Sie sind auf Seite 1von 69

Table of Contents

Disclaimer The Really Boring History Part: Where Neckties & Knots Come From Patterns & Knots: When & How To Use the Right Knot The Windsor Knot The Windsor Illustrated Tying the Windsor, Step By Step Tips for Tying the Windsor The Eldredge Knot The Eldredge Illustrated The Eldredge Knot, Step By Step Tips to keep in mind

The Ediety Knot (AKA, The Merovingian Knot) The Ediety Illustrated The Ediety Knot, Step By Step Tips for Tying the Ediety Knot The Trinity Knot The Trinity Illustrated The Trinity Knot, Step By Step Tips to Keep In Mind When Tying the Trinity The Atlantic Knot The Atlantic Illustrated The Atlantic Knot, Step By Step Tips to Keep in Mind for the Atlantic Knot The Han Knot (AKA, The Cape Knot)

Disclaimer No part of this book may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without prior written permission from the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical review and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, please contact the publisher. 2013 by Michael awesometieknots.com / reserved Melrose / All rights

The Really Boring History Part: Where Neckties & Knots Come From
The modern necktie is actually pretty old. Let me bore you with a bit of history before we get into the real meat of this book, the knots. (If you want to skip to knots right now, tap here. I don't blame you because history is reeeaaallly boring.) Mercenary Beginnings

What we call the "necktie" can be traced way back to 1618, when it was worn by mercenaries in the Thirty Years War - it was called the "cravat" and immediately caught the eye of the more stylish population in Paris (no surprises there) and spread around Europe. In the 1600s men wore cravats made out of lace, and it took them ages to tie and arrange a cravat just right. Eventually through the 1700s cravats gave way to a variation called the "Stock" which had a high, stiff collar - again, originally from the military where the stiff nature of the Stock reminded soldiers they had to keep their chins up and look proper.

But the cravat was not gone forever, and through the 1800s it made a resurgence as fashionistas coming back to England from Italy brought it back with them and those heros of style being what they always have been, several books were published on the various ways to tie your cravat. It was also around this time that someone (cmon, someone awesome) coined the word "tie" in connection with the cravat. And it stuck. Into the Modern Age

'Round about 1860-ish the modern necktie as we know it today was born. The Industrial Revolution was in full swing and men wanted a fashionable style that didn't take long to put on, could be worn comfortably all day (Neckties comfortable? Well, when you're coming from the stiff, high collars of the 1820s), and didn't loosen or untie as you worked and went about your business on those newfangled steam engines. Neckties as we know and love/hate them today basically go back this period. The first knots people tied were simple affairs, as were the neckties themselves: straight, thin, and usually black. The

common tie knot from this period was by today's standards pretty bland. In 1926, a man named Jesse Langdorf (one of the few true heros of the necktie) invented a way of making ties by cutting them 'on the bias', or against the grain of the fabric, and then stitching the tie together in three segments - this was a true revelation because it gave the tie some elasticity and also made fall it straight and flat from the knot rather than twisting. By the time the 20's were finished, the necktie was being made with the inner lining and stitching we see today. The 'slip stitch' was starting to be used in the tie at this point also, which was another great milestone - it allowed

the fabric to move with the seams rather than stretch or even tear. I'll spare you the small, period style changes that have happened since the 20's, but will say that hand painted ties, vests, and waistlines all influenced how men wore a tie through the 30s and up to the 50s. Through the 60's fashion designers began to use bolder and brighter colors, and it was at this point also that clothiers began selling shirt/tie combos for the guys who didn't want to bother trying to match them themselves, and/or didnt have a lady friend around to help them out.

