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Final Project: Foundational Documents College Readiness Gaylen F. Brannon Colorado State University Adult Education EDAE 639 December 12, 2013

Running head: FINAL PROJECT Problem Need Statement Background According to the article, Improving Student Success by Strengthening Developmental Education in Community Colleges: The Role of State Policy, Price & Roberts (2009) states: Estimates suggest that 60 percent of first-time community college students who enroll directly from high school do not have the basic academic skills needed to successfully complete collegelevel courses. Overall, far too many enrolled students are at risk of failing and thus contribute to the low community college retention and graduation rates.

Need for Informational Change Most of the current literature describes college readiness as a binary measure. For example, ACT (ACTs college readiness, 2008) defines college readiness as the level of academic achievement a student needs to be ready to enroll and succeedwithout remediationin credit-bearing first-year postsecondary courses. With this definition, students are college ready or they are not. Gateway to College National Network views becoming college ready as a multi-dimensional process, a continuum of attitudes, behaviors, skills and knowledge students are working toward over time to increase their ability to be successful in a postsecondary setting.

Based on the research of Conley, Sedlacek, many other educators in the field of college readiness and the ten years of experience the Gateway to College organization has serving students; we have identified and adopted five dimensions of college readiness, which will be detailed later in this paper. The implementation of these five dimensions will

Running head: FINAL PROJECT impact the work of program staff, specifically faculty and resource specialists (advisors). Program staff need to understand the structures, practices and characteristics that translate these dimension into a quality educational experience that achieves the desired outcomes: Decrease the need for remediation through developmental education courses Increase the number of students passing all their academic courses with grades of C or better Increase the persistence rate of students in Gateway programs as they participate in foundation term coursework and transition into traditional college classes. Students moving further on the continuum of college readiness

Data reflects that many pre college experiences are not intentionally developed or aligned to prepare student for college success. This instructional design is created to address this need. Information Gap Coordinating a Gateway to College program is no small task. Staff are diligently working hard to keep their programs moving. However, this does not always mean that programs are working systemically or intentionally to incorporate the experiences needed to develop college readiness in students. Program staff need a clear understanding of how the Gateway to College organization defines college readiness and how implementing this information can impact their work. The five dimensions of college readiness in post secondary community college is defined as an academic measure, the ability to pass a course or assessment. Gateway wants

Running head: FINAL PROJECT to expand the current definition of college readiness to include the implementation of the five dimensions of college readiness: I. Key Cognitive Strategies

The higher levels of critical thinking are important components to the key cognitive strategies. Staff must help students develop these strategies to the point they become habitual ways of thinking. This will help students comprehend how faculty approach their subject matter and support students as they engage in their courses and develop their ability to think critically about the world (Conley, 2011) The key cognitive strategies include the following: II. Analysis Reasoning, argumentation, proof Intellectual openness Inquisitiveness Interpretation Precision and accuracy Problem solving Key Content Knowledge

Conley (2010) states Students need strong grounding in content that is foundational to the understanding of academic disciplines. For this grounding to take place, instructors must first be clear of what the key content or big ideas are for their particular disciplines. This sets the foundation that will guide learners in understanding the big ideas of the content areas they are studying (Conley 2011). There are two overarching academic skills essential to this end, writing and research. Writing and research are the primary means that college

Running head: FINAL PROJECT instructors use to engage students in learning information. Instructors need to help students develop the writing and research skills needed to access the key content knowledge of the discipline, (Conley 2011). III. Academic Behaviors

Academic behaviors are independent of any particular content area, yet influence all aspects of academic work (Conley 2011, p. 160). In the work, Redefining College Readiness, Conley (2011) states, This facet of college readiness encompasses a range of behaviors such as self-awareness, self-monitoring and self-control, (Conley 2011, p. 161). It also includes the ability to reflect on ones learning, apply a growth mindset, transfer learning to various situations, and employ a variety of learning strategies. Instructors needs to intentionally support the development of these behaviors so students are better able to comprehend material and complete academic tasks successfully. Also in this dimension are: IV. Study skills Time management Prioritization Identification and utilization of resources that support academic success Contextual Skills and Awareness

Contextual factors encompass the information necessary to understand how college operates as a system and culture. Instructors need to create experiences that allow students to be exposed and become familiar with the context of college, (Conley 2011, p. 13).

Running head: FINAL PROJECT Examples of contextual skills and awareness include: Understanding college admissions Knowing college options Comprehending the financial aid system Testing and placement requirements

V.

