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Chelsea Turner Interdisciplinary Unit Plan-Art Lesson #1 Bullfighting Culture I. II.

Benchmark/Standard Art: Romance and Drama: Bullfighting as an art form. Behavioral Objective: The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the traditional bullfight-the dance with death which has been called indefensible but irresistible. The traditional bullfight has long captured the attention and imagination of painters, novelists, poets, photographers, sculptors, and cinematographers. Anticipatory Set: The students will conduct research on the scenes of mans struggle with bulls and wild beasts that are depicted in the Paleolithic paintings (which date between 15,000 and 10,000 BCE) found in the caves of France and Spain. Objective/Purpose: After the students conduct their research on these scenes, they will be creating their own cave painting depicting the romance and culture of bullfighting. They will present their research and show and tell their art pieces. Input a. Task Analysis: i. Day 1: Introduction-the importance of bullfighting in Spain and introduction to cave painting research project and cave painting creation (due Friday) ii. Day 2: Examples of art depicting the romance and culture of bullfighting iii. Day 3: Bullfighting art now-wards off evil (furniture, architecture, carved sculptures) iv. Day 4: Symbol of strength and fertility v. Day 5: Presentations and show and tell b. Thinking Levels: i. Knowledge: Understanding the importance of bullfighting in this culture and how and why art was inspired by this dance with death. ii. Comprehension: Students are able to conduct their own research and with the knowledge they learn in class, they can see where bullfighting originated and the importance. iii. Analysis: Students will be creating a presentation on their findings and also create their own cave paintings of bullfighting with oil pastels on a 9x12 piece of black paper. c. Learning Styles: i. Intrapersonal: Students will be conducting research outside of class and present their findings. These findings will be reflected in their illustrations. ii. Visual: Students will be exposed to many examples, pictures, videos, ect. Modeling a. Presenting Art History with examples of modern day art and where it originated b. Oil pastel demo (students will have the tools and knowledge how to use this medium) c. My own cave painting example will help students understand my expectations Checking for Understanding a. Students will complete assessment worksheets b. Students will conduct research and get a grade for progression c. Students will present their research findings and present their own cave paintings depicting the romance of bullfighting Guided Practice

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a. Students will fill out assessment worksheets b. Research progression c. Final project assessment Independent Practice a. Independent research b. Independent presentations and illustrations Closure a. Knowledge: Understanding bullfighting as an art form and applying these ideas in their own creations b. Assessment: Students are able to present their research findings and how they applied their findings in their illustrations. The research, presentation, and projects are all separate grades.

Chelsea Turner Interdisciplinary Unit Plan-Art Lesson #2 15th Century Spanish Art vs. 15th Century American Art I. Benchmark/Standard Art: Understanding how events and movements in history reflect in the art that is being produced and being able to compare the Spanish and American art during this time period. Behavioral Objective: The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the two cultures compare to one another. Students will be comparing and contrasting Renaissance art with the Hispano-Flemish art. Anticipatory Set: The students will be divided into two groups, Renaissance art and HispanoFlemish art. These groups must work together to conduct research regarding the historical events that happened during this time period. They will also be studying the art during this time. It is their job to make connections of how these events shaped and sculpted the art during this time. Objective/Purpose: Groups will prepare for a Socratic Seminar, displaying their knowledge of the content they were presented with. The Renaissance Art group will conduct questions for the Hispano-Flemish group and vice versa. Students will all have to prepare questions and also answers for possible questions asked. Input a. Task Analysis: i. Day 1: Discussion about 15th century time period and events going on during this time. ii. Day 2: Examples of art from each culture and background iii. Day 3: Artists popular during this time period iv. Day 4: Work day with groups v. Day 5: Socratic Seminar b. Thinking Levels: i. Knowledge: Students understand main events, artists, and art movements popular during this time period. ii. Comprehension: They can make connections as to why this type of art was made and reasoning behind it. Ex: The unification of Spain 1472 brought about a rapid development in the arts, largely due to the royal patronage of Ferdinand and Isabella. A Hispano-Flemish style flourished, based largely on Flemish painting (in particular the works of van Eyck and van der Weyden) but also on Moorish traditions. iii. Analysis: Students will demonstrate their findings in the Socratic Seminar c. Learning Styles: i. Interpersonal: Students will work in their groups to conduct research and an investigation ii. Visual: Video, examples of art iii. Auditory: Students will listen to other students points of view Modeling a. Discussion/Lecture b. Model Socratic Seminar c. Example prompt questions Checking for Understanding a. Monitor students progress through research and exploration

