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Kurwongbah State School

Curriculum Plan 2013

"Individuals Together"

CONTENTS
Page/s
Rationale Curriculum- Strategic Improvement (CSI) Team Role of the Curriculum Support Teacher (CST) Role of Curriculum Teams Overview of 2013 Curriculum Priorities Minimum time allocations for English, mathematics, science and history NAPLAN 2013 (Dates/ writing task) ASoT- The Art and Science of Teaching Dimensions of Teaching and Learning Implementing the Australian Curriculum Accessing C2C Resources Australian Curriculum: English School Expectations- English Reading and Writing Spelling 2013 C2C English Unit Overview Australian Curriculum: Mathematics School Expectations- Mathematics Australian Curriculum: Science School Expectations- Science 2013 C2C Science Unit Overview Australian Curriculum: History School Expectations- History 2013 C2C History Unit Overview Digital Pedagogy at Kurwongbah Exit outcomes North Coast Regional Classroom Teaching Expectations Curriculum Organisation Highly Effective Teachers Pedagogy Differentiated Learning Kurwongbah State School Class Differentiation Template (Sample) Curriculum Risk Assessment Teaching Strategies Assessment and Reporting Reporting in Prep Moderation Forming Partnerships Supporting Documents Appendix: Overview of the QCAR Framework Appendix: 2013 Assessment and Testing Overview Appendix: 2013 KSS Yearly Data Collection Overview Collecting and using data at Kurwongbah State School Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School English Targets Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School Mathematics Targets Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School Science Targets Appendix: Overview of units at Kurwongbah State School KLA/ Essential Learning Units for 2013 3 3 4 4 5-6 6 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12-13 13 14 15-16 16 17-18 18-19 19 20 21 21 22 23 24 25 26-27 28 29-30 31 32 33-37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44-45 46 47 48 49 50 51-79 51
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RATIONALE
The Kurwongbah State School Curriculum Plan outlines how the school addresses curriculum, pedagogy, assessment and reporting. It provides links between Education Queensland documents and school based documents. Curriculum at Kurwongbah is developed from the Australian Curriculum in English, mathematics, science and history from P-7; as well as the EYCG in Prep, and the Essential Learnings in Technology, The Arts, SOSE, HPE from years 1-7 and LOTE in years 5- 7. The school is committed to developing teacher practices through professional development focusing on aspects of curriculum implementation, pedagogy and assessment and the incorporation of a proactive approach to planning and teaching. This is evidenced by the development of rigorous units, use of ICT and the incorporation of a variety of productive pedagogies within quality programs. The continued implementation of the Kurwongbah State School Assessment and Reporting Plan 2013 and the Kurwongbah State School Moderation Plan 2013 is aimed at further enhancing teacher proficiency in assessment, moderation and reporting practices and developing a common understanding of quality assessment. Kurwongbah State Schools Curriculum Plan is updated annually to reflect the current direction of curriculum, pedagogy, assessment and reporting. It is endorsed by the Curriculum- Strategic Improvement (CSI) Management Team.

CSI TEAM
The Curriculum- Strategic Improvement (CSI) Team is made up of year level coordinators, the Curriculum Support Teacher, Learning Support Teachers (L&N), HOSES, Principal, Deputy Principals, Curriculum team managers and other key members of staff. The CSI Management Team respond to the strategic goals of the school and oversee whole school curriculum planning, implementation and review. The purpose of the CSI Team is to: Respond to the Teaching and Learning Audit results and recommendations by developing strategic goals and action planning Respond to whole school strategic planning documents, make recommendations and review strategic actions throughout the year Identify priority areas to be addressed through professional learning Lead the implementation of the Australian Curriculum Continue to align school priorities to the QCAR Framework Prioritise the KLAs of English, mathematics, science and history Monitor school targets in English, mathematics and science Respond to national and state directives and meet all strategic expectations Identify the learning needs of staff and support them through curriculum change processes Keep staff informed of curriculum changes and imperatives and to provide targeted professional development as needed Ensure that staffs continuing efforts in curriculum are valued and supported.
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ROLE OF THE CST


Kurwongbah State School has identified the need for a Curriculum Support Teacher (CST) role to support teachers in curriculum planning, teaching, assessment and reporting. The CST currently works 6 days a fortnight (Wednesday-Friday). The CST works with the school Admin Team and CSI (Curriculum- Strategic Improvement) Team to monitor, facilitate and action curriculum directives, initiatives, and alignment of curriculum, assessment and reporting. Kurwongbah State School's CST will support teachers in the planning and implementation of curriculum programs by: Working alongside the school Principal, Deputy Principals and the Curriculum- Strategic Improvement Management Team to develop, implement and monitor strategic curriculum plans, goals and targets for the school Reviewing and updating the KSS Curriculum Overview (including Whole school plans and programs) Working with Curriculum Team Program Managers to monitor the implementation of the Australian Curriculum in English, mathematics, science and history Facilitating regular professional learning sessions that assist teachers in becoming familiar with pedagogy, curriculum intent, planning requirements, assessment practices, moderation, assessment and reporting Working in classrooms to provide modelled experiences and to observe and provide feedback on targeted curriculum areas and pedagogy Sharing curriculum initiatives, productive pedagogies and effective strategies at conferences within the school, within the district and beyond Assisting teachers in the development of assessment tasks and in the successful implementation of moderation processes across class groups and local school cluster.

ROLE OF CURRICULUM TEAMS

In 2013 the role of Curriculum Teams in English, mathematics, science and history is to: o continue to monitor resources required for the implementation of the Australian Curriculum through C2C units, identifying resources already available within the school and purchasing resources required to implement units o monitor the implementation of the Australian Curriculum in each curriculum area and make recommendations to the CSI Team to improve or streamline the delivery of C2C units o audit the C2C units against the ACARA Scope and sequence documents to look for alignment and identify any gaps. In 2013 the work of the Mathematics team will also be to develop a school-wide approach to implementing and monitoring a number facts program In 2013 the work of the Geography Team is to: o become familiar with the Australian Curriculum: Geography by attending face-toface or online professional development sessions and through self-exploration of the ACARA webpage o prepare and deliver a number of professional learning sessions for staff in term four. o review and familiarise staff with the C2C units for geography (if available) or to develop units of work for implementation in 2014 o audit current print resources to identify and purchase resources to prepare for unit implementation in 2013
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OVERVIEW OF 2013 CURRICULUM PRIORITIES


Our work as Kurwongbah is vitally important. At Kurwongbah, we believe that teachers can make a significant difference to the lives of our students. We do this through structuring rigorous learning experiences that assist every student to reach their full potential. At Kurwongbah we are committed to: Ensuring that every day, in every classroom, every student is learning and achieving to the best of their ability. Refocusing our energies A crowded curriculum results in superficial coverage of content. We need to create space in the curriculum to develop depth of student understanding. In 2013 and beyond our priority must be to focus on English, mathematics, science and history. Other learning areas, while essential for the development of the whole child, will be refined and reworked to take up significantly less time and focus on developing deep understandings rather than a cursory coverage of multiple Essential Learnings. Children will be given opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge, understandings and skills in ways that suit their learning styles and strengths. Teachers will continue to differentiate for the range of students in their classrooms. Making links across year levels at Kurwongbah This year we have introduced a new school structure to Kurwongbah through a mix of straight and mixed year level classes. Teachers are strongly encouraged to look for related concepts across units/ year levels and provide opportunities for students to work in mixed year level groups wherever possible, (e.g. Reading groups, spelling, maths warm-ups, maths rotational activities and investigations, Essential learning units, etc.). Professional learning at Kurwongbah Ongoing professional development is essential in maintaining skilled and confident teachers. Throughout 2013 teachers at Kurwongbah will be involved in targeted, ongoing professional development (including professional conversations, professional readings, mentoring, workshops and presentations) around key areas: Term 1: ASoT- Design Question 6; Digital pedagogy Term 2: ASoT- Design Question 6; Digital pedagogy Term 3: ASoT- Design question 1; Digital pedagogy Term 4: ASoT- Design question 1; Geography- Familiarisation; preparing for implementation in 2014; Digital pedagogy Teaching and learning focus areas This year we will deeply engage in two areas of teaching and learning in an explicit and focussed way. These focus areas have been identified through data analysis (i.e. 2012 NAPLAN results) and teacher feedback as being areas of need within the school and have been approved by the CSI Team.
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Semester One: Number Facts Semester Two: Spelling Throughout the year, teachers will be provided with professional readings, professional learning sessions, and opportunities to deeply unpack data around these focus areas and to discuss these areas with other teachers in their year levels and beyond.

Minimum time allocations for English, mathematics, science and history Access to a rich and engaging curriculum for all students is important. Queensland state schools are required to address the Australian Curriculum in English, mathematics, science and history and the Essential Learnings in all other Key Learning Areas (KLAs). International, national and state data highlights the need to focus attention on the teaching and learning of English, mathematics and science to improve student achievement in these important areas. English and mathematics are fundamental in all years of schooling and must therefore be a primary focus of learning. The focus on science recognises that studying this curriculum area provides an essential preparation for twenty-first century living. While we will continue to teach all learning areas, it is important that we prioritise English, mathematics, science and history. Required time allocations for English, mathematics science and history in Prep to year 7 are provided in the table below. These allocations represent minimum times and it is up to teachers to decide how much additional time they may require for each curriculum area. Minimum time allocations per week for English, mathematics, science and history in 2013: Learning area English Mathematics Science History Prep 7 hrs 5 hrs 1 hr Year 1 7 hrs 5 hrs 1 hr Year 2 7 hrs 5 hrs 1 hr Year 3 7 hrs 5 hrs 1.75 hrs 1 hr Year 4 6 hrs 5 hrs 1.75 hrs 1 hr Year 5 6 hrs 5 hrs 1.75 hrs 1 hr Year 6 6 hrs 5 hrs 1.75 hrs 1 hr Year 7 6 hrs 5 hrs 2.5 hrs 1.25 hrs

0.5 hrs 0.5 hrs 0.5 hrs

NAPLAN 2013 2013 test dates The 2013 NAPLAN tests for years 3, 5, 7 and 9 will be held during Term 2, week 5 on Tuesday 14, Wednesday 15 and Thursday 16 May. Writing test for NAPLAN 2013 The writing task for the 2013 NAPLAN Writing tests for Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 will be a persuasive task. Resources to assist the teaching of persuasive writing are available on the QSA website at www.qsa.qld.edu.au/10524.html.
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ASoT-The ART AND SCIENCE OF TEACHING


In 2013 and beyond all teachers at Kurwongbah will become familiar with the Art and Science of Teaching framework developed by Dr Robert Marzano. The model unpacks the components of effective pedagogy that are articulated through 10 design questions. 10 design questions: 1. What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and celebrate success? 2. What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge? 3. What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge? 4. What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about new knowledge? 5. What will I do to engage students? 6. What will I do to establish or maintain classroom rules and procedures? 7. What will I do to recognize and acknowledge adherence and lack of adherence to classroom rules and procedures? 8. What will I do to establish and maintain effective relationships with students? 9. What will I do to communicate high expectations for all students? 10. What will I do to develop effective lessons organized into a cohesive unit? The focus for teachers at Kurwongbah in 2013 will be: Design Question 6: What will I do to establish or maintain classroom rules and procedures? Design Question 1: What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and celebrate success? Professional learning and ASoT A focussed, rigorous approach to professional learning will support the familiarisation and implementation of instructional strategies through regular: Whole-staff professional learning sessions Smaller across-sector Teacher Learning Communities (TLCs) Benefits of ASoT Based on 30 years of research Clearly articulates what makes a significant positive difference to student learning Presents a common language, common practices/ common approach (across classes and schools) Provides a clear whole-school focus It is practical, evidence based and builds on our current pedagogical strengths Makes explicit the things we can do as teachers to really make a difference Provides scales for each design question against which we can measure our own progress and which can be used as a reflective tool for analysing our practices

DIMENSIONS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING

Accessed from http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=49267 The Dimensions of teaching and learning form the basis of every teacher's professional practice. Each dimension links to and supports the others. There is no fixed starting point. At the heart of every teacher's practice are students. Accordingly, students lie at the heart of the Dimensions of teaching and learning. Curriculum intent what do my students need to learn? Feedback where are students now and where do they aim to be? NB. Further information about effective feedback strategies including professional readings can be located in g drive at: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\Professional Learning Sessions\2012\Feedback (T3) Assessment what have my students learnt and how well have they learnt it? Sequencing teaching and learning what do my students already know and what do they need to learn next? Making judgments how do I evaluate the quality of students' performance and their depth of learning?

NB. The Dimensions of teaching and learning framework underpins all of the C2C unit plans.
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IMPLEMENTING THE AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM


In June 2010, the Minister for Education and Training Geoff Wilson announced that the State, Catholic and Independent school sectors had agreed on a staged approach to the implementation of Phase 1 of the Australian Curriculum F(P)10 in Queensland. In 2013, schools in Queensland have been directed to: continue to implement the Australian curriculum in English, mathematics, science begin implementation of the Australian curriculum: History begin the familiarisation process for the Australian curriculum: Geography (to be implemented in 2014)

Implementation in 2013 means: planning, teaching, assessing and reporting in English, maths, science and history across the year level/s using the Australian Curriculum. In 2013, Kurwongbah staff will implement the Australian Curriculum in English, mathematics, science and history through a process of adapting and adopting the available Curriculum into the Classroom (C2C) suite of resources developed by Education Queensland. Teachers should look for related concepts across units/ year levels and provide opportunities for students to work in mixed year level groups wherever possible. Accessing C2C resources The 2013 Curriculum into the Classroom (C2C) materials are aligned with Australian Curriculum v3.0. They will be progressively released by unit for English, mathematics science and history learning areas in single year level and multilevel format from now onwards (see release and replacement schedule below). As each unit is released, it will replace the 2012 C2C version which will be removed. The new C2C materials are designed to support schools in meeting the requirement to implement Australian Curriculum v3.0 from 2013. Detailed information and comprehensive year level plans can be found at: https://oneportal.deta.qld.gov.au/EducationDelivery/Stateschooling/schoolcurriculum/ Curriculumintotheclassroom/Pages/default.aspx Access updated C2C materials via One School at https://oslp.eq.edu.au/ C2C materials can also be downloaded from: https://detschool.eq.edu.au/resources/c2c/

NB. A detailed document, entitled Navigating Version 2.0 of C2C has been uploaded to OnePortal for your information. This document clearly explains the differences between Phase 1 and Phase 2 resources, especially within the unit plans. This document can be accessed at: https://team.oneportal.deta.qld.gov.au/sites/kurwongbah/Document%20Library/ C2C/HowTo_Navigating%20Version%202.0%20of%20C2C.doc
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Australian Curriculum: English All teachers at Kurwongbah have the responsibility to assist students to acquire the essential knowledge, understandings and skills in English that they will require for active, informed participation in school and beyond.

The study of English is central to the learning and development of all young Australians. It helps create confident communicators, imaginative thinkers and informed citizens. It is through the study of English that individuals learn to analyse, understand, communicate with and build relationships with others and with the world around them. The study of English helps young people develop the knowledge and skills needed for education, training and the workplace. It helps them become ethical, thoughtful, informed and active members of society. In this light it is clear that the Australian Curriculum: English plays an important part in developing the understanding, attitudes and capabilities of those who will take responsibility for Australias future. Although Australia is a linguistically and culturally diverse country, participation in many aspects of Australian life depends on effective communication in Standard Australian English. In addition, proficiency in English is invaluable globally. The Australian Curriculum: English contributes both to nation-building and to internationalisation. The Australian Curriculum: English also helps students to engage imaginatively and critically with literature to expand the scope of their experience. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have contributed to Australian society and to its contemporary literature and its literary heritage through their distinctive ways of representing and communicating knowledge, traditions and experience. The Australian Curriculum: English values, respects and explores this contribution. It also emphasises Australias links to Asia. Aims in English At Kurwongbah State School, we aim to ensure that students:

learn to listen to, read, view, speak, write, create and reflect on increasingly complex and sophisticated spoken, written and multimodal texts across a growing range of contexts with accuracy, fluency and purpose appreciate, enjoy and use the English language in all its variations and develop a sense of its richness and power to evoke feelings, convey information, form ideas, facilitate interaction with others, entertain, persuade and argue understand how Standard Australian English works in its spoken and written forms and in combination with non-linguistic forms of communication to create meaning develop interest and skills in inquiring into the aesthetic aspects of texts, and develop an informed appreciation of literature.
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School Expectations- English Teachers at Kurwongbah State School are expected to: Be familiar with the Australian Curriculum: English http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Rationale

available

at:

Implement/ adapt the C2C English Units available on OneSchool (see the 2013 C2C English Unit Overview below). [Please note that the suggested teaching sequence and supporting resources are provided as a starting point. It is up to each individual teacher to determine which resources are used and to what extent. This should be determined on the basis of the needs of the students in the class]. At planning/ unit familiarisation stage refer to and complete the Curriculum Activity Risk Planner located in the 2013 Curriculum Overview folder in G drive G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\CurriculumRisk Assessment to identify any associated hazards/ risks within lessons/units Timetable the teaching of English for a minimum of 7 hours (Years Prep-3) and 6 hours (Years 4-7) each week Identify students prior knowledge, skills and understanding through pre-testing and analysis of existing data Differentiate learning to cater for the individual learning needs of students in your class Implement C2C assessment tasks and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, understandings and skills in all areas of English Clearly communicate (articulate and display) learning goals in English to students Assist students to set personal learning goals in English and to monitor those goals (for further information on goal setting refer to resources at: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\Professional Learning Sessions\2012\Goal setting (T2) Explicitly teach reading, writing, spelling and grammar Implement a school-based pre and post spelling test each term (NB. Spelling pre and post tests for each year level are available on G drive at G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\English\Spelling prepost tests_2013) Implement the Kurwongbah State School Phonological Program (NB. Supporting resources, templates and overviews are available in G drive at: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\KSS Phonological Program Work towards school targets in English o Please refer to Appendix: Kurwongbah State School English Targets 2013 Provide ongoing feedback to students on their learning Collect evidence of student knowledge, understanding and skills in all areas of English (i.e. Body of work/ Student Folio) Apply agreed standards to student work for the purposes of assessment Participate in professional conversations and moderation activities to achieve consistency in teacher judgements across classes Report on student progress two times a year using an agreed 5-point scale
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Reading and writing procedures The teaching of reading and writing is every teachers responsibility. It is important that you include regular explicit reading and writing sessions daily to provide opportunities for students to develop essential knowledge, understandings and skills. The following table provides an overview of the essential components of reading and writing programs. Audit your existing programs to ensure that all of these components are included each week: Reading Procedures Reading to Students Modelled Reading Shared Reading Guided Reading Independent Reading Language Experience Book Discussion Groups Modelled Writing Shared and Interactive Writing Guided Writing Independent Writing Language Experience Authors Circle/Chair
(Ref: A Miller, 2012, English [PowerPoint Presentation])

Writing Procedures

Classroom Reading Program: Reading strategies There are a number of reading strategies that are integral to a rigorous classroom reading program. Ensure that the explicit teaching of the following strategies are included within your program and that all students are provided with multiple opportunities to practice using these strategies on a regular basis: Comprehension Strategies
Predicting Connecting Comparing Inferring Synthesising Creating Images/Visualising Self-questioning/Self-monitoring Skimming Scanning Determining importance/ Determining Main Idea Summarising/Paraphrasing

Decoding / Word Identification Strategies


Re-reading Reading On Adjusting Reading Rate Sounding Out Chunking Using Analogy Consulting a Reference

(Ref: A Miller, 2012, English [PowerPoint Presentation])


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Classroom Writing Program: Writing processes and strategies


A clear writing process is an essential component of a classroom writing program. Students should be explicitly taught each of the steps and be provided with opportunities to work through the process when writing within a range of text types. The explicit teaching of the following strategies for writing should feature prominently in a rigorous writing program: Writing Processes stages used to compose texts Writing Strategies used during the stages of composing texts

Planning Drafting Conferring Refining Publishing

Predicting Self-questioning Creating Images Determining Importance Connecting Comparing Paraphrasing/Summarising Re-reading Synthesising

PLUS Spelling Strategies (see below)


(Ref: A Miller, 2012, English [PowerPoint Presentation])

Spelling In 2013 all teachers from years 2-7 will implement their year level spelling program as provided as part of the C2C suite of resources. A spelling overview, year level spelling lists, year level spelling journals and other spelling resources can be located at: https://learningplace.eq.edu.au/cx/resources/file/64032b89-6bac-f41d-998390b6dfb51b73/1/index.html Please ensure you access the Phase 2 Spelling resources including: P-6 year spelling overview 7-10 year spelling overview Year One Spelling Program In 2012 a collective decision was made to adapt the optional Year 1 C2C spelling resources to aim for a deeper, consistent, evenly-paced approach to the teaching and learning of spelling patterns and conventions. The program was developed in collaboration with all P/1 teachers at Kurwongbah and was successfully trialled in 2012. Changes have been made to refine the program for 2013. The Year One Spelling Program for 2013 can be located on G drive at: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\English Spelling strategies An effective spelling program should include the explicit teaching of the following strategies and provide opportunities for students to practise using these strategies in a variety of contexts: Strategies Sounding out, chunking, using visual memory, using an analogy, using meaning, using memory aids, using spelling generalisations, consulting and authority
(Ref: A Miller, 2012, English [PowerPoint Presentation])

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2013 C2C English Unit Overview:


Term 1 Prep 1 Unit 1: Exploring our new world Unit 1: Exploring emotion in picture books Unit 2: Explaining how a story works Term 2 Unit 2: Enjoying and retelling stories Unit 3: Exploring characters in stories Unit 4: Engaging with poetry Term 3 Unit 3: Interacting with others Unit 5: Examining language of communication questioning Unit 6: Retelling cultural stores Unit 3: Identifying stereotypes Unit 4: Responding persuasively to narratives Unit 3: Exploring personal experiences through events Unit 4: Exploring procedure Unit 5: Exploring procedural texts Unit 6: Exploring informative texts Unit 7: Exploring plot and characterisation in stories Unit 8: Exploring narrative texts Unit 7: Reading, writing and performing poetry Unit 8: Reading, responding to and writing people's stories Term 4 Unit 4: Responding to text Unit 7: Creating digital procedural texts Unit 8: Creating digital texts

Unit 1: Reading, writing and performing poetry Unit 2: Stories of families and friends

Unit 2: Investigating characters Unit 1: Analysing and creating a persuasive text [NB. Reverse order]

Unit 5: Reading and responding to different versions of a story Unit 6: Creating online narratives

Unit 1: Investigating author's language in a familiar narrative Unit 2: Examining humour in poetry

Unit 3: Exploring recounts of texts set in the past Unit 4: Retelling an Aboriginal peoples and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples story Unit 3: Examining media texts Unit 4: Examining characters in animated film Unit 3: Examining advertising in the media Unit 4: Examining persuasive techniques in news reports Unit 3: Reading and creating life writing: biographies Unit 4: Reading and creating life writing: literary memories

Unit 5: Examining traditional stories Unit 6: Exploring a quest novel

Unit 7: Interpretting literary texts Unit 8: Designing persuasive texts

Unit 1: Examining literary texts- fantasy novel Unit 2: Examining literary texts-fantasy novel

Unit 5: Appreciating poetry Unit 6: Responding to poetry

Unit 7: Exploring narrative through novels and film Unit 8: Reviewing narrative film Unit 7: Comparing texts Unit 8: Transforming a text

Unit 1: Short stories Unit 2: Writing a short story

Unit 5: Interpreting literary texts Unit 6: Exploring literary texts by the same author Unit 5: Reading and interpreting literature about Australia and Australians Unit 6: Examining representations of Australia and Australians in literature

Unit 1: Analysing persuasion in media texts Unit 2: Persuading through motivational speaking

Unit 7: Exploring perspectives on poetry and songs Unit 8: Re-imagining poetry

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Australian Curriculum: Mathematics All teachers at Kurwongbah have the responsibility to assist students to acquire the essential knowledge, understandings and skills in mathematics that they will require for active, informed participation in school and beyond.

Learning mathematics creates opportunities for and enriches the lives of all Australians. The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It develops the numeracy capabilities that all students need in their personal, work and civic life, and provides the fundamentals on which mathematical specialties and professional applications of mathematics are built. Mathematics has its own value and beauty and the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics aims to instil in students an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematical reasoning. Mathematical ideas have evolved across all cultures over thousands of years, and are constantly developing. Digital technologies are facilitating this expansion of ideas and providing access to new tools for continuing mathematical exploration and invention. The curriculum focuses on developing increasingly sophisticated and refined mathematical understanding, fluency, logical reasoning, analytical thought and problem-solving skills. These capabilities enable students to respond to familiar and unfamiliar situations by employing mathematical strategies to make informed decisions and solve problems efficiently. The Australian Curriculum: Mathematics ensures that the links between the various components of mathematics, as well as the relationship between mathematics and other disciplines, are made clear. Mathematics is composed of multiple but interrelated and interdependent concepts and systems which students apply beyond the mathematics classroom. In science, for example, understanding sources of error and their impact on the confidence of conclusions is vital, as is the use of mathematical models in other disciplines. In geography, interpretation of data underpins the study of human populations and their physical environments; in history, students need to be able to imagine timelines and time frames to reconcile related events; and in English, deriving quantitative and spatial information is an important aspect of making meaning of texts. The curriculum anticipates that schools will ensure all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply their mathematical understanding creatively and efficiently. The mathematics curriculum provides students with carefully paced, in-depth study of critical skills and concepts. It encourages teachers to help students become self-motivated, confident learners through inquiry and active participation in challenging and engaging experiences.

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Aims in mathematics At Kurwongbah State School we aim to ensure that students:

are confident, creative users and communicators of mathematics, able to investigate, represent and interpret situations in their personal and work lives and as active citizens develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of mathematical concepts and fluency with processes, and are able to pose and solve problems and reason in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability recognise connections between the areas of mathematics and other disciplines and appreciate mathematics as an accessible and enjoyable discipline to study.

School Expectations- Mathematics Teachers at Kurwongbah State School are expected to: Be familiar with the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics available at: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Mathematics/Rationale Implement/ adapt the C2C Mathematics Units available on OneSchool [Please note that the suggested teaching sequence and supporting resources are provided as a starting point. It is up to each individual teacher to determine which resources are used and to what extent. This should be determined on the basis of the needs of the students in the teachers class]. At planning/ unit familiarisation stage refer to and complete the Curriculum Activity Risk Planner located in the 2013 Curriculum Overview folder in G drive G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\CurriculumRisk Assessment to identify any associated hazards/ risks within lessons/units Timetable the teaching of mathematics for 5 hours (Prep Year 7) each week Spend time each day (i.e. during Maths warm-up) to review and practise Number Facts Identify students prior knowledge, skills and understanding through pre-testing and analysis of existing data Clearly communicate (articulate and display) learning goals in mathematics to students Provide ongoing feedback to students on their learning Assist students to set learning goals in mathematics and to monitor those goals Implement C2C assessment tasks and investigations that provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, understandings and skills in all areas of mathematics Work towards school targets in Mathematics o Please refer to Appendix: Kurwongbah State School Mathematics Targets 2013 Collect evidence of student knowledge, understanding and skills in all areas of Mathematics Apply agreed standards to student work for the purposes of assessment Participate in professional conversations and Moderation activities to achieve consistency in teacher judgements across classes Report on student progress two times a year using an agreed 5-point scale
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Australian Curriculum: Science All teachers at Kurwongbah have the responsibility to assist students to acquire the essential knowledge, understandings and skills in science that they will require for active, informed participation in school and beyond.

Science provides an empirical way of answering interesting and important questions about the biological, physical and technological world. The knowledge it produces has proved to be a reliable basis for action in our personal, social and economic lives. Science is a dynamic, collaborative and creative human endeavour arising from our desire to make sense of our world through exploring the unknown, investigating universal mysteries, making predictions and solving problems. Science aims to understand a large number of observations in terms of a much smaller number of broad principles. Science knowledge is contestable and is revised, refined and extended as new evidence arises. The Australian Curriculum: Science provides opportunities for students to develop an understanding of important science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, of sciences contribution to our culture and society, and its applications in our lives. The curriculum supports students to develop the scientific knowledge, understandings and skills to make informed decisions about local, national and global issues and to participate, if they so wish, in science-related careers. In addition to its practical applications, learning science is a valuable pursuit in its own right. Students can experience the joy of scientific discovery and nurture their natural curiosity about the world around them. In doing this, they develop critical and creative thinking skills and challenge themselves to identify questions and draw evidence-based conclusions using scientific methods. The wider benefits of this scientific literacy are well established, including giving students the capability to investigate the natural world and changes made to it through human activity. The science curriculum promotes six overarching ideas that highlight certain common approaches to a scientific view of the world and which can be applied to many of the areas of science understanding. These overarching ideas are patterns, order and organisation; form and function; stability and change; systems; scale and measurement; and matter and energy. Aims in science At Kurwongbah State School we aim to ensure that students develop:

an interest in science as a means of expanding their curiosity and willingness to explore, ask questions about and speculate on the changing world in which they live

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an understanding of the vision that science provides of the nature of living things, of the Earth and its place in the cosmos, and of the physical and chemical processes that explain the behaviour of all material things an understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry and the ability to use a range of scientific inquiry methods, including questioning; planning and conducting experiments and investigations based on ethical principles; collecting and analysing data; evaluating results; and drawing critical, evidence-based conclusions an ability to communicate scientific understanding and findings to a range of audiences, to justify ideas on the basis of evidence, and to evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims an ability to solve problems and make informed, evidence-based decisions about current and future applications of science while taking into account ethical and social implications of decisions an understanding of historical and cultural contributions to science as well as contemporary science issues and activities and an understanding of the diversity of careers related to science a solid foundation of knowledge of the biological, chemical, physical, Earth and space sciences, including being able to select and integrate the scientific knowledge and methods needed to explain and predict phenomena, to apply that understanding to new situations and events, and to appreciate the dynamic nature of science knowledge.

School Expectations- Science Teachers at Kurwongbah State School are expected to: Be familiar with the Australian Curriculum: Science available at: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Science/Rationale At planning/ unit familiarisation stage refer to and complete the Curriculum Activity Risk Planner located in the 2013 Curriculum Overview folder in G drive G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\CurriculumRisk Assessment to identify any associated hazards/ risks within lessons/units Implement/ adapt the C2C Science Units available on OneSchool (see the 2013 C2C Science Unit Overview below) [Please note that the suggested teaching sequence and supporting resources are provided as a starting point. It is up to each individual teacher to determine which resources are used and to what extent. This should be determined on the basis of the needs of the students in the teachers class]. Timetable the teaching of science for 1 hour (Years Prep-2). 1.75 hours (Years 36) 2.5 hours (Year 7) each week Clearly communicate (articulate and display) learning goals in science to students Identify students prior knowledge, skills and understanding through pre-testing Implement C2C assessment tasks and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, understandings and skills in all areas of science Work towards school targets in Science Please refer to Appendix: Kurwongbah State School Science Targets 2013
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Collect evidence of student knowledge, understanding and skills in all areas of Science Apply agreed standards to student work for the purposes of assessment Provide ongoing feedback to students on their learning Participate in professional conversations and Moderation activities to achieve consistency in teacher judgements across classes Report on student progress two times a year using an agreed 5-point scale

2013 C2C Science Unit Overview:

Term 1

Term 2 Unit 2: Our material world

Term 3 Unit 3: Weather watch

Term 4 Unit 4: Move it, move it

Prep

Unit 1: Our living world

Unit 1: Living adventure

Unit 2: Material madness

Unit 3: Changes around me

Unit 4: Light and sound

Unit 1: Mix, make and use

Unit 2: Toy factory

Unit 3: Good to grow

Unit 4: Save planet Earth

Unit 1: Is it living?

Unit 2: Spinning Earth

Unit 3: Hot stuff

Unit 4: What's the matter?

Unit 1: Here today gone tomorrow

Unit 2: Ready, set, grow!

Unit 3: Material use

Unit 4: Speedy but safe

Unit 1: Survival in the Australian environment Unit 1: Making changes

Unit 2: Our place in the solar system

Unit 3: Now you see it

Unit 4: Matter matters

Unit 2: Power up electricity usage down

Unit 3: Our changing world

Unit 4: Life on Earth

Unit 1: Water waste not, want not Unit 2: Water waste not, want not (continued)

Unit 3: Moving right along - exploring motion Unit 4: Moving right along - applications in real systems

Unit 5: Heavenly bodies Unit 6: Sensational seasons

Unit 7: Organising organisms Unit 8: Affecting organisms

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Australian Curriculum: History All teachers at Kurwongbah have the responsibility to assist students to acquire the essential knowledge, understandings and skills in science that they will require for active, informed participation in school and beyond.