Non-Cognitive Factors

Instructors must help students develop the non-cognitive factors that contribute to the overall success of students. These factors relate to and support the other non-cognitive factors found in the previous four dimensions. They comprise of attitudes, behaviors, motivations, skills, and perceptions students need for both academic and personal achievement. Examples of these factors include: Educational commitment Social Comfort Dealing with setbacks Aspirations

These attitudes, behaviors, and skills are not traditionally considered in the makeup of college success, (Sedlacek, 2011, p. 5). However, research advocates that non-cognitive factors are important predictors of college and career readiness (Webb, Gore, & Calderon, 2010, p. 9).

Running head: FINAL PROJECT Environment Defined Gateway to College programs exists in 43 schools across the country. Programs are developed with the award of a grant and the collaborative partnership between school districts or a charter school and a local community college. Each program is unique in structure and approach to educational experiences. But all programs incorporate the Gateway to College Essential Elements and Core Commitments: 1. Significant Dual Credit: Gateway to College is a college-based dual credit program that serves eligible students who have dropped out of (or are unlikely to graduate from) high school and who simultaneously earn a high school diploma and substantial college credit. 2. Sustainable Partnerships: Gateway to College leverages the capacity of school districts, colleges, and other community organizations to create sustainable programs that help meet the local need for dropout recovery. 3. Holistic Student Support Gateway to College provides wrap-around student support to meet the academic, social, and emotional needs of our students in an environment that fosters the development of knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in school and in life. 4. Innovative Teaching and Learning Gateway to College encourages the implementation of innovative pedagogical techniques based on both research and proven practices in effective teaching and learning. 5. Intentional Collaboration Gateway to College integrates collaboration, continuous improvement, and professional development, with the goal of improving student success and program sustainability. The principles of Holistic student Support:

Running head: FINAL PROJECT Caring Relationships Strengths-Based Mindset Solution-Focused Approach Community Connections

Principles of Teaching and Learning: Integrated outcomes-based curriculum and instruction Rigor Relationships-Collaborative, Inclusive, Learning Communities Relevance project-based Active Learning Constructive meaning Personal Growth Assessment Within these components are strategies practices and approaches that support college readiness. They exist, in various degrees, throughout programs and without an intentional plan or focus. This instructional design will pilot tools and approaches and training modules that assist programs in using a structured intentional framework to increase students college readiness. Five to seven programs will participate in the pilot. Program staff who participate in the pilot will be asked to complete 3 hours of training, through the use of on line modules, designed to increase their understanding of college readiness (from the Gateway organizations perspective). As a result of this training participants will then employ the use of research based tools and strategies that have the

Running head: FINAL PROJECT potential to move students further on the continuum of college readiness. The pilot will take place during the spring 2014 term.

Rationale for Instructional Event The Gateway organization is asking program staff to operate in the context of a new definition and approach to college readiness. The Gateway organization recognizes the diversity of experience and training that program staff bring to this work. To achieve the desired outcomes, across the network, it is necessary to create consistency in the practices, strategies and approaches delivered to students. Providing this training and instruction to program staff is a means to accomplish this.

Supporters The goal at the Gateway to College National Network is to improve the overall outcomes of all programs specifically in the areas of student persistence, retention, attendance, passing grades and graduation rates. We believe college readiness is a critical high leverage approach that seamlessly facilitates the accomplishment of all the other goals. Everyone within the Gateway organization holds this belief: The president, Laurel Dukehart, vice president of operations, Ben Beyers, associate vice president of partner support and training, George Reese, Senior Manager of Partner Support and Training, Prentice Davis and manger of partner support and training Kris Barnum and manager of research and evaluation Devora Shamah. In addition, we have talked with several program directors who have shared their thought about this approach and would like to involve their program staff in the upcoming pilot. These directors include: Cynthia Aguliar of El

Running head: FINAL PROJECT Paso, Texas, William Davis of the Cuyahoga Community College. I will be soliciting addition participation from five other programs to engage in the pilot.

Summary Helping program staff help students develop college readiness is a key aspect in the work of Gateway to College programs. This instructional design will address this problem and meet this need.