The 80's made ties super skinny, but thankfully this didn't last because using a skinny tie really limits your choice of tie knots. But the 90's widened them out again and brought the full array of tie knots back into play. Nowadays, basically anything goes when it comes to neckties. You can wear your football team around your neck, or your favorites Looney Toons guy, or go old school and wear the British regimental stripes - basically, anything you want to wear can be worn if you have the chutzpa to pull it off. Sometimes more chutzpa is required for a certain tie, so be sure and vary either the amount of chutzpa or the style of tie

to make it work best. All this history aside, let me say this before we move on: The traditional styles like paisleys, stripes, and solids are absolutely the best choice when you start tying unique knots. The whole point of tying a cool knot is because it's cool, so you want people to notice it. Wearing a Marvin the Martian design makes people look at the Martian, not the knot, so save that tie for poker night. Some tie patterns work better with some knots rather than others. Which patterns work best with which knots? Turn the

page and we'll dig into that...

Patterns & Knots: When & How To Use the Right Knot
Basically, the bolder the pattern on the tie the simpler the tie knot should be, and vice versa, the simpler the pattern the more complex a knot you can get away with. Its not a hard and fast rule though, and if you really like complex knots like The Eldredge then by all means tie it whenever you feel like tying it. Society isnt going to demonize you if you pair a fancy knot with a really detailed or bold patterned tie - youll always be more

awesome than, say, Richard Simmons because Richard Simmons never wore a tie in the first place. It works best this way but its no big deal whichever knot you use with whichever tie you choose. But if you want the knot to stand out, keep it in mind as you pick out a tie and tie the knot. People look at the boldest thing first - its why companies spend billions of dollars every year on marketing. Its just how the human eye works, and it works that way for ties, too. If you have more detail in your knot then thats where people are going to look,

and a detailed or bold tie pattern is going to detract from the attention people would otherwise give the knot. Also, complex tie knots have more folds and flips, which can get lost on a tie that has a pattern with a lot of detail. Solids absolutely work the best for these complex knots because you can easily see the folds of the knot itself. Use this handy dandy chart to make the most of both your ties and your tie knots:

As long as you remember the delicate, ballerina-like balance between knot and pattern youll be a stunner. Im joking about the ballerina part. The guiding principle is: Complex knot with simple tie. Simple knot with complex tie. Done.

One more thing to keep in mind when you tie these knots: As with any tie tie knot, you want the front of the tie to fall basically halfway down your belt buckle. You wont have it exact each time, but aim for the belt buckle and youll hit it most of the time. The only knot where this doesnt apply is the Ediety Knot, since that can easily wind up being much shorter at both the wide and thin ends (for this reason, only wear the Ediety Knot when you have a vest or suit to cover the bottom of the tie.) Now, the whole reason you got this book: Prepare to meet the awesomest tie

knots in the world.

The Windsor Knot

The Windsor is actually a fairly common

knot, at least in name (including the variations of Half and Full Windsor), but it can be a lot more complicated than it needs to be with so many instructions for it online - and with a lot of people teaching variations of the knot, or even passing off the Half Windsor as the regular or Full Windsor (the Half Windsor skips one of the last loops and can look a bit lopsided and uneven). Learning to properly tie the Windsor will help you out quite a bit with the Ediety Knot later on. The Windsor is sometimes called the Double or Full Windsor and its one of the most enduring knots. It got its name in Great Britain, supposedly named for

the Duke of Windsor. It is also the ONLY knot used by all personnel in the Royal Air Force in black tie uniform because its such a dressy and formal looking knot. By contrast, Ian Fleming wrote that James Bond never trusted a man who wore a Windsor... but what did he know? The reason the Windsor is so enduring is because its so symmetrical. Theres no off-balance look to the knot - its very even, balanced, and full.

The Windsor Illustrated

Tying the Windsor, Step By Step 1. Put the tie around your neck with the wide end to your right side. Its a normal-tied knot, so you need plenty of length on the wide end. The thin end, in fact, basically only needs to be long enough to stabilize the knot (about six inches long is fine). 2. Pass the wide end of the tie over the thin end and around the back, passing behind the knot and up through the neck. Bring the wide end back down front to the left side. 3. Pass the wide end around back from

left to right. 4. From Step 3, bring the wide end up over the front on the right side and down through neck in the back. 5. Bring the wide end from Step 4 around the front of the tie from left to right. 6. Bring the wide part up through the neck from behind and over the front of the knot. 7. Pass the wide end through that front

loop you made in Step 5. 8. Tighten the knot up, center it on your neck, and fold the collar down. Done! Tips for Tying the Windsor 1. In Step 4, you can easily adjust the knot to be more symmetrical. You want the knot to be even on both sides, and this is a key point in tying the knot where you can make a slight correction without getting to the end and having to untie everything. 2. Unlike the other knots in this book, you tie the Windsor with the wide end

of the tie. Which means you dont adjust the wide end at the beginning and then tie the knot around it with the thin end. Its a little tricky at first to get the length just right (about halfway down your belt buckle), but a little practice will let you know how much length you need. 3. Keep in mind that with thicker knots, thicker fabric ties REALLY can get bulky. Ive tied this knot with thin and medium ties, which work best. The really heavy ties tend to have trouble with twisting fabric (which can ruin the tie) and the end result is a really bulky tie knot. The more bulk you have in a knot, the more unbalanced it

can look.

The Eldredge Knot

The Eldredge and the Ediety (which is

up next) are the two most complex knots in this book - so reserve them for your simple pattern or solid ties to get the most bang out of them. The Eldredge is a thin-tied knot - which means you hold the wide end of the tie where you want it to sit and then use the thin end to go through the motions of actually tying the knot.

The Eldredge Illustrated

The Eldredge Knot, Step By Step The Eldredge looks fantastic when its well tied, and surprisingly its not that complicated to do - its a very easy knot to learn. 1. Adjust the front of the tie (wide end) on the left side a couple inches above where you want it to sit, which is at the belt buckle. 2. Using the thin end of the tie, cross over the front from right to left, and then come back behind from left to right.

3. Bring the thin end up the front over the right side of the knot and pass it down behind through the neck. 4. Pull the thin end off to the bottom left of the knot and wrap it around the front of the knot. The tricky part is all done - from now on, youll just be passing the thin end back and forth until you have the herringbone effect of the knot. 5. From Step 4, bring the thin end up behind the knot through the neck and pass it over to the right side.

6. Bring the thin end behind the knot from right to left, and bring it up over the front of the knot, tucking underneath that loop on the front you made in Step 5 (its like making a simple knot within the knot). Tighten it up a bit so everything lays flat. 7. Again, bring the thin end around the back to the front right of the tie, looping around the right neck part of the tie, and pull it back down behind the knot. 8. Bring the thin end down behind the knot to left side, and like in Step 6, up over the front of the knot but again

passing it underneath the topmost loop - the one you just made in Step 7. Again, its like a simple knot-withina-knot. Tighten it down again so the knot lays flat. 9. Adjust the front of the tie, bringing the knot up to your neck and make sure its centered. 10. Holding the thin end wrapped up alongside your neck, fold the collar down so everythings hidden underneath.

Tips to keep in mind 1. Adjust the wide end of the tie a little higher than you want it to be. This is because once the knot is done and you tighten the knot up to your neck the front of the tie will lengthen. I give it a couple inches, but it depends on where you tie the knot (close to your neck or several inches away). Play around with which feels best and youll get to know how to adjust the tie at the beginning to have it end up where you want. 2. Some have experimented with wrapping the short end down through the last loop on the back of the tie and

letting the thin end hang behind the wide end, like a normal or regular tie knot. I dont recommend this because it gives the tie a somewhat lopsided appearance on that last pass through the knot. 3. Youll have to tie this knot a few times to get the finished length correct. Thats the biggest issue with the knot. After a few times, youll have a pretty good idea of where you need to hold the wide end as you start the knot. Its higher than you think at first! 4. The Eldredge does not work well

with a striped tie! Thats because the stripes wind up going in all different directions and the detail of the knot gets lost. For best results, use a plain solid tie.

The Ediety Knot (AKA, The Merovingian Knot)

The Eldredge and the Ediety are the most stunning knots you can tie - both will leave the viewer with no idea how you tied them, only that you must be a wizard for knowing how to do it. The Ediety is somewhat more complicated than the Eldredge, simply because it can be tied two ways: 1. You can tie the Full Windsor backwards, then loosen the knot (but dont untie it), take the tie off, flip it over, put it back on, and tighten it up. 2. You can tie the knot as a whole new knot in itself - no flipping - which is the correct way Ill be showing you.