History is a disciplined process of inquiry into the past that develops students' curiosity and imagination. Awareness of history is an essential characteristic of any society, and historical knowledge is fundamental to understanding ourselves and others. It promotes the understanding of societies, events, movements and developments that have shaped humanity from earliest times. It helps students appreciate how the world and its people have changed, as well as the significant continuities that exist to the present day. History, as a discipline, has its own methods and procedures which make it different from other ways of understanding human experience. The study of history is based on evidence derived from remains of the past. It is interpretative by nature, promotes debate and encourages thinking about human values, including present and future challenges. The process of historical inquiry develops transferable skills, such as the ability to ask relevant questions; critically analyse and interpret sources; consider context; respect and explain different perspectives; develop and substantiate interpretations, and communicate effectively. The curriculum generally takes a world history approach within which the history of Australia is taught. It does this in order to equip students for the world (local, regional and global) in which they live. An understanding of world history enhances students appreciation of Australian history. It enables them to develop an understanding of the past and present experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, their identity and the continuing value of their culture. It also helps students to appreciate Australia's distinctive path of social, economic and political development, its position in the Asia-Pacific region, and its global interrelationships. This knowledge and understanding is essential for informed and active participation in Australia's diverse society. Aims in history At Kurwongbah, we aim to ensure that students develop: interest in, and enjoyment of, historical study for lifelong learning and work, including their capacity and willingness to be informed and active citizens knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the past and the forces that shape societies, including Australian society understanding and use of historical concepts, such as evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability capacity to undertake historical inquiry, including skills in the analysis and use of sources, and in explanation and communication.
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School expectations- History Teachers at Kurwongbah State School are expected to: Be familiar with the Australian Curriculum: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Rationale

History

available

at:

At planning/ unit familiarisation stage refer to and complete the Curriculum Activity Risk Planner located in the 2013 Curriculum Overview folder in G drive G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\CurriculumRisk Assessment to identify any associated hazards/ risks within lessons/units Implement /adapt the C2C History Units available on OneSchool (see the 2013 C2C History Unit Overview below). [Please note that the suggested teaching sequence and supporting resources are provided as a starting point. It is up to each individual teacher to determine which resources are used and to what extent. This should be determined on the basis of the needs of the students in the class]. Timetable the teaching of history for a minimum of 30 minutes (years Prep-2), 1 hour (Years 3- 6) and 1.25 hours (Year7) each week or equivalent Identify students prior knowledge, skills and understanding through pre-testing Clearly communicate (articulate and display) learning goals in history to students Differentiate learning to cater for the individual learning needs of students in your class Implement C2C assessment tasks and provide opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, understandings and skills in all areas of history Collect evidence of student knowledge, understanding and skills in all areas of History Apply agreed standards to student work for the purposes of assessment Provide ongoing feedback to students on their learning Participate in informal professional conversations and moderation activities to achieve consistency in teacher judgements across classes Report on student progress two times a year using an agreed 5-point scale

2013 C2C History Unit Overview


Semester 1 Prep Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7 Exploring fabulous families Exploring this moment in time Semester 2 Tell me a story about the past Exploring yesterday and today- my grandparents, my parents and me Exploring my local community

Exploring the impact of changing technology on peoples lives Investigating celebrations, Exploring continuity and change in local commemorations and community diversity communities Investigating European exploration and the Investigating the impact of colonisation movement of peoples Exploring the development of British Investigating the colonial period in Australia colonies in Australia Exploring the development of the Investigating the emergence of Australia as Australian nation a diverse society A Investigating the ancient The Asian World- China The Mediterranean Worldpast (18.5 hours) (15 hours) Rome (16.5 hours) B Investigating the ancient The Mediterranean The Asian World- India (15 past (18.5 hours) World- Greece (16.5 hours) hours) C Investigating the ancient The Mediterranean The Asian World- China (15 past (18.5 hours) World- Egypt (16.5 hours) hours)
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DIGITAL PEDAGOGY AT KURWONGBAH


Digital pedagogy at Kurwongbah SS is purposeful, embedded and directly connected with class tasks and curriculum content. ICT allow student outcomes to be differentiated and personalised and encourage teacher and student collaboration. Targeted professional learning for staff in developing effective digital pedagogy is delivered through; Tech Know Bytes face-to-face sessions, One Portal Documents, One Channel sessions, Atomic Learning Tutorials and a school based Tech Know Bytes edStudio. Teachers can gain more information about Student Expectations around ICT through the C2C plans and curriculum priorities as well as the Student ICT Expectations. The KSS ICT Scope and Sequence documents currently being developed and refined will align C2C tasks with year level junctures and school based decisions regarding worthwhile and important ICT learning. There are many supporting documents to assist teachers about teaching and learning with ICT. The ICT Placemats demonstrate practical ideas for using school software, working in digitally rich environments and for using online tools and spaces. Teachers working more than 0.4 are entitled to a school CFT teacher (computer for teachers laptop) to encourage use of ICT daily with students and as a management tool for the designated teacher. The Learning Place is a safe EQ environment that is designed as a shared space and a supportive learning environment for teachers and students. Teachers are expected to embed ICT into their daily teaching in meaningful and engaging ways. Teachers are expected to continue on their digital journey by embracing and engaging with technology and improving the digital pedagogy of themselves and the digital literacy of their students in accordance to the Professional Development Framework. C2C units have many supportive e-resources that support the teaching of skills, genres and lessons through relative, engaging and visually appealing ways. ICTs not only assist teachers in the delivery of lessons and help students make connections to real-life events but ICT also enable students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding via software applications that are suitable and age appropriate and which allow for diversity amongst learners. ICTs are tools both students and teachers use to achieve a desired outcome. As professionals, role models and teachers of students digital citizenships we are required to model and explicitly teach our students the correct ethical, safe and legal use of devices, tools, environments and the internet in accordance to the Departmental guidelines. Upon logging in to school computers students and staff accept these responsibilities as well as after signing the declaration of the Department of Education and the Arts Use of Intranet, Internet and Electronic Mail Services and ICT Devices by Staff Policy at the beginning of each year. We cannot assume or expect our students to know about Internet safety, cyberbullying and Internet etiquette (Netiquette) and we as teacher should not assume these important lessons have been learnt previously. There are many tools and sites to support staff and a collection of educational resources addressing these concepts can be found on The Learning Place. Knowledge and application of accurate copyright procedures also need to be employed by staff and students by referring to Smartcopying and the Copy It Right! Edstudio. More policies can be found at http://ppr.det.qld.gov.au/corp/ict/management/Pages/Acceptable-Use-of-DepartmentsInformation-Communication-and-Technology-(ICT)-Network-and-Systems.aspx
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EXIT OUTCOMES
The Kurwongbah State School Community values these attributes:
Our Goal is for students to: Have an understanding of themselves: -Personal well being -Self concept -Self worth Become effective communicators -Appropriate social skills -Cooperative team skills -Tolerance and respect for differences KLAs School Programs Reflector HPE SOSE The Arts Music English The Arts English HPE Science SOSE Seasons for growth School Camps Instrumental Music Leaders Council Aussie of the Month Outstanding Student Awards Individual recognition of students SSS Room Green Team Peer Tutoring School Band Cross Country Social Skills Program Chess Club P/1 Choir Junior Singers Senior Singers Performance Group String Ensemble School Band Mid-Year Night of Music ACE Day Computer Lab Special Days Chess Club

We strive to develop these attributes in our students through these formal and informal school programs and initiatives:
Curriculum Pro-Active Initiatives PAL Goal setting Self evaluation Behaviour Reports Year 5 Bike Ed Swimming Program End of Year and Awards Night of Music Hall games Speaking on Parade

Communicator

Drama Camp Sports Day Interschool Sport Intra-school Sport Values Program

Be critical and creative thinkers -Risk taker -Problem Solver -Divergent Thinker -Flexible and adaptable -Knowledge of the past -Cultural and political awareness Be self-directed learners able to participate as active community members -Initiative -pro-active -work ethic -love of learning -values and ethics

Technology Maths Science SOSE English LOTE The Arts

Thinker

ICT Drama GATE Program Thinking Skills

Student initiated Talent Quests Parade Presentations Drama Performances Prep Obstacle Courses at lunchtime

English The Arts Maths SOSE Science LOTE HPE Technology

Participator

Seasons for Growth Virtues Program Effective Management of Students Policy Social Skills Program

Buddy System Top Kurwongbah Kid Excursions/Incursions Class Meetings Open communication High Five Strategy Free Dress Days Fund raising activities School Camps Chappys programs

Author/ Illustrator visits Kidsing Year 7 Meetings Tidy Block Awards Term discos Theme Days Book Week activities (Dress-up parade, competitions, displays) School Fetes Library Monitors

Kurwongbahs five vales are HONESTY, CARING, RESPECT, RESILIENCE and EXCELLENCE
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North Coast Regional Classroom Teaching Expectations


The NCR expectations regarding classroom teaching practices are: Pedagogy Each teacher: 1. ensures that every lesson has a purpose and that all lesson time is productive 2. delivers each lesson using explicit instruction (as per their schools definition of an excellent lesson) 3. uses strategies to move student knowledge from short term to long term memory 4. accepts accountability for each students learning 5. uses data to inform their teaching and student learning. Learning Environment Each teacher: 1. establishes an atmosphere of high expectations 2. sets a positive classroom learning tone 3. demands high standards of student presentation and handwriting 4. regularly corrects student work and provides feedback to each student 5. provides a high standard of classroom display that is relevant and educationally stimulating. Student Engagement Each teacher facilitates high student engagement by: 1. building effective relationships with all student s(ensuring that each student feels valued and respected) 2. ensuring that each student is given work at a level they can access and which is academically challenging 3. supporting each student to have friends at school 4. establishing goals for and with each student and engages each student in their progress towards their goals.

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CURRICULUM ORGANISATION
Our Vision for our students: At Kurwongbah all students are encouraged to become responsible, confident, self-motivated and cooperative individuals who aspire to achieve their maximum potential within a safe and supportive single year and mixed-year level setting. Kurwongbah State School is a P to 7 school which caters for the needs of approximately 940 students. We currently have a combination of mixed year level and single year level classes. In 2013 the school is organised in the following way: Prep/1: Six double classes (JA, JB, JC, JD, JE, JF) Year 2: Three double classes (JG, JH, JI) Years 3/4: Four double classes (MA, MB, MC, MD) Year 5: One double class (SE) and one single class (SF) Years 5/6: Two double classes (SC, SD) Year 7: Two double classes (SA, SB)

Implementing units: C2C units aligned to the Australian Curriculum in English, mathematics, science and history will be adopted or adapted to be implemented from Prep to year 7. Prep teachers will continue to implement the Early Years Curriculum Guidelines. Teachers in Years 1-7 follow a two year cycle to implement Technology, SOSE (remaining strands), HPE and Arts units and/or Assessment Bank Items (See Appendix: Overview of Units at Kurwongbah). These units have been collaboratively developed by the CST and classroom teachers and align to the QCAR Framework: Essential Learnings and Standards, while the Assessment Bank Items are sources from the QSA Assessment Bank and align to identified Essential Learnings. For further information about the QCAR Framework, please refer to Appendix: Overview of the QCAR Framework Unit plans are presented in a consistent format using the Kurwongbah unit planner or QSA unit planner across each juncture point and include the following features: Unit overview Essential learnings Assessment overview Teaching and learning opportunities Guide to Making Judgements (GTMJ or marking guide) Supporting resources Units will continue to be reviewed, updated and realigned as the Australian Curriculum is released and we receive directives from EQ regarding familiarisation and implementation priorities. Unit plans and Assessment Bank Items can be accessed on the Intranet from G drive by following this path: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\Unit Planning

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HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEACHERS


Studies that take into account all of the available evidence on teacher effectiveness suggest that students placed with high-performing teachers will progress three times as fast as those placed with lowperforming teachers (Barber & Mourshed, 2007). At Kurwongbah we believe that all teachers can be highly effective teachers. There is now a large body of educational research into the factors underpinning highly effective teaching. Meta-analyses of this research (e.g. Walberg, 1984; Bransford, Brown & Cocking, 2000; Hattie, 2003) reveal a number of teaching practices associated with significantly improved student outcomes. Four broad characteristics of highly effective teaching are summarised briefly here. High expectations Highly effective teachers create classroom environments in which all students are expected to learn successfully. They set high expectations for student learning and create orderly classrooms in which students feel safe and supported to learn. They are driven by a belief that, although individuals are at different stages in their learning, every student is capable of learning and making progress beyond their current level of attainment if motivated and given appropriate learning opportunities and support. Highly effective teachers understand the importance of developing students own beliefs in their abilities to learn successfully, and work to promote students understandings of the relationship between effort and success. As part of this process, highly effective teachers make clear what students are expected to learn. They communicate clear and high expectations of individual students and are clear about the standards expected of students in each grade of school. They set learning goals for individuals couched in terms of the knowledge, skills and understandings that they are expected to develop (not simply in terms of classroom activities to be completed). They set high expectations for individual progress and are focused on ensuring that all students achieve grade-level proficiency in foundational skills such as reading, writing and numeracy. Deep knowledge Highly effective teachers have a deep understanding of the subjects they teach. These teachers have studied the content they teach in considerably greater depth than the level at which they currently teach and they have high levels of confidence in the subjects they teach. Their deep content knowledge allows them to focus on teaching underlying methods, concepts, principles and big ideas in a subject, rather than on factual and procedural knowledge alone. Highly effective teachers not only have deep knowledge of the subjects they teach, they also have deep understandings of how students learn those subjects (i.e. pedagogical content knowledge). They understand how learning typically progresses in a subject: for example, the skills and understandings that are pre-requisites for progress, and common paths of student learning. They are familiar with the kinds of learning difficulties that some students experience and with appropriate interventions
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and available professional support for those difficulties. And they are aware of common student misunderstandings and errors, and know how to diagnose and address obstacles to further learning. Targeted teaching The most important single factor influencing learning is what the learner already knows. Ascertain this and teach him accordingly. (Ausubel, 1968) Highly effective teachers establish where students are up to in their learning. They understand the importance of first ascertaining students current levels of knowledge, skill and understanding, and they see teaching not so much as the delivery of onesize-fits-all, grade-appropriate curriculum content to a classroom of students, as the design of learning opportunities tailored to students current levels of readiness and need. They use starting point assessments and diagnoses of individual difficulties and misunderstandings to design effective interventions and teaching. Having established where students are up to in their learning, these teachers then direct their teaching to student needs and readiness. They maximise student engagement and hence learning by differentiating teaching according to student needs (i.e. not teaching to the middle of the class, but personalising teaching and learning as required). They use evidence-based teaching methods (such as direct instruction) that are known to be effective in promoting student learning and they use intrinsic factors (such as curiosity) to engage students and to motivate learning. Highly effective teachers work to ensure that all students are appropriately engaged, challenged and extended, including high-achieving students who already are working well beyond grade expectations. Continuous monitoring A consistent and strong research finding is that highly effective teachers provide continuous feedback to learning. They continually monitor the progress of individual students and provide feedback to support further learning. The provision of feedback is a key to effective classroom teaching. Highly effective teachers provide feedback in forms that guide student action and provide encouragement that further progress is possible with further effort. They assist students and parents to see and to monitor individual progress over time including across the years of school and they provide feedback to parents on what they can do to support their childrens learning. Beyond this, highly effective teachers reflect on their own practice and strive for continuous improvement. They use feedback about student learning to reflect on the effectiveness of their teaching efforts. They recognise that improvement in teaching is always possible and are eager to find ways to improve outcomes for students. They place a high priority on their own professional learning and usually work with colleagues in pursuit of improved teaching practices and enhanced student learning.

Accessed from: Teaching and Learning: Highly Effective Teachers (Roadmap Years 19) http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=45365

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PEDAGOGY
Pedagogical beliefs At Kurwongbah we believe that teaching and learning should be child-centred, responding to the needs of the students in our classes. that is responsive to student needs by: creating an environment for collaborative learning based on a recognition of each childs learning needs recognising that all children learning in different ways. By addressing individuality and diversity the school strives to cater for the needs of each child through a strong philosophical commitment to individualised, small group and large group (across age and year levels) teaching strategies differentiating the curriculum to best meet the needs of individual students by providing additional scaffolding or extending students We create an environment

The individual needs of students are addressed through the following: Differentiation Flexible class structures Cooperative planning with specialist staff Quality classroom programs Curriculum Support Model that supports inclusive education Use of a variety of strategies including explicit teaching, cooperative learning, inquiry-based learning Integration of ICT into planning/ teaching and learning SSS Room GATE Program

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DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING
Differentiated Classroom learning Differentiated learning is a pedagogical approach that identifies and monitors the individual needs of students and matches these with ways of teaching. It focuses on HOW something is taught and centres the learner as pivotal in all classroom activity. Teachers are aware of their students diverse backgrounds and know that they are academically, culturally, linguistically, economically, socially and motivationally diverse. To maximise student outcomes, teachers consider this diversity when designing educational programs to cater for individual needs. Teacher practice Classroom teachers in their day-to-day teaching acknowledge that the particular learning needs of individual children are the starting place to consider differentiated learning. To ascertain these learning needs, teachers monitor the progress of their students to see where they are at within a particular learning task. Teachers can monitor this progress through identifying: difficulties students might be having with the content, skills and processes student strengths, and their levels of readiness students interests and motivations the ways students learn. This monitoring then informs classroom teaching and learning activities so that each individual students learning needs, including high-achieving students, can be catered for. Suggestions for differentiating learning needs

Dimensions

Planning considerations

Our students

What do my students already know about what I am about to teach? What learning difficulties and misunderstandings do I anticipate my students might have with what I am about to teach? What constitutes my students backgrounds? How will I harness these to maximise student outcomes? How will I design the learning experiences to include all my students, including social support?

Curriculum intent

Does my planning present and represent the curriculum so that all students have access to the same content? Does my planning provide opportunities for students to have different entry points, learning tasks and outcomes that are tailored to their individual needs?
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Assessment

Does the assessment provide opportunities and mediums through which students can demonstrate learnings? Have I scaffolded their learning in ways that are responsive to their own particular needs so that assessments are achievable? Does my assessment accommodate the learning goals of each and every student for this particular unit of work?

Teaching and learning sequence

Will the learning experiences engage, challenge and extend all my students despite their diverse backgrounds, characteristics and needs? Do the learning experiences provide students with different opportunities to acquire the content, processes and skills? Have I incorporated flexible learning experiences e.g. a variety of activities and learning tasks; representation of curriculum in different contexts; individual, group and whole-of-class instructional modes; and multimodal assessment? How will I adjust my teaching in response to the progress students are/are not making?

Making Judgments

Are the task-specific assessable elements aligned with what I intended to assess and what I intended students to learn? Am I consistently using the evidence in student work to make judgments against the nominated assessable elements?

Feedback

Does my feedback-reflection-action loop explicitly focus on individual progress and differences in students? Do I use information gained through continuous and formative assessment processes to modify my teaching and to plan the learning activities appropriate to my students? Does my feedback process provide information to students and their parents/care givers about particular student learning needs?