Audience Analysis Interview questions were sent to program leadership (directors) via email. These directors shared these questions with site staff during their weekly meeting. This allowed everyone an opportunity to discuss these questions and prepare for the phone interviews I had scheduled for the following week. In some cases were held with individual directors who repeated the responses back to me. In other cases, the interviews took place via a conference call with the director and the entire staff, so I could discuss questions with the group and hear responses firsthand. Program managers work at the Gateway to College national office and are responsible for the oversight and support of a select group of programs. I sent these managers a list of questions that we would address as a group during a meeting, dedicated to the discussion of the college readiness implementation plan.

Interview Questions for Site Staff What is your current understanding of college readiness?

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT How effectively do you support college readiness in your work and how is this evidenced? What do you most need to support your work in helping students become more ready for college success?

Interview Questions for Program Managers What are your programs current understandings about college readiness? How effectively are they supporting college readiness in their work and how is this evidenced? What is the program staffs interest in implementing The Gateway model of college readiness? Based on your knowledge of the program, their needs/goals and data outcomes, what suggestions do you have or what considerations should I be mindful of regarding the implementation (pilot and actual rollout) of the college readiness work?

Rationale and Approach for Questions The questions I asked site staff related to their background knowledge, motivation, and perceived need. It was important for me to gain clarity about their understanding of college readiness and their awareness of the current research and literature on this topic, verses the traditional perspective of college readiness. I did not want to make assumptions about their knowledge. My question regarding their current level of effectiveness helped me gauge how they view their work and this question allowed me to

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT see how open they are to the prospect of doing their work differently. In addition, it was important to know how they measured their effectiveness and if their opinions were based on anecdotes, concrete data or both. Need is a powerful motivator. If they do not recognize a need to change how they work, they will be less likely to engage in the training or experience the benefits from it. My questions were few but were crafted to garner the most information with the least investment of time.

As a program manager, I am in constant contract with the program directors and site staff, through regular calls and emails and visits. My contact with programs is occurring, in some cases weekly, and at the very least, monthly. Visits are taking place at least once a year and in many of the programs that will be a part of this college readiness implementation pilot, we have had at least three face-to-face interactions within the last eight months. My role as manager of partner support and training requires I have an intimate knowledge of what is happening at the sites I am assigned to serve. I must have a deep understanding of what is taking place with the staff and the overall workings of the programs. This is made possible through regular and consistent interactions. My instructional design project is focused on the staff at several of my sites and the sites of my colleagues. I am not as familiar with the work at program of which I am not the manager, so I chose to interview my colleagues who serve these programs and have the same intimate knowledge of their sites and I have with my mine.

At the programs where I serve as manger, I am attuned to the context in which the staff operates. Most programs have only two full-time employees in addition to the director

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT and data administrator. The instructors in most of our programs are adjuncts. They often have multiple teaching assignments at the college or full time jobs in other areas. Work with the Gateway to College program is only a fraction of what these adjuncts do. For this reason, as an organization, we are sensitive to our interactions with them. We understand that securing additional time outside of their contracted hours is difficult and could incur a financial cost for the program. It has proven ineffective to request faculty voluntarily participate in surveys, interviews or training outside of their regular hours. This is not a reflection of their lack of passion or commitment to our program, but rather the fact that these adjuncts face multiple responsibilities beyond their work in the Gateway to College program.

Responses to Questions/Impact to Design I personally spoke with the directors and staff of three programs who will be piloting the college readiness plan. These programs are: Tri-C, El Paso and Hinds Community college. The interviews my colleagues conducted are from the community colleges of: Bristol, Hennepin, Highline, Holyoke, Mt. Wachussets, Portland, and San Francisco. What is your current understanding of college readiness? What are your programs current understandings about college readiness? o In summary, everyone remarked that college readiness reflects a students ability to pass college classes, or pass a specific test that denotes a their ability to succeed in college course work.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Although some of the staff interviewed, attended a workshop on college readiness that held during our national conference, it is obvious the information shared did not impact their long-term understanding of college readiness. These responses reflect the traditional higher education approach to college readiness that links a students ability to succeed in college solely by their ability to pass course work or a test. This informs me that those who will be participating in this instructional design, bring to this experience, some ingrained ways of thinking or mental models about college readiness that must be addressed in order to impact how they implement this training with students. Experiences throughout the training, will need to reinforce, compare and contrast the traditional approach to college readiness with the (new) Gateway model. I will need to scaffold their understanding of the new model using the foundation of the traditional model. In essence, I will build on what they know to teach what they do not know. How effectively do you support college readiness in your work and how is this evidenced? How effectively are they supporting college readiness in their work and how is this evidenced? o The responses to these questions were fairly consistent. Comments such as the following were shared: Our students are so low, we have a lot of work to do to get them college ready. We need to a better job, only 2 students passed the TASK test!

