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CIED 7603 P-12 Practicum Learning Module Summary Evaluation Report Kecia McGouirk

Part 1: Online Classroom Impact Overview The P-12 Practicum Learning Module was designed to help eighth grade students at Monroe County Middle School complete a unit in Visual Art. This unit was centered on students understanding the Language of Art and recognizing the elements of art and principles of design in artworks. In order to do this, the students created a PowerPoint and completed assignments related to the unit. At total of eight students from two separate classes were used in this Learning Module. Planning for this module was based on the material and resources that were currently used in the course. However, the activities and learning experiences were adjusted to reflect the delivery of the material. All students used PBworks (a wiki created by the instructor). PBworks was used to deliver all materials and assignments were submitted by email. Thirty hours of instructional planning and mentor planning was included during this Learning Module. Challenges with planning this module included: the timing of how long it would take students to complete the various sections and making sure students completed all instructional steps in order. The process of planning was evaluated and changed during the module to allow a sufficient amount of student work. Students were given assignments in a variety of ways to allow for all types of learners. There were multiple-choice quizzes, writing assignments, and a PowerPoint.

McGouirk Page 2 The information was provided in several ways as well. Students were all given written detailed instructions. However, they also received a chapter summary and a PowerPoint explanation for additional understanding. Students were also encouraged to discuss the information and assignments with each other through postings on the wiki. This form of collaboration encourages students to compare and contrast with constructive criticism. The students selected for this course were ranked above average. Each student willingly volunteered and a consent form was signed by their parent. Having well-behaved and responsible students was vital for this module because the technology used was located different from my classroom. Students independently accessed each lesson daily by using the desktop computers in the library located across from my class room. Either I or my mentor, Will Smith, would check on these students periodically each day to see if there were any problems. The first problem I encountered was wiki accessibility. Students were unable to click on some of the links within the wiki; therefore, the suggestion of changing browsers from Internet Explorer to Firefox was the answer. Another problem occurred when students were unable to save word documents and a PowerPoint on the school systems student drive. Instead, students saved assignments on a USB and then emailed me their final work. One last issue arose when I discovered that students habitually skirted around assignment directions rather than choosing to follow step-by-step. This was disappointing since the instructions were written to be followed easily with extra details. Interestingly enough, this was the first time all eight of these students received and submitted work through an online delivery course. Students were amazed at how easy lessons could be accessible in this way. They also enjoyed the discussion posts and were amazed at how it could be synchronous when all students were online at the same time. In

McGouirk Page 3 conclusion, students scored average on the pretest and above average on the post-test for the module. And even though there were a few technical issues it is in my opinion that the students showed a high interest in online instructional delivery but also showed by the end of the three-week module an eagerness to return to the traditional classroom setting. Part 2: Learner Assessments A variety of assessments were given to desired online learners. Please view my wikis class assignments at (McGouirk Visual Art Class) for extended explanation or view the following attachments for a quick overview: Pre-test / Post-test Assessments (Results were emailed to instructor): http://www.glencoe.com/sec/art/art_talk/students/flash.php/1a/1a/eng http://www.glencoe.com/sec/art/art_talk/students/flash.php/1a/1b/eng Chapter Quiz: http://www.glencoe.com/qe/qe151at.php?qi=4680&state=1a Chapter Quiz Submission Instructions: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/70196017/Quiz%20Submissi on%20Instructions Self-Assessment (Not graded and saved in (L:) or emailed to instructor): http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/70195638/Self-Assessment Self-Reflection/Critique Instructions and Rubric: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/70260923/SelfReflection%20and%20Critique%20Rubric Discussion Forum Instructions: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/70286197/Weeks%2023%20Discussion Discussion Rubric: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/70285953/Discussion%20Ru bric PowerPoint Instructions and Rubric: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/71059244/PowerPoint%20R ubric Avatar Creation Instructions and Rubric: http://mcgouirkvisualartclass.pbworks.com/w/page/71062702/Avatar%20Rubric

McGouirk Page 4 Part 3: Pre-Test and Post-Test Data

Table 1: Assessment Overview Examples of student exemplars for the assessments named in the first column below can be viewed here from my wiki.
Name of Assessments Name of School where online PPLM was implemented Topic of the P-12 Practicum Learning Module Student Demographic No. of students taught Pre-Assessment/ Length of Unit of Post Assessment instruction Used

Chapter Quiz Self-Reflection and Critique Discussion Forum PowerPoint Avatar Creation

Visual Art: Language of Art including Monroe County the Art Middle School Elements and Design Principles

8 grade students

th

Online Pre-Test Online Post-Test

13 days during a 3-week period

Table 2: Assessment Individual Data


Student Identifier Pre-test score in percentage Post-test score in percentage

Student A1 Student A2 Student A3 Student A4 Student B1 Student B2 Student B3 Student B4 Table 3: Assessment Group Data
Group Pretest Mean score in %