Please note: There is an expectation at Kurwongbah that documentation of differentiation practices will occur at the unit level and will be collaboratively planned with your cohort support teacher (IEC/ ST L&N) and recorded in OneSchool or equivalent. The school had adopted the following differentiation planner/ template as an agreed, consistent format to be used by all teachers. Please see the sample on the next page for guidance on how to use the planner for purposeful unit level planning for differentiation. A blank template and suggestions are available in G drive at G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview There is an understanding that differentiation will occur daily in all classrooms as units are changed, tweaked, extended and adapted to suit the needs of all learners within the classroom but that extensive daily documentation of differentiation is not required.
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Kurwongbah State School Class Differentiation Template (SAMPLE) Date: Term 2 Weeks 1- 5 2013 Class Differentiation Science Term 2 Unit 3 Living Things
Class: JM
Student Names Significant Extension Required

Teacher:

Renee
Staff Names

What and How Supported


Independent research on living creatures using different sources. (PROCESS) Presents research in negotiated media of choice. (PRODUCT) Negotiated to access library as needed. (ENVIRONMENT)

Hannah

1 30min session with TA / week to assist Teacher provides research questions

Harry Chris James

Some Extension Required

Chose own animal to research and locate information with minimal assistance. (PROCESS). Complete task independently after PowerPoint techniques are modelled for class. (PROCESS)

Teacher instruction of power point

Ben Kate Sarah Joan Larra John Peter Sam Shelly

Achieving Year Level Expectations

Complete instructions and modelling Answer questions when arise Ask questions to guide research

Jo Bob Charlie Seth Arron Caleb

Support Needed

Continual monitoring of each step (PROCESS) Repeat and re-model instructions as needed (PROCESS) Use of a template to create desired outcome. (PROCESS) Provide concrete examples (PROCESS) Provide specific resources that allow for easy access to required information (PROCESS) Direct teacher support when completing task (PROCESS-ENVIRONMENT)

Teacher to support throughout process

Pete (II)
Intensive Support Required

TA read info to student (PROCESS) Repeat question before and throughout reading (e.g. what does the animal eat?) (PROCESS Scaffold sentence building (PROCESS) Write out sentences for Pete to type into PowerPoint (PROCESS) Reduced outcome (PRODUCT)

TA supporting process 3 times per week for 30min

Modified from a document developed by Palmwoods State School 31

CURRICULUM RISK ASSESSMENT


Undertaking curriculum activities is the core business of schools, and doing that safely is fundamental to the way we do business. All staff at Kurwongbah who have responsibilities for the curriculum need to know about the risk management process and how this process is applied to curriculum activities. Schools are workplaces, and as such, we operate under the Workplace Health and Safety Act. This Act outlines the responsibilities that various stakeholders have to ensure the safety of all those at a workplace. Employers have the obligation to: Provide a safe workplace Persons in control (e.g. Principals) have the obligation to: Ensure the risk of injury or illness in minimised for people at the workplace; Minimise the risk of injury from plant or substances; and Ensure safe access to and from the workplace for everyone. Workers and others (e.g. students, parents, contractors, volunteers and visitors) have the obligation to: comply with all reasonable instructions (e.g. the wearing of PPE); and, not place themselves or others at risk. Refer to: Prosecution of Government Departments Fact Sheet: http://education.qld.gov.au/health/pdfs/healthsafety/prosecution-govt-departments.pdf This fact sheet provides an excellent explanation of our obligations to manage safety, and positive steps that can be taken to fulfil these obligations. It is ideal for principals and other administrators. A number of tools have been developed and are available for staff to assist with Curriculum Risk Management: 1. Curriculum Activity Risk Planner 2. Curriculum Activity Risk Assessment Guidelines 3. Curriculum Activity Risk Assessment Template 4. School Curriculum Activity Register for high risk activities. The Planner has been designed to assist teachers start the curriculum risk assessment process: Step 1: Identify hazards associated with activities Step 2: Assess the risk level Step 3: Determine the control measures required The Curriculum Activity Risk Planner is a tool for teachers to record their thinking around the risk levels of the activities they are planning. The Planner record sheet will provide staff with a place to record the details of the curriculum activities they intend to do that involve hazards. It is recommended that high and extreme risk activities be identified and recorded. Some medium risk activities may also be recorded. More information as well as digital copies of the planner, guidelines and template can be located in G drive: G:\Coredata\Curriculum\2013_Curriculum_Overview\Curriculum Risk Assessment
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TEACHING STRATEGIES
Productive teachers use a range of teaching strategies including: Direct teaching Interactive teaching Indirect teaching Experiential teaching

Direct teaching Direct teaching is a highly structured teaching strategy. It's used to build and consolidate student knowledge, understanding and skills. The teacher actively directs the students in learning activities and focuses on ensuring all students achieve and consolidate the learning objectives. Direct teaching methods include: 1. Explicit teaching Explicit teaching is teaching of specific concepts or skills within a highly structured framework. The focus is on achieving specific learning outcomes. Students build and consolidate knowledge and/or skills important to a unit or program of work. This provides building blocks for more meaningful learning. 2. Intensive teaching When the explicit teaching method is used to achieve specific learning outcomes for individual or small groups it is referred to as intensive teaching. It may involve specialist teachers and/or the use of assistive technology. Intensive teaching is characterised by:

individual/small group instruction up to six students explicit instructional talk at all stages high response rates from teacher immediate feedback on learning sequential mastery of learning opportunities for students to use higher order thinking skills.

For some students intensive scaffolding may be required to achieve specific knowledge and/or skills important to a unit or program of work. 3. Structured overview A structured overview (or advance organiser), is a verbal, visual or written summary or outline of a topic, concept or skill. It's given to students at the start of a unit or lesson. It distils difficult or complex ideas into simple definitions or explanations and shows how all the information relates. Structured overviews can be used throughout a lesson or unit to reinforce relationships between ideas and anchor learning. Students can place new ideas in context and see the 'big picture'. It also provides a model for when students look for their own organising ideas and generate organisers of their own.
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4. Drill and practice In a drill, students attend to material or skills repeatedly and/or in different ways until they're firmly established in their minds. Practice involves repeatedly applying or using a concept or skill in order to increase speed and/or automaticity. (Automaticity is when a student can perform a task without thinking about it.) Drilling and practising concepts and skills refines and improves the retention and recall of facts and processes and the ability to use them effectively and efficiently. This provides the building blocks for more meaningful learning. Students are able to master materials at their own pace. Interactive teaching Interactive teaching has students working collaboratively and productively in small groups in a planned, well-managed and monitored learning environment. Interactive teaching involves:

teachers specifying what students are to do students engaging with the task teachers monitoring progress and making decisions about what to do next to achieve the learning goal.

Interactive teaching methods include: 1. Whole-class discussion A whole-class discussion is a group interaction where students participate in a purposeful, systematic exchange of facts, ideas and opinions. Students share ideas, listen to a variety of points of view and express and explore their own views about a topic or problem. Whole-class discussions help students to explore a range of perspectives on a topic or issue. Discussions can generate new ideas or original solutions to problems as students build on each others' thinking. This method also helps students develop communication skills and provides an opportunity for students to see that their ideas are valued. By participating in the discussions, students can also reflect on their own attitudes and values, and those of others. 2. Cooperative learning Cooperative learning involves small groups of students working together to achieve a common learning goal. Each learner within a group is given responsibility for some part of the learning. The entire group is accountable for the success of each of its members. However, each student is accountable for demonstrating his or her understanding of the material. Students of any age or ability can achieve more by working collaboratively than by working alone. This method is also useful when:

the learning task is too large for individual students an issue needs to be explored from multiple perspectives
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trying to develop students' social and collaborative skills as a way of learning.

Students learn by seeing how other students approach learning. Students learn by teaching others.

3. Peer partner learning In peer partner learning, one student provides feedback to a partner while the partner completes a task or skill. It's a collaborative experience where students learn from and with each other. A version of peer partner learning is reciprocal teaching, when students teach each other specific material or skills.

Indirect teaching Indirect teaching focuses on the student taking responsibility for their learning. In this strategy, students are involved in observing, investigating and drawing inferences from data, and forming hypotheses. The teacher organises the learning environment for the student. However, as the student takes responsibility for their learning, the teacher's role moves from instructor to facilitator. Indirect teaching methods include: 1. Inquiry-based learning Inquiry-based learning is about posing questions and finding answers to questions and issues. It is an open-ended and creative way of seeking knowledge through using critical and creative thinking. Inquiry-based learning is useful when the question or issue:

extends beyond the classroom involves broad and deep investigation.

It encourages independent learning as students have to come up with resolutions to questions themselves, rather than relying on the teacher. Students can have a significant say about the content and context of their work, and develop ownership over the learning. Inquiry-based learning builds students' research, interview and web search skills. It also builds the critical and creative thinking skills necessary for thoughtful review of information. 2. Inductive teaching In inductive teaching, students' knowledge comes from the way they experience and interact with facts, information and events. Essentially, inductive teaching is a process that enables students to discover a concept from the inside out. Teachers give students information about an issue or concept and encourage students to:

look for patterns within the information


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explore, observe and raise questions make connections from their explorations of the information.

Students use their specific learning to make a conclusion about information and/or events. Students can then apply their conclusion to new information, issues or events. That is, they take the generalisation and apply it to a new or unfamiliar situation. 3. Problem-based learning Problem-based learning involves students working together to solve an openended, challenging problem. This is different to giving students a problem to solve using information they have just learnt better termed an 'exercise' rather than a problem. Problem-based learning is appropriate when the problem needs broad and deep research and investigation. It develops students ability to be self-directed, independent and interdependent learners as they work together to solve a problem. They learn how to take responsibility for their own group and organise and direct their learning with support from the teacher. It develops students thinking and reasoning skills, including:

analysis applying existing knowledge to new situations separating fact from opinion making judgments critical and creative thinking.

Experiential teaching In experiential teaching, students learn from experiencing real, simulated or dramatised situations. Through the teaching process students are immersed in practical experiences that model real-world issues. Students can:

analyse and process their experiences form ideas or theories about issues, ideas and/or problems make generalisations reflect on their learning and future applications.

Experiential teaching methods include: 1. Field experience A field experience is a structured activity that involves taking students out of the classroom. It can be a brief activity or a longer, more sustained project. While this method occurs outside the classroom, the setting could be in the school garden or playground. A field experience brings learning to life as students participate in experiences with 'real' people, places and/or events.
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2. Simulation A simulation copies realistic, 'real world' conditions as much as possible. This helps students transfer concepts and problem-solutions to the 'real' world. Simulations can include cooperative games or games played by individuals against their own standard. In a simulation, students experience and learn from and about situations they cannot experience directly. 3. Role play Role play involves students exploring issues, ideas and/or problems through dramatic action when they 'put on someone else's shoes'. In role play, students consider another perspective to an issue by taking on a particular role. It makes learning relevant, particularly when the roles are of people involved in real-life or life-like situations. Role play gives students opportunities to examine their values and behaviours, develop empathy towards others and skills for solving interpersonal problems. 4. Process drama Process drama is a dramatic event without a written text. It can be improvised or composed and rehearsed. In a process drama, students can create an imagined world where they discover, articulate and sustain fictional roles and situations. The teacher may take on a role within the dramatic event or may stand outside the fiction. In a process drama, students can imagine themselves as others and explore beliefs, feelings, behaviours and relationships across diverse situations. [N.B. Additional information about these teaching strategies and methods, including examples can be found at: https://learningplace.eq.edu.au/cx/resources/items/f3515e44-6fe3-47e9-a58275b4beb73a45/1/priority_four.html?.hb=true]

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ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING


Assessment Assessment is a key aspect of the teaching and learning process. Assessment focuses on the performance of individual and groups of students in the educational setting and occurs in a variety of ways. It involves a practical, systemic process for collecting and analysing data, the major purpose of which is the improvement of learning through informed decision making. Assessment occurs when students are active in their teaching and learning environment. It should be: Diagnostic Formative (referred to as monitoring within C2C unit plans) Summative A range of assessment techniques and instruments used at Kurwongbah State School include: Focussed analysis; Consultation; Observation; Peer and self-assessment. Reporting Reporting is the process of communicating information obtained from the assessment process about students demonstration of learning outcomes. Reporting provides information on: Demonstrated evidence of student learning against agreed standards; Judgments made about students demonstration of learning outcomes. Audiences: Students of Kurwongbah State School School Administration Team Principal and Deputy Principals Parents/carers of students at Kurwongbah State School Kurwongbah State School Community Education Queensland. When: A written progress report is issued twice a year end of Semester 1 and Semester 2 Face-to-Face Interviews are offered twice a year- once at the end of Term 1 and again during Semester 2 Assessment and Reporting Plan Information regarding assessing and reporting at Kurwongbah is specifically detailed in the Kurwongbah State School Assessment and Reporting Plan. Please refer to this plan for further information about assessment and reporting practices and responsibilities at Kurwongbah.

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REPORTING IN PREP
The Prep year has been recognised as the first year of schooling in Queensland from 2012. Prep is equivalent to the Foundation year (F) of the Australian Curriculum. For Prep: An Early Learning Record is no longer required. Use the following five-point scale to report student achievement in the Australian Curriculum English, Mathematics, Science and History: Applying (AP) The student applies a thorough understanding of the required concepts, facts and procedures. The student demonstrates a high level of skill that can be transferred to new situations. Making Connections (MC) The student makes connections using the curriculum content and demonstrates a clear understanding of the required concepts, facts and procedures. The student applies a high level of skill in situations familiar to them and is beginning to transfer skills to new situations. Working With (WW) The student can work with the curriculum content and demonstrates understanding of the required concepts, facts and procedures. The student can apply skills in situations familiar to them. Exploring (EX) The student is exploring the curriculum content and demonstrates understanding of aspects of the required concepts, facts and procedures. The student applies a varying level of skill in situations familiar to them. Becoming Aware (BA) The student is becoming aware of the curriculum content and demonstrates a basic understanding of aspects of required concepts, facts and procedures. The student is beginning to apply skills in situations familiar to them. N: Insufficient evidence to make a judgment.1 Use comments to report on student achievement in the early learning areas of: Social and personal learning; Health and physical learning; and Active learning processes (Early Years Curriculum Guidelines). Report on effort and behaviour using comments.

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MODERATION
Why do we moderate? Moderation provides an opportunity for teachers to achieve consistency in teacher judgement through a structured process that allows them to compare judgements in order to either confirm or adjust them. The process involves close collaboration to establish a shared understanding of what achievement of KLA standards looks like and whether or not the student has demonstrated achievement of that standard. Teachers work towards making judgements that are consistent and comparable. What purposes can moderation serve in supporting consistency in teacher judgement? Develop shared or common interpretations of standards and expectations of what constitutes achievement of KLA standards Develop shared understandings of what students achievements look like Develop accuracy and reliability in making judgements Ensure judgements are equitable in terms of implications for student learning Strengthen the value of teachers judgements Inform well-targeted teaching programs Make judgements in relation to syllabus standards Ultimately, we engage in moderation to ensure that reported judgements of student achievement are defensible and comparable. Social Moderation Social moderation is an extended, collaborative process. It is the culmination of a process that delivers multiple opportunities for learning through quality, equitable and well-considered educational experiences. The ultimate aim of moderation is to achieve comparable grades in a diverse range of authentic assessment tasks across a range of schools in Queensland. The moderation process can be enacted within a school based context and/or across clusters or regions. While cohesive groups working collaboratively to achieve consensus, on-line models may provide moderation contexts that respond to issues such as distance or like-school groupings. Conference Model of Moderation At Kurwongbah, we have chosen the Conference Model as the process for moderation each term. Using the conference model for moderation, teachers discuss and deliberate in making their judgements about the quality of all of the evidence presented as student work. Teachers make judgements on several criteria to reach an 'on-balance' holistic judgement. This is not a procedural approach but one that is based on the teachers' professional knowledge in shared and collaborative decision making. Teachers mark (some or all) student responses individually, and then select assessment samples representative of their application for A to E standards. They meet with other teachers to discuss their judgements by sharing their samples. Teachers reach a consensus on the interpretation and application of the standards. Further details about Moderation at Kurwongbah State School including Moderation protocols and an overview of moderation activities for 2013 can be accessed via the Kurwongbah State School Moderation Plan 2013.
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FORMING PARTNERSHIPS
Forming strong partnerships with our school community and local community is a priority. This is evidenced through: An Emphasis on a Team Approach Building strong year level teams through year level meetings, year level moderations and shared practice. Explicitly planning for links between classes and sectors of the school as part of the curriculum plan. Regular opportunities for cohort and whole school sharing and reflection.

Strong Parent Partnerships Parent Information evening sessions run at the beginning of the year to give parents information about the year ahead and classroom routines and expectations. Displays in the classrooms, Administration Block and the Resource Centre feature student-created products and highlight the innovative practices within our classrooms. Regular parent communication through school newsletters, class newsletters, communication books, interviews and emails. Inviting parents to learning celebrations, culminating activities or Expos planned as part of unit planning. Parent volunteers working in classrooms Parent workshops and information sessions provided throughout the year. Parent involvement with home reading, homework tasks and school projects. Involving parents in school projects Book Club, Premiers Reading challenge, Support-A-Talker, Support-A-Reader, etc.

Community Links Regularly invite community members with specific expertise to participate as part of our integrated Units, e.g. Local member. Utilise local facilities for excursions and to enhance learning.

Some of the links already created include: A study of the local area and places of interest (2/3 unit) Study of Lake Kurwongbah (6/7 unit) including the involvement of a local environmental group Excursions to local places as part of integrated units- Working Farm, Heritage Museum, Local Council Library, etc.

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SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
School documents that support this Curriculum Plan are: Kurwongbah State School Curriculum Plan 2013 Kurwongbah State School Assessment and Reporting Plan- 2013 Kurwongbah State School Moderation Plan- 2013 Kurwongbah State School Science Program- 2013 GATE Action Plan Learning Enhancement Policy Effective Management of Students Policy Kurwongbah State School Values Project

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APPENDIX: OVERVIEW OF THE QCAR FRAMEWORK


The QCAR Framework enables schools to deliver cohesive learning programs for Years 19 and help students achieve deeper levels of understanding. Intellectually challenging and real-world learning experiences will help all students become lifelong learners. Assessing student work against the same standards will increase the consistency of teacher judgements of student achievement across the state. The QCAR Framework supports the importance of both the Early Phase and Middle Phase of learning by ensuring the creation of space for learning within the total school environment, continuity of curriculum intent and comparability and consistency in assessment and reporting.

Curriculum Essential Leanings: Core of curriculum School based curriculum: Contextually relevant curriculum Inquiry based curriculum model: developing deep knowledge and understanding Pedagogical Practices: Developing curriculum intent to provide multiple opportunities for students to engage in intellectually challenging and real-world learning experiences Assessment Standards: ensuring continuity, comparability and consistency Assessment strategies and techniques Evidence of student achievement Social Moderation and Moderation Protocols Pedagogical Practices: Provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning in a range of contexts and media Assessment refers to the collection of information about student achievement. The QCAR framework recognises the central role of teachers' every day classroom assessment in providing authentic and valid feedback for ongoing improvement in teaching and student learning. It also recognises that statewide point-in-time assessment provides reliable and comparable information about student achievement across schools. While each assessment approach provides different information, in combination fuller picture of student achievement is provided. Reporting Reporting guidelines: Formats, styles and frequency Template Pedagogical Practices: Developing reporting structures and techniques that reflect the multiple opportunities in which students have demonstrated their learning

(Accessed from: http://education.qld.gov.au/qcar/implementing.html)


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APPENDIX: 2013 ASSESSMENT AND TESTING OVERVIEW


When
Annual

What
BRIGANCE Screener (Prep, Term 1) Prep Reading Behaviours Inventory (Prep, Term 3) Letter/Sound Checklist (Prep/ Year 1, Terms 2 and 4)

Who
Classroom teacher Classroom teacher Teacher aides Intervention

Action

Intervention, differentiation, targeted teaching Targeted teaching

Speech Screening (Prep/ Year 1, Term 2) Vision Screener (Prep/ Year 1, Term1/ Term 2)

Speech pathologist Eyes@Narangba

Intervention, Support-A-Talker; home program, intensive support (one-on-one, small group) Individual screening, teacher information

Auditory processing (Year 1; Term 3)

Teacher aides

Parent information

South Australian Spelling Test (Years 1-7, Term 4)

Classroom Teacher

Individualised spelling programs, whole class programs

NAPLAN (Years 3, 5 and 7, Term 2)

Classroom teacher

Intensive teaching initiative (final year), Lexia, Enrichment program

PAT-R (Years 4 and 6, Term 4)

Classroom teacher

Data analysis, referral process, classroom reading program

PAT-Maths (Years 4 and 6, Term 4)

Classroom teacher

Data analysis, referral process, classroom mathematics programs

Semester

Summative assessment tasks (Technology, HPE, SOSE, The Arts, LOTE)

Classroom teacher

Targeted teaching, reporting

PROBE (Years 3-7; Terms 2 and 4)

Classroom teacher

Whole class reading program

History summative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7)

Classroom teacher

Targeted teaching, reporting

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Term

Spelling diagnostic tests- pre and post (Years 1-7)

Classroom teacher

Differentiation; targeted teaching

PM Benchmark (Years P-3)

Classroom teacher/ Key teacher/ Teacher aide/ Learning Support

Whole class reading program, Support-A-Reader, volunteer program

Science summative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7)

Classroom teacher

Targeted teaching, reporting

Unit

English formative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7) Mathematics formative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7)

Classroom teacher Classroom teacher

Monitoring, differentiation, grouping, goal setting Monitoring, differentiation, grouping, goal setting

English- summative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7) Mathematics- summative assessment task/s (C2C, Years P-7)

Classroom teacher Classroom teacher

Reporting, moderation, goal setting Reporting, moderation, goal setting

Monthly

Triple S OneSchool Reports

Behaviour support teacher

Monitoring

Weekly

Student work samples (Years P-7) Observations (Years P-7) Checklists (Years P-7) Anecdotal records (Years P-7)

Classroom teacher

Classroom teacher/ Learning support

Differentiation, explicit teaching

Weekly Triple S Room Reports

Behaviour support teacher

BMI, Task cards, Playground cards, YOYOB Cards, LOTE cards, IBSP, Parent contact, Stakeholder meetings, Outside agencies

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Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School Yearly Data Collection Overview


Year Level P Term One BRIGANCE Screener (K) Term Two Speech Screening Letter/Sound Checklist (K) Vision Screening Speech Screening PM Benchmark (K) Vision Screening Validation (S) PM Benchmark (K) NAPLAN (National Assessment ProgramLiteracy and Numeracy tests) (N) (NB. Text type-persuasive) Tuesday14 May Wednesday 15 May Thursday 16 May PM Benchmark (K) PROBE (K) Term Three Prep Reading Behaviour Inventory (K) Term Four PM Benchmark (K) Sight Word Checklist (K) Letter/Sound Checklist (K) PM Benchmark (K) SA Spelling Test (K) PM Benchmark (K) SA Spelling Test (K) PROBE (OPTIONAL) SA Spelling Test (K) PM Benchmark (K) PROBE (OPTIONAL)

Auditory Processing (K)

NAPLAN (National Assessment ProgramLiteracy and Numeracy tests) (N) (NB. Text type-persuasive) Tuesday 14 May Wednesday 15 May Thursday 16 May PROBE (K) PROBE (K)

SA Spelling Test (Week 4) (K) PROBE (Week 4-8) (K) PAT-R Reading Comprehension Test Form 4 (K) Vocabulary Test Form 1 PAT-MATHS Maths Test Form 1 (K) SA Spelling Test (Week 4) (K) PROBE (Week 4-8) (K)

SA Spelling Test (Week 4) (K) PROBE (Week 4-8) (K) PAT-R Reading Comprehension Test Form 5 (K) Vocabulary Test Form 2 PAT-MATHS Maths Test Form 3 (K)

NAPLAN (National Assessment ProgramLiteracy and Numeracy tests) (N) (NB. Text type- persuasive) Tuesday 14 May Wednesday 15 May Thursday 16 May PROBE (K)

SA Spelling Test (Week 4) (K) PROBE (Week 4-6) (K)

Key: K- School-based; S- State-based; N- National testing; *NB Teachers are to advise Learning Support of new enrolments 46

NAPLAN
Literacy Numeracy Action: Actions: UPLG Intensive teaching initiative Lexia Enrichment Program

Collecting and using data at Kurwongbah State School

Behaviour data
Weekly Triple S Room reports Monthly OneSchool reports Individual Behaviour Management Tracker Functional Behavioural Analysis Actions: BMI Task Cards Playground cards YOYOB Cards LOTE Cards IBSP Parent Contact Stakeholder meetings Outside agencies Advisory Visiting Teachersspecific disabilities

School data South Australian Spelling PROBE Pat-R Pat-M Vision screening Auditory processing screening Speech screening and assessments

Class data
Assessment tasks Work samples Checklists GTMJs Observations Anecdotal records Test results Disability specific programs Whole word reading program

Individual Support Plans ( ISP) Education Adjustment Profile Actions: Differentiation Ability grouping Reporting- face-to-face, written, oral Referrals to Learning Support, IEC, Guidance counselling or Enrichment Program Support-A-Talker

Actions: Lexia Support-A-Reader (Volunteers) Learning Support (Intervention/Differentiation) Enrichment Program Report to parents and teachers Classroom differentiation Speech therapy

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Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School English Targets


SA Spelling 80% of students at or above PM Benchmark PROBE NAPLAN PAT R English (Report Card) % of students at or above C level (or equivalent)

95% of students at or above

95% of students at or above

Reading

Writing

Grammar and Punct.


NMS U2B

Spelling

85% of students at or above stanine Vocab Comp

Accuracy Sem 1
Prep Year 1 6.5 4-7 7-13

Comp. Sem 2
Accuracy Comp.

NMS

U2B

NMS

U2B

NMS

U2B

Sem 2

80% 75% 80%

Year 2 Year 3 Year 4

7.5 8.5 9.5

12-16 18-22

16- 20 22-24

75% 75% 95% 75% 98% 50% 98% 50% 97% 51% 97% 46% 5 5

81% 83% 88%

Sem 1: The Big Race (F) Age: 9-10 Sem2: Instant Fire (NF) Age: 9.5-10.5 Year 5 10.5 99% 75% 97% 41% 100% 50% 96% 53% 98% 42% Sem 1: The Greenland (NF) Age: 10-11 Sem 2: Grand Idea (F) Age: 10.5-11.5 95% 75% Sem 1: Trenchers (NF) Age: 11-12 Sem 2: Wheres Freddie (F) Age: 11.512.5 95% 75% Sem 1: Bay Rescue (F) Age: 12-13 Sem 2: Hard Tack (NF) Age: 12.5-13.5

Book 1

Book 4 75%

Year 6

11.5

71%

Book 2

Book 5

Year 7

12.5

96%

29%

98%

29%

96%

37%

92%

22%

91%

NB. NAPLAN Year 5 and 7 targets calculated on 2011 year 3 and 5 scores + 3%; NAPLAN Year 3 targets calculated on 2012 year 3 scores + 3%, Report card targets calculated on 2012 results of same cohort of students (e.g. year 3 calculated on 2012 year 2 results) + 3%.

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Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School Mathematics Targets


NAPLAN NMS Prep 80% Year 1 80% Year 2 92% Year 3 95% Year 4 5 Book 1 Year 5 98% Year 6 5 Book 3 Year 7 95% 22% 81% 82% 34% 80% 83% 35% 86% U2B PAT M 80% of students at or above stanine Achievement Level (Report Card) % of students at or above C level (or equivalent)

NB. NAPLAN Year 5 and 7 targets calculated on 2011 year 3 and 5 scores + 3%; NAPLAN Year 3 targets calculated on 2012 year 3 scores + 3%, Report card targets calculated on 2012 results of same cohort of students (e.g. year 3 calculated on 2012 year 2 results) + 3%.

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Appendix: 2013 Kurwongbah State School Science Targets


Achievement Level (Report Card) % of students at or above C level (or equivalent) Prep 85% Year 1 85% Year 2 100% Year 3 98% Year 4 85% Year 5 70% Year 6 74% Year 7 98%

NB. Report card targets calculated on 2012 results of same cohort of students (e.g. year 3 calculated on 2012 year 2 results) + 3%.

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APPENDIX: OVERVIEW OF UNITS AT KURWONGBAH


KLA/ Essential Learning Units for 2013
HPE SOSE Technology The Arts

Sem 1 Years 1 and 2 PE lessons only

Sem 2

Sem 1

Sem 2 An introduction to maps and mapping

Sem 1 Designing, making and reflecting on an item for the Fete Designing, making and reflecting on an item for the Fete Designing, making and reflecting on an item for the Fete Designing, making and reflecting on an item for the Fete

Sem 2 Design task

Sem 1 Colour my world (QSA)

Sem 2 Drama

Daniel Safe and Morcombe Child happy Safety Unit classrooms (QSA) Daniel Playing Morcombe Child around with Safety Unit rules

Years 3/4

PE lessons only

Reading and making simple maps

Design task

Visual Arts elements in action- Art folio Visual Arts: Beyond Observation (QSA) Visual Arts elementsCreating a visual arts folio

Drama

Years 5 and 5/6

PE lessons only

Daniel Discovering Morcombe Child Democracy: Safety Unit Rules and Laws Daniel Discovering Morcombe Child Democracy: Safety Unit Being a democratic citizen.

Maps and Mapping

Design task (Scratch? Set design?)

Drama

Years 7

PE lessons only

Discovering Democracy: Levels of Government

Design task (Poetry transformation)

Drama

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Prep- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum) Term 1
Unit 1: Enjoying our new world Students listen to and read texts to explore predictable text structures and common visual patterns in a range of literary and non-literary texts, including fiction and non-fiction books and everyday texts. They engage in multiple opportunities to learn about language, literature and literacy within the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, play, real-life situations, investigations and routines and transitions.

Term 2
Unit 2: Enjoying and retelling stories Students will listen to and engage with a range of literary and non-literary texts with a focus on exploring how language is used to entertain through retelling events. They engage in multiple opportunities to learn about language, literature and literacy within the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, play, real life situations, investigations and routines and transitions. Students will sequence events from a range of texts and select a favourite story to retell to a small group of classmates. Students will prepare for their spoken retelling by drawing events in sequence and writing simple sentences.

Term 3
Unit 3: Interacting with others Students listen to, view and interpret a range of multimodal texts, including poetry and rhymes to develop an understanding of sound and letter knowledge, a range of language features and identify common visual patterns. They engage in multiple opportunities to learn about language, literature and literacy within the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, play, real life situations, investigations and routines and transitions. Students will create and recite a rhyming story to a familiar audience. They will show understanding of the rhyming story by creating some gestures to go with it. Students will write and draw a personal response to a rhyming story including justification for their opinion.

Term 4
Unit 4: Responding to text Students will have multiple opportunities to read, examine and respond to literature and explore text structure and organisation. Students will create a short imaginative multimodal text which includes illustrations. They engage in multiple opportunities to learn about language, literature and literacy within the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, play, real life situations, investigations and routines and transitions.

English

Unit 1: Prep students will engage in activities across the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, investigations, active learning, real life situations, routines and transitions. When opportunities arise in the classroom, the appropriate strand of mathematics Number and algebra, Measurement and geometry, Statistics and probability may be addressed. In this unit through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value explore principles of counting, explore numbers in the environment, represent and subitise quantities, connect numerals to quantities, compare quantities, order numerals and quantities, record representations of quantities Patterns and algebra sort and classify objects, sequence of numbers to 20, describe and create patterns Using units of measurement sequence routines and events, compare the duration of events, explore size Location identify language of location, represent locations Data ask questions to gather information.

Unit 2: Prep students will engage in activities across the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, investigations, active learning, real life situations, routines and transitions. When opportunities arise in the classroom, the appropriate strand of mathematics Number and algebra, Measurement and geometry, Statistics and probability may be addressed. In this unit through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value apply the counting principles, count forwards and backwards, order numbers, represent and partition amounts Patterns and algebra copy, describe and continue repeating patterns Using units of measurement sequence events, measure duration, directly compare objects using length Shape sort, compare and describe 3D objects, identify and describe 2D shapes, sort and name 2D shapes Location explore change in location, describe movement, represent and create simple movement paths Data ask questions to gather information.

Unit 3: Prep students will engage in activities across the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, investigations, active learning, real life situations, routines and transitions. When opportunities arise in the classroom, the appropriate strand of mathematics Number and algebra, Measurement and geometry, Statistics and probability may be addressed. In this unit through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value make equal amounts, combine small amounts, represent, model and represent addition, explore part-part-whole situations, explore, describe and represent sharing Patterns and algebra copy, describe, continue and create growing patterns Using units of measurement sequence and represent daily and weekly events, recall days of the week sequence, directly and indirectly compare objects using mass Data identify questions in a familiar context, represent responses and interpret data.

Unit 4: Prep students will engage in activities across the five contexts of learning focused teaching and learning, investigations, active learning, real life situations, routines and transitions. When opportunities arise in the classroom, the appropriate strand of mathematics Number and algebra, Measurement and geometry, Statistics and probability may be addressed. In this unit through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count and represent quantities, connect different arrangements of quantities, partition quantities into equal and not equal parts, identify and describe addition Using units of measurement compare the capacity of containers, the mass and length of objects and sort objects according to given attributes Shape identify, describe and compare 2D shapes and 3D objects Location position and locate objects, describe changes in location, represent and create movement paths Data ask questions to gather information, interpret data.

Mathematics

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Term 1
Unit 1: Our living world

Term 2
Unit 2: Our material world Students engage in activities from the five contexts of learning play, real life situations, investigations, routines and transitions and focused learning and teaching. The unit provides opportunities for students to examine familiar objects using their senses. Through exploration and discussion, language is focused to describe the properties of the materials from which objects are made. Students then observe and analyse the reciprocal connection between properties of materials, objects and purposes so that they recognise the scientific decision making in everyday life.

Term 3
Unit 3: Weather watch Prep students engage in activities from the five contexts of learning play, real life situations, investigations, routines and transitions and focused learning and teaching. This unit involves students using sensory experiences to explore daily and seasonal changes in the local weather and to reflect on the impact of these changes on plants, animals and daily life. Students are provided opportunities to explore specific regional weather events and interpretations of weather phenomena through various cultural perspectives. Students then formulate generalisations about the signs and signals relating to weather. .

Term 4
Unit 4: Move it, move it Prep students engage in activities from the five contexts of learning play, real life situations, investigations, routines and transitions and focused learning and teaching. This unit involves students observing and asking questions about how things move. Students gather different types of information about factors influencing movement and apply and explain knowledge of movement in a familiar situation.

Students use their senses to investigate the needs of living things, both animals and plants, in natural and man-made environments. Students determine that the survival of all living things is reliant on basic needs being met and discuss the consequences for living things when their needs are not met. Students consider the impact of human activity and natural events on the availability of basic needs and describe some sustainable practices that they could implement to protect Earth's resources and support the provision of the needs of living things.