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT We have to do something different. What we are doing is not working, students are not passing their college classes. We used the XYZ program and students still didnt pass the tests!

These responses are evidence that site staff understand only one aspect of college readiness: the component of content knowledge. There are certain aspects of academic content that students need to understand to be successful in college. However, this is only about twenty percent of what is actually needed for college success. Current research asserts that the other eighty percent includes critical thinking, academic behaviors, contextual awareness (understanding the systems of college) and non-cognitive (social, emotional) variables.

As I develop the instructional design, I need to create experiences that help staff understand the other dimensions of college readiness. Understanding that there are multiple facets of college readiness is a conceptual foundation I must assist site staff in attaining. What do you most need to support your work in helping students become more ready for college success? o Responses to this question were consistent, We need training! We need help! During the conversations, participants repeatedly talked about or requested training. They expressed a need for help or a desire for input on ideas to assist them in better preparing students in becoming college ready. The instructional design will specifically address this with training modules that explain each dimension of college readiness and how implementation of

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT the strategies in that dimension increases students ability to move further on the continuum of college readiness. What is the staffs interest in implementing The Gateway model of college readiness? o Most programs are eager to be a part of the pilot, but others are unable to participate because they are preoccupied with program sustainability issues. Those sites facing these challenges believe they will have reached resolution by the date of the national rollout. Based on your knowledge of the program, their needs/goals and outcomes, what suggestions do you have or what considerations should I be mindful of regarding the implementation (pilot and actual rollout) of the college readiness work? o There needs to be a clear structure mission, vision and outcomes for what is to be accomplished through the pilot and roll-out. There have been concerns about the ambiguity in which the national office sometimes communicates information. o Be mindful of the current challenges staffs are facing. New programs may not be at a place to participate in the pilot and veteran sites may be facing other issues that would make participation in the pilot difficult. o The college readiness tools, resources and training modules should first be released only to the programs participating in the pilot. If others are using the materials without proper guidance and training and as a result have a negative experience and less than desirable outcomes, it could sour their perspective on this work and their ability to engage in the implementation

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT rollout. If they discuss their negative experiences with staff from other programs, extensive damage could be done preventing effective implementation during the rollout. o The training modules need to be thorough, and concise. Staff training and access to these modules will in most cases be integrated into contracted staff meeting time. That time must be used effectively. o Delineate between the essential resources needed for successful implementation and auxiliary resources that can be used to enhance their work but are not necessary for quality implementation. o Auxiliary resources should be pinpointed for specific information so that the use of these resources will be easily accessible for staff. o Some of the language used in the auxiliary resources could be off putting to the site staff. Talk with the developer to see if he might reword the materials so it fits the context of higher education.

Now is perfect timing for this type of instructional design! The problem of college readiness is evident and the need is real. Recent policy changes have placed an intense focus on students achieving greater success in college. This equates to course passing rates, program persistence, retention and completion. With these new expectations, program leaders and site staff are ready to rise to the occasion, but the stakes are high. It is crucial we learn the lessons through this pilot that will result in an effective national implementation rollout. How programs implement the new college readiness model cannot be an exercise in experimentation. It must be managed and nurtured in such a way that

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT positive outcomes are achieved and meaningful results accomplished. I must, in the formation of my design, have clear and concise outcomes and measures for assessment so everyone involved can track and identify success.

Reflection I am very satisfied with the questions I asked and the responses I received. I found the responses about staffs understanding of college readiness especially insightful. Realizing the mental models staff have about college readiness gives me clarity about the structures and strategies I can use to help them develop a broader understanding of the concept of multiple college readiness dimensions and identifying information that will assist them in doing the work to increase students abilities, knowledge and skills to be more successful in college.

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Learning Objectives Primary Objective: 1.0 Learners will understand why Gateway to College uses five dimensions of college readiness. Training Objective 1.1 Given a scenario that reflects a students college intake experience, learners will be able to correctly select one of two descriptors that identify how a multifaceted approach can build college readiness in students. Training Objective 1.2 After reading the structure of a one-on-one meeting, learners will be able to correctly select one of three descriptors that illustrate how the Gateway approach benefits students and those who deliver services to them? Training Objective 1.3 As a result of reading excerpts related to the dimensions of college readiness, learners will be able to identify passages from the text that relate how experiences in each dimension, builds college readiness in students. Primary Objective: 2.0 Learners will understand how to use the College Readiness Rubric

Training Objective 2.1 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to correctly answer three questions that identify the steps and conditions for using the College Readiness Rubric with students. Training Objective 2.2 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to accurately answer three questions about the goal setting process and its application with students. Primary Objective 3.0 Learners will understand how portfolios support the development of college readiness Training Objective 3.1 Given a review of information about portfolios, learners will be able to accurately align the five dimensions of college readiness to the use of portfolios.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Learning Assessments Overview The Gateway to college organization wants to support their programs in working with students in a focused and intentional manner to build the skills, attitudes and behaviors needed for success in college. To this end, it is crucial program staff understand, in concept and application, what college readiness is and how to develop it in students. In the text, Instructional Design, Third Edition, the authors (Smith & Regan, 2008) state, Learning a concept requires two cognitive processes-generalization and discrimination, p. 173. Generalization and discrimination are the basis for all of the learning activities and assessments in the college readiness modules. Aligning Objectives and Assessments Primary Objective: 1.0 Learners will understand why Gateway to College uses five dimensions of

college readiness. Training Objective 1.1 Given a scenario that reflects a students college intake experience, learners will be able to correctly select one of two descriptors that identify how a multifaceted approach can build college readiness in students. Learning Assessment 1.1 After reading a scenario that reflects a students college intake experience, the learner will describe the scenario by selecting one of two descriptors: This student has a full picture of what it means to be college ready

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT This student needs more information about what it means to be college ready.

Learners will then listen and read a narrative that substantiates the best answer. Training Objective 1.2 After reading the structure of a one-on-one meeting, learners will be able to correctly select one of three descriptors that illustrate how the Gateway approach benefits students and those who deliver services to them? Learning Assessment 1.2 After reading about the structure of a one-on-one meeting between a student and the resource specialist, the learner will be able to select one of three descriptors that best illustrates the experience reflected in the structure overview. This process helps the student learn about college readiness as they identify where they currently see themselves on the rubric. Goal setting helps the students focus on the area that need further development. This process clarifies for staff and faculty where the students strengths and needs are based on how the student completes the rubric and identifies goals. This process clarifies for staff faculty and the student where (s)he is strong and what areas are in need of further development. Goal setting helps everyone get a clear picture of where the student is and what areas need additional attention. Learners will then listen and read a narrative that substantiates the best answer. Training Objective 1.3 As a result of reading excerpts related to the dimensions of college readiness, learners will be able to identify passages from the text that relate how experiences in each dimension, builds college readiness in students.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Learning Assessment 1.3 After reading excerpts related to the five dimensions of college readiness, learners will identify passages from the text that relate how learning experiences from the dimensions builds college readiness They will then compare their selected text to a highlighted passage from the text. Learners will then listen to a narrative that elaborates on the highlighted passage discussing how the noted experiences build college readiness in students. Primary Objective: 2.0 Learners will understand how to use the College Readiness Rubric

Training Objective 2.1 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to correctly answer three questions that identify the steps and conditions for using the College Readiness Rubric with students. Training Objective 2.2 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to accurately answer two questions about the goal setting process and its application with students. Learning Assessment 2.1 and 2.2 Given information about the five dimensions of college readiness and how to use the college readiness rubric, learners will be able to correctly answer five multiple choice questions related to steps an conditions for using the rubric and the process of goal setting: The College Readiness Rubric is used at what point in a students enrollment into the program and under what conditions?

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT How is the College Readiness Rubric completed? What activities in this process of using the rubric, move a student to see where they need further development and prompt students to work to address those areas? In what ways are student and staff accountability structured into the goal setting process? What is an artifact and why are they a part of the goal setting process?

After responding to each question, the learners will see the correct answer and additional information that elaborates on the correct choice. Primary Objective 3.0 Learners will understand how portfolios support the development of college readiness Training Objective 3.1 Given a review of information about portfolios, learners will be able to accurately align the five dimensions of college readiness to the use of portfolios. Learning Assessment 3.1 After reading an article about the use of portfolios, learners will be able to accurately categorize twelve passages from the text and align those passages with the dimension of college readiness that substantiates how the use of portfolios relate to the dimensions of college readiness.