The first method might work very well if you already are very familiar with the Windsor. Just flip the tie when youre done and voila! Ediety Knot! But in my opinion its best to keep each knot separate and learn the Ediety Knot as a knot in its own right. However, with that in mind, even when you tie the Ediety with the second method its still the basic moves of the Windsor so it should come quite naturally for you if youre familiar with that knot.

The Ediety Illustrated

The Ediety Knot, Step By Step The fact that youre aiming for the little end to wind up on the front of the knot can confuse some guys because it flies in the face of everything you know about tie knots. Just keep following the steps, check the illustrations, use the reference links to the video if you need to, and keep going. Youll get it fine with a little practice. 1. Put the tie around your neck with the wide end to your right, and give it PLENTY of length because this knot eats just as much fabric as the Full Windsor.

2. Bring the wide end to the left under the thin end. 3. Bring it up over the front and then down through the neck, pulling it back to the left side. 4. Bring the wide end from left to right across the front of the tie. This is the part that makes that little mini-knot in the Ediety. 5. Bring it behind the knot on the right, up through the neck and back down to the front on the right side.

6. Bring the wide end around the back of the know from right to left. 7. Put the wide end up over the front of the knot and down through the neck, put pass it through that back loop you just made in Step 6. 8. Tighten the knot up, center it good, and youre all set! Tips for Tying the Ediety Knot 1 . Be sure and give yourself PLENTY (hey, theres that word in all caps again!) of length on the wide end of the knot since theres so many moves

in this knot. Leave it longer than you think youll need, but within reason. As with all these knots, after a few times practicing it youll have it nailed down like a pro. 2. Be aware before that when you wear this knot you need to wear either a vest or a blazer/suit coat. The reason is because the bottom end of the tie dont look pretty.. The short end can wind up being longer than the wide end, or the tie can be really short on both ends and look more like a bib. Wearing a vest or blazer hides the bottom ends of the tie so no one sees them - all they see is the

awesome knot itself. 3 . A tie clip works great with this knot - clip the tie (both wide and thing ends) to your shirt, but pull them up a smidgeon so the tie is a bit puffy at up near the knot. Doing this makes it look more cravat.

The Trinity Knot

Like the Eldredge and the Ediety knots,

the Trinity is an eye catcher. Unlike those two knots, the Trinity isnt a tight knot. You need to keep things a little looser than youre used to if you want the knot to work right.

The Trinity Illustrated

The Trinity Knot, Step By Step Remember: Dont tighten down the knot with each move like you do on other tie knots. Let the fabric fold more or less on its own to add the volume to the knot that it needs in order to look best. 1. With the thin end of the tie hanging down on the right side, bring it to the left side over the wide end. 2. Now the thin end goes up behind through the neck, and bring it down to the left. 3. Bring the thin end around the back of

the knot to the right side, then up over the front and down through the neck. 4. Now heres where the knot starts taking shape: From Step 3, bring the thin end loosely around the front from left to right, and up through neck from behind the knot. 5. Carry the thin end over the top of the knot but tuck it through the loose front loop you made in Step 4, keeping this loop loose also. 6. After passing the thin end through the loose loop from Step 4, bring it

around behind the knot from left to right, and pass it over the top of the knot through the loose loop #2 you made in Step 5. 7. Adjust the knot as needed to give it the Trinity shape, and tuck the thin end up under the collar with the neck band of the tie, and fold the collar down.

Tips to Keep In Mind When Tying the T 1 . Try and save this knot for your thicker ties. And by thicker I mean ties that are a heavier material. The reason is that the Trinity needs to be tied a bit looser than normal knots,

and the heavier fabric lets the knot stay loose but still have body. Thin fabric ties dont work well for the Trinity because they twist and dimple in the knot itself, which ruins the look of the knot altogether. 2 . As with other thin-tied knots, adjust the wide end of the tie up higher than normal as you start tying the knot - a couple inches higher than normal is a good starting point if you want the finished tie to fall to your belt buckle. Practice and patience will teach you exactly where to adjust the wide end of the tie as you start the knot.