Science

Unit 1: Exploring fabulous families Inquiry question/s: What is my history and how do I know? In this unit, students: understand how the past is different from the present investigate their personal history, particularly family relationships examine the nature of and structure of families recognise similarities and differences between families appreciate diversity within their family and others share information about their family with others. Prep students will develop skills and understandings by engaging in activities associated with the five contexts for learning focused learning and teaching, investigations, real-life situations, play and routines and transitions. Historical understandings and skills will be developed through social and personal learning, language learning and communication, early mathematical understandings and active learning processes.

Unit 2: Tell me a story about the past Inquiry question/s: How can stories of the past be told and shared? What stories do other people tell about the past? In this unit, students: understand how they, and the stories of others communicate information about the past recognise that sources help to tell stories, remember the past and signify importance recognise that families commemorate different and similar events according to their beliefs and what is important to them listen to and appreciate family stories, and recognise how the past is communicated listen to and appreciate the stories of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples and recognise how the past is communicated compare their own family commemorations to those of others discuss, create and order pictures of significant commemorations. Prep students will develop skills and understandings by engaging in activities associated with the five contexts for learning focused learning and teaching, investigations, real-life situations, play and routines and transitions. Historical understandings and skills will be developed through social and personal learning, language learning and communication, early mathematical understandings and active learning processes.

History

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Year 1 Overview of units- 2014 (Essential Learnings)


Semester One: Positive pathways Semester Two: Around the World

The Arts The Arts- Drama Students develop and present a dramatic interpretation of a familiar story. HPE Heathy food, healthy me! Assessed through PE lessons only. Students learn about healthy food choices to select food for a healthy school lunch. SOSE Community Helpers Students identify and describe the role of a Community Helper to demonstrate what they know and understand about people who help us (from an image of the Community Helper). Essential Learning: Citizenship involves belonging to groups and communities and valuing different contributions and behaviours such as caring for other members e.g. families and schools are groups that are based on cooperation and care for their members. Technology Make it tasty! Students design and make a sandwich for another class member (design, make, evaluate, reflect). Postcard Design Students design and make a postcard from a chosen country considering layout and visual appeal. Cultural diversity Students visit a series of countries around the world and use concept maps to record their thinking and understanding about those places and cultural experiences. The Arts- Dance Students plan and perform a 4-movement dance sequence based on an excerpt from a familiar cultural story

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Year 1- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 7 Unit 8

Unit 1: Exploring emotion in picture books Students listen to, read, view and interpret written picture books, including stories from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. They identify emotive content and justify their interpretations of the stories.

Unit 3: Unit 2: Explaining how Exploring a story works characters in Students listen stories Students listen to, read and view a range of to, read, view picture books in and interpret order to analyse spoken, written and multimodal and explain a literary texts to familiar story. identify some features of characters in these texts and to create written character descriptions.

Unit 4: Engaging with poetry Students listen to, read and view a variety of poems to explore sound and rhythm. Students recite a poem to the class and reflect on their recitation.

Unit 5: Examining language of communication questioning Students listen to, read, view and interpret texts with animal characters to explore how they reflect human qualities. Students present an interview in pairs asking open and closed questions of an animal character.

Unit 6: Retelling cultural stories Students listen to, read, view and interpret picture books and stories including a wide selection from different cultures. They write and read a retell of their favourite story to an audience of peers.

Unit 7: Creating digital procedural texts Students listen to, read, view and interpret traditional and digital multimodal texts, to explore the language and text structures of instruction in literary and information contexts. Students create a digital multimodal presentation of a procedure from a literary context.

Unit 8: Creating digital texts Students listen to, read, view and interpret a range of narrative texts to create a digital innovation on a favourite story. Students present a spoken justification about the choices for their innovation.

English

55

Unit 1: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value recognise, model, count and order 2-digit numbers and partition small collections flexibly, represent addition and subtraction situations and use a range of strategies to recall basic addition facts and use the commutative principle Time use days and weeks to show duration Measurement compare, order and measure lengths of objects

Unit 2: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value recognise, model, count and order 2-digit numbers and partition small collections flexibly, represent addition and subtraction situations and use a range of strategies to recall basic addition facts and use the commutative principle Location and direction follow and give directions Data gather, represent and interpret data Chance describe the likelihood of events

Unit 3: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value skip count forwards and backwards in tens to 100, identify and represent 2-digit numbers, and partition and rearrange number collections flexibly, represent multiples of 10, write simple number sentences using + and = Fractions explore half a collection or quantity Time explore oclock on analogue clocks

Unit 4: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value skip count forwards and backwards in tens to 100, identify and represent 2-digit numbers, and partition and rearrange number collections flexibly, represent multiples of 10, write simple number sentences using + and = Money sort, classify and describe Australian coins and describe buying and selling situations Shapes and objects describe and classify 2D shapes and 3D objects according to geometric features

Unit 5: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value skip count forwards and backwards in fives to 50, identify zero as a place holder, and represent 2digit numbers, use standard partitions and apply the associative principle Fractions recognise and describe halves Measurement compare, order and measure capacity of objects

Unit 6: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value skip count forwards and backwards in fives to 50, identify zero as a place holder, and represent 2digit numbers, use standard partitions and apply the associative principle Time tell time to the half hour and describe duration Money order Australian coins according to their value.

Unit 7: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count forwards and backwards beyond 100, extend skip counting patterns, represent and locate numbers showing relative position, add single digit and 2-digit numbers without regrouping and use addition and subtraction to find unknowns Shapes and objects recognise and classify 2D shapes and 3D objects Data identify simple questions to collect data, represent and describe data displays Chance describe the outcomes of events as will, wont and might happen and modifying events to alter the chance of an outcome occurring.

Unit 8: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count forwards and backwards beyond 100, extend skip counting patterns, represent and locate numbers showing relative position, add single digit and 2-digit numbers without regrouping and use addition and subtraction to find unknowns Location and direction follow and give directions.

Mathematics

56

Unit 1: Living adventure

Unit 2: Material madness

Unit 3: Changes around me

Unit 4: Light and sound This unit provides opportunities for students to discover that light and sound are produced by a range of sources and can be changed. Students organise and create a record to communicate their developing scientific thinking about sensory explorations of light and sound. This unit involves students reflecting on the advances and applications of sound and light in real-life contexts.

Students make links between Students experience and describe In this unit, students will compare external features of living things physical changes that can be and describe the changes that and the environment where they made to familiar materials and occur in the features of the day sky and landscape with the night are found. They explore a range of begin to infer cause and effect sky and landscape. Students ask habitats, and consider the relationships. Students modify an questions and explore differences between healthy and existing material for a given understandings about what they unhealthy habitats. Students purpose and explain the resultant observe. Students organise predict how change to habitats effects to others. observations and make inferences can affect how the needs of living things are met. to link the observable changes to everyday life, Indigenous cultures, and plants and animals. Unit 1: Exploring this moment in time Inquiry Question/s: How do we describe the sequence of time?

Science

Unit 2: Exploring yesterday and today- my grandparents, my parents and me

Inquiry Question/s: How has family life changed or remained the same over time? How can we show that the present is different from or similar to the In this unit, students: past? understand concepts and terms used to describe the passing of time understand how a timeline can order events according to past, present or possible future In this unit, students: recognise events that happened in the past may be memorable or identify elements of significance in the childhood lives of their have personal significance parents and grandparents collect and discuss sources, such as images, objects and family compare and contrast the childhood of their parents and stories, that have personal significance grandparents with their own sequence events of personal significance recognise elements of childhoods that may have changed or describe an event of personal significance, referring to sources, and remained the same pose questions about what life was like in grandparents childhood using terms to describe the passing of time. examine sources showing family life over generations interview grandparents or special older person to gain information to use in a narrative about how family life has changed tell a narrative supported by images contrasting the experience of childhood from their grandparents day to present day.

History

57

Years 2/3 Overview of units- 2014 (Essential Learnings)


The Arts Visual Arts- Colour my world Children use colour to create visual art works that express a feeling. They select one of their artworks and prepare an artists statement about it. They also interpret the artworks of another child, making use of visual arts language. Media- PhotoStory Students select images from a bank of images (available in G drive) to design and create a presentation using PhotoStory that explains the production of a common food or clothing item by sequencing digital images and recording audio, inserting transitions and applying relevant text as captions.

HPE

Assessed through PE lessons only

Transport safety test (QSA Assessment Bank Item) Students analyse a transport scene to identify dangerous behaviours. They identify possible risks and harms and suggest alternative behaviours that would minimise risks to themselves and others.

SOSE

Safe and happy classrooms (QSA Assessment Bank Item) Students will discuss classroom rules. They will choose five classroom rules for a poster and explain why these rules are important. They will also reflect on their poster design.

How is it made? Students create a series of concept maps and flow charts that record their understandings about the processes/steps associated with the production of familiar food and clothing items. They explain the steps involved in the production of a familiar food or clothing item.

Technology

Mixed media construction Students design and create a sculpture or collage from mixed media, considering available everyday materials and their properties to explore the use of those materials in a variety of interesting ways. Students reflect on their constructions.

Make a puppet/ mask Students follow the technology process to design, make and evaluate a puppet (or mask) and reflect on their learning.

58

Year 2- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Term 1
Unit 1: Unit 2: Reading, writing and Stories of families performing poetry and friends Students read and listen to a range of poems to create an imaginative poetry reconstruction. Students present their poem or rhyme to a familiar audience. Students will explore texts to analyse how stories convey a message about issues that relate to families and friends. Students will write a biography about a character from a book and present it in multimodal digital form. Unit 3: Identifying stereotypes Students read, view and listen to a variety of texts to explore how depictions of characters in print, sound and images create stereotypes. Students identify stereotypical characters in texts and create an imaginative alternative character description to present to an audience of peers.

Term 2
Unit 4: Responding persuasively to narratives Students read, view and listen to a variety of literary texts to explore how stereotypes are used to persuade audiences. Students create a persuasive response. They compare how the representations of a character are depicted differently in two publications of the same story and give reasons for a particular preference. Unit 5: Exploring procedural texts

Term 3
Unit 6: Exploring informative texts Students read, view and listen to a range of stories to create an informative text about an event in a literary text.

Term 4
Unit 7: Exploring plot and characterisation in stories Students explore a variety of stories including dreaming stories, pictures books, traditional tales and digital text to explore how stories use plot and characterisation to entertain and engage an audience. Students create a written imaginative event to be added to a familiar narrative with appropriate images that match the text. Students present their written event to their peers. Unit 8: Exploring narrative texts Students read, view and listen to a range of stories from other cultures. They create a written retell of an event in the life of a person or character from one of the stories studied.

Students read, view and listen to a variety of everyday procedural texts and familiar stories that involve a procedure, e.g. traditional stories and contemporary stories. Students develop multimodal instructions for a procedure and present them to an audience of peers.

English

59

Unit 1: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count and order numbers, represent numbers in different ways, represent and describe addition situations, recall and derive basic facts, choose efficient computation methods Patterns identify a pattern rule, record addition and subtraction situations, interpret number sentences Time interpret time on calendars using dates, days, months and seasons Measurement measure, compare and order objects using informal units of length.

Unit 2: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value order numbers, represent numbers in different ways, represent and describe addition situations, recall and derive basic facts, choose efficient computation methods, represent multiplication and division situations Patterns identify a pattern rule, record addition and subtraction situations, interpret number sentences Chance identifying and describing outcomes using the language of chance Data collect, represent and interpret data.

Unit 3: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count and order numbers, represent numbers in different ways, use part-part-whole reasoning, identify related facts for addition and subtraction Fractions recognise and interpret uses of halves and quarters Patterns use a rule to describe a number pattern Shapes and objects describe and draw 2D shapes with and without digital technologies and describe the features of 3D objects Location interpret simple maps of familiar locations, drawing mud maps of personal significance.

Unit 4: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value count and order numbers, represent numbers in different ways, partition and rearrange small collections, use partpart-whole reasoning, identify related facts for addition and subtraction Money compare and order coins according to their value, represent and solve simple shopping problems Time tell time to the quarter hour, read and interpret calendars. Measurement measure, compare and order objects using informal units of length and area.

Unit 5: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value describe the order and relative position of numbers, partition and rearrange collections beyond 100, connect addition and subtraction, apply the associative law to add three single digit numbers Fractions recognise and interpret uses of halves, quarters and eighths Patterns derive other sequences from known sequences, identify missing elements Measurement compare objects based on length, area, capacity and volume, measure and order using informal units, investigate mass with balance scales Fractions representing halves, fourths and eighths using linear and area models, representing halves, fourths and eighths of a collection.

Unit 6: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value describe the order and relative position of numbers, partition and rearrange collections beyond 100, connect addition and subtraction, apply the associative law to add three single digit numbers Patterns consolidate deriving other sequences from known sequences, identify missing elements Time name and order months and seasons, construct, read and interpret a calendar, tell time to the quarter hour Money apply efficient strategies to count notes and order coins, represent and solve simple shopping problems Money count and order small collections of Australian coins and notes.

Unit 7: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value consolidate place value of numbers, represent and solve simple 3digit addition and subtraction, represent multiplication situations using symbols and represent the commutative principle with multiplication Patterns create number sequences using 2s, 5s and 10s patterns Chance identifying and describing outcomes using the language of chance. Data collect, represent, including lists, tables and picture graphs, and interpret data.

Unit 8: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Shape describe and draw 2D shapes, describe 3D objects Number and place value consolidate place value of numbers, represent and solve simple 3digit addition and subtraction, represent multiplication situations using symbols and represent the commutative principle with multiplication Patterns consolidate creating number sequences using 2s, 5s and 10s patterns Location interpret simple maps Shape consolidate describing and drawing 2D shapes with and without digital technologies and describing the features of 3D objects.

Mathematics

60

Unit 1: Mix, make and use Students investigate combinations of different materials and give reasons for the selection of particular materials according to their properties and purpose. Students combine materials to make an object which has a purpose in everyday life.

Unit 2: Toy factory Students explain the pushes and pulls that cause movement, based on observations of themselves and objects used for play and daily activities. Students collect informal data about movement and the effect of materials on movement and are guided to recognise patterns and make predictions. They then apply this knowledge to explain the pushes and pulls and selected materials of a toy or object they create.

Unit 3: Good to grow In this unit students examine how living things grow. They investigate and compare the life stages of different living things, including similarities and differences between parents and their offspring. They describe the characteristics and needs of living things in each life stage, and consider the relevance of this knowledge to their everyday lives, especially when caring for living things in the environment. Unit 2: Exploring my local community

Unit 4: Save planet Earth In this unit students investigate Earths resources, reflecting on how Earths resources are used and the importance of conserving resources for the future of all living things. Students propose and explain actions that can be taken to conserve Earths resources.

Science

Unit 1: Exploring the impact of changing technology on peoples lives Inquiry question/s: How have changes in technology shaped our daily life?

Inquiry questions: What aspects of the past can you see today? What do they tell us? What remains of the past are important to the local community? Why?

In this unit, students; appreciate that history involves the study of the remains of the past In this unit, students: investigate continuity and change in technology used in the home, for appreciate that history involves the study of the remains of the past example, toys or household products examine the remains of the past in the local area through a focus on an ask questions of older generations about the impact of changing technology historical site and/or a significant person on their lives investigate a person and/or site of significance in the local community sequence key developments in the use of a particular technology in daily ask questions of a historical site and/or person to appreciate its value or life over time contribution to the community or significance to Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander peoples compare and contrast sources depicting use of technology in daily life now and in the past sequence key events in the history of the historical site and/or person over time describe ways technology has impacted on peoples lives making them different from those of previous generations. discuss why a historical site and/or person has heritage value or is significant present a report on a person and/or site of significance to the local community.

History

61

Year 3- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Unit 1: Analysing and creating a persuasive text

Unit 3: Exploring personal experiences Students listen to, through events Students read and view, read and Students read, listen to written view and analyse explore short digital and written narratives, simple and spoken literary and persuasive texts. chapter books or informative texts to digital stories to They complete a running record and explore the use of identify the way authors portray descriptive reading experiences of an language in the comprehension event. Students construction of and write short use persuasive texts. character. Students read an comprehension strategies to build extract from a literal and inferred novel and build literal and inferred meaning and meaning from the make text. They express interpretations about a literary a point of view text. Students about the thoughts, feelings write a persuasive and actions of the letter to persuade main characters in the school principal that an a novel. event should be celebrated at school.

Unit 2: Investigating characters

English

Unit 4: Exploring procedure Students listen to, read, view and analyse informative, literary and digital texts about caring for animals to plan and create a written procedure which includes related multimodal elements.

Unit 5: Reading and responding to different versions of a story Students listen to, view, read and compare a range of stories, with a focus on different versions of the same story. They create a spoken retell of a story they select from another perspective.

Unit 6: Creating online narratives Students listen to, read and view selected narratives presented as simple chapter books, including a digital text. They demonstrate understanding though written responses focusing on language used to describe and shape setting and events of a chosen narrative. Students create a digital multimodal alternate ending for a narrative studied in class.

Unit 7: Reading, writing and performing poetry Students listen to and read poetry about different places in Australia. Students create and perform a written poem that includes the use of imagery and sound devices.

Unit 8: Reading, responding to and writing peoples stories Students listen to, read and view informative and imaginative texts set in the past about people and their experiences. They write a letter to a student in the future describing a memorable event in their life and their hopes for the future.