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Why Assessments Were Chosen I choose these assessments because I wanted to engage learners in ways that supported the learning of concepts. These assessments check understanding in ways that are aligned to the development of participants learning concepts. How Assessments Are Conducted Each module assesses the participants learning after they engage in activities that require they discriminate between examples that reflect college readiness and others that do not. For example, the primary objective: 1.0 Learners will understand why Gateway to College uses five

dimensions of college readiness The learners are asked as discriminate between experiences common to their context and identify it as promoting college readiness or not. Scenarios were selected that reflect their current practices, to help learners avoid generalizing their current practices as supporting college readiness when in fact, they do not. As learners discern the correct answers, their conceptual understanding is developed and they can connect this understanding to why the Gateway organization uses five dimensions of college readiness verses the traditional approach. For the primary learning objectives 2.0 and 3.0: 2.0 Learners will understand how to use the College Readiness

Rubric 3.0 Learners will understand how portfolios support the

development of college readiness

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT These assessments also involve learners in generalization and discrimination. In these assessments, learners are asked to discern information in the form of multiple-choice questions from a bank of questions that include current/traditional ways of thinking about college readiness. Participants learn the concept of college readiness (from the Gateway organizations perspective) through activities that require they put aside their current generalizations about this topic. Discerning between the current generalizations about what it means to be college ready, and embracing the new approach, equates to successfully grasping the concept of college readiness, which will be reflected through the assessment. I have designed the learning activities and assessments to be completed on-line. These approaches allow the learners to participate in the modules in an asynchronous manner. Learners will achieve a greater benefit from the experience as a result of this structure.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Content Outline: Syllabus Syllabus: Online College Readiness Training Modules Module Facilitator: Gaylen Brannon-Trottier Please contact with questions or concerns 971-232-6880 gbrannon@gatewaytocollege.org Overview The college readiness training modules are created for learners to complete online, in an asynchronous manner. Learners have the option of selecting modules in any order, completing the modules at their own pace, and reviewing them as needed. Learners are also encouraged to take notes on their learning throughout the process. The content is designed to increase the capacity of learners to understand and implement strategies that move students further on the continuum of college readiness. Integrated in each module are learning assessments and opportunities for personal reflection. This reflection allows participants to connect their learning experience to actionable steps to their work. Participant feedback and input regarding the learning modules are important to the Gateway organization. For this reason, at the conclusion of each module, is a link to Survey Monkey so learners can provide anonymous feedback about their experience. In addition to the learning activities and resources found in each module, there is a list of supplemental resources participants can access on the Gateway to College organizational wiki, GatewayLive! for more information. Objectives 1.0 Learners will understand why Gateway to College uses five dimensions of college readiness. 2.0 3.0 Learners will understand how to use the College Readiness Rubric Learners will understand how portfolios support the development of college readiness

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Training Components: Introducing College Readiness Estimated module completion time: 20 minutes Materials Computer (with audio) Online Module Journal and writing tools for notes Training Objective 1.1 Given a scenario that reflects a students college intake experience, learners will be able to correctly select one of two descriptors that identify how a multifaceted approach can build college readiness in students. Training Objective 1.2 After reading the structure of a one-on-one meeting, learners will be able to correctly select one of three descriptors that illustrate how the Gateway approach benefits students and those who deliver services to them. The 5 Dimensions of College Readiness Estimated module completion time: 45 minutes Materials Computer (with audio) Online Module Journal and writing tools for notes Readings: College Readiness Overview The Academic Behaviors Needed to Meet College Readiness Standards (Excerpt) Contextual Skills and Awareness (Excerpt) Active Learning Creating Excitement in the Classroom (Excerpt) Understanding by Design (Excerpt) The promise of Non-cognitive Factors (Excerpt) The 5 Dimensions: Reflection Sheet Training Objective 1.3 As a result of reading excerpts related to the dimensions of college readiness, learners will be able to identify passages from the text that relate how experiences in each dimension, builds college readiness in students. Using the College Readiness Rubric

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Estimated module completion time: 35 minutes Materials Computer (with audio) Online Module Journal and writing tools for notes College Readiness Rubric College Readiness Goal Sheet Training Objective 2.1 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to correctly answer three questions that identify the steps and conditions for using the College Readiness Rubric with students. Training Objective 2.2 After an overview of how to use the College Readiness Rubric, learners will be able to accurately answer three questions about the goal setting process and its application with students.

