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Running head: DIVISION DETECTIVES MATH UNIT

Division Detectives Math Unit Lynette Nichols EED/415 October 10, 2011 Dr. Charity Jennings

Division Detectives Math Unit Division Detectives Math Unit Subjects: Mathematics, Reading, and Science Grade Level: 3 Duration: 10 1 hour sessions Learning Activities: 1. Mini-lesson Review 2. Lesson 1 3. Lesson 2 4. Lesson 3 5. Lesson 4 6. Lesson 5 Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS) Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing Expectation: use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4)

Division Detectives Math Unit Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension) identify explicit information and infer implicit information in literary and informational text using details, sequence of events, cause and effect relationships, and problem and solution (GPS, ITBS, CE) (3LA_B2009-17) Expectation: retell, summarize/paraphrase stories, and relate setting, characters, and events to real life (GPS, CE) (3LA_B2009-19) Expectation: summarize important ideas in informational text (GPS) (3LA_B2009-20) Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills Expectation: begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J2009-98) Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations Expectation: explain the relationship between division and subtraction and division and Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations explain the relationship between division and subtraction and division and multiplication (GPS) (3MA_B2007-29) recognize and explain the two models of division: determining how many equal parts of a given size or amount may be taken away from the whole (repeated subtraction) and determining the size of the parts when the whole is separated into a given number of equal parts (sharing model) (GPS) (3MA_B2007-30)

Division Detectives Math Unit recognize problem-solving situations in which division may be applied and write corresponding mathematical expressions (GPS) (3MA_B2007-31) explain the different meanings of the remainder in division problems (GPS) (3MA_B2007-32) Topic: E Algebra use a symbol own and find the value of the un

known in a number sentence (GPS) (3MA_E2007-60) demonstrate equivalent relationships using numbers, objects, pictures, words, and symbols (GPS) (3MA_E2007-61) Subject Area: Science Topic: B - Earth Science investigate the physical attributes of rocks and soils (GPS, ITBS) (3SC_B2006-8) Topic Opener Mini lesson Review multiplication facts and vocabulary with discussions. We know multiplication is is putting groups of items into a larger group. When we divide, we separate items into smaller groups. Play one-on-one games with fact family triangle cards. Review multiplication facts as groupings. In small groups and pairs, students will show their partner the fact family card. The partner will use the card to show the array. Then the student will split the array into groups. KWL Chart
What We Know What We Wonder What We Learned

Division Detectives Math Unit

Lesson One: Repeated Subtraction Subjects: Math and Reading Duration: Two 1 hour sessions Second session will include review, guided practice, and independent work from a similar lesson in the textbook. Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS) Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing Expectation: use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4) Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension) Expectation: retell, summarize/paraphrase stories, and relate setting, characters, and events to real life (GPS, CE) (3LA_B2009-19) Expectation: summarize important ideas in informational text (GPS) (3LA_B2009-20) Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills Expectation: begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J2009-98)

Division Detectives Math Unit Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations Expectation: explain the relationship between division and subtraction and division and multiplication (GPS) (3MA_B2007-29) Behavioral Objectives When given a passage, the student will summarize events related to real life independently with 80% accuracy. When given a passage, the student will summarize important ideas in informational text independently with 90% accuracy. When given a model, the student will explain the operations of subtraction and division independently with 80% accuracy. When given a model, the student will use oral language to inform others about fact related to the lesson topic independently with 80% accuracy. When given a graphic organizer and journal, the student will take notes in his or her own words using key vocabulary appropriately with 90% accuracy. When given a set of manipulatives the student will solve division problems in a group with 90% accuracy. When given manipulatives the student will solve division problems independently with 80 % accuracy. Instructional Objectives

Division Detectives Math Unit The students will discover division is another way to subtract or separate items from a larger group into smaller groups. The teacher will demonstrate how to use division as repeated subtraction with word problems. The teacher will introduce key vocabulary, provide definitions, and examples. The teacher will define division as repeated subtraction, a way to sort one group into to several groups at one time. The students will paraphrase the definitions, model the meanings of vocabulary, and record them in their math journals. Resources and Materials
Manipulatives Chip counters Unifix cubes Number line Reading Materials The book: Pinczes, E. J. (1993). One hundred hungry Ants. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin. Textbook (optional) will provide additional visual aids and picture glossary for individual students. Other Addition chart Multiplication chart Teacher made graphic organizer (with vocabulary definitions filled in for ELL and students with special needs) KWL chart Teacher made assessment Computer with internet access Whiteboard Dry erase markers Projector

Instructional Sequence 1. Introduce the topic. 2. Review essential questions and discoveries from previous lessons-KWL chart 3. State objectives and solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Provide clarification.

Division Detectives Math Unit 4. Provide information with sample problem. 5. Solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Allow student to student and teacher to student discourse. Provide clarification. 6. Guided practice. Complete up to two problems as a class. Introduce the problem one at a time. Allow students to work in groups to model their solutions. Reflect on each groups response with a class discussion. Provide clarification. 7. Re-teaching provide- direct instruction to students in small groups as other students complete graphic organizers, math journals, and individual work. 8. Close lesson with summary and KWL chart Lesson Delivery and Guided Practice This is the first lesson in a unit on conceptual division. Students will learn to detect division concepts in stories and everyday life. In the previous unit, students discovered the relationship between addition and multiplication and multiplication facts. Students will use similar materials from the multiplication lessons to help introduce the connection between division and multiplication in a later lesson. Classroom Management- Provide pre-sorted manipulatives for each group. Do not pass them out until you are ready to begin the hands-on activity. Students should be familiar with the manipulatives. However, model the appropriate use before students proceed. Instructional Strategy- Direct Reading Thinking Activity and group work. Review the KWL chart and vocabulary introduced at the beginning of the unit in topic opener mini-lesson.

Division Detectives Math Unit Anticipatory Set- Today will learn a faster way to use subtraction to sort items. This is called division. Has anyone seen or used division? Ask students to share what they know and record it on the whiteboard for everyone to see. Check that each student has his or her math journal, copy of the KWL chart, and pencil. Allow students to sit where they are comfortable but close enough to see the pictures. Tell students you will read aloud the book, One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes. Ask the students, What do you think this story is about? How can we learn division from these hungry ants? Show students the pictures as you read the story. Pause and ask students to think about what they think will happen next each time the littlest ant says, Stop! Lesson- After reading the story, make sure the website for the online manipulatives is open to the Rectangle Division manipulative. Ask students, What did you notice about this story? Did you see any patterns? What patterns did you see? Write the patterns on the board. Show the pictures and pass the book around the class. Ask students to read the passages to find the division problems. For example, the first time the littlest ant tells them to split up he states, Two lines of fifty (Pinczes, 1993, p. 6). Ask students, What is two lines of 50? Can you model it? Can you show me another way? Use the online manipulative to show your own model on the board or use the one below. Write the subtraction algorithm and division algorithm side by side. Ask the students to volunteer to label the algorithms. Allow volunteers to use the online manipulative to display their models to the class. One hundred ants separated into two lines of 50. ************************************************** ************************************************** 100-50=50 and 1002=50 another way to look at this is, two $50 dollar bills equals $100.

Division Detectives Math Unit Ask students to model with the base-10 blocks. Tell them to show it another way with manipulatives or drawings. Then record the information from the board into their journals. Walk around the room and assess the students models. Solicit feedback to clarify any discrepancies. Ask students to share and explain their models to the class. Divide students into groups of four. Ask the students, if the class divides into equal groups of four, how many groups will there be? Repeat with another example from the story until students seem comfortable with the concept. Allow other students to develop their own division problems with items in the room such as desks, pencils, crayons, etc. Remember to tell students to show their answer in two ways with models before writing the algorithm. Ask volunteers to show and explain how they divided. Write the algorithms and models for the different ways students used division. Make sure students write down their own thoughts and draw models to match the algorithms. Walk around to assess individual progress and clarify any discrepancies. Closure Summarize the main points of the lesson. Review the KWL chart. Make sure students fill in these questions. What is division? How did the ants use division? How can we use division in everyday life? What else did you learn about division? Independent Practice We have 25 students in our class and 28 desks how many ways can I group the students and desks. Each student must be in a group. Remind the students to record two models to match each algorithm they create. This assignment will serve as practice as well as a formative assessment.

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Division Detectives Math Unit Differentiated Instruction As students work in groups, pull out four to five students and assess their comprehension and skills with two word problems. Use the information to develop a mini-lesson for re-teaching with directing instruction. For special need students use smaller dividends. For ELL students provide a graphic organizer with labeled pictures to learn vocabulary. For gifted students use larger dividends and more complex story problems. Notice each student will use manipulatives and graphic organizers. However, the expectations for how they use them will vary. Students will also take turns completing math practice online. Assessment Student independent work will serve as the assessment for this lesson. A lesson review test will be given one to two days later. This will provide students with more time to connect with the concepts. Lesson Review Name ________________________________________ Date _____________________ Fill in the blank with words from the word bank. 1. The result of division is a __________. 2. The number used to divide another number in a division problem is the __________. 3. The number divided in a division problem is the __________. Label the dividend, divisor, and quotient in each problem. You may draw models.
Dividend Divisor Quotient

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Division Detectives Math Unit

12

4.

21 3 = 7

5.

3 = 12 4
_______ ______

______ ______ _______

______

Draw a line to match the subtraction problem to the division find the difference or the quotient. You may use models. 6. 14 - 2 - 2 - 2 2 2 2 = a. 12 4 =

7. 20-5 -5-5=

b. 14 7 =

8. 12 3 -3-3=

c. 20 4 =

Draw models to find the quotient. 9. 15 3= 10. 35 7 =

11. 24 12=

12. 40 8 =

Lesson Review Answer Key


dividend divisor quotient

Division Detectives Math Unit Fill in the blank with words from the word bank. 1. The result of division is a _quotient____. 2. The number used to divide another number in a division problem is the _divisor__. 3. The number divided in a division problem is the _dividend__. Label the dividend, divisor, and quotient in each problem. You may draw models.

13

4.

21 3 = 7

5.

3 = 12 4
dividend divisor

dividend divisor quotient

quotient

Draw a line to match the subtraction problem to the division find the difference or the quotient. You may use models. * Models may vary. 6. 14 - 2 - 2 - 2 2 2 2 = 2 a. 12 4 = 3

7. 20-5 -5-5= 5

b. 14 7 = 2

8. 12 3 -3-3=3

c. 20 4 = 5

Draw models to find the quotient. * Models may vary. 9. 15 3= 5 10. 35 7 = 5

Division Detectives Math Unit

14

11. 24 12= 2 KWL Chart


What We Know What We Wonder

12. 40 8 = 5

What We Learned

Vocabulary Graphic Organizer


Word Dividend Divisor Quotient Definition The number being divided in a division problem The number used to divide the dividend. The result of division. Visual Example 324=8 324=8 324=8 Your own words

Annotated Bibliography Eather, J. (2011). A math dictionary for kids 2011 by Jenny Eather. Retrieved from http://www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com/dictionary.html This is a useful site with an interactive dictionary. Students can read or listen to the definitions. The site is interactive and allows students to rearrange, explore, and practice math. The definitions for the graphic organizer and assessment were retrieved from this dictionary. Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS)

Division Detectives Math Unit The most recent standards were retrieved from this booklet. IXL Learning (2011). IXL division word problems facts to 10 3rd grade math practice. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/division-word-problems-facts-to-10 This site has several forms of interactive math practice. Students will use this cite to address varied levels of math literacy. Students will be directed to the activities that challenged them at the appropriate level. Pinczes, E. J. (1993). One hundred hungry Ants. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin. Pinczes writes a very entertaining story that directly teaches the concept of division as grouping. This story inspired the lesson plan. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website. Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example. Utah State University (2010). Rectangle division: NLVM. Retrieved from http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=category_g_2_t_1.html This is an online manipulative library. The library has manipulatives for grades PreK-12 for the five main math content areas. The division rectangle allows the student to see the division and multiplication operations at the same time. Students can practice division with this activity. Lesson Two: Grouping and Sorting Subjects: Math, Reading, Science

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Division Detectives Math Unit Duration: Two 1 hour sessions Second session will include review, guided practice, and independent work from a similar lesson in the textbook. Give Assessment before lesson 3. Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS) Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4) Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension) identify explicit information and infer implicit information in literary and informational text using details, sequence of events, cause and effect relationships, and problem and solution (GPS, ITBS, CE) (3LA_B2009-17) Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J200998) Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations explain the relationship between division and subtraction and division and multiplication (GPS) (3MA_B2007-29)

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Division Detectives Math Unit recognize and explain the two models of division: determining how many equal parts of a given size or amount may be taken away from the whole (repeated subtraction) and determining the size of the parts when the whole is separated into a given number of equal parts (sharing model) (GPS) (3MA_B2007-30) recognize problem-solving situations in which division may be applied and write corresponding mathematical expressions (GPS) (3MA_B2007-31) Subject Area: Science Topic: B - Earth Science investigate the physical attributes of rocks and soils (GPS, ITBS) (3SC_B2006-8) Behavioral Objectives When given a passage, the student will summarize important ideas independently with 90% accuracy. When given a model, the student will explain the operations of division as sharing independently with 80% accuracy. When given a model, the student will use oral language to inform others about facts related to the lesson topic independently with 80% accuracy. When given a graphic organizer and journal, the student will take notes in his or her own words using key vocabulary appropriately with 90% accuracy. When given a rock chart on the whiteboard, the student will fill in one or more attributes with 90% accuracy. When given a set of manipulatives the student will solve division problems in a group with 90% accuracy.

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Division Detectives Math Unit When given manipulatives the student will solve division problems independently with 80 % accuracy. Instructional Objectives The students will discover division is another way to share or sort items from a larger group into smaller groups. The teacher will demonstrate how to use division as sorting and sharing with word problems. The teacher will introduce key vocabulary, provide definitions, and examples. The teacher will define division as grouping, a way to equally. The students will paraphrase the definitions, model the meanings of vocabulary, and record them in their math journals. Resources and Materials
Manipulatives 5 bags of rocks 1 bag of small slate squares, 1 bag of small marble squares, 1 bag of small pieces of chalk, 1 bag of small granite squares, and 1 bag of small pieces of pumice. Reading Materials Giganti, P. Jr. (1992). Each orange had 8 slices: A counting book. New York, NY: Mulberry Books. Leffingwell, R. (2006). Sharing and dividing. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library. Leslie, T. (2005). Divide It Up!. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. Other Colored Pencils (10 sets) Worksheets KWL chart Journals Whiteboard Dry erase markers (two or more colors) Computer with internet access

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KWL Chart
What We Know What We Wonder What We Learned

Vocabulary Graphic Organizer

Division Detectives Math Unit


Word Hard Shiny Heavy Definition Visual Example Your own words

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Instructional Sequence 1. Review last lesson. 2. Introduce the topic. 3. Review essential questions and discoveries from previous lessons-KWL chart 4. State objectives and solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Provide clarification. 5. Provide information with sample problem. 6. Solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Allow student to student and teacher to student discourse. Provide clarification. 7. Guided practice. Complete first set of problems as a class. Introduce the problems one at a time. Allow students to work in groups to model their solutions. Reflect on each groups response with a class discussion. Provide clarification. 8. Re-teaching provide- direct instruction to students in small groups as other students complete individual work, practice, and journaling. 9. Close lesson with summary and KWL chart Lesson Delivery and Guided Practice

Division Detectives Math Unit This is the second lesson in a unit on conceptual division. In this lesson, students will explore division as sharing and sorting. They will review the concept of repeated subtraction from the first lesson. The teacher will introduce division as sharing and sorting. The students will note key questions and discoveries on the KWL chart. Instructional Strategy- Direct/Explicit group and individual work. Review- Review the previous lesson. Reference the students work from the previous day. Clarify any discrepancies found without letting the class know who made the error. Tell students to ask questions and provide solutions to fix errors. Tell the students to use their journals to take notes. Anticipatory Set- Yesterday we read One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes and learned that division is repeated subtraction. The ants in the story separated into smaller and smaller groups. Division can also be used for sharing or grouping things. Have you ever shared something with a friend, brother, or sister? Today we will practice dividing by 2 and 5. We are going to discover how to share things by grouping them by 2 and 5. When we divide something evenly by 2 the number in the ones column of the quotient will be 2,4,6,8, or 0. When we divide evenly by 5 the number in the ones column of the quotient will be 0 or 5. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Write students remarks and questions on the board. Tell students to note their questions and discoveries on their KWL chart in their journals. Tell students that today they will use rocks as counters instead of counting chips. Remind the students that although they are rocks they are tools for their investigation and learning. The rocks should be handled with care. Pass out a set of rocks to every fifth student. Tell the students they will have 20 seconds to look at the five rocks slate, marble, chalk, granite, and pumice

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Division Detectives Math Unit before passing them on to the next student. Ask students to think about words to describe the rocks. When everyone has finished looking at the rocks, write the words on the board under the name of each rock. Tell the students you will discuss the words later in Science. Lesson- Tell the students, We have five bags of rocks. Each bag has a different kind of rock. We have 30 students. How can we share the rocks equally? Each large bag will have two smaller bags of rocks. Once the students have divided into six groups of five, tell the students they need to divide each group once more by two because there are two small bags of rocks in each large bag. Once the students have divided into 10 groups of three tell them they will each take a turn using the rocks to solve division problems. Ask students, Did anyone notice that we just used division? Tell the students they should try to solve the problem on their own first before asking others in their group for help. Tell the students to think about the textures of the rocks they are using. They may add words to the board to describe the rocks. There will be a Science lesson later about rocks. Note: If you do not have 30 students find another way to divide the students. For example if you have 28 students, you may choose to have one group of three and five groups of five. Acknowledge the different quantities of the groups but do not go in-depth about remainders. Remainders will be in a later lesson. Classroom Management: Tell the students that each group will have a problem solver, a writer, and a problem checker. Each member should agree before the writer records the final answer. Pass out presorted materials to the class. Each group will receive a basket with a bag of rocks, colored pencils, multiplication chart, and worksheet.

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Division Detectives Math Unit Guided Practice- Tell students you will complete the first set of questions together. Question one, We had five bags of rocks and 30 students. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? Write the number sentence on the board. Thirty students divided by five bags equals. 30 5 =. Solicit answers from the class. Show the problem as repeated subtraction. Show the problem rows as in the Rectangle Division (Utah State University, 2011) activity.Ask a volunteer to draw a model on the board. Question two, We opened the five bags of rocks. There were two smaller bags inside. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? Solicit answers from students. Ask a volunteer to draw a model on the board. Question three, We had five groups of six students and each group was divided by two. How many groups of students do we have all together? This may be tricky for some students to visualize. Ask a volunteer to help you draw a model. We started with 30 students and divided by five. 30 5=6. Draw 30 dots in an array of 5 by 6. Circle six dots in a row to show five groups of six. Then we divided each group of six by two 6 3=3. Get a different color dry erase marker. Circle two groups of three dots in each group of six. Ask the students to count how many groups of three there are in all. Tell students to complete the remaining with their group. Float around the room to observe student progress and provide support. Once groups have completed the worksheet, solicit feedback and clarify. Review each question on the worksheet. Ask each group what answer they came up with for each problem. Ask one student from each group to explain how they solved one of the problems. Closure Review group work and clarify any discrepancies. Make a copy for each group member to keep in his or her journal. Summarize the main points of the lesson. Review the KWL chart. Make sure students fill in these questions. What is division? How did Mike use division? How

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Division Detectives Math Unit can we use division in everyday life? What else did you learn about division? Hand out the independent Independent Practice- Students will complete a worksheet that matches their level of math literacy. Whatever is not completed in class will be homework. Students will also practice division facts for 10 minutes at a time on the computer (http://www.ixl.com/math/grade3/division-facts-to-5) or (http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=grade_g_2.html). Allow advanced students to practice with word problems to provide more challenge (http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/division-word-problems-facts-to-10). Differentiated Instruction- As students work in groups, pull out four to five students and assess their comprehension and skills with two word problems. Use the information to develop a mini-lesson for re-teaching with directing instruction. For special need students, use smaller numbers. For ELL students provide a graphic organizer with labeled pictures to learn vocabulary. For gifted students use larger dividends and more complex story problems. Notice each student will use manipulatives and graphic organizers. However, the expectations for how they use them will vary. Students will also take turns completing math practice online. