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1 INTRODUCTION

Garam Masala

Masala

are

not

spices

in

themselves.

Theyre

wonderfully aromatic blends of spices used throughout India and the rest of the Indian subcontinent. Different regions use different combinations, and the blends will also vary from household where proportions may vary according to whatever dish it is being used to season. They are all highly aromatic, but can vary in intensity of flavour from mild to extremely hot. Masalas can be found easily in the international section of any big groceries store in the west or in any Indian or South Asian shops. Garam Masala, which literally means hot (Garam) spice blend (Masala), is the best known of Indian spice mixtures. It was popularized in northern India during the Moghul Emprie. Garam Masala does not contain turmeric, the ingredient that gives Western-style curries and many of the curries in Indonesia, Malaysia and southern state of India their characteristic yellow colour. The most common was of making Garam Masala is given below. This special blend of spices is used at the end of cooking or fried in the beginning of cooking to add a subtle flavour to the cooked dish. Please note, Garam masala must be added in small quantities, or else it will overpower the dish. Use Garam masala as directed in recipes but dont stop there. It is excellent for flavoring many dishes, not just Indian fare. Sprinkle some over a squash before roasting or a bowl of pumpkin soup before serving, or onto corn on the cob that has been brushed with oil or butter.

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Ingredients Coriander seeds ( Dhaniya ) Cinnamon stick ( Dalchini) Black peppercorns ( Kali Mirch) Whole cloves (Laung) Cumin seeds (Jeera) Nutmeg (Jaiphal) Green cardamom pods, peeled and seeds crushed (Elaichi) Mace (Jaivitri)

Preparation Place all the spices in a dry frying pan or skillet and heat over a very low heat, stirring constantly. As soon as the aroms from the spices begins, remove the pan from the heat. This step is to release the aromatic oils from the spices. Working with only a small quantity at a time, put the spices in an electric blender to grind it to a fine powder. Remove the cardamom pod skins. Allow to cool. Store the Garam Masala in an air- tight container. As long as the container is rightly closed after each use, it should last for a long time.

Source: http:// www.food-india.com/ingredients/i001_i025/i003.html,2003-2010

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2.1 HISTORY OF WORLD SPICE MARKET The earliest evidence of the use of spice by humans was around 50,000 B.C. The Spice trade developed throughout the Middle East in around 2000 BCE with cinnamon and pepper. The Egyptians used herbs for embalming and their demand for exotic herbs helped stimulate world trade. In fact, the word spice comes from the same root as species, meaning kinds of goods. By 1000 BC china and India had a medical systems based upon herbs. Early uses were connected with magic, medicine, religion, tradition, and preservation. A recent archaeological discovery suggests that clove, indigenous to the Indonesian island of Ternate in the Maluku Islands, could have been introduced to the Middle East very early on. Digs found a clove burnt onto the floor of a burned down kitchen in the Mesopotamian site of Terqa, in what is now is now modern-day Syria, dated to 1700 BC. In the story of Genesis, Joseph was sold into slavery by his brothers to spice merchants. In the biblical poem Song of Solomon, the male speaker compares his beloved to many forms of spices. Generally, Egyptian, Chinese, Indian, and Mesopotamian sources do not refer to known spices. In South Asia, nutmeg, which originates from the Banda Islands in the Malukus, has a Sanskrit name. Sanskrit is the ancient language of India, showing how old the usage of this spice is in this region. Historians believe that nutmeg was introduced to Europe in the 6th century BC. The ancient Indian epic of Ramayana mentions cloves. In any case, it is known that the Romans had cloves in the 1 st century AD because Pliny the Elder spoke of them in his writings. Indonesian merchants traveled around China, India, the Middle East, and the east coast of Africa. Arab merchants facilitated the routes through the Middle East and India. This made the city of Alexandria in Egypt the main trading centre for spices because of its port. The most important discovery prior to the European spice trade was the monsoon winds (40 CE). Sailing from Eastern spice growers to Western European consumers gradually replaced the land-locked spice routes once facilitated by the Middle East Arab caravans.

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2.2 MIDDLE AGES

Spices were among the most demanded and expensive products available in Europe in the Middle Ages, the most common being black pepper, cinnamon (and the cheaper alternative cassia), cumin, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. Given the medieval medicine's main theory of humorist, spices and herbs were viewed as indispensable elements to balance "humours" in food, a daily basis for good health at a time of recurrent pandemics. Spices were all imported from plantations in Asia and Africa, which made them extremely expensive. From the 8th until the 15th century, the Republic of Venice had the monopoly on spice trade with the Middle East, and along with it the neighboring Italian city-states. The trade made the region phenomenally rich. It has been estimated that around 1,000 tons of pepper and 1,000 tons of the other common spices were imported into Western Europe each year during the Late Middle Ages. The value of these goods was the equivalent of a yearly supply of grain for 1.5 million people. While paper was the most common spice, the most exclusive was saffron, used as much for its vivid yellow-red color as for its flavor. Spices that have now fallen into some obscurity in European cuisine include grains of paradise, a relative of cardamom which almost entirely replaced pepper in late medieval north French cooking, long pepper, mace, spikenard, galangal and cubeb. A popular modern- day misconception is that medieval cooks used liberal amounts of spices, particularly black pepper, merely to disguise the taste of spoiled meat. However, a medieval feast was as much a culinary event as it was a display of the hosts vast resources and generosity, and as most nobles had a wide selection of fresh or preserved mints, fish, or seafood to choose from, the use of ruinously expensive spices on cheap, rotting, meat would have made little sense.

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2.3 EARLY MODERN PERIOD The control of trade routes and the spice-producing regions were the main reasons that Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama sailed to India in 1499. Spain and Portugal were not happy to pay the high price that Venice demanded for spices. At around the same time, Christopher Columbus returned from the New World, he described to investors the many new spices available there. Alfonzo de Albuquerque (14531515) allowed the Portuguese to take control of the sea routes to India. In 1506, he took the island of Socotra in the mouth of the Red Sea and, in 1507, Ormuz in the Persian Gulf. Since becoming the viceroy of the Indies, he took Goa in India in 1510, and Malacca on the Malay Peninsula in 1511. The Portuguese could now trade directly with Siam, China, and the Moluccas. The Silk Road complemented the Portuguese sea routes, and brought the treasures of the Orient to Europe via Lisbon, including many spices. With the discovery of the New World came new spices, including allspice, bell and chili peppers, vanilla, and chocolate. This development kept the spice trade, with America as a late comer with its new seasonings, profitable well into the 19th century. In the Caribbean, the island of Grenada is well known for growing and exporting a number of spices, including the nutmeg, which was introduced to Grenada by the settlers.