Using Portfolios to Support College Readiness Estimated module completion time: 20 minutes Materials Computer Online Module Writing tools and journal for notes Module Activity Information Sheet Heading Pages Excerpt Pages Article: The Learning Portfolio. IDEA Paper 41 Portfolios Reflection Question Answer Key Training Objective 3.1 Given a review of information about portfolios, learners will be able to accurately align the five dimensions of college readiness to the use of portfolios. Supplemental Materials GatewayLive! live.gatewaytocollege.org (College Readiness) College Readiness Overview for Faculty College Readiness Overview for Resource Specialists College Readiness Flyer (students) (In progress) Article: Using Portfolios in the Classroom

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT GatewayLive! live.gatewaytocollege.org (Mindsets) Mindsets (Creating a Growth Mindset in Students) GatewayLive! live.gatewaytocollege.org (Gateway Achievers) Supports for developing academic behaviors for better grades

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Program Evaluation Overview The college readiness pilot will take place with seven programs throughout our network. These programs reflect innovators, early adopters and programs motivated to implement change because of the current challenges they are facing with student outcomes around college success. Participation in the pilot is voluntary. Prior to programs being invited to participate, discussions were had with the programs liaison (case manager) and the associate vice president of Gateway to College to solicit their input regarding the proposed list of pilot schools. As a result, some programs were removed from the list and others added. Program directors were sent email invitations informing them of the pilot and received a personal phone call to answer questions, address concerns and confirm participation. This pilot is, in itself, a means of formative evaluation. However, within the pilot, I will use three means to conduct additional formative evaluations: one approach involves one-on-one interviews and will incorporate the collection of information using the One-onone Data and Interpretation Tool. The other two methods include monthly check-in calls to monitor programs as they progress through the pilot. These calls will use probing questions to garner feedback, and surface issues. Program liaisons (program managers) will also contribute to the evaluation process by recording observations during their site visits.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT One-on-one interviews will take place four weeks after the initial start of the term/use the One-on-one Data and Interpretation tool for information gathered during individual interviews. pilot. This will allow those using the readiness rubric time enough to go through the training, and use the rubric with students. At this point, learners should have a wealth of information regarding their experience with training materials. Calls and site observations evaluation will begin after the sixth week of the term and will coincide with regular check-in calls and site visits. Informal evaluation will continue through the length of the pilot, which is the length of the term and is dependent on the programs calendar: quarters or semesters. Summative evaluation will take place at the conclusion of the pilot with rough data collected from the Gateway database two weeks after the end of the term. Formative Evaluation One-on-one Interviews As noted in my learner analysis, time with program staff, specifically resource specialist and instructors is at a premium. In consideration of this challenge, I will first connect with program directors during my regular monthly call to inform them that I would like to spend up to forty-five minutes interviewing staff who have gone through at least two training modules; I will only conduct one-on-one (individual) interviews one time for each learner and will keep them within the noted time period of forty-five minutes. The modules are designed so learners have flexibility with the order in which they engage. For this reason, not all learners, at this point in the pilot, will have interacted with the same material. I would like to get input regarding a variety of modules and the flexible design of 31

Running head: FINAL PROJECT the modules and timing of the formative evaluations should facilitate this goal. One-on-one interviews, will be guided by a script (Appendix A). I will use a customized One-on-one Data Interpretation Tool (Appendix B) to record information from these interviews. Check-in Calls As programs directors were informed, prior to their participation of the pilot, that monthly check-in calls would be part of their commitment to the pilot. These calls will be scheduled in advance and will be preceded by an email briefly outlining questions and topics of discussion. (A list of questions can be viewed in Appendix C). These calls will take no more than sixty minutes and involve the director and or staff according to how the program currently holds check-ins with their program liaison. Calls regarding the pilot will be incorporated into their current call schedule as planned with their program liaisons. No additional calls will need to be added to their calendars. Site Visits At Gateway to College, site visits are regular components of program management. For the efficiency, I will collaborate with the program liaisons who, as part of their job, will be on site working with program directors and staff. I will ask them to be the eyes and ears on the ground during their site visits to see how staff and faculty are implementing their learning from the training modules. And to look for evidence on how students are engaging in experiences that further college readiness. I will meet with program liaisons prior to their site visits to review the use of the Site Visit Observation Form (Appendix D). This form will record artifacts that reflect how 32