62

Unit 1: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent 2 and 3-digit numbers using standard and nonstandard partitioning, compare and order numbers, use addition and subtraction flexibly, identify related facts represent multiplication and division situations, record mental computation methods and select an appropriate computation method Measurement represent time (5minute) and explore the relationship between minutes and seconds, compare and order objects using length

Unit 2: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value partition 2 and 3-digit numbers, compare and order numbers, apply efficient strategies to recall x2, x5 and x10 facts, apply the Commutative principle, use estimation strategies, solve addition and subtraction problems, represent multiplication and division situations and select an appropriate computation method Measurement compare and order objects using length Chance conduct experiments, identify and describe possible outcomes Data collect and organise data and create, interpret and compare data displays

Unit 3: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent odd and even numbers, compare and order numbers, describe the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction, derive an efficient strategy for x3, represent and explain division facts with 0, use arrays to represent multiplication and partition numbers to aid calculation Fractions model and represent unit fractions with materials and visual models Shapes and objects describe and compare key features and make models

Unit 4: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value compare and order numbers, describe the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction, derive an efficient strategy for x3, represent and explain division facts with 0, use arrays to represent multiplication and partition numbers to aid calculation Money represent amounts s equivalent combinations of coins and notes and solve simple shopping problems Location creating and interpreting simple grid maps and showing position and pathways Geometric reasoning identify and compare angles

Unit 5: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent 2, 3 and 4-digit numbers, explore equivalence between different number sentences (3+?=5 and 5-3=?), solve addition and subtraction problems and derive strategies for multiplication facts to 10x10 Fractions model and represent unit fractions and write fractions using symbols Money represent amounts s equivalent combinations of coins and notes and solve simple shopping problems Symmetry identify symmetry in the environment

Unit 6: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value generalise the pattern for odd and even numbers, consolidate representing 2, 3 and 4-digit numbers, exploring equivalence between different number sentences (3+?=5 and 5-3=?), solving addition and subtraction problems and deriving strategies for multiplication facts to 10x10 Measurement read and represent time, compare and order objects using mass and capacity

Unit 7: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent numbers up to and beyond 10 000 flexibly, fluently recall addition facts to 10+10, consolidate strategies for multiplication facts, multiply 2-digit numbers by a single digit multiplier and partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to assist calculations Chance consolidate identifying and describing possible outcomes Data consolidate collect, organising, representing and interpreting data

Unit 8: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:
Number and place value represent numbers up to and beyond 10 000 flexibly, fluently recall addition facts to 10+10, consolidate strategies for multiplication facts, multiply 2-digit numbers by a single digit multiplier and partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to assist calculations Fractions compare and order fractions Shapes and objects consolidate describing and comparing features and making models Measurement consolidate comparing objects using length, mass and capacity

Mathematics

Money consolidate
coins and notes, record combinations symbolically and solve simple shopping problems including change

63

Unit 1: Is it living? Students will justify groupings of living and non-living things according to observable features and recognise once-living things. Students will investigate the living and nonliving things in their local environment and recognise the use of this science knowledge in their lives

Unit 2: Spinning Earth

Unit 3: Hot stuff In this unit students investigate how heat can be produced and transferred. Students explore factors affecting heat transference and safety practices required. The unit provides opportunities to use this knowledge to analyse real life applications of heat production and transference.

Unit 4: Whats the matter? In this unit students will investigate the properties of solids and liquids and the effect of adding or removing heat. Students will evaluate how adding or removing heat affects materials in everyday life.

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the Earths rotation on its axis in relation to the position of the sun to explain how day and night is made. Students will make predictions using their prior experiences and collect and present data on shadows to help answer questions about everyday observations. This unit will provide students with the opportunity to engage in cultural representations of the relationship between the sun, moon, Earth and time Unit 1: Investigating celebrations, commemorations and community diversity Inquiry question/s: How and why do people choose to remember significant events of the past? What is the nature of the contribution made by different groups and individuals in the community?

Science

Unit 2: Exploring continuity and change in local communities Inquiry questions: Who lived here first and how do we know? How has our community changed? What features have been lost and what features have been retained?

In this unit, students In this unit, students: investigate the celebration and commemoration of significant events in their lives, plan and conduct research about continuity and change in the region or their local community and other places around the world state/territory use provided sources to examine the significance of these celebrations and pose a range of questions to guide research commemorations from a range of perspectives including Aboriginal peoples and identify sources and locate relevant information in sources to answer questions Torres Strait Islander peoples and other identified cultural groups linked to the about the past history of the local area locate information in sources to explore the importance of Country and Place to pose questions about the enduring significance of these events, particularly through Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples who belong to a local area or the use of symbols and emblems region recognise the historical features and diversity of their community recognise and appreciate the historical features and remains of the past in a local appreciate the remains of the past in the local area through a focus on events area celebrated by the community and the contributions of different groups to the record information from sources, including oral stories from Aboriginal or Torres community. Strait Islander Elders use a range of communication forms including texts to explain aspects of continuity and change over time in the region or state/territory.

History

64

Years 4/5 Overview of KLA units- 2014 (Essential Learnings)

Semester One- Bound for Botany Bay


The Arts Drama- Role Play Students work in small groups to create and present a dramatic role-play related to a period of time or event studied within the Bound for Botany Bay unit. HPE
HPE covered by PE lessons only.

Semester Two- Cultural Diversity in Australia


Dance Students respond to a cultural story or a piece of cultural music by planning, practising and presenting a dance sequence.

To be confirmed

SOSE TBA. Celebrating cultural diversity in Australia Students select a cultural event, festival or celebration to research and present information in the form of an informational poster. Technology PowerPoint Presentation Students design, produce and reflect on a PowerPoint presentation to share their SOSE knowledge and understandings. Creating a poster Students follow the technology design process to plan and create an informational poster (based on the SOSE unit Celebrating Cultural Diversity in Australia) which demonstrates their ability to incorporate design elements and information to convey a message.

65

Year 4- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Term 1
Unit 1: Investigating authors language in a familiar narrative Unit 2: Examining humour in poetry

Term 2
Unit 4: Retelling an Aboriginal peoples and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples story Unit 5: Examining traditional stories

Term 3
Unit 6: Exploring a quest novel

Term 4
Unit 7: Interpreting literary texts Unit 8: Designing persuasive texts

Unit 3: Exploring recounts of texts set in the Students will read and past Students listen to listen to a range of Students read a and read a variety narrative and examine humorous poems by different authors. of historical texts to and analyse the write a literary language features and They will identify structural features and recount set in the techniques used by poetic language the author. They past from a different create a new chapter devices in humorous perspective. for the narrative for an poetry. They will use this knowledge to audience of their innovate on poems peers. and evaluate the poems by expressing personal viewpoint using evidence from the poem.

English

Students listen to, read and view traditional stories from different cultures. Students listen to, They demonstrate read and view understanding by stories about and from Aboriginal and responding in writing to comprehension Torres Strait questions focusing on Islander histories language features, and cultures. They themes and demonstrate messages in stories understanding by and by writing parts of traditional stories. responding in

The assessment is a reading comprehension task in which students will identify structural features and poetic language devices in a humorous poem. They will interpret and evaluate how effective these are in creating a humorous poem.

writing to comprehension questions focusing on language features, themes and messages in stories. Students present an informative oral about a selected story.

Students listen to and read a quest novel, Rowan of Rin by Emily Rodda. Through close reading, responding in a blog and mapping character development, they demonstrate understanding of the quest novel. Through an oral presentation, students explain how Emily Rodda represents the main character, Rowan in an important event in Rowan of Rin.

Students listen to, read and view a range of nonfiction and multimodal persuasive product advertisements from different times. They demonstrate understanding of these persuasive texts through written and spoken responses. Students focus on techniques and language features used to persuade the products target audience and justify opinions to peers during a panel discussion.

Students read and view a range of product packaging. Students demonstrate understanding through written responses to reading and viewing comprehension focusing on persuasive techniques used in breakfast cereal packaging. Students design and promote a breakfast cereal package using persuasive language and visual techniques.

66

Mathematics

Unit 1: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify rules and continue 2, 3, 5 and 10 sequences, use standard and nonstandard partitioning, apply and derive multiplication facts, choose and apply efficient mental strategies Fractions and decimals represent and order halves, quarters and thirds Measurement read, represent, convert, calculate durations, measure and compare temperature and length

Unit 2: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify rules and continue 2, 3, 5 and 10 sequences, use standard and nonstandard partitioning, apply commutative and identity principle, choose and apply efficient mental strategies Fractions and decimals represent and order halves, quarters and thirds

Location use simple scale, legends and cardinal compass points to find and Fractions and decimals Chance describe the represent, order and describe locations and likelihood of events pathways count halves, quarters, using the language of thirds and fifths Geometric reasoning chance and order the identify angles as equal probability of events on Shapes and objects to and not equal to right a continuum compare and describe angles two dimensional Data collect data, Fractions and decimals shapes from construct suitable data represent, order and displays and make combining and splitting count halves, quarters, conclusions or thirds and fifths predictions based on the data Money calculate Algebra explore and describe number patterns resulting from multiplication, write number sentences and solve problems change to the nearest 5 cents

Unit 3: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value explain and generalise about odd and even numbers, represent, order and compare numbers, identify missing elements in sequences, represent numbers as the sum of parts, apply and derive multiplication facts, use operations flexibly, choose and apply efficient mental strategies and connect multiplication and division operations

Unit 4: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify missing elements in sequences, represent numbers as the sum of parts, apply and derive multiplication facts, use operations flexibly, choose and apply efficient mental strategies and connect multiplication and division operations

Unit 5: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify rules and continue 4, 6, 7 and 9 sequences, represent numbers as the sum of parts, choose and apply efficient mental strategies and connect multiplication and division operations

Fractions and decimals Fractions and decimals extend the place develop fluency value system to include when switching decimals by creating between decimals and fractions and Fractions and decimals Fractions and decimals representations and consolidate consolidate extend the place represent, order and representing, ordering representing, ordering value system to include count halves, quarters, and counting fractions and counting fractions decimals by creating thirds and fifths Chance consolidate and decimals representations and Transformations ordering the probability Chance consolidate consolidate create symmetrical of events on a representing, ordering ordering the probability patterns, pictures and continuum and counting fractions of events on a shapes continuum Data consolidate Measurement Money solve collecting data, consolidate measuring Measurement problems involving constructing displays temperature and consolidate reading and purchases and change and making length, use informal converting time conclusions units to measure and Money consolidate compare area and solving problems using informal units to order, calculate and involving purchases compare volume Algebra consolidate solving problems involving multiplication

Unit 6: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify rules and continue 4, 6, 7 and 9 sequences, represent numbers as the sum of parts, choose and apply efficient mental strategies and connect multiplication and division operations

Unit 7: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value represent, order and compare numbers, identify missing elements in sequences, choose and apply efficient mental strategies and connect multiplication and division operations

Unit 8: Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number and place value consolidate representing, ordering and comparing numbers, choosing and applying efficient mental strategies and connecting multiplication and division operations

67

Unit 1: Here today gone tomorrow

Unit 2: Ready, set, grow!

Unit 3: Material use

Unit 4: Speedy but safe

Students explore natural processes and human activity which cause weathering and erosion of the earths surface. Students relate this to their local area and predict consequences of future occurrences and human activity. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earths surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They apply their knowledge to make predictions based on interactions within systems, including those involving the actions of humans.

Science

Students investigating life cycles. They will examine relationships between living things and their dependence on the environment. By considering human and natural changes to the environment, students predict the effect of these changes on living things and possible consequences to species survival.

This unit involves students investigating a range of physical properties of materials and considering how these influence their selection and use.

This unit involves students investigating how forces affect objects through direct and indirect contact and relate this knowledge to the use of forces in everyday life.

Unit 1: Investigating European exploration and the movement of peoples Inquiry question/s: Why did the great journeys of exploration occur? Why did the Europeans settle in Australia? In this unit, students: recognise connections between world history events and the history of Australia appreciate the remains of the past can reveal aspects of what life was like then investigate the journeys of the great explorers from the 1400s to the late 1700s and how these resulted in colonisation and the building of empires around the globe pose questions about the reasons for the colonisation of Australia by the British use provided sources to examine the journeys that led to Australias colonisation by the English through the arrival of the First Fleet, the establishment of the first settlement in Sydney Cove and the early days of the colony sequence key events related to the colonisation of Australia describe the experiences of a convict who travelled on the First Fleet and identify how life changed.

Unit 2: Investigating the impact of colonisation Inquiry question/s: What was life like for Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples before the arrival of the Europeans? What was the nature and consequence of contact between Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples and early traders, explorers and settlers? In this unit, students: recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories as part of the shared history belonging to all Australians appreciate the longevity and richness of the history of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples investigate the histories, cultures and daily lives of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples prior to contact with others pose questions about the effect of colonisation, particularly the arrival of early traders, explorers and settlers on Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples use provided sources to identify points of view and examine the impact of these interactions on families and the environment describe the experiences of a group over time identifying events that brought change.

History

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Year 5- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Term 1
Unit 1: Examining literary texts - fantasy novel Students listen to, read and interpret a novel from the fantasy genre showing understanding of character development in relation to plot and setting. They demonstrate the ability to analyse the development of a main character through a written response. Unit 2: Examining literary texts -fantasy novel Students continue to read and interpret a novel from the fantasy genre showing understanding of character development. They explain, from the point of view of the author, text and language choices which describe one good character and one evil character. Unit 3: Examining media texts

Term 2
Unit 4: Examining characters in animated film

Term 3
Unit 5: Unit 6: Appreciating poetry Responding to poetry

Term 4
Unit 7: Unit 8: Exploring narrative Reviewing narrative through novels and film film

Students listen to, read, view and interpret a range of news articles and reports from journals and newspapers to respond to viewpoints portrayed in media texts. Students apply comprehension strategies focussing on particular viewpoints portrayed in a range of media texts. They create a digital multimodal news article, including written and visual, elements, from a particular viewpoint.

Students listen to, read and view a Students listen to, range of poetry, read, view and songs, anthems interpret a range of and odes from animations different times, to including film and create a folio of digital texts. responses Students present a analysing authors point of view about use of language personal conflict and its impact on and ethical the message and dilemmas faced by ideas of text. fantasy characters through a panel discussion. They produce an animated story exploring a characters behaviour when faced with an ethical dilemma.

Students listen to, read and view a range of poetry including narrative poems to create a transformation of a chosen poem to a digital narrative. In a spoken presentation they explain how they develop character through their transformation of the poem.

Students listen to, read and view films and novels with a range of characters involving flashbacks or shifts in time. They create a written comparison of a novel and the film version of the novel. They demonstrate understanding of positioning of characters in a chosen film through a viewing comprehension.

English

Students listen to and view narrative films and spoken, written and digital film reviews to create a written film review of a chosen film. Students express and justify opinions about the film during a panel discussion.

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Unit 1:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:
Number and place value identify and list factors, list multiples, round to meet a practical purpose, demonstrate and explain strategies for multiplication, record methods, use inverse relationships for division, compare methods for mental computation

Unit 2:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:
Number and place value consolidate rounding, demonstrate and explain strategies for multiplication, record methods, use inverse relationships for division, compare methods for mental computation

Unit 3:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:

Unit 4:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:

Unit 5:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:
Number and place value consolidate rounding, multiplication and division strategies, mentally calculating an answer and dual-step problems Money list personal expenses, solve problems and make a personal savings plan Location describe locations and give directions using maps and plans Transformations describe translations, reflections and rotations, identify line and rotational symmetry and apply the enlargement transformation

Unit 6:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:
Number and place value consolidate rounding, multiplication and division strategies, mentally calculating an answer and dual-step problems Fractions and decimals compare and order unit fractions, solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions with the same denominator and consolidate decimals beyond hundredths Algebra represent patterns on a number line and write equivalent number sentences Money list income and expenses and make a simple budget Measurement choose appropriate units of measurement for length, area, volume, capacity and mass and solve problems involving perimeter and area

Unit 7:
Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of:

Unit 8:

Through the Proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings Number and place value of: find the highest common factor
Number and place value of 2 whole numbers, find the consolidate number lowest common multiple of 2 or work including rounding, more whole numbers, multiplication and division consolidate rounding, strategies, mentally multiplication and division calculating an answer and strategies, mentally calculating dual-step problems, an answer and dual-step solving problems involving problems, solve problems multiplication or division involving multiplication or and recording methods division and write appropriate appropriately recordings of methods Fractions and decimals Chance numerically consolidate decimals represent the likelihood of beyond hundredths chance events Data collect and display data, Geometric reasoning measure, compare and pose questions, identify and construct angles justify choice of data display Location investigate local maps, construct maps, explore routes, and calculate time and distance

Fractions and decimals consolidate unit fractions Fractions and decimals and add and subtract compare and order unit fractions with the same fractions using diagrams denominator and number lines, and Money calculate totals add and subtract fractions and change mentally and with the same check answers using a calculator denominator Data pose a question, plan data collection, collect, display and interpret data Chance list outcomes of chance experiments and represent probabilities between 0 and 1 Measurement estimate and calculate the perimeter and area of rectangles, solve problems, read, convert and compare 12- and 24hour time

Number and place value Number and place value use multiples to make use factors and division easier, represent multiples to aid division, multiples on a number consolidate rounding and line, consolidate rounding strategies for and strategies for multiplication, increase multiplication, increase formality of recording formality of recording methods, continue methods, explore divisibility tests and divisibility tests and extend computation strategies for computation strategies to larger numbers, mixed larger numbers, mixed operations and dual-step operations and dual-step problems problems Algebra create patterns Fractions and decimals from repeated addition extend knowledge of and subtraction of whole decimals to thousandths numbers and decimals, and beyond, locate and write equivalent decimals on number lines, number sentences order and represent Fractions and decimals decimals work with decimals to Shapes and objects thousandths and beyond, connect 3D objects with compare, order and their nets and other 2D represent decimals representations Geometric reasoning estimate, measure and compare angles using degrees

Mathematics

Unit 1: Survival in the Australian environment

Unit 2: Our place in the solar system

Unit 3: Now you see it

Unit 4: Matter matters Students will broaden their classification of matter to include gases and begin to see how matter structures the world around them. Students will investigate the observable properties and behaviour of solids, liquids and gases, and the development of composite materials to meet the needs of modern society.