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2.4 HANDLING SPICES

A typical home's kitchen shelf of spices as would be seen in the United States or Canada. A spice may be available in several forms: fresh, whole dried, or pre-ground dried. Generally, spices are dried. A whole dried spice has the longest shelf life so can be purchased and stored in larger amounts, making it cheaper on a per-serving basis. Some spices are rarely available either fresh or whole, for example turmeric, and must be purchased in ground form. Small seeds, such as fennel and mustard seeds, are used both whole and in powder form. The flavor of a spice is derived in part from compounds that oxidize or evaporate when exposed to air. Grinding a spice greatly increases its surface area and so increases the rates of oxidation and evaporation. Thus, flavor is maximized by storing a spice whole and grinding when needed. The shelf life of a whole spice is roughly two years; of a ground spice roughly six months. The "flavor life" of a ground spice can much shorter. Ground spices are better stored away from light. To grind a whole spice, the classic tool is mortar and pestle. Less labor-intensive tools are more common now: a micro plane or fine grater can be used to grind small amounts; a coffee grinder is useful for larger amounts. A frequently used spice such as black pepper may merit storage in its own hand grinder or mill. Some flavor elements in spices are soluble in water; many are soluble in oil or fat. As a general rule, the flavors from a spice take time to infuse into the food so spices are added early in preparation Source :(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/spice)

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2.5 INDIAN SPICE MARKET The fame of Indian spices is older than recorded history. The Story of Indian spices is more than 7000 years old. Centuries before Greece and Rome had been discovered, sailing ships were carrying Indian spices, perfumes and textile to Mesopotamia, Arabia and Egypt. It was the lure of these that brought many seafarers to the shores of India. Long before Christian era, the Greek merchants thronged the markets of South India, buying many expensive items amongst which spices were one. Epicurean Rome was spending a fortune on Indian spices, silks, brocades, Dhaka Muslin and cloth of gold, etc. It is believed that the Parthia wars were being fought by Rome largely to keep open the trade route to India. It is also said that Indian spices and her famed products were the main lure for crusades and expeditions to the East. Today when spices cost so little, it seems unbelievable that they were once a royal luxury and those men were willing to risk their lives in quest of them. Though there were the Dark Ages, but there were rich people who had gold to exchange for pepper and cinnamon. It was in the year1492 A.D., that Christopher Columbus discovered the New World. Five years later, four tiny ships sailed southward from the port of Lisbon, Portugal, under the guidance of Captain Vasco Da Gama. Like Columbus, Vasco Da Gama too was searching for a new route to the spice lands of Asia. While Columbus failed to achieve the goal, Da Gama succeeded. In a two year, 24,000miles round trip, he took his ships around the continent of Africa to India and back to Lisbon. Only two of the four ships survived to reach their homeport. These two ships brought back a cargo of spices and other products worth 60 times the cost of the said voyage. The spices of the East were valuable in those times, during these Middle Ages; a pound of ginger was worth a sheep, a pound of mace worth three sheeps or half a cow. Pepper, the most valuable spice of all, was counted out in individual peppercorns, and a sack of pepper was said to be worth a man`s life. Da Gama`s successful voyage intensified an international power struggle for control over the spice trade. For three centuries afterwards the nations of Western Europe -

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Portugal, Spain, France, Holland, and Great Britain - fought bloody sea-wars over the spiceproducing colonies. By the year 1000 Arabians had conquered the Indus valley, what is now India. They brought the cumin and coriander that mixed with Indian pepper; ginger and turmeric make up the base of so many South Asian dishes. It was this combination of spices that centurys later British sailors spread throughout the world as curry powder. In India, Arabian traders got the rare and exotic spices of the Far East from local spice merchants. Arabian traders were able to make good money supplying these spices, even with the high prices paid to the Indian middle men, not only to their countrymen back home, but to Europe as well. These traders of spices paid for the Art and Education for which Arabia became famous in the present day. In many ways the culture of Arabia loved studying and learning different things. Many great Greek and Roman plays were translated in Arabic, so too were the geographic writings of Pliny and Ptolemy telling of the general location of the tabled Spice Islands.

As Arabian astronomers charted the stars in order in order to study them and understand mans relation with them, they realized these same charts could be used for navigation. And then Arabian traders invented the technology and knew the odds. Soon they were sailing to what is now Indonesia and Malaysia to purchase spices directly, bypassing the Indian middleman. By the middle of the 13th century Arabian merchants were regularly visiting Sumatra for cassia from the slopes of Mount kainite. White travelling they would stop as little villages and towns that had fresh water resource to refill their water suppliers. At these stops the merchants would barter their cumin, coriander and saffron and speak and preach and their religion as well. The tropical climate did not suit the saffron but coriander now plays an integral part in so many dishes across Indonesia. The religion, which they preached white bartering spices, did even better than the coriander, with Indonesia today being the worlds most populous Islamic country. Compared to the Hindu belief in a caste system spread earlier by traders from India, it seems the Islamic belief that all were equal in serving God really hit a chord with the people of Indonesia. In nutshell, the

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fascinating history of spices is a story of adventure, exploration, conquest and fierce naval rivalry.

The people of those times used spices, as we do today, to enhance or vary the flavours of their foods. Spices were also flavour disguisers, masking the taste of the otherwise tasteless food that was nutritious, but if un spices, had to be thrown away. Some spices were also used for preserving food like meat for a year or more without refrigeration. In the sixteenth century, cloves were used to preserve food without refrigeration. Cloves contain a chemical called eugenic that inhibits the growth of bacteria. It is still used to preserve some modern foods like Virginia ham. Later, mustard and ground mustard were also found to have preservative qualities. When spices were not available people went hungry because they could not preserve their foods to carry them over to the winter. Such was the importance of spices those days. Broadly, there are two main subdivisions of spices one being the major spices and the other is minor spices. For example the spices like pepper cardamom, ginger, turmeric,

chilies etc., comes under major category. The important minor spices grown in India are avowal, aniseed, caraway, celery, coriander, cumin, dill seed, fennel, fenugreek, garlic, onion, saffron, vanilla etc.

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2.6 DEVELOPMENT OF SPICE MARKET IN INDIA The History of spice development dates back to 1951 by setting up of a high level Spices Enquiry Committee by the Planning Commission in view of the significant role spices play among agricultural commodities produced in the country. The committee felt the immense value of these commodities in building up the national economy and observed lack of organized efforts to improve their production and marketing as being done for other plantation crops like tea, coffee, rubber, etc. The committee in their report submitted in October 1953, stressed the need for better planning, research and coordinated efforts in the proper development of these crops. The Government of India accepted above recommendations and provided necessary funds to ICAR for implementing various schemes on Research Development and Marketing in all the regions of the country. An ad- hoc Central Spices and Cashew nut Committee, a semi autonomous body consisting of govererment officials and representatives of growers and traders was set up in 1961, devoting special attention in solving problems confronting the crop development and financed research schemes to implement by the State Governments. Based on the report of the Agricultural Research Review Team, appointed by Government of India, the Central Spices and Cashew nut committee was abolished in September 1965 and the responsibility for spices research was transferred to the ICAR. The Government of /India took over development and marketing functions handled by the Committee by setting up of a Regional office of the Ministry and subsequently created the present Directorate of Arcanum and Spices Development as a Kerala, for paying adequate attention in different aspects of crop development. Simultaneously Indian Spices Development Council was constituted in order to continue the association of various official and non-official interests with the development programmers on these crops and have the benefit of the continued advice. The directorate served as the Secretariat of the Development Council. No sizable programmed for development of spices was undertaken in the first Five Year plan (1951-56). The second Five Year Plan (1951-61) contaminated provision to the tune of Rs. 15.49 lakh while the third Five year plan (1961-66) had an outlay of Rs. 35 lakh for spice development with which planning material production was taken up for the development of major spices in the important growing states. In the Fourth Five year Plan ( 1969-74), development programs were

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concentrated for large scale production and distribution of high yielding varieties of important spices with a financial provision of Rs. 13.9 lakh A well organized effort for spices development was mooted in the Fifth Five Year Plan (197479) with a plan provision of Rs 175 lakh with stress for the development of major spices alone that too confined to traditional centres of cultivation. In this plan period a special component plan costing over Rs. 30 lakh was also taken up for the development of spices cultivation in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands. In the Sixth Five Year plan (979-84) the development programmers on spices were assigned to State Governments as their mandate on the recommendations of the National Development Council. However, Central Scheme was continued in the Union Territories and autonomous organizations like State Agricultural Universities and ICAR Institutes with the limited financial resources made available.

