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Nick Schreiber Performance Task Assessment HS Mathematics Unit on Creating and Interpreting Data Clear Purpose: The purpose

of this summative assessment is to determine students understanding of collecting and interpreting data. Students have been learning how to find, plot and interpret data throughout these past few weeks and this project should culminate their understanding and learning. This assessment allows students to be creative with their understanding and use their learning in new ways and new questions. Standards/Benchmarks: Strand IV: Statistics and Probability . S1.1.1 Construct and interpret dot plots, histograms, relative frequency histograms, bar graphs, basic control charts, and box plots with appropriate labels and scales; determine which kinds of plots are appropriate for different types of data; compare data sets and interpret differences based on graphs and summary statistics. . S1.2.1 Calculate and interpret measures of center including: mean, median, and mode; explain uses, advantages and disadvantages of each measure given a particular set of data and its context. . S1.2.3 Compute and interpret measures of variation, including percentiles, quartiles, interquartile range, variance, and standard deviation. Learning Targets I can create a hypothesis that can be tested through experimentation. I can create an experiment that and collect data from that experiment. I can use the data that I have found to determine the mean, median, mode, standard deviation and variance of the data. I can draw conclusions about my hypothesis from the data I collected. I can address my conclusions in a well-written document that my peers can read and understand. Section it is being addressed Part 1 Part 1 Part 2 Part 2 Part 3

Objective: The past few weeks we have been learning to collect and interpret data and draw mathematical conclusions from this data. The objective of this assessment is to allow you to show your creativity by coming up with a hypothesis that you would be interested in testing. This assessment will allow you to come up with YOUR OWN data, using YOUR OWN experiment and you will draw conclusions from this data. This assessment is split into three parts, which combined will help me determine your understanding of our lessons the past few weeks. Part 1: (10 points) The first part of this assessment is to create a hypothesis you can experiment on and draw conclusions from data. You have total creative freedom to come up with whatever hypothesis you wish. I only ask that you be smart with the hypothesis you choose. Do not choose a hypothesis that would require you to do an extreme amount of extra work, however, creativity will be rewarded if you are up to the challenge. 1. Create a testable hypothesis. 2. Write up an outline of how you plan to test and prove/disprove your hypothesis. Bring this outline into class tomorrow. 3. Your experimental plan should include any/all materials you will use in your experiment. 4. We will go over in groups together and critique peers work. 5. Your final hypothesis and experimental plan are due at the end of class tomorrow. 6. You will be able to refer to the Internet to come up with a hypothesis that you wish to test. However, you must site the source of your hypothesis if you choose to find one from the Internet. Data Collection: You must complete your data collection on your own at home and bring your results to class on Monday. These results must be typed up on an excel document or neatly written on graph paper. Rubric: Points Hypothesis I created a testable hypothesis that can be understood by my peers, with proper wording. I created a testable hypothesis, but did not word my hypothesis properly. I created a hypothesis, but it was not testable and worded improperly. I did not create a hypothesis. Experimental Plan I created an experimental plan that was logical and well worded. I created an experimental plan that was logical in meaning but was not well worded. I created an experimental plan that was not logical and not well worded. I did not create an experimental plan.

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Part 2: (10 points) Monday while in class we will once again get in groups to discuss your results and also use class time to create posters that you will present on. 1. Using the data you have collected, create a graph that will display your results in the best way possible. 2. You will determine the mean, median, mode, standard deviation and variance of your data. You will be submitting the work you do to determine these results so please write neatly. a. This will be turned in with the final draft of your findings so feel free to use class time to create a rough draft of your work. 3. Neatly organize your data onto one document and save this document before the end of class. 4. Come up with a title for your experiment and presentation. 5. You must submit a copy of your results and graphs at the end of class. Along with the title of your report. Rubric:

Points

Work My work was logical and contained no mathematical errors. My work was logical but it contained some mathematical errors. My work was not logical and contained many mathematical errors. I did not turn in my work.

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Graphs My graph fit my data so other students could understand my work. My graph was plotted correctly. My graph was not plotted correctly, however, my graph choice was correct. My graph choice did not fit my data and my graph was plotted incorrectly. I did not submit a graph.