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b. Every student must participate and turn in their questions and preparation papers Guided Practice a. Conducting research and making connections Independent Practice a. Students will come up with Socratic seminar questions and their own preparation papers Closure: a. Knowledge: Understanding how events and movements in history reflect in the art that is being produced and being able to compare the Spanish and American art during this time period. b. Comprehension: The students will be divided into two groups, Renaissance art and Hispano-Flemish art. These groups must work together to conduct research regarding the historical events that happened during this time period. They will also be studying the art during this time. It is their job to make connections of how these events shaped and sculpted the art during this time. c. Assessment: Socratic Seminar

Chelsea Turner Interdisciplinary Unit Plan-Art Lesson #3 16th Century Spanish Art Vs. American Art I. Benchmark/Standard Art: Art: Understanding how events and movements in history reflect in the art that is being produced and being able to compare the Spanish and American art during this time period. Behavioral Objective: The learner will demonstrate an understanding of the two cultures compare to one another. Students will produce work based off El Grecos Mannerist style (the first great figure in Spanish art), and a Baroque piece of art. Anticipatory Set: Students will create a piece in a Mannerist style and Baroque style once learning their characteristics. They will be comparing and contrasting these pieces to discover the differences between the two. Objective/Purpose: Over the next week, students will learn about two different types of painting styles, one Spanish and the other American. They will understand the characteristics of each and apply this in their own works of art. Input a. Task Analysis: i. Day 1: Discussion on Mannerist style: artists, movement itself and characteristics ii. Day 2: Work day on Mannerist painting iii. Day 3:Discussion on Baroque style: artists, movement itself and characteristics iv. Day 4: Work day on Baroque painting v. Day 5: Work day to complete both styles of paintings b. Thinking Levels: i. Knowledge: Knowing the different artists and characteristics belonging to each movement ii. Comprehension: Being able to distinguish these movements and apply the characteristics in their own works of art iii. Analysis: Creating a Mannerist and Baroque style painting c. Learning Styles: i. Interpersonal: Students work on their pieces individually ii. Visual: Examples will be provided from these movements d. Methods and Materials: i. Ways of presenting: lecture, discussion, and demonstration ii. Materials needed: Acrylic paint, paint brushes, water, 6x8 piece of Mat board, newspaper, pencil Modeling a. Demonstration: painting in these styles will be demonstrated and modeled Checking for Understanding a. Notes on characteristics will be turned in and graded b. Characteristics are being applied in paintings c. Paintings will be graded Guided Practice a. Characteristic chart (notes) will be studied in order to apply to painting b. Assessment worksheet Independent Practice

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a. Paintings will be completed individually: time will be given inside of class, and students will have HW as well. Closure a. Recap of characteristics b. How they compare with one another c. Show and tell: explaining the differences.

Chelsea Turner Interdisciplinary Unit Plan-Art Lesson #4 20th Century Spanish Abstract Expressionism vs. American Abstract Expressionism I. Benchmark/Standard Art: Students demonstrate an understanding of the origin of Abstract art in the Spanish and American culture and will create their own abstract piece based on an artist from one of these cultures. Behavioral Objective: The learner will create an abstract piece based on an artist they will select from either the Spanish or American culture. Anticipatory Set: Abstract Art is often misunderstood. I want students to gain an appreciation for this movement, which will happen once students understand the intent, goal, and ideas behind this movement. By creating their own piece through meaning and understanding, students will make even more connections. Objective/Purpose: Over the next week, students will learn all about Abstract art in the Spanish and American culture, gaining an understanding the important of its popularity. Students will then express themselves in one of these styles. Input a. Task Analysis: i. Day 1: Class discussion: What is abstract art? (Students will get the chance to voice their opinions on this movement since it is one of the most controversial). ii. Day 2: Characteristics, origins, popular artists, and ideas behind each movement (ex: Spanish art became an important force in European art. Major figures, many of whom worked abroad, include Juan Gris, Joan Mir, Salvador Dal, and Picasso, widely regarded as the most innovative artist of the century. iii. Day 3: Work day on own expressions. iv. Day 4: Work day on own expressions. v. Day 5: Work day and quick show and tell b. Thinking Levels i. Knowledge: Understanding the Abstract movement in both cultures ii. Comprehension: Applying this knowledge in their own expressions iii. Analysis: Create a piece based on an artist from one of these movements c. Learning Styles: i. Interpersonal: individual creations ii. Visual Modeling a. Class discussion: prompt questions will be asked by me b. Examples of each movement and characteristics c. Show students some techniques with paint that these artists actually used (suggestions, but not limited, for their own expressions.) Checking for Understanding a. Ask students their opinions before teaching them b. Progression on expressions c. Expressions Guided Practice a. Students will create their sketches before their own expressions

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b. Feedback from me to improve c. Complete expressions Independent Practice a. Sketches b. Expressions done within class and outside of class Closure a. Knowledge: Students demonstrate an understanding of the origin of Abstract art in the Spanish and American culture b. Comprehension: Students will create their own abstract piece based on an artist from one of these cultures. c. Assessment: Students will create sketches that will help them produce a final piece of work.

Chelsea Turner Interdisciplinary Unit Plan-Art Lesson #5 21st Century Art I. Benchmark/Standard Art: Understanding how events and movements in history reflect in the art that is being produced and being able to compare the Spanish and American art during this time period. Behavioral Objective: The learner will demonstrate their knowledge of a 21st century idea from the Spanish culture and from American culture in a research paper. Anticipatory Set: Students will conduct research of two ideas from the 21st century, one from the Spanish culture and another from American culture and compare and contrast one another. (I want students to select ideas or topics that they have an interest in). Objective/Purpose: This week, students will be learning about ideas and topics that artists focus on in the 21st century (so many opportunities and ideas). They will select one idea from each culture and compare and contrast them in their 3-page research papers. They will then be presenting their papers to the class with a visual aid. Input a. Task Analysis:

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i. Day 1: Ideas from Spain (ex. Controversy surrounding royal family) ii. Day 2: Ideas from America (ex: 21st-century art is a burgeoning field of practice, research, and publication, making it an incredibly dynamic field of study. Many important topics have been resonating in the new century and inspiring new thinking and scholarly debate, such as the surge of bio art in response to scientific research in the life sciences, and the critical theory known as relational aesthetics that developed in response to an increase in art that invites viewers participation and interaction. Other topics that were much-discussed in the late 20th century remain vital for the analysis of 21st-century art and visual culture, including semiotics, post-modernism, and feminism.
iii. Day 3: Work Day iv. Day 4: Work Day v. Day 5: Presentations b. Thinking Levels: i. Knowledge: Understanding the different ideas, topics, and viewpoints each culture has ii. Comprehension: Selecting two ideas and comparing and contrasting their origins, what they are, and why the idea is important. iii. Analysis: Conduct research, compare and contrast two ideas, and presentations in front of the class with a visual aid c. Learning Styles: i. Interpersonal: Conducting research and connections are done individually Checking for Understanding a. Questions regarding these two cultures b. Drafts of research paper c. Research paper Guided Practice a. Questions, ideas, topics, drafts, and final paper

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Independent Practice a. Questions, ideas, topics, drafts, and final paper Closure a. Presentations from all students b. Recap of important ideas, topics, and issues discussed