Source: (http:/www.indiaspices.com/pdf/spice-AR-2008-09-English.pdf)

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2.7 INDIAN SPICES India is known the world over as The Home of Spices , thus Spices and condiments need no introduction. The climate of the country is ideal for the growth of almost all spices. Spices are an important group of agricultural goods, which are virtually indispensable in the culinary art. They also play a significant role in our national economy and in the economies of several spice producing, exporting and importing countries. India accounts for about 45% of the global spice exports. In India, from the point of view of both domestic consumption and export, spices are important commercial crops. According to the international Organization for Standardization [ISO], there are about 109 spices and India produces as many as 75 in its various agro climatic re gions. The term spices and condiments applies to natural plant or vegetable products or mixtures in whole or ground form, which are used for imparting flavour, aroma and piquancy to the food items. Spices are also being used within the country for flavoring foods and in medicines, pharmaceutical, perfumery, cosmetics and several other industries. Fruits [ cardamom, chilies etc.], or Berries [ allspice, black pepper, juniper etc], or Seeds [ aniseed, caraway, celery, coriander], or Rhizomes [ ginger, turmeric etc.], or Roots [ angelica, horse- radish, linage etc.], or Leaves [ bay leaves, mints, marjoram, tempt etc.], or Kernel [ nutmeg etc.] or Aril [ mace], or Bank [ cinnamon, cassia etc.] , or Bulbs [ garlic, onion etc.], or other part of spice plants.

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2.8 LIST OF INDIAN SPICES

Cardamom

Large Cardamom

Pepper

Chilies

Ginger

Mustard

Coriander

Cumin

Fennel

Fenugreek

Mustard

Nutmeg

Mace

Vanilla

All Spice

Poppy Seed

Tamarind

Caboodle

Cinnamon

Cassia

Garlic

Star Anise

Sweet Flag Greater Galangal

Clove

Pomegranate

Aniseed

Bishops Weed

Caraway

Dill

Saffron

Juniper Berry

Asafoetida

Caper

Kokum

Tempt

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Celery

Curry Leaf

Mint

Parsley

Horse Radish

Thyme

Pepper Long

Sage

Lovage

Bay Leaf

Hyssop

Basil

Rose Mary

Savory

Marjoram

Oregano

Tarragon

Curry Powder

Source: (http//www.mypdfsearch.com/spice.pdf) (http://www.indianspices.com/pdf/spice_gallery.pdf)

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2.9 CHALLENGES OF INDIAN SPICE INDUSTRY The session started with the chairpersons remark in which she talked about WTO/ global issues. She also discussed the livelihood issues in spice industries and pointed out that there was shortage of labour in this industry. Afterwards, Mr G Sree Kumar from Spices Board gave a board view of Indian spice industry in terms of its performance, wherein he mentioned that Indias share in the export of global spice market was approximately 50 percent. Despite its huge share in export market, India exported only 10 percent of its spice production. It was also revealed that India exported around 175 spice products to over 160 countries. Further, he showed that only 7 percent of total exporters contributed around 80 percent of total Indias exports. There was a continuous rising trend in the export of spice products since 1990 91. He also mentioned that more than 30 percent of spice product was coming from value added products. Then he discussed about the importance of Spice Park and expectations from it. The purpose of the spice park was to provide basic infrastructure facilities and also to provide uninterrupted or adequate supply of spices. It had provided worlds best spice quality laboratories in India. In his view, The vision of Indian spice industry is to become a processing hub and premier supplier of value added spices and herbs in the industrial, retail and food service segments of the global by meeting the quality and requirement. Further, he spelt out the challenges in the spice industry basically focusing on pepper and cardamom. According to him, the major challenges in India were small holding, incidence of diseases, uncertainty in prices and others. These factors resulted in low productivity, reduction in pepper cultivation and stagnant production. Then he suggested the factors to be studied in spice industry, which were price competitiveness in international market, cost of production, supply chain and market efficiency, tax/ duty and others. Afterward, discussants raised various issued starting from information asymmetry in price and cost of production to mechanization and tariff issues. Need of holistic approach was also pointed out. Finally the issue of intercropping in spice industry was also raised.

Source: http:// www.cds.edu/admin/homeFiles/GB%20 annexure%204.pdf

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2.10 GOVERNMENT INTIATIVE


Indian Government is providing financial assistance to the farmers who are engaged in the production of the various spices. Government has also taken certain steps to ensure the availability of better quality spices, more hygienically processed spices in order to boost exports. Indian spice board also provides financial and technical assistance to farmers.

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3.1 HISTORY OF WONDER FOOD

J.P.Foods one of the leading producers and distributors of Basic as well as Blended Masalas is among the fastest growing industries in state of Gujarat. J. P. Foods is promoted by J. P. Tobacco Products Ltd., a national leader in tobacco products. The different activities of the Group Companies include manufacturing of Biddies, Pharmaceuticals, and transport with a turnover exceeding 3900 Million Indian Rupees. J.P. Food India launched its range of basic masalas in March 1999, under the brand name WONDER MASALA. The company has already set its distribution and retail network in whole of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal pradesh, and J & K. The products will soon be available in other states of India.

J.P. Food today operates with a high profile organizational network. The company has developed enlightened management capabilities owing to a unique fusion of entrepreneurship with professional expertise. The company has a full- fledged distribution network comprising of super stockiest, distributors all over Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, and J & K, and all logistics term to ensure timely supply.

With the roaring success of the initial launch, the company has now embarked on an expansion plan to increase production capacity three- fold within a short span of time.

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3.2 COMPANY PROFILE

At J.P.Foods the core culture is to deliver superior quality products born of the highest technological norms. J.P. Foods is recognized as a renowned manufacturer and exporter of Basic and Mixed Masalas. J.P. Foods India launched its range of basic masalas in March 1999, under the brand name 'WONDER MASALA'. The company has already set its distribution and retail network in whole of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, and J&K. The products will soon be available in other states of India.

J.P. Foods today operates with a high profile organizational network. The company has developed enlightened management capabilities owing to a unique fusion of entrepreneurship with professional expertise. The company has a full-fledged distribution network comprising of super stockiest, distributors all over Gujarat , Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, and J&K , and its logistics team to ensure timely supply.

With the roaring success of the initial launch, the company has now embarked on an expansion plan to increase production capacity three-fold within a short span of time. A complete new range of Instant mixes and a variety of Pickles are to be launched very shortly.

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3.3 INFRASTRUCTURE

By virtue of blending class and refinement, J.P. Foods has engineered a sophisticated production plant that matches its unsurpassed range. Situated amidst the clean and hygienic environment at Kadi, 45 kms away from the Ahmadabad, this plant is a first-of-its-kind in Gujarat and third in India. The factory premise spans over an impressively built-up area of around 37,000 sq. ft. with open land of about 50,000 sq.mt. that ensures pollution-free surroundings. Each building is designed to achieve efficiency in loading and unloading the finished products. The entire plant is dust-proof and equipped with efficient machines which sort, de-stone, clean, de-moisturize, grind and blend the various raw materials. Computerized mechanisms and the process automation keeps the product absolutely untouched by human hands, thus ensuring 100% hygiene.