86 93 100 93 100 79 86 93

100 100 100 100 100 93 93 100

Group Posttest Mean score in %

Percent Change (+ or - %)

Group A: 93 Group B: 89

Group A: 100 Group B: 96 Part 4: Analysis and Interpretation of Data

Group A: +7 Group B: +7

Data results proved that students showed a growth between the pre-test and posttest during this three-week module but as mentioned in the overview, students did well on the pretest too. The reason these 8th grade students performed well could be because I

McGouirk Page 5 taught them during their 6th and 7th grade years as well. Therefore, the material introduced during the module may have looked slightly familiar but delivered with more depth. It is my opinion however, that the module was a success with few technical issues. Students willingness to perform well during the module was quite evident but they also showed a desire to be back in my traditional classroom setting where they created hands-on 3-D Visual Art projects. Part 5: Recommendations for Revisions There are a few areas that would benefit from revision in future implementations of this module. First, it would be helpful to students to include a tutorial on how to maneuver using a PBworks wiki. And although I did email students on receiving assignment submissions and final grades, I did not offer feedback on the discussion forum. Therefore, another way to help increase student achievement is incorporating consistent feedback throughout the module so that students will be aware of understanding. Testing and evaluating all technical issues before hand is probably the biggest advice to offer but sadly this sometimes cannot be discovered until after implementation has begun.

Resources Cavanaugh, C. & Blomeyer, R. (2007). What works in K-12 online learning. Oregon: International Society for Technology in Education. Vonderwell, S., Liang, X., & Alderman, K. (2007). Asynchronous discussions and assessment in online learning. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 39(3), 309-328. Wang, H. & Gearhart, D. (2006). Designing and developing web-based instruction. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

McGouirk Page 6 Summative Evaluation Report Rubric (30% of course grade) Unsatisfactory (<7 pts.) Overview is written at a less than graduate level and omits considerations of all indicated questions. Demonstrates inadequate understanding of concepts of assessment, instructional planning, learning strategies, and evidence-based practices. Fails to include general evidence base for assessment, including cited references to best practices literature. Some errors in referencing may be present. Unsatisfactory (<4 pts.) Learner assessments are included, but may be missing instructions to students and scoring guides. Errors in writing and clarity may be present. Satisfactory (7-8 pts.) Overview is written at graduate level with few errors and includes considerations of all indicated questions. Demonstrates adequate understanding of concepts of assessment, instructional planning, learning strategies, and evidence-based practices. Includes general evidence base for assessment, including cited references to best practices literature. Some errors in referencing may be present. Satisfactory (4 pts.) Learner assessments are included. Instructions to students and scoring guides are included. Minor errors in writing and clarity may be present. Satisfactory (4 pts.) Exemplary ( 9-10 pts.) Overview is written at graduate level with no errors and includes considerations of all indicated questions. Demonstrates strong understanding of concepts of assessment, instructional planning, learning strategies, and evidence-based practices. Includes evidence base for assessment, including properly cited references to best practices literature.

Overview (10 pts. Possible)

Exemplary (5 pts.) Learner assessments are included. Instructions to students and scoring guides are included. Graduate level writing and construction are present. Exemplary (5 pts.)

Learner Assessments (5 pts. Possible)

Pre-test and PostTest Data (5 pts. Possible)

Unsatisfactory (<4 pts.) Tables are confusing, Tables are complete Tables are complete inaccurate, or and accurate. and accurate. missing.

McGouirk Page 7 Unsatisfactory (<4 pts.) There is inadequate discussion of planning for data handling. Criteria for success are confusing or inadequately communicated. Unsatisfactory (<4 pts.) Recommendations for changes are described minimally, and may not be clearly indicated by student achievement data or the experience of delivering the instruction. Rationales do not clearly demonstrate the authority of evidence-based practices. Satisfactory (4 pts.) There is adequate discussion of planning for data handling. Criteria for success are reasonable and clearly communicated. Satisfactory (4 pts.) Recommendations for changes are described, but may not be clearly indicated by student achievement data and the experience of delivering the instruction. Rationales are based on candidate experience but may not clearly demonstrate the authority of evidence-based practices. Exemplary (5 pts.) There is clear evidence of planning for data handling. Criteria for success are reasonable and clearly communicated. Exemplary (5 pts.) Recommendations for changes are clearly indicated by student achievement data and the experience of delivering the instruction. Rationales are based on candidate experience and on the authority of evidence-based practices.

Analysis and Interpretation of Data (5 pts. Possible)

Recommendations for Revision (5 pts. Possible)

Unsatisfactory (<21 pts.) Overall (30 pts. Possible)

Satisfactory (21 - 24 pts.)

Exemplary (25 - 30 pts.)