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Non Formal Education

ICT in Education Partnerships with Private Sector/Industry Increase spending for Basic Education

Vision: Functionally Literate Filipinos


Teacher Development and Supply

SBM Critical learning resources

Teachers

Hiring and deployment Training Certification Program Teachers benefits and Welfare

RBEC Tech Voc Food for English, school Science, Math Every Child a NAT Reader NCAE Multi-Grade A&E Distance and alternative learning

CHED

Pre-school
Feeding

Special Education

B A S I C
Elementary ECE
DSWD DOH LGUs

E D U C AT I O N
High School

?
NCAE +
Counselling

College/ University

Grade 1 Readiness Test

Public Schools Private Schools


Drop-outs

Technical Vocational TESDA

Labor Force
Alternative Learning

Accreditation & Equivalency

INDUS TRY

Basic Education Framework

MISSION
The mission of Non Formal Education (NFE) in the Philippines is to empower the Filipino with "desirable knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values that will enable him/her to think critically and creatively, act innovatively and humanely in improving the quality of his/her life and that of his/her family, community and country.

NFE aims to reduce the number of illiterate out-of-school youth and adults with needbased literacy programs, plus continue education through basic development projects.

History of Non Formal Education


DECS Bureau of Nonformal Education(BNFE) 1908 - ACT No. 1829 was created to provide for the delivery of civic educational lectures in towns and barrios Act No. 80 in 1936 - Office of Adult Education This branch was transformed into the Adult and Community Education Division of the Bureau of Public Schools The Education Act of 1982 created the Bureau of Continuing Education from the Office of Nonformal Education

The Aquino government after the People Power Revolution, enacted Executive Order No. 117 in 1987 to create the Bureau of Nonformal Education. Article 14, section 2(4) of the 1987 Philippine Constitution stated: "The state shall encourage nonformal, formal, indigenous learning systems, as well as self-learning, independent and out-of-school study programs, particularly those that respond to community needs; and provide adult citizens, the disabled and out-of school youth training in civics, vocational efficiency and other skills.

Bureau of Non Formal Education

Literacy Division (LD)

Continuing Education Division (CED)

Staff Development Division (SDD)

Literacy Division (LD)


serving the needs of those unable to avail of formal education

Continuing Education Division (CED)


expanding access to educational opportunities

Staff Development Division (SDD)


providing opportunities for the acquisition of skills to ensure employability, efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness in the labor market

Sources of Funds: Bureau of Non Formal Education


funds from other international agencies such as UNESCO, UNICEF, ACCU, and elsewhere

General Appropriations Act

loans from the Asian Development Bank

TESDA
In 1995, the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) was established to help regulate non-degree technical-vocational programs. TESDA was also in charge of skill orientation, training, and development of out-of-school youth and unemployed community adults.