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3.4 QUALITY A number of measures have been implemented for highquality production. A standard operating procedure has been adapted to manufacture quality products in our factory as per AGMARK standards. The material is fumigated before grinding, which destroys all the traces of fungus, bacteria and the rodents. The material is ground at a lower temperature than at conventional plants, so that the aroma and flavour are not lost during the grinding process. Enough care is taken to ensure that dust and bacteria do not enter the plant and storage areas. Continuous atomization has been adapted to ensure that human hands do not touch the material. Meticulous checks are maintained in all the manufacturing, storing and packaging departments to heighten the original flavour and aroma of the spices. and bacteria do not enter the plant and storage areas. Continuous atomization has been adapted to ensure that human hands do not touch the material. Meticulous checks are maintained in all the manufacturing, storing and packaging departments to heighten the original flavour and aroma of the spices. 3.5 FOOD TECHNOLOGIST In order to produce the best product quality and blends, the company has hired the services of a food technologist. He has been instrumental in offering the best quality standards, duly acknowledged by domestic and foreign buyers. He is also a consultant to other organizations who conduct nutrition programmes in India.

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3.6 GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATIONS Our product confirms to Indian government standards and has the AGMARK label on its basic spices. The company is also registered with the Spice Board of India-Cochin, The Federation of Indian Export Organizations - New Delhi & The Agriculture and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA)-New Delhi and various Indo-Foreign Chambers of Commerce. 3.7 QUALITY CONTROL & LABORATORY The company has its own stringent quality checks and test laboratories which have put our products on the global map and encouraged us to get registered with international organizations. The laboratory offers analytical services to analyses spices for physical, chemical and microbial contaminants. The analysis of spices for pesticide residues and presence of aflatoxin are also undertaken. Needless to mention, our short exposure in the domestic markets has earned us the title of the No. 1 quality product, leaving behind other established players.

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3.8 PRODUCT OF THE COMPANY


The product available in the Indian market is classified into three categories. (1) Basic Spices ( Powder Spices) Chili Powder Turmeric Powder Coriander Powder Coriander-Cumin Powder Kashmiri Chili Powder Black Pepper Powder Amchoor Powder Hing (Asafoetida) Powder Supreme Garam Masala Achar Masala Cumin Whole (Jeera)

Chilly Powder Wonder Chilly Powder is the spice that truly portrays the exotic flavors of India. Packing available in ( 6gms, 50gms, 100gms, 200gms, 500gms, 1Kg, 5Kg & 20Kg)

Turmeric Powder Turmeric is a ground root of a plant predominantly grown in India. With Wonder Turmeric Powder, what you get is this herb's natural core essence. Packing available in ( 6gms, 50gms, 100gms, 200gms, 500gms, 1Kg, 5Kg & 20Kg)

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Coriander Powder When there's a need to heighten the aroma of any cuisine, you can trust the authenticity of Wonder Coriander Powder. Packing available in (6gms, 100gms, 200gms, 500gms, & 10Kg)

Coriander-Cumin Powder Wonder sources the best-grown cumin from the fertile, loamy regions of Gujarat and Rajasthan. Packing available in (100gms, 200gms, 500gms & 10Kg)

Kashmiri Chilly Powder Wonder Kashmir Chilli Powder is a produce of finely ground, distinctly flavored Kashmir chillies. Packing available in ( 50gms, 100gms )

Black Pepper Powder Packing available in ( 50gms, 100gms ) Amchoor Powder Amchoor Powder (Dry Mango Powder) is obtain by grinding clean, dried, peeled mango slices. Dry Mango Powder can be used instead of tamarind or Citric Acid. Packing available in (50gms, 100gms)

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Hing (Asafoetida) Powder Wonder Hing (Asafoetida) has an aromatic, pungent whiff. Its distinct tang, adds a memorable taste and a heavy flavour to your cooking. Packing available in (10gms, 25gms, 50gms, 100 gms, 200gms) Supreme Garam Masala This Wonder's blend is pepper-based and specifically blended to impart more pungency. Packing available in ( 50gms, 100gms, 500gms ) Achar Masala Since centuries the preparation of pickles, though a very tedious and time consuming process, has been a tradition in several Indian households. Packing available in (200gms, 500gms) Cumin Whole (Jeera) Wonder Jeera whole pure and reliable Packing available in (100gms)

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GENERAL SPICES

Anistar Whole Anistar Powder Bay Leaves Whole * Bay Leaves Powder Cardamom (Black) Cardamom Whole (Green) Cardamom Granules (Green) Cardamom Powder (Green) Cardamom Whole (White) Cinnamon Stick (Flat) Cinnamon Stick (Round) Cinnamon Powder Cloves Whole Cloves Powder Coriander Crushed Curry Leaves (Whole) Curry Leaves Powder Dagar Phool Whole * Dagar Phool Powder

Fenugreek Crushed Fenugreek Powder Ganthoda Whole Ganthoda Powder Ginger Whole Ginger Powder Kachri Mace Whole Mace Powder Mint Leaves Whole Mint Leaves Powder Mustard Crushed Nutmeg Powder Nutmeg Whole Pepper Whole (Black) Pepper Crushed (Black) Pepper Powder (Black) Pepper Whole (White) Pepper Crushed (White) Pepper Powder (White) Shah Jiru

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3.9 MARKET OF WONDER MASALA


INDIAN MARKET Gujarat Delhi Japur

DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL OF THE COMPANY


IN GUJARAT

FACTORY

DISTRIBUTOR

RETAILER

CUSTOMERS

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4.1

LITERATURE REVIEW

The global market for chilies is estimated at 400,000 metric tonnes and production in major countries are growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.2 percent, according to KD Evander Reddy of ITC Guntur. In a report presented at the recent World Spice Congress, he pointed out that productivity of Indian chilly has shown positive signs in recent years. In chillies the major producing countries are India, China, Peru, Bangladesh, Hungary and few others. Production of major countries is growing at CAGR 5.2 percent. World trade in chilies is put at 400,000 metric tonnes. Indian share in global production range from 50 to 60 percent, China and Peru are growing fast and Hungary shows a decline. Peru and China are dominating world paprika trade. However India is the only one source for hot chilies. The Indian productivity in Chilies has been showing positive signs showing rise from 1544 kgper hectare in 2005 to 1550 kg per hectare in 2009.During 2007 and 2008, the productivityrecorded was 1685 and 1611 kg per hectare respectively. The steady increase in productivity wason account of hybrids KOCHI (Commodity Online): Sreekumar Raghavan Indias value added spices may get more acceptances in USA if trends from supermarkets and restaurants are any indication. Trend experts Mintel reported that ethnic flavours are becoming the popular trend for ready-to-eat foods in USA and other leading countries. Since culinary her band spices show potential health benefits in scientific studies, the functional qualities will likely appeal to consumers. Products featuring turmeric, cinnamon, and ginger may be reaching the store shelves next year, Mintel said in their 2010 Global Packaged Food predictions. In the coming years, Indias spices exports mainly pepper would be more dependent on changing food consumption patterns in USA and other leading markets rather than just the production in Brazil or Vietnam. According to Spices Board, spice oils and oleoresins including mint products like mint oils, menthol crystals, and menthol powder contributed 40% of the total export earnings for India in2008-09. Chili contributed 20% followed by cumin 10%, pepper 8% and turmeric

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5%. During the year 2008-09, Indian spices and spice products reached more than135 countries in world. The leading among them are USA (21%), Malaysia (7%), UAE (6%), China (6%) and UK (5%).

Exports are increasing over a period of time. As well as Indian spices are being recognized for its quality and trust that has been changed over a period of time.

India to be world spices hub by 2017 India will be the worlds largest spices processing hub by 2017, according to V J Kurien, chairman, Spices Board. Addressing a press conference here he said the board was making all efforts to achieve the goal within 10 years.

A vision document for the purpose in being prepared by a team of experts in the Spices Board and will be finalized in 3-4 months. Currently, the country is handling 44 per cent of worlds total spices business quantity wise, and35 per cent in value terms. More than 70 per cent of the worlds business in value-added spices products is also handled by India.