Part 3: (20 points) This is the report part of the assessment. Using your results from the data you collected you will write up a report stating your hypothesis, how you tested it and the results that you received from your experiment. In your report you should reference the data that you collected and the conclusions you can make from those results. 1. In class you will begin to write an introduction to your report, describing how you came up with your hypothesis and the hypothesis itself. The rough draft of this introduction will be turned in at the beginning of class on Tuesday. 2. Finish organizing your data onto a word document. 3. Write up a full report on your experiment using the following format: a. Introduction b. Experimental Process c. Results/Data d. Conclusions 4. You will turn in the final draft of your report next week Monday!

Rubric:

Points

Introduction

Experimental Plan

Results/Data

Introduction is precise and gives a brief overview of the experiment. It is well worded and contains no grammatical errors. My introduction is precise and gives a brief overview of the experiment. There are a few grammatical errors.

Experimental plan is logical and easy to follow. It includes materials used in the experiment and specific instructions on how to perform the experiment. My experimental plan is logical, however, the wording is not easy to follow. The instructions are vague at some points.

My results are logical and well organized with plenty of white space between calculations.

My results are logical but not well organized.

My introduction is lengthy and does not overview the experiment. I did not turn in an introduction.

My experimental plan is not written logically and the instructions are confusing. I did not turn in an experimental plan.

My results are not organized and it is difficult to follow. I did not turn in my results/data.

Conclusion My conclusion interprets my results from the experiment and makes a logical case proving or disproving my hypothesis. My conclusion interprets the results from my experiment but my reasoning is not logical. My conclusion makes incorrect interpretations of the data I collected. I did not turn in my conclusion.

Name: Date: Hour: Student Reflection Part 1 Directions: Please write your name, date and hour at the top of the page and grade yourself on the following rubric. Points Hypothesis I created a testable hypothesis that can be understood by my peers, with proper wording. I created a testable hypothesis, but did not word my hypothesis properly. I created a hypothesis, but it was not testable and worded improperly. I did not create a hypothesis. Experimental Plan I created an experimental plan that was logical and well worded. I created an experimental plan that was logical in meaning but was not well worded. I created an experimental plan that was not logical and not well worded. I did not create an experimental plan.

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My hypothesis score: My experimental plan score: My Total Score: Why did you give yourself these scores?

Student Reflection Part 2 Directions: Please grade yourself on the following rubric. Rubric:

Points

Work My work was logical and contained no mathematical errors. My work was logical but it contained some mathematical errors. My work was not logical and contained many mathematical errors. I did not turn in my work.

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Graphs My graph fit my data so other students could understand my work. My graph was plotted correctly. My graph was not plotted correctly, however, my graph choice was correct. My graph choice did not fit my data and my graph was plotted incorrectly. I did not submit a graph.

My work score: My graphs score: My Total Score: Why did you give yourself these scores?

Student Reflection Part 3 Directions: Please grade yourself on the following rubric.

Points

Introduction

Experimental Plan

Results/Data

Introduction is precise and gives a brief overview of the experiment. It is well worded and contains no grammatical errors. My introduction is precise and gives a brief overview of the experiment. There are a few grammatical errors.

Experimental plan is logical and easy to follow. It includes materials used in the experiment and specific instructions on how to perform the experiment. My experimental plan is logical, however, the wording is not easy to follow. The instructions are vague at some points.

My results are logical and well organized with plenty of white space between calculations.

My results are logical but not well organized.

My introduction is lengthy and does not overview the experiment. I did not turn in an introduction.

My experimental plan is not written logically and the instructions are confusing. I did not turn in an experimental plan.

My results are not organized and it is difficult to follow. I did not turn in my results/data.

Conclusion My conclusion interprets my results from the experiment and makes a logical case proving or disproving my hypothesis. My conclusion interprets the results from my experiment but my reasoning is not logical. My conclusion makes incorrect interpretations of the data I collected. I did not turn in my conclusion.

My Introduction score: My experimental plan score: My results/data score: My conclusion score: My Total Score: Why did you give yourself these scores?

Directions: Please answer the following two questions, then you are finally finished! Based on the following learning goals, which did you feel most comfortable with and why? Learning Targets Section it is being addressed I can create a hypothesis that can be tested through experimentation. Part 1 I can create an experiment that and collect data from that experiment. Part 1 I can use the data that I have found to determine the mean, median, mode, standard deviation and variance of the data. Part 2 I can draw conclusions about my hypothesis from the data I collected. Part 2 I can address my conclusions in a well-written document that my peers can read and understand. Part 3

Which learning goal did you feel the least comfortable with and why?