Running head: FINAL PROJECT staff are implementing their learning through their work. This form also documents, through artifacts, students learning and how they are engaging in experiences that develop their college readiness. Collectively, these evaluations will inform what types of adjustments needs to made to the modules or what information needs to be added or deleted in ensure a more effective training. For example, after the one-on-one interviews, and the completion of the Site Observation Forms, data will be analyzed for trends. It might be noted, during site visits, that there is little observable evidence of implementation. During check-in calls, journal entries reflect challenges with staff accessing the modules, and interviews further substantiate difficulties with the content of the modules. Clearly, this highlights a need to revisit the content and structure of the modules and problem solve how to intervene so to get learning and implementation back on track. Monitoring the evaluations and supporting programs through the pilot will not be the sole responsibility of the instructional designer. Continued input and support from other Gateway to College staff and teams will play an integral role in the delivery of the pilot and the launch. Summative Evaluation The Research and Development Team at the Gateway to College National Office, participated in establishing the method for summative evaluation. We will be using the objective approach. As an organization, we are currently making a concentrated effort to improve program outcomes throughout our network of forty-three schools. These outcome

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT measures are identified by funders and related to our grant deliverables. We are using one of these data points, students earning grades of C or better in all classes to measure the effectiveness of the College Readiness Pilot. The foundations of college readiness strategies are threefold: Programs have an understanding of what it means to be college ready and this definition supports both the work of staff and faculty yet it also supports student learning. College readiness is demystified for students. Students and staff are able to see clearly what readiness traits students bring to their education and what areas they need to develop. Program faculty, staff and students work with intention to increase students skills and abilities (traits) that support college success. If students are developing in these areas a consistent measure will be passing grades. Passing grades reflect that students are accessing the key content knowledge of the course and that instructors are implementing practices that help students access this content. This would include the development and practice of critical thinking skills noted in the dimension of Key Cognitive Strategies. In addition, to pass classes students have to employ academic behaviors such as attending class, managing time to complete assignments, study skills and learning strategies. Contextual skills and awareness come into play as instructors clarify the norms of college and provide feedback and support as students navigate the culture of college and its expectations. At the conclusion of the term programs will input their usual data points into the Gateway database. We will be able to pull data and compare for each program, the number

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT of students passing all of their courses with grades of C of better. We will be able to do this from two perspectives: how individual students did last term in comparison to this term how the fall cohort did in comparison to the spring cohort

It is our hope to see a three to five percent increase in students passing all classes with grades of C or better.

The dimension of non-cognitive variables is extremely important in becoming college ready, however its connection to grades is not transparent. This dimension requires a more subjective evaluation approach such as student growth on the College Readiness Rubric. The research and evaluation team made a strong case for not incorporating this measure into the evaluation approach because it would create a burden on programs to conducting pre and post assessments of each student, in a manner that is not already part of their record and data collection. Programs will be encouraged to collect this information using anecdotal data.

Information from this evaluation will be used to create content for the college readiness strand of workshops to be held during our National Peer Learning Conference in July 2014, and will aid in marketing and disseminating information about these strategies as we launch the college readiness tools to the network in August of 2014.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT Summary The development of the college readiness pilot is the culmination of eighteen months of research, conversations, meetings, presentations and mini-pilots involving multiple programs, individuals and stakeholders. Every team at the Gateway to College national office has, in some way, been included in the process. For example, the Human Resource and Finance team created a specific code to track the time investment in this work. The Research and Development team assisted with the development and design of the pilot. Communications was involved in supporting the medium used to creation the modules and programs managers worked collaboratively in researching and creating content as well as support for the implementation of the pilot. In addition, program directors and students provided feedback and input in the development of tools and approaches for delivery. This College Readiness Pilot has truly been a network-wide endeavor incorporating all stakeholders. And I am anticipating a successful outcome.

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Running head: FINAL PROJECT References

ACT's college readiness system: Meeting the challenge of a changing world. (2008). Retrieved July 11, 2013 from http://www.act.org/research/policymakers/pdf/crs.pdf

Conley, D. (2010). College and career ready: Helping all students succeed beyond high school . San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Conley, D. (2011). Redefining college readiness, (Vol. 5). Eugene, OR: Educational Policy Improvement Center.

Price, D., & Roberts, B. (2009). Improving student success by strengthening developmental education in community colleges: The role of state policy. Retrieved from http://www.workingpoorfamilies.org/pdfs/WPFP_policybrief_winter08-09.pdf

Sedlacek, W.E. (2011). Using noncognitive variables in assessing readiness for higher education. Readings on Equal Education. 25, 187-205.

Smith, P., & Tillman, R. (2005). Instructional design. (3rd ed.). New Jersey: Jossey-Bass.

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