Kurien said the emergence of Vietnam as a processing centre would not be a serious threat to India as the countrys major firms were more quality conscious. According to the estimates of the board, India had exported value-added spices-based products worth Rs 2,100 crore in 2006-07 which is a remarkable in history.

The board will launch e-auction of cardamom by next July. Although the commerce ministry had announced the project almost a year back, this will be set in motion in the beginning of the next harvesting season. The testing of the new system is in full-swing, and will be introduced at Bodinay kanoor in Tamil Nadu and later will be extended to other major cardamom auction centers.

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Kurien said during the on-going Five Year Plan, 9 more spices parks would be set up in various states apart from the first one being set up in Idukki district of Kerala. Though the exact locations of the parks are yet to be finalized, one each will come up at Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.

Meanwhile, the Spices Board chairman ruled out the possibility of extension of the export subsidy scheme for black pepper. Domestic prices of the commodity have appreciated more than100 per cent during the last 6-7 months, thus severely affecting exports.

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5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

5.1 PROBLEM STATEMENT: The project study aims to conduct drive retail initiatives in Kalol & Kadi city, and to measure its impact on sales for Wonder Foods Products Pvt. Ltd. The research is exploratory in nature and quantitative research tools to be used for data collection & analysis the data will be collected from the survey of the grocery retailers who sell wonder product. How the Channel Sales management is working in Wonder foods private ltd. How does Proper Channel Sales management affect the sales? How does channel design make any difference? How availability and distribution network spices affects on its sales and satisfaction of retailer? Effect of waiting time after ordering on the retailers as well as on sales? How layers of distribution network affects on the availability and sales of the product?

A STUDY ON RETAILER SATISFACTION TOWARDS WONDER MASALA IN KADI & KALOL CITY. 5.2 OBJECTIVE: To find out relationship of retailer with different brands of Garam Masala. To determine satisfaction level for wonder product specific focus on Garam Masala. To identify the preferred promotional schemes by retailers. To find out the test liked by consumer of masala through retailer. To study the effective source of Advertisement for Garam Masala. To find out the factors that affect the retailers decision for purchasing Garam Masala. To know the purchasing frequency of Garam Masala of retailers.

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5.3 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT: A well structured questionnaire are used which was a mixture of open ended, closed-ended questions, rating scales, multiple choices and dichotomous are also used for collections certain information. 5.4 METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION:SAMPLE DESIGN: The sample design for this project was a non probability Sampling Design. Under the non probability Sampling Techniques, judgmental Sampling method is to be implemented.

Sample Size Sample Unit

: 100 Retailers : of the retail store shop

Sampling Method: Non-Probabilistic Convenience sampling Sample Geography: grocery retail stores of KALOL & KADI city

5.5 DATA COLLECTION: Nature of data PRIMARY DATA: Descriptive research design is been used for the study. Primary data was collected from retailer. Survey method personal interview method is used to collect data from the retailers. SECONDARY DATA: The secondary data was collected from websites. The secondary data is collected through journal, magazines and web portals. 5.6 SAMPLE SIZE: Due to time and resources constraints the sample size of 50 kalol & 50 kadi, retailers are selected for the survey in agreement with industry and project guide. : The nature of data is both primary and secondary data.

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5.7 SAMPLE PROCEDURE: Convenience sampling was adopted for collection of information and the sampling is nonprobability. 5.8 QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN:-

The questionnaire has been design as per the concept of the questionnaire design.

5.9 LIMITATION: Every research has certain limitation to it. So also the research conducted had certain limitation. They are stated as under: Due to time and resources the sample size was restricted to 100 in consultations with project guide. The sample respondents may not be the true presentation of the total customers. They can be errors due to bios of respondents. Convenience sampling has own its limitations which would h0ave resulted in minor errors. The time with in which the study is being attempted is too short to carry out a detailed analysis. The respondents were not able to justify their stand at points and hence this proved to be a limitation of the study.

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Q.1.Do you sell Garam Masala? (Tick mark as applicable)

Table 1.1 shows retailers keeping Garam Masala to sell at their store

Particular Frequency Percentage 100 100% YES 0 0 NO 100 100 TOTAL Chart: 1.1 show retailer keeping Garam Masala to sell at their store

INTERPRETATION Here we can find 100% of the retailers are selling Garam masala at their store. We can also say that Garam masala is mostly demanded by the customers at retail outlets so the retailers are keeping Garam masala to sell at their store.

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Q.2 Are the some brand of Garam Masala, please tick in front of the brand that you keep to sell and please specify since how long, you sell the specified brand?

Table: 2.1 Showing Retailers Relation with individual company listed below in table

Time Brand Wonder Everest MDH Badshah Jalaram Ramdev

Not keeping 0 1 1 3 33 3

0-3 Years 30 16 14 17 42 7

4-7 Years 34 51 22 25 13 12

8-11Years 22 27 48 36 7 32

12 or more Years 15 5 15 19 5 46

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Chart:2.1 Showing number of retailers that are not keeping Garam masala of individual Company mention in the chart

INTERPRETATION: Everest & MDH is the company which is more preferable among retailer to keep at their stores. Only 1 retailer out of 100 are not keeping Garam masala of Everest & MDH comparies Garam masala at their store to sell. Only 1 retailer is not keeping wonder Garam masala at their store to sell. Other 99 retailer are keeping wonder Garam masala to sell at their store. Jalaram is the brand which is least preferred to keep by retailer. 33 retailers out of 100 retailers are not associated with Jalaram specifically for Garam masala product.

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Chart 2.2 Showing numbers of retailers that are keeping Garam masala of individual Company mention in the chart since 0 years to 3 years.

INTERPRETATION: In this range of years Jalaram is the best company who is having relation with the retailer among other companics. Out of 100 retailers wonder Garam masala are kept by 28 retailers in the range of 0 years to 3 years. Means they are associated with company within last 3 years only. Ramdev are companies who have only 7 retailers out of 100 retailers associated with the company since last 3 years.

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Chart 2.3 Showing numbers of retailers that are keeping Garam masala of individual Companies mention in the chart since 4 years to 7 Years.

INTERPRETATION: Everest is the Company having 51 retailers associated with the company for garam masala from 4 years- 7 years. Wonder has 34 retailers out of 100 retailers associated with the company for garam masala from 4 years- 7 years. Badshah has 25 retailers out of 100 retailers associated with the company for garam masala from 4 years 7 years.

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Chart 2.4 Showing numbers of retailers that are keeping Garam masala of individual Company mention in the chart since 8 years to 11 years.

INTERPRETATION: Out of 100 retailers 48 retailers are associated with MDH Company since 8 to 11 years with specific focus for selling Garam masala. Badshah also has strong hold in the market. 36 retailers are keeping Badshah Garam masala since 8 years to 11 years to sell at their store. Wonder are having 22 retailers are keeping respectively that are selling their Garam masala in this range of years.

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Chart 2.5 Showing numbers of retailers that are keeping garam masala of individual Company mention in the chart since 12 years or more than 12 years

INTERPRETATION: Out of 100 retailers 46 retailers are associated with the Ramdev company with more than 12 years for selling Garam masala product. We can say that company holds good relations with their retailers through their distribution channel. Badshah is the second largest company in above mentioned companies in the chart who is having 19 retailers associated with them in business to sell Garam masala product. Wonder & MDH are also holding good relations with retailers. They are having 15 retailers respectively associated with company with more than 12 years to sell Garam masala product. Everest and Jalaram are some companies who are not having or have very less countable number of retailers associated with them to sell Garam masala of their respective companies with 12 or more years.

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[3] Please specify from the following, which type of blended spices you have in your shop? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE, MULTIPLE CHOICES)

Table:3.1 Shows Number of retailers keeping the specific blended spices at their stores to sell

ITEM Hing Vadapou Masala Sandwich Masala Garam Masala Tea Masala Pav bhaji Masala Chhole Masala Kitchen king Masala

Percentage 100.00% 69.00% 46.00% 100.00% 84.00% 81.00% 73.00% 24.00%

ITEM Chat Masala Curry Masala Tanduri Masala Archer Masala Panipuri Masala Sambher Masala Kasturi Methi

Percentage 84.00% 25.00% 34.00% 47.00% 84.00% 56.00% 57.00%

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Chart 3.1 Shows Number of retailers keeping the specific blended spices at their stores to sell

INTERPRETATION: Out of 15 products of blended spices motioned above in chart, Garam Masala is the product that is store by highest number of retailers at their store to sell of all the companies. Hing is the product next to Garam masala which is stored by retailers to sell. Out of 100 retailers, 100 retailers keep Hing to sell. After this two products, Tea masala and archer masala are the most saleable items which retailers keep at their stores. The least preferable items Sandwich masala and vadapuv masala.

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[4] Please rank the following Factor on the basis of their priority that you consider while purchasing Garam Masala? (Rank it 1= highest priority to 10= lowest priority)

Table: 4.1 shows priority of factors that are considered while purchasing Garam masala by retailers

PARTICULAR

Mean Statistic

Std. Deviation Statistic


1.167 1.796 2.111 2.287 2.189 2.326 1.76 2.2 1.55 2.734

Customers demand Quality of Product Price of the product Brand of the company Consistency of the service Scheme in the product Retailer Credit Policy of Wonder masala Profit Margin Replacement of product Relation with distributor

3.47 4.37 4.5 5.27 5.41 6.23 7.21 1.74 8.68 8.09

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Factor consider while purchasing Garam Masala


9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

INTERPRETATION: In above graph shows the mean and standard deviation of the various factors. Here retailer credit policy of Company masalas Mean is high compare to other factors and relation with distributors standard deviation is high compare to other factors. Here Profit Margins mean is low it is good for the public thats why custom er more purchase the wonder masala. Customer demand is low in standard deviation it is bad for the company.

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[5] Do you sell Garam Masala of Wonder Company? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE)

Particular Frequency Percentage 100 100% YES 0 0 NO 100 100 TOTAL

Chart 5.1 Showing Wonder Garam Masala Share with Retailers

share of Wonder Masala


0%

YES NO

100%

INTERPRETATION: Out of the 100 retailers 100 retailers are keeping Wonder Garam masala that is 100% of retailers are keeping Wonder Garam masala to sell at their outlet in the market. 100% retailers are using wonder masala it is good for the company and awareness level is high.

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[6] Please show your level of satisfaction towards Wonder masala by Rating the below mentioned factors in scale of 1 to 5?

1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied Table 6.1 Cronbachs Alpha (Reliability test)

Reliability Statistics Cronbach'sAlphaa -.204 INTERPRETATION: The cronbachs alpha is done to test the reliability of the factors are reliable when cronbachs alpha is greater than 0.60. Here the cronbachs alpha is -0.204 so we can say that the factors are not reliable. Table 6.2 Shows mean and standard deviation score FACTORS Relation with Distributor Product Quality Purchase Price Variety in Garam Masala Scheme provided by company Correct order delivered to your store Invoice accuracy Product Delivery Time Replacement provided is 7 day by company Profit Margin Mean
3.90 3.29 3.37 3.43 3.65 3.42 3.30 3.58 3.39 3.57

N of Items 10

Std. Deviation
1.150 .844 .872 1.130 .947 .819 1.040 1.216 .920 1.085

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Shows retailers level of satisfaction with Wonder Company and Garam Masala

INTERPRETATION: Here, the respondents were asked to show their level of satisfaction with several statements. Here relation with distributor is more to the company. company maintain the good relationship with the distributor.

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[7] Rate your satisfaction level for the following brands on the given parameters

(1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied)

Kitchen Express Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Replacement Time Credit Policy

1 28 20 25 19 27 26 21 20 21 25 28

2 3 7 5 8 11 13 18 20 34 10 6

3 15 3 22 22 9 19 2 4 5 26 8

4 9 5 14 19 13 3 21 10 20 11 11

5 45 65 34 32 40 39 38 46 20 28 47

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Kitchen Express
70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5

INTERPRETATION: Here, Factor analysis of Kitchen express more retailer highly satisfied with price. Most of the retailer prefers the highly satisfied for various factor of the kitchen express. Around 30% retailers are not happy with profit margin of the kitchen express.

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Everest Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Replacement Time Credit Policy

1 15 8 12 23 13 41 17 22 38 22 17

2 31 7 25 27 27 25 21 14 21 22 12

3 19 49 8 16 8 12 27 28 15 9 33

4 32 31 43 20 43 4 21 27 12 19 23

5 2 5 12 14 9 18 14 9 14 28 15

EVEREST
50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5

INTERPRETATION: Here, Factor analysis of Everest shows the more retailers are dissatisfied with the price of Everest. In quality of the Everest Most of the retailers are neutral. Retailers point of view product replacement time is good for the Everest Company. Everest Companys delivery time period is not good as the survey of retailers.

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MDH Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Replacement Time Credit Policy

1 17 20 11 10 31 18 18 14 10 24 15

2 36 30 26 23 18 45 14 22 31 17 39

3 20 17 46 29 28 20 35 33 45 21 27

4 19 28 11 27 16 7 19 21 12 21 11

5 8 5 8 11 7 10 14 10 2 17 8

MDH
50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5

INTERPRETATION: Here, Factor analysis of MDH shows the more retailers are dissatisfied with the price of MDH. Take the factor of promotional scheme of MDH most of the retailers are neutral. In quality more retailers are dissatisfied for the quality of MDH. Product replacement time is not good for the company because most of the retailer highly satisfied.

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Ramdev Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Replacement Time Credit Policy

1 19 26 33 21 14 4 15 33 10 10 19

2 17 31 15 25 17 10 39 16 8 14 23

3 37 19 25 18 36 42 3 16 23 26 20

4 17 14 17 16 18 37 26 11 19 36 32

5 10 10 10 20 15 7 17 24 40 4 6

RAMDEV
45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5

INTERPRETATION:
Here, Factor analysis of Ramdev shows the more retailers are neutral with the price of

Ramdev. Visit of sales person to retailers most are neutral. Most of the retailers are happy with the product delivery time. Credit policy of the Ramdev most of the retailers are satisfied. Brand image of the Ramdev is not good during the research.

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Wonder Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Replacement Time Credit Policy

1 21 24 24 34 22 16 29 13 14 19 30

2 18 30 31 19 25 7 8 28 8 25 20

3 9 12 4 15 21 5 28 19 12 20 10

4 23 17 15 13 12 51 13 26 37 13 23

5 29 17 26 19 20 21 22 14 29 23 17

WONDER
60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Series1 Series2 Series3 Series4 Series5

INTERPRETATION: In Wonder masala factor analysis shows the most of the retailer highly satisfied with the price of the product. Most of the sales person visits the retailers are wonder masala. Retailers are happy with the product delivery time because delivery meets time to time.

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[8] Duration between two visits of salesmen at your place?

Table: 8.1 Shows preference of salesmen by retailers

Particular With in 7 day with in 15 day with in 1 month

Total 21 48 31

Chart 8.1Shows preference of visits of salesmen by retailers of Garam masala

TOTAL
31% 21%
With in 7 day

with in 15 day 48% with in 1 month

INTERPRETATION: Above diagram shows the 48% sales person visit the retailers of Garam masala within 15 days. 31% sales person visit in 1 month to retailers. 21% sales person visits the retailers within 7 days it is good for the company and also increase the brand image of the company.