Science

Students will examine the structural features and adaptations that assist living things to survive in their environment. This knowledge will be used to create a creature with adaptations that are suitable for survival in a prescribed environment.

Students will be exploring the place of Earth in the solar system and then using this knowledge to look for patterns and relationships between components of this system. They discover how science and technology have advanced understanding of space.

In this unit students investigate the properties of light and the formation of shadows. They explore the role of light in everyday objects and devices and consider how improved technology has changed devices.

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Unit 1: Exploring the development of British colonies in Australia Inquiry Question/s: How did an Australian colony develop over time and why? How did colonial settlement change the environment? What do we know about the lives of people in Australias colonial past and how do we know? In this unit, students: recognise key events in Australia of the 1800s appreciate how Australians came to live together and were governed overtime sequence key events related to the development of British colonies in Australia. investigate the economic, political and social motivations behind colonial developments, particularly the establishment of the Moreton Bay colony in Queensland, use provided sources to examine and describe aspects of daily life in the early to mid-1800s locate information in sources about the reasons for migration to the colonies by people from Europe during the mid-1800s use provided sources to examine and describe the impacts of colonisation on the environment and Aboriginal peoples.

Unit 2: Investigating the colonial period in Australia Inquiry Question/s: What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies? What do we know about the lives of people in Australias colonial past and how do we know? In this unit, students: recognise key events in Australia of the 1800s appreciate how Australians came to live together and were governed overtime investigate the causes and effects of significant developments or events affecting development of the Queensland colony, for example, frontier conflicts and the Gold Rush. pose questions about the reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia use provided sources to examine and describe the experiences of and the contributions of significant individuals or groups to life in the colonies compose and present a description of the contribution of a significant individual or group to shaping colonial Australia.

History

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Years 6/7 Overview of KLA units- 2014 (Essential Learnings)

KLA
The Arts

Semester 1
Visual Arts- Beyond observation Dance

Semester 2

HPE

Students explore the art elements of line, shape, colour and texture and complete the QSA Assessment Bank Item Beyond Observation (Students create and display a series of observational drawings and abstract one drawing using a grid drawing exercise. They respond and reflect on drawing processes). Healthy Eating Plan for Adolescents (Health)
Students analyse their own eating habits, learning about healthy eating and the nutritional needs of adolescents to design their own healthy eating plan. Essential learning: Food groups are rich in particular nutrients, and food intake can be adapted to meet changing needs during adolescence To be advised

Student work in small groups to plan, practise and present a bush dance.

HPE covered by PE lessons only.

SOSE

To be advised

Technology

Technology Students design and create a one-page advertisement or information brochure to inform their peers of the components and importance of a healthy eating plan. Essential learning: Product design and production decisions are influenced by specifications, constraints and aspects of appropriateness including functions, aesthetics, ethics, culture, available finances and resources, and sustainability e.g. menu design is influenced by type of cuisine, cultural theme and cost

Stck em up! Students will investigate, design, create and evaluate one of the following tasks based upon a historical event or person in Australia: Diorama, Wanted Poster or Rat Trap.

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Year 6- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum)
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Unit 1: Short stories Students listen to and read a range of short stories by different authors. They investigate and compare similarities and differences in the ways authors use text structure, language features and strategies to create humorous effects. Students complete a comprehension task about a particular short story and other short stories they have read.

Unit 2: Writing a short story Students read and view short stories, and write a short story about a character who faces a conflict. Students will also reflect on the writing process when making and explaining editorial choices.

Unit 3: Examining advertising in the media Students listen to, read and view advertisements from magazines and internet sites. They demonstrate their understanding of the texts persuasive features through written responses to comprehension questions by justifying their responses in discussions with peers. They create a digital multimodal advertisement to persuade a particular audience.

Unit 4: Examining persuasive techniques in news reports Students listen to, read and view a variety of news reports from television, radio and internet. Students identify and analyse bias and the effectiveness of persuasive devices used to influence audiences. They create a critical review of a chosen news report.

Unit 5: Interpreting literary texts Students listen to, read and view extracts from literary texts set in earlier times. They demonstrate their understanding of how the events and characters are created within historical contexts. They create a literary text that explores personal experiences.

Unit 6: Exploring literary texts by the same author Students listen to, read and view literary texts by the same author to create written responses focusing on language and literary techniques that contribute to an authors style.

Unit 7: Comparing texts Students listen to, read, view and analyse literary and informative texts on the same topic. They identify the authors message and compare the effects of language, structural and visual features on the audience. They compare selected texts persuading others to a particular point of view during a debate.

English

Unit 8: Transforming a text Students read and compare literary and informative texts such as websites or information books that deal with a sustainability issue. Students transform an informative text into a literary text for younger audiences.

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In this unit students build upon prior learning. They will: identify and describe prime, composite, square and triangular numbers use efficient mental and written strategies for all four operations with whole numbers compare fractions with related denominators and represent them on a number line connect and convert metric units of length, mass and capacity construct prisms and pyramids.

In this unit students build upon prior learning. They will: identify and describe prime, composite, square and triangular numbers use efficient mental and written strategies for all four operations with whole numbers add and subtract decimals sequence whole numbers, fractions and decimals and describe the rule used explore different ways to present data.

In this unit students build upon Term 1 concepts. They will: investigate positive and negative numbers investigate fractions of a quantity explore the use of brackets and the order of operations solve length and area problems construct and interpret data displays represent data in a variety of ways interpret secondary data.

In this unit students build upon Term 1 concepts. They will: investigate positive and negative numbers multiply and divide decimals by powers of ten order of operations investigate the relationship between fractions, decimals and percentage solve length and area problems.

In this unit students build upon Term 1 and 2 concepts. They will: multiply decimals by whole numbers and perform divisions with terminating decimals order of operations calculate percentage discounts solve problems involving length, mass and capacity connect volume and capacity investigate angles.

In this unit students build upon Term 1 and 2 concepts. They will: multiply decimals by whole numbers and perform divisions with terminating decimals calculate percentage discounts describe probability (using fractions, decimals and percentage) conduct chance experiments (observed and expected frequency) compare observed frequencies across experiments with expected frequencies.

In this unit students build upon Term 1, 2 and 3 concepts. They will: use efficient mental and written strategies for all four operations with whole numbers calculate percentage discounts understand order of operations connect volume and capacity interpret and use timetables investigate combinations of translations, reflections and rotations use the Cartesian coordinate system in relation to all four quadrants.

In this unit students build upon Term 1, 2 and 3 concepts. They will: use efficient mental and written strategies for all four operations with whole numbers understand order of operations calculate percentage discounts use repeated trials of chance experiments to make predictions of likely outcomes.

Mathematics

Unit 1: Making changes Students investigate changes that can be made to materials and how these changes are classified as reversible or irreversible. They explore the effects of reversible and irreversible changes in everyday materials and how this is used to solve problems that directly affect peoples' lives.

Unit 2: Power up electricity usage down Students explore and infer that electrical circuits provide a means of transferring and transforming electricity. They investigate how energy from a variety of sources can be used to generate electricity and evaluate personal and community choices to use sustainable renewable energy sources.

Unit 3: Our changing world In this unit students explore how sudden geological and extreme weather events can affect Earths surface. They consider the effects of earthquakes and volcanoes on the Earths surface and how communities are affected. They gather, record and interpret data relating to weather and weather events. Students explore the ways in which people use scientific observations to prepare for disaster in Australia and throughout Asia.

Unit 4: Life on Earth In this unit students will explore their local environment, investigating the relationship between the growth and survival of living things and the physical conditions of the environment. Students investigate the impact of the surrounding environment on living things and the implications for decision making. Human impact on the environment and implications for growth and survival of living things will also be explored.

Science

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Unit 1: Exploring the development of the Australian nation Inquiry questions: Why and how did Australia become a nation? How did Australian society change throughout the twentieth century? In this unit, students: recognise key events in the development of Australia as a nation appreciate how Australians came to live together and were governed overtime investigate Australias path to Federation from the late 1800s to 1901 examine sources presenting different perspectives on Federation and preferred models of government, including British and American influences on Australias system of law and government describe the experiences of Australian democracy and citizenship by a range of groups, including the status and rights of Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples identify continuity or change explain the significance of individuals or groups who advocated for rights or were the beneficiaries of polices and legislation.

Unit 2: Investigating the emergence of Australia as a diverse society Inquiry questions: Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come? What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society? In this unit, students: recognise key events in Australias economic and social development appreciate how Australians came to live and work together examine the growth of the Australian population in the twentieth century appreciate how world events affected the development of Australian society during this time compare the factors which contributed to people migrating to Australia identify the reasons behind migration stories explore the significance of individual narratives from oral and written histories.

History

75

Year 7- Overview of English, maths, science and history C2C units (Australian Curriculum) Term 1
Unit 1: Analysing persuasion in media texts Students understand how text structures and language features combine in media texts to influence audiences. Students analyse an advertisement and identify text and language features which persuade. They create a multimodal response to inform their peers about persuasive elements and how these combine to influence emotions and opinions. Unit 2: Persuading through motivational speaking

Term 2
Unit 4: Reading and creating life writing: literary memoirs Students listen to, read and view autobiographical narratives and picture books to create a literary memoir.

Term 3
Unit 5: Reading and interpreting literature about Australia and Australians Students listen to, read and view literature about Australia and Australians, including the close study of a novel. Students demonstrate their understanding of this literature by responding to comprehension questions from reading and viewing texts. Unit 6: Examining representations of Australia and Australians in literature Students examine the ways characters, real and imagined; have been represented in texts studied in unit 5. Students use this information and evidence to construct written responses to the events in the novel and the range of texts examined.

Term 4
Unit 7: Exploring perspectives in poetry and songs Students listen to and read a variety of poems and songs that put forward different points of view. They create and present a spoken response to persuade that a song is an effective form of social comment. Unit 8: Re-imagining poetry Students listen to and read a variety of poems. They select a poem and transform it into a multimodal presentation to communicate its ideas or messages in a different way.

Unit 3: Reading and creating life writing: biographies Students listen to, Students will read and view examine how biographies, language is used interviews and to persuade in digital stories (life motivational writing) to speeches from respond to a different biographical text. historical, social Students create a and cultural written contexts. The text biographical structures and excerpt. language features, including persuasive devices, will be examined. Students will deliver a recording of a persuasive motivational speech to promote a point of view or enable a new way of seeing.

English

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Unit 1: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Probability list outcomes of events and assign probabilities Statistics compare and interpret data displays, calculate measures of centre and range Number write products of primes in index notation and calculate square roots and apply commutative, associative and distributive laws to computation Real numbers compare fractions using equivalence, add and subtract fractions with unrelated denominators, and express one fraction as a quantity of another

Unit 2: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Algebra introduce the concept of a variable Measurement establish formulas for perimeter of rectangles and for area of rectangles, triangles and parallelograms and use these to solve problems Geometric reasoning revise classification of angles & angle rules involving straight lines, triangles & quadrilaterals & investigate the sum of angles in triangles and quadrilaterals Real numbers connect fractions, decimals and percentages, solve problems involving adding and subtracting fractions with unrelated denominators, and express one fraction as a quantity of another, find a percent of a quantity

Unit 3: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Algebra create and substitute into algebraic expressions, plot points on the Cartesian plane and solve linear equations Shapes and objects identify properties of prisms, apply conventions for building and drawing prisms Number compare and order integers, revise index notation, squares and square roots

Unit 4: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Algebra solve simple linear equations Geometric reasoning investigate corresponding, alternate and cointerior angles Number compare, order, add and subtract integers Real numbers identify equivalent fractions and multiply and divide fractions, round decimals

Unit 5: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number investigate and simplify ratios, identify equivalent ratios and solve problems and consolidate the commutative, associative and distributive laws and computation Algebra apply the commutative and associative laws to algebraic expressions Transformations plot points in the four quadrants, translate, reflect and rotate shapes on the Cartesian plane Financial mathematics calculate best buys and make informed decisions on purchasing through planning and reasoning

Unit 6: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Measurement calculate volume of rectangular prisms, exploring the relationship between the area of the base, height and volume of rectangular prisms, solve problems involving perimeter and area Number add and subtract integers, round decimals, and consolidate the commutative, associative and distributive laws and computation Real numbers consolidate multiplying and dividing fractions

Unit 7: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Statistics display data in stem-andleaf plots, explore bias & sample size, make informed decisions based on interpretations of data Probability list outcomes of events and assign probabilities as a fraction, decimal or percent Measurement solve problems involving area of triangles, rectangles and compound shapes Real numbers consolidate multiplying and dividing fractions and solve problems involving adding and subtracting fractions Algebra identify independent and dependent variables, creating tables of values, plot points and match different representations of a situation (word problems, graph, rule, table of values, ordered pairs).

Unit 8: Through the proficiency strands Understanding, Fluency, Problem solving and Reasoning, students have opportunities to develop understandings of: Number simplify ratios and solve problems Statistics consolidate measures of centre and range and relationship to displays Transformations translate, reflect and rotate shapes on the Cartesian plane, identify line and rotational symmetry Geometric reasoning consolidate corresponding, alternate and cointerior angle rules Financial mathematics make informed decisions on purchasing through planning and reasoning

Mathematics

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Unit 1: Water waste not, want not Students will consider the importance of water and the water cycle. They investigate pure substances, mixtures and separation techniques. Students consider everyday applications of the separation techniques and relate their use in a variety of occupations. These understandings will be applied in Unit 2 through other applications to their community. This unit needs to precede the unit Water Waste not, want not (continued). The assessment of some concepts in this unit take place in Unit 2, Water Waste not, want not (continued).

Unit 2: Water waste not, want not (continued) Students will investigate the application of filtration systems in water treatment and recycling processes. They compare and contrast artificial treatment process and the water cycle to understand how humans have impacted on and mimic natural processes. This unit follows on from Unit 1 Water Waste not, want not.

Unit 3:

Unit 4:

Unit 5: Heavenly bodies

Unit 6: Sensational seasons This unit builds on the concepts covered in unit 5 relating to the relative positions of the Earth and sun. This unit also considers the seasons, different cultural understandings, and how scientific understandings have changed over time. It examines the impact of seasons on animals and plants and human endeavours such as farming and fishing. This unit needs to follow Unit 5: Heavenly bodies.

Unit 7: Organising organisms This unit involves students classifying organisms based on their physical characteristics. They construct and use dichotomous keys to assist and describe classification. Students analyse the effectiveness of dichotomous keys and suggest improvements. They explore feeding relationships between organisms in an environment using food chains and food webs and will apply these understandings Unit 8, Affecting organisms. The unit needs to precede Unit 8: Affecting organisms.

Unit 8: Affecting organisms In this unit students identify how human activity can impact food webs in the marine environment. Students will examine the work of scientists in Antarctica. They will explore native food webs and how these were understood and used by Aboriginal peoples. These understandings follow on from Unit 7 where students classified and explored the interrelationship between organisms in an environment through food chains and food webs. This unit needs to follow Unit 7: Organising organisms.

Moving right Moving right along along exploring motion applications in real systems Students will investigate forces, exploring how they can change the motion of an object and the impact of friction on a moving object. Students will have opportunities to plan and conduct investigations that focus on fair testing and the evaluation of results. They will apply their understanding of these forces in the community. This unit needs to precede the Unit: Moving right along applications in real systems.

Science

This unit involves students learning about This unit builds on interrelationships the concepts between the sun, explored in the Earth and moon unit: Moving right system. They along exploring explore predictable motion and phenomena such considers the as eclipses, tides, application of phases of the these forces to moon and solar transportation in phenomena. the community. Further predictable Students will phenomena will be investigate studied in Unit 6. propulsion This unit needs to systems. precede Unit 6: This unit needs to be preceded by the Unit: Moving right along exploring motion. Sensational seasons.

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Unit 1: Investigating the ancient past (18.5 hours) Focus question: How do historians and archaeologists investigate the past and what are the problems they encounter? In this unit, students: identify the tools, techniques and methods used by historians and archaeologists to investigate history explore the range of sources that can be used in an historical investigation and the usefulness of these sources investigate a historical mystery from Ancient Australia that has challenged historians or archaeologists appreciate the importance of conserving remains of the ancient past As above

Option A: Unit 2: The Asian World- China (15 hours)

Option A: Unit 3: The Mediterranean world- Rome (16.5 hours)

History

Option B: Unit 2: The Mediterranean World- Greece (16.5 hours)

Option B: Unit 3: The Asian World- India (15 hours)

As above

Option C: Unit 2: The Mediterranean World- Egypt (16.5 hours)

Option C: Unit 3: The Asian World- China (15 hours)

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