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R English 4 Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 To be or not to be Rachel Lenkei

December 17, 2013

Enduring Understandings:
The language, words, and dialogue of a text are essential to understanding the progression of a plot and the development of characters

Essential Questions:
Are knowledge and happiness compatible? What value do people place on life and death?

Objectives: Lesson Focus: Analyzing Hamlets soliloquy through close reading, and connecting to Hamlets development over the course of the play Lesson Goals: Students will comprehend Hamlets soliloquy, apply this understanding to their knowledge of Hamlets personality, and identify differences in language in earlier versions of Hamlet Students will be able to: Apply knowledge of language analysis to close reading of text Analyze character development through dialogue Identify elements of theme and motif in the text Materials: Student copies of Hamlet Procedures: Warm up: Finish revenge conversation review NYT article and homework question (what are Hamlets motives for revenge?) Read Act 3.1 soliloquy Watch Kenneth Branagh film clip of soliloquy Instruction: In groups of 3 or 4, hand out sections of soliloquy to paraphrase and do close reading Figurative language, word choice, connections to themes/motifs in play As a class, write notes/paraphrase on board and discuss Create larger poster to connect lines and ideas of student comments Present on screen copies of original Hamlet texts from British Library, comparing versions Pass out copies of Quarto 1 and Quarto 2 (or display on front screen) Ask students what they observe, similarities and differences to modern versions General differences between version and current text How versions contribute to Hamlets character development How does the meaning change Quick write make connections between themes/messages conveyed in 3.1 soliloquy and either 1.2 (pg 15) or 2.2 (pg 71) How is Hamlets character changing over the course of the 3 soliloquies? Homework: Finish reading 3.1, answer guiding questions Assessment: Participation discussion; contributions to group work, writing in notebooks Standards:
CC.1.3.11-12.A: Determine and analyze the relationship between two or more themes or central ideas of a text, including the development and interaction of the themes; provide an objective summary of the text. CC.1.3.11-12.B: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences and conclusions based on and related to an authors implicit and explicit assumptions and beliefs. CC.1.3.11-12.E: Evaluate the structure of texts including how specific sentences, paragraphs and larger portions of the

R English 4 Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1 To be or not to be Rachel Lenkei

December 17, 2013

texts relate to each other and the whole.