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[9] Are you satisfied by the following sales promotion scheme of Wonder Masala? (Rank 1=highest priority to 7=lowest priority)

Table:9.1 Show preference of promotional scheme by retailers of garam masala

SCHEME
Gift Article Cash discount Premium offer or Bonus offer Off- Season discount Coupons in Packing ( lucky draw)

WEIGHTS
320 274 324 331 281

RANK 4 6 3 2 5 1

Bundle Offer ( Example : Buy 2 get 1 340 Free)

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Chart 9.1 shows preference of promotional scheme by retailers of garam masala

INTERPRETATION: Here in this question, retailers were asked to show their preference about the various promotional schemes. Out of 100 retailers, get the bundle offers are more. Retailers are not more offers to the cash discount.

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[10] Give your opinion of various promotional material provided by wonder masala.

1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied

Table: 10:1 Shows priority of various promotional material provided by wonder masala

particular Stickers Posters Displays Dummy packs

Weights
215 230 233 363

Rank
4 3 2 1

Chart: 10:1 Shows priority of various promotional material provided by wonder masala

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INTERPRETATION: In this graph, Shows the priority of various promotional material provided by wonder masala. Most of the retailers get the more priority to dummy packs. In sticker priority most of the retailers get last rank to the company.

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[11] Please rank the following preferred media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala on basis of your preference.(Rank 1=highest priority to 7=lowest priority)

Table:11.1 Shows the preference of retailers regarding promotional activities to promote Wonder Garam Masala Particular Newspaper Television ads Radio ads Hoardings Internet ads Weights 445 397 176 129 356 Rank 1 2 4 5 3

Chart 11.1Shows the preference of retailers regarding promotional activities

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INTERPRETATION: Here in this question Respondent were asked to give the rank to their preferred source of advertisement. By analyzing the data, it is seen that the most preferred source of advertisement is Newspaper. Respondents preferred Newspaper the most as the source of advertisement. Second most preferred source of advertisement is Television, followed by Internet ads, Radio. Least preferred source of advertisement is Hoardings.

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[12] Have you ever recommended Wonder Garam Masala to customers? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE) Table 12.1 Shows Retailers recommendation of Wonder Garam Masala to customers

Particular No, never recommended Have recommended once or twice Have recommended more than twice

Tick mark 40 43 17

Chart 12.1 Shows Retailers recommendation of Wonder Garam Masala to customer

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INTERPRETATION: Here in this question respondents were asked have you ever recommended Wonder Garam masala to customer Most of the retailers replied that they do not prefer to recommend Wonder gram masala to their customers of gram masala. The above graph shows that 43Retailers avoid to Recommended Wonder Garam Masala to the Customer, while 40 respondents have no, never recommended once or twice and only 17 retailers have recommended more than twice to their customers above Wonder Garam masala. By analysis the data, it could be concluded that Retailer are less willing to recommended Wonder Garam masala.

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ANNOVA TEST
H0: There is no significance difference between satisfaction towards Wonder masala and Form of Business. H1: There is significance difference between satisfaction towards Wonder masala and Form of Business.

INTERPRETATION This is the table that shows the output of the ANOVA analysis and whether we have a statistically significant difference between our group means.

We can see that the significance level is in the case of all reasons for towards Wonder masala which is above 0.05. Therefore, there is no a statistically significant difference in the mean between reason for towards Wonder masala and Form of Business.

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. Factors Relation with Distributor Product Quality Purchase Price Variety in Garam Masala Scheme provided by company Correct order delivered to your store Invoice accuracy Product Delivery Time Replacement provided is 7 day by company Profit Margin Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Between Groups Within Groups Total Sum of Squares .307 130.693 131.000 .022 70.568 70.590 .030 75.280 75.310 .002 126.508 126.510 .970 87.780 88.750 1.546 64.814 66.360 .545 106.455 107.000 .087 146.273 146.360 .044 83.746 83.790 .946 115.564 116.510 df 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 1 98 99 Mean Square .307 1.334 .022 .720 .030 .768 .002 1.291 .970 .896 1.546 .661 .545 1.086 .087 1.493 .044 .855 F .230 Sig. .633

.030

.862

.039

.845

.002

.966

1.083

.301

2.337

.130

.502

.480

.058

.809

.051

.821

.946 1.179

.802

.373

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H0: There is no significance difference between various promotional material provided by wonder masala and Monthly Income. H1: There is significance difference between various promotional material provided by wonder masala and Monthly Income.

various promotional material Stickers Between Groups Within Groups Total Posters Between Groups Within Groups Total Displays Between Groups Within Groups Total Dummy packs Between Groups Within Groups Total

Sum of Squares 8.383 138.367 146.750 3.374 67.626 71.000 1.968 56.142 58.110 9.960 139.350 149.310

df 4 95 99 4 95 99 4 95 99 4 95 99

Mean Square 2.096 1.456

F 1.439

Sig. .227

.844 .712

1.185

.322

.492 .591

.832

.508

2.490 1.467

1.698

.157

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INTERPRETATION This is the table that shows the output of the ANOVA analysis and whether we have a statistically significant difference between our group means. We can see that the significance level is in the case of all reasons for various promotional materials provided by wonder masala which is above 0.05. Therefore, there is no a statistically significant difference in the mean between promotional material provided by wonder masala and Monthly Income.

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H0: There is no significance difference between media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala and Monthly Income. H1: There is significance difference between various media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala and Monthly Income.

Media channel Newspaper Between Groups Within Groups Total Television ads Between Groups Within Groups Total Radio ads Between Groups Within Groups Total Hoardings Between Groups Within Groups Total Internet ads Between Groups Within Groups Total

Sum of Squares 1.310 47.050 48.360 .664 54.246 54.910 .739 25.501 26.240 1.875 20.715 22.590 .594 74.046 74.640

df 4 95 99 4 95 99 4 95 99 4 95 99 4 95 99

Mean Square .327 .495

F .661

Sig. .621

.166 .571

.291

.883

.185 .268

.689

.602

.469 .218

2.150

.081

.148 .779

.190

.943

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INTERPRETATION This is the table that shows the output of the ANOVA analysis and whether we have a statistically significant difference between our group means. We can see that the significance level is in the case of all reasons for media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala which is above 0.05. Therefore, there is no a statistically significant difference in the mean between various media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala and Monthly Income.

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KRUSKAL WALIIS TEST

Ranks Media Newspaper Form of Business Sole Proprietorship Partnership Total Television ads Sole Proprietorship Partnership Total Radio ads Sole Proprietorship Partnership Total Hoardings Sole Proprietorship Partnership Total Internet ads Sole Proprietorship Partnership Total N 88 12 100 88 12 100 88 12 100 88 12 100 88 12 100 50.01 54.08 50.28 52.13 50.53 50.25 51.03 46.58 Mean Rank 50.88 47.75

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Test Statisticsa,b News paper Chisquare df Asymp. Sig. .153 Television Radio ads ads .290 .002 Hoardings Internet ads

1 .696

1 .590

1 .968 .791 .603

a. Kruskal Wallis Test b. Grouping Variable: Form of Business

INTERPRETION The Ranks table shows the mean rank of the Media for each Form of Business. The Test Statistics table presents the Chi-square value (Kruskal-Wallis H), the degrees of freedom and the significance level.

We can report that there is no a statistically significant difference between the Form of Business (H (2) = 0.153, p =0 .696), with a mean rank of 50.88 for Sole proprietorship, 47.75 Partnership in the case of news paper.