3 . Remember to tie the last three loops of the knot loosely - the Trinity needs the loops to have some volume to them. If you over tighten the knot, you will get dimples on the three loops in the front, which ruins the look of the knot. 4 . The Trinity can work with striped ties pretty good - but depending whether you tie it left or right handed means you get either a pinwheel effect (stripes go out from the center of the knot) or a triangle effect (stripes go around the center). Experiment with both and see which

one you like!

The Atlantic Knot

The Atlantic Knot is hands-down the

simplest knot youll learn in this book, but it works great with a heavy fabric tie and works wonders when youre in a hurry and need something sharp and unusual. Like the Eldredge and the Trinity knots, the Atlantic is a thin-tied knot, meaning that just as with those two knots you have to adjust the wide end of the tie before you begin tying the knot. The same as with the Trinity and Eldredge, keep it a couple inches above where you want it to fall, which is usually at the belt buckle. As you tighten the knot the wide end, or front, of the tie will lengthen.

The Atlantic Illustrated

The Atlantic Knot, Step By Step 1. With the wide end of the tie around your neck on your right, adjust it a couple inches above where you want it to hang once its all tied. 2. Wrap the thin end over the top from left to right and up through the neck from behind the knot, bringing it down on the opposite side on the left. 3. Bring the thin end around behind the knot from left to right. 4. Bring the thin end up over the front the knot and down through the neck,

passing through that loop you made in Step 3. 5. Cinch the knot up to your neck, and center it before you fold the collar down.

Tips to Keep in Mind for the Atlantic Kn 1. Tie the knot relatively loosely. This knot doesnt eat as much of the tie as the others, so the thin end of the tie may end up falling lower than the wide end (not something you want!). Tying the knot loosely adds a bit more volume to the knot, making it look more substantial, and it also uses up

more of the length of the tie so you can counter this problem.

The Han Knot (AKA, The Cape Knot)

From the best I can tell, the Han was first tied by a stylish gentleman named Henry Hu (the link to the original video he posted on YouTube is in the Resources chapter). Hu himself states he isnt aware if its been tied before, but gives the name Han for the knot. Its since made a surge in popularity on various websites, where its being called the Cape knot - whichever name is correct I dont know but Cape is the more popular name. Both are relatively new knots. The Han, according Mr. Hu, was originally the result of trying to tie The Ediety Knot and getting it slightly wrong. However, the result is still a very unique

and cool knot - so lets tie it up right and give it a proper place in the world of tie knots. The knot got the name Cape because it look like the knot has a little cape behind it - A gentleman named Alex Krasny supplied this name. Its a cool effect.

The Han Illustrated

Tying the Han/Cape Knot, Step By Step 1. Place the tie around your neck, with the thin end on your right side. Adjust the wide end of the tie a couple inches above where you want it to fall when the knot is finished. This is a thin-tied knot, so youll be tying the knot with the thin end of the tie. 2. Bring the thin end over the top of the knot to your left, and then up behind through the neck. 3. Bring the thin end down to your right side and pass it behind the knot to the left side, but continue around the front

of the knot back to the right side (you just made a 180 degree loop around the knot). 4. Pass the thin end up behind the knot through the neck, and bring it down to the front on right side again. 5. Bring the thin end around the back to the left side, then up and over the knot and down through the neck. 6. Pass the thin end through that last loop on the back (the back loop you made in the beginning of Step 5.

7. Tighten up the knot and center it on your neck. Fold the collar down and youre all set to go! Tips for the Han/Cape Knot 1. This knot doesnt work well with a striped tie. As with the Eldredge knot, the stripes confuse the detail of the knot and the wow factor is almost completely lost. By all means tie with stripes if for your own enjoyment but dont expect many people to notice if you do.