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Ethical Use of Technology /2013

Ethical Use of Technology Jeremy Jones Education 1070-2 12-2-13

Ethical Use of Technology /2013

Ethical Use of Technology


The rubric for this paper requires that I cover the social, educational, cultural/equity, and legal/ethical issues of technology mentioned on page 12-18 and table 1.3 (pages 14-15). Although these are important issues, most need to be considered by my other classmates who want to teach older children. Few of them apply directly to the preschool age that I want to teach except perhaps funding, teacher accountability, and security for the children. However, I have found some research that shows my philosophy and ethical framework almost word for word that I will put in at the end of my paper after I have covered the rubric requirements. Social issues mean, Technology uses have a way of both responding to societal needs and problems and creating a new set of issues with society-wide implication (Roblyer, pg. 13). Issues that have been brought up in this book include quality of life concerns, fears about technology overuse and misuses, risks of online social networking, problems due to malware, spam and other malicious actions. All these make people feel worried about what might happen to their computers and to their students, including me. One of the topics that hurt me the most was fears about technology missus and risks of social networking. The reason for that was because I found I was addicted to Facebook. I was there 24/7 and I could not stop myself. I would be on it during class, talking with friends, in the bathroom and then I started to speak in Facebook words like g2g and how r u ding? I noticed when I went to my weight loss camp over the summer that I went through withdrawal for about six weeks. That scared me because I was a mess. I started to pretend that I was texting, messaging people and sending emails to my friends. The other problem that scared me the most was that some of my friends were cyber bullying other people. Cyberbullying means online harassment in social networks (Roblyer, pg. 16). At least two of my friends have died because of this.

Ethical Use of Technology /2013

Howard-Jones (2011) did research on the impact of digital technologies on human wellbeing which stated that the developing brain can be more susceptible to environmental influence than an adults so that it is important to pay attention to those risks to childrens development that are likely to be most significant. He said that it could increase aggression from playing violent video games, interfere with psychosocial wellbeing and attention, and disrupt sleep (Howard-Jones, 2011). However, Plowman and McPake found no evidence from their family research visits that suggested that three- and four-year-old children are at risk from either of these, although they admit these issues may become more pertinent as children get older (Plowman and McPake, 2013). Education means, Trends in the educational system are intertwined with trends in technology and society (Roblyer, pg. 17). In my classroom I know that I will need funding and grants for technology. I need to be up to date with the federal requirements and the 21st Century skills. In my classroom I need to be technologically up to date and familiar with any special education technology needs for my students. These may be difficult because Recent economic downturns in the U.S. economy have meant decreased education funding, which also means fewer funds available for technology hardware, software, and training (Roblyer, pg. 17). Cultural and equity issues include the digital divide, racial and gender equity and students with special needs. I have special needs. I heard from my family that people thought I would not make it to college or even finish high school. I would teach my students that even though they are different, there is no reason why they cannot learn. In the book it says that African Americans, and Hispanic minorities use computers less and enter careers in math, science, and technology areas at lower rate (Roblyer, pg. 18). This means that they will not be ready for

Ethical Use of Technology /2013

careers in math, science, and technology unless teachers encourage their exploration of technology. Legal and ethical issues include hacking, safety issues, plagiarism, academic dishonesty, illegal downloads, and software piracy. Hacking has hurt me. When I was addicted to Facebook, someone hacked me and messed up everything to the point where Facebook changed all my emails and account. I felt like all my friends were gone and I could not fix it. I have two firewalls just in case one fails and I back up my computer weekly. A firewall means, software that blocks unauthorized access to classroom computers (Roblyer, pg. 18). I would make sure that my students have firewalls and know how to avoid hacking. The paper Seven Myths About Young Children and Technology by: Lydia Plowman & Joanna McPake from Scotland really covers my ideals of being a good preschool teacher and also my views on how to use technology with my students and their parents. They say: Curriculum guidance in the early years emphasizes the importance of supporting children in all aspects of their emotional, social, cognitive and physical development in ways that will enable them to become increasingly independent and eager to progress in their learning. These aspirations are compatible with the examples of playing and learning with technology at home that we have described above, but we found that preschool staff tended to focus on what they saw as the overtly educational gains to be made the acquisition of basic operational skills (such as learning to use a mouse), certain learning dispositions (such as taking turns), and the learning arising from the content (such as basic number games) rather than childrens awareness of the different cultural and work-related uses of technology. Our studies have identified a number of areas for consideration by early years educators. These can be summarized as the need to: recognize childrens different preferences develop awareness of the role of a wide range of technologies in the childs home learning environment acknowledge the range and diversity of childrens early experiences at home and the ways in which parents, siblings and carers induct children into culturally significant technological practices, and extend their vision of the nature of childrens technological competences beyond operational skills.
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Ethical Use of Technology /2013

Our research suggests that technologies can expand the range of opportunities for children to learn about the world around them, to develop their communicative abilities, and to learn to learn. Even in low technology households, the home provided a richer mix of technologies than many preschool settings as well as providing opportunities for children both to observe and to participate in authentic activities (Plowman, McPake, and Stephen, 2008, 2010). Nothing comes without a price. New technology offers all sorts of opportunities for education while at the same time raising new problems. In its position statement, the National Association for the Education of Young Children says that Technology tools can help educators make and strengthen homeschool connections (NAEYC, 2012: p7). As a teacher, it is important for me to be familiar with the developments in technology while also knowing how to protect my preschoolers from risk as much as possible and to educate their parents to both the good and bad opportunities that technology provides. I pledge to continue to follow the standards for ethical use of technology and to ethical practice in all of my relationships with children.

Ethical Use of Technology /2013

References
Howard-Jones P (2011). The impact of digital technologies on human wellbeing: Evidence from the sciences of mind and brain. Oxford, Nominet Trust. NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) (2012). Technology and Interactive Media as Tools in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children from Birth through Age 8. National Association for the Education of Young Children and the Fred Rogers Center, Washington DC. Plowman L & McPake J (2013). Seven Myths About Young Children and Technology. Childhood Education 89 (1) 27-33. Plowman L., McPake J. & Stephen C. (2008) Just picking it up? Young children learning with technology at home. Cambridge Journal of Education 38(3) 303-319. Plowman L., McPake J. & Stephen C. (2010). The technologisation of childhood? Young children and technologies at home. Children and Society 24(1) 63-74.