We can report that there is no a statistically significant difference between the Form of Business (H (2) = 0.290, p =0 .590), with a mean rank of 51.03 for Sole proprietorship, 46.58 Partnership in the case of Television Ads.

In this test we can analyze that there is no significance difference between the Form of Business and monthly turnover on media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala.

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CHI-SQUARE TEST H0: There Is No Dependency between Duration to visits of salesmen and Monthly Income. H1: There Is Dependency between Duration to visits of salesmen and Monthly Income. Duration to visits of salesman Less than 5000 WITH 7 DAY WITH IN 15 DAY WITH IN 1 MONTH Total 2 0 Monthly Income 1000115000 3 9 1600120000 1 17 More than 20001 8 11

5000-10000 7 11

Total 21 48

10

11

31

23

22

29

24

100

Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2-sided) 8 8 1 .013 .010 .543

Value Pearson Chi-Square Likelihood Ratio Linear-by-Linear Association N of Valid Cases 19.364a 20.020 .370

df

100

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INTERPRETATION Here the test is about does Duration to visits of salesmen and Monthly Income. At 5% significance level and with 8 degree of freedom the value of Pearson chi-square is 0.013 so, the null hypothesis is accepted, which shows there is no dependency between Duration to visits of salesmen and Monthly Income. The reason for monthly income on visits of salesman. Because of different marketers have different income.

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7.1 FINDINGS
Retailers store Garam masala as per the demand of customer. Generally they retain the stock of reputed brands i.e. Wonder, Ramdev, MDH, Everest, Badshah, and Jalaram, as demands of these brands are too high in the market.

Out of 100 retailers, all 100 retailers keep Garam masala. 100 retailers keep hing and 25 retailers keep tea masala to sell. 43 retailers keep Achar masala. So we can say that in the market demand for these products is high. So retailers are interested to keep these products as their retail outlets. The Chart masala of the Wonder Company holds the strongest position in the market out of the product length of the company. Out of 100 retailers, 84 retailers are selling Wonder Chart Masala to their customers.

Retailers are getting good return on the sales of chart masala of Wonder Company due to constant scheme in the product for the retailers and timely accurate service provided by the company.

It could be concluded that the television is the most preferred source of advertisement. The focus reason behind this could be that, people watch television and it is universally prove that the television is the best source for entertainment.

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7.2 RECOMMENDATION
Company should arrange meeting with retailers followed by complementary lunch and in the meeting companys top level management should make retailers aware regarding companies policies procedures regarding replacement. Different schemes available in market and also companys future plan should also be shared so as retailers take interest in selling companies product.

Packing of the Garam masala should be made more attractive. Premium Garam masala box packing colour should be changed from black to any other and try to make attractive by putting some spices snaps on packing.

Company should bring the bundle offers in the small quantity purchased by the retailers and continue that offer trough out of the year in order to increase the level of sales of premium Garam masala.

According to changing seasons and upcoming festivals company should make advertisement related to that festival or reason. In making advertisement company should focus on the idea of delivering message, creativity in the advertisement as the research shows that people are more conscious about these factors in advertisement and they gives long lasting impact on viewers mind.

Companys research and development team should focus on the taste and smell of Garam masala. They should try to develop such Garam masala which gives better taste and smell to the food when added to food while cooking.

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8 CONCLUSION
It is concluded that customers demand and profit margin in the product influence the buying behavior of the retailers. This is due to less demand by consumers at retail outlets and very less margin in highly competitive market of Garam masala. Biasness of the retailers also affects the sales. Due to very less time interval schemes in Wonder company the retailers are not ready to sell the Garam masala product of the company.

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9. BIBLIOGRAPHY
BOOKS Marketing Management, Philip kotler Search Engines www.google.com www.wikipeiia.com Website Visited: http://www.spiceboardofindia.com. http://www.food-india.com http://www.cds.edu. http://J.P.Food.com

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10. ANNEXURE
RETAILER SATISFACTION OF WONDER MASALA

Hello Respondent,

We, student of S.V. Institute of Management, Kadi, Gujarat, conducting a survey on retailer satisfaction of Wonder Masala. We request you to spare a few minutes from your valuable time to answer few questions. We assure you all the information given by you will be used only for Academic purpose only.

[1] Do you sell Garam Masala? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE) Yes { } No { }

[2] Following are the some brand of Garam Masala, please tick in front of the brand that you keep to sell and please specify since how long, you sell the specified brand?

Time Brand Wonder Everest MDH Badshah Jalaram Ramdev Other

Not keeping

0-3 Years

4-7 Years

8-11 Years

12 or more Years

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[3] Please specify from the following, which type of blended spices you have in your shop? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE, MULTIPLE CHOICE) ITEM Hing Vadapou Masala Sandwich Masala Garam Masala Tea Masala Pav bhaji Masala Chhole Masala Kitchen king Masala TICK ITEM Chat Masala Curry Masala Tanduri Masala Archer Masala Panipuri Masala Sambher Masala Kasturi Methi All in one Masala TICK

[4] Please rank the following Factor on the basis of their priority that you consider while purchasing Garam Masala? (Rank it 1= highest priority to 10= lowest priority) PARTICULAR Customers demand Quality of Product Price of the product Brand of the company Consistency of the service Scheme in the product Retailer Credit Policy of Wonder masala Profit Margin Replacement of product Relation with distributor Others, specify: RANK

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[5] Do you sell Garam Masala of Wonder Company? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE) Yes { } No { }

[6] Please show your level of satisfaction towards Wonder masala by Rating the below mentioned factors in scale of 1 to 5? (1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied)

FACTORS Relation with Distributor Product Quality Purchase Price Variety in Garam Masala Scheme provided by company Correct order delivered to your store Invoice accuracy Product Delivery Time Replacement provided is 7 day by company Profit Margin Others, Specify

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[7] Rate your satisfaction level for the following brands on the given parameters (1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied)

Wonder Price Quality Brand Image Brand Awareness to customer Profit Margin Visit of Sales person Product Knowledge of Sales person Promotional Scheme Product delivery Time Product Time Replacement

Ramdev

MDH

Everest

Kitchen Express

Credit Policy

[8] Duration between two visits of salesmen at your place? With in 7 day { } with in 15 day { } with in 1 month { }

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[9] Are you satisfied by the following sales promotion scheme of Wonder Masala? (Rank 1=highest priority to 7=lowest priority) SCHEME Gift Article Cash discount Premium offer or Bonus offer Off- Season discount Coupons in Packing ( lucky draw) Bundle Offer ( Example : Buy 2 get 1 Free) Others, Please specify__________________ RANK

[10] Give your opinion of various promotional material provided by wonder masala. (1= highly dissatisfied, 2= dissatisfied, 3= Neutral, 4= satisfied, 5= highly satisfied)

1 Stickers Posters Displays Dummy packs

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[11] Please rank the following preferred media channel to promote wonder Garam Masala on basis of your preference.(Rank 1=highest priority to 7=lowest priority) Particulars Newspaper Television ads Radio ads Hoardings Internet ads Others, specify_______________________ [12] Have you ever recommended Wonder Garam Masala to customers? (TICK MARK AS APPLICABLE) RANK

Particular No, never recommended Have recommended once or twice Have recommended more than twice PERSONAL DETAILS

Tick mark

1. Outlet Name______________________________________________________ 2. Contact Person Name ______________________________________________ 3. Address_________________________________________________________ Phone: (Off)__________(Mob)_________________(e-mail)________________ 4. 5. Education___________________________________________________ Monthly Income__________________

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