any setpoint load reduction request active or due to essential failure) 13) On GL installations only 14) Any external shutdown, except emergency stop 14) Utilised as combined shutdown input for PSZ401 and any external shutdown (except emergency stop) 14) Utilised as combined shutdown input for TEZ402 and any external shutdown (except emergency stop) 15) Used internally by WECS 16) Optional, used only with air waste gate 17) Load reduction request due to (strategic) sensor failure related to valve control failure handling 18) Variable set point, see chart 1 next page. 19) Variable set point, see chart 2 next page. 20) Variable set point, see chart 3 next page 21) Variable set point, see chart 4 next page 22) Load reduction request due to (strategic) module failure related to valve control failure handling 23) Load reduction request due to control valve failure 23) Load reduction request due to control valve failure 24) Ps refers to the static pressure in the installation at site 25) PY refers to dynamical pressures (PT sensor reading - static pressure) 26) LL-setpoint refers to pre-heat alarm (only active during ready for start) 27) The External shutdown input can only be utilised for external shutdown indication on modbus. See also note 14. 28) Address 30202, 10202: common failure alarm is ON in case at least one sensor failure or module failure is active. 29) Alarm / load reduction setpoints turbocharger type dependant

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Page 8 (9)

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on
Revision -

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Alarm cond. Note

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

Code

Name

B L

Type

Range / Unit

Set points Alarm -Delay

Stop

-Delay L.red. 2) -Delay

Modbus Addresses Anal. Alarm Stop L.red. 2) Scale

Others_start_chart Overview variable setpoints valid for: ABS, BV, CCS, DNV, LR and RINA Chart 1: Lube oil pressure safety
4

Chart 2: HT cooling water pressure safety


5 4,5

3,5

alarm load reduction standby pump autostop

alarm
PT201 pressure [bar]

standby pump autostop autostop backup switch load reduction

PY401 pressure [bar]

2,5

1,5

1
200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 Engine speed [rpm]

lu
1,5 1 0,5
650 700

se
3,5 3 2,5 2 0 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700
Engine speed [rpm]

Chart 3: LT cooling water pressure safety


4 3,5 3
PY471 pressure [bar]

rn a
700 600 500
PY471=PT471-Pstatic Pstatic=600mbar (default)

Chart 4: Exhaust gas cylinder temperature deviation safety

alarm standby pump

TY5xxx [dgC]

2,5 2

nt e

400 300 200 100 0

1,5 1 0,5

fo ri

0 200

250

300

350

400

450

500

550

600

650

700

10

on
PY401=PT401-Pstatic Pstatic=600mbar (default)

load reduction alarm

15

20

Engine speed [rpm]

Output bmep [bar]

File name: 9530DT317 rev. a ver8.xls

Page 9 (9)

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Alarm cond. Note
25 30 35

Modbus, W38B, main engine

Modbus W38 filtered for:all W38, global list

Revision -

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A
Axial clearance camshaft thrust bearing, 2.4 114 crankshaft thrust bearing, 2.4 114 , 2.5 17 , 2.6 3

Emergency operation, defective turbocharger, 2.3 26

B
Bearing 0bearing camshaft, 2.5 21 camshaft bearing bush, inspection, 2.5 19 Bearing, big end bearing, assembling, 2.6 25 BN, 1.2 8 Booster maintenance, governing system, 1.6 13

Fuel control mechanism, maintenance, 1.6 14 Fuel system, draining, 1.1 22

C
Camshaft, 2.8 2 journal, removal, 2.8 16 CCAI, 1.1 19 Centrifugal filter, cleaning, 1.2 47

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D

Components of internal system, Cooling water pump, 1.4 11 Cooling water, 1.4 2 additives, qualities, 1.4 4 control, 1.4 5 requirements, 1.4 3

Cooling water flow, HT cooling water , charge air cooler, 1.4 8 Cooling water pump inspection/assembling, 1.4 14 maintenance, 1.4 12 removal, 1.4 13 , 1.4 15 removal seals, 1.4 13

Crankcase breathing system, 1.2 49 Cranking, turning device, 2.6 31 Crankshaft gear wheel, 2.8 12

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Dimensions and masses engine components, 2.4 127 turbochargers, 2.4 128

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G H
Lubricating oil flash point, 1.2 8 insolubles, 1.2 8 Lubricating oil flow cooler, 1.2 28 cylinder head, 1.2 21

Gudgeon pin bearing, Inspection and maintenance, 2.6 13

HP fuel pump, connection, 1.6 7

Inlet valve seat, removing, 2.7 21

Lubricants additional equipment actuator, 1.2 4 hydraulic tools, 1.2 4 turning gear, 1.2 4

Lubricating oil cooler flow LT water, 1.2 29 mounting cooler stack, 1.2 32 removing cooler stack, 1.2 31

Lubricating oil module, 1.2 27 Lubricating oil pump, engine driven unit, 1.2 22

Maintenance, crankshaft explosion relief valves, 2.5 29 Maintenance tools charge air and exhaust gas system, 2.4 32

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INDEX

Manual Wrtsil 38

Tappet guide block, 2.8 19 Thermostatic valve cooling water, 1.4 8 operation, 1.2 34 maintenance, 1.2 34 trouble shooting, 1.2 34

O
Output, engine, 1.0 3

P
Piston and connecting rod, mounting, 2.6 15 Piston rings, inspection and maintenance, 2.6 13 Pressure control unit, maintenance, 1.2 25

R
Requirements, starting air, 1.3 2

Sensor location tags, 1.6 24

Starting air valve, maintenance, 1.3 11 Stop cylinder adjustment, check, 1.6 10 maintenance, 1.6 10

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V W

Tolerances, camshaft bearing, 2.4 114 Trouble shooting, governing system, 1.6 13

Valve lifting gear, removing, 2.8 19 Viscosity, conversion diagram, 1.1 12

WECS control system, failure identification, 1.6 63

se

Tightening torque, jack pressure air distributor drive shaft, 2.4 104 camshaft and valve drive, 2.4 102 cooling water system components, 2.4 93 crankshaft, connecting rod, piston, 2.4 97 cylinder head with valves, 2.4 99 Drive shaft for mechanical actuator, 2.4 103 engine block with bearings, 2.4 94 general table, 2.4 108 injection system components, 2.4 105

on

cooling water system, 2.4 31 crankshaft, connecting rod, piston, 2.4 42 cylinder head with valves, 2.4 49 engine block, main bearing, cylinder liner, 2.4 34 injection system, 2.4 68 lubricating oil system, 2.4 30 miscellaneous, 2.4 23

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Manual Wrtsil 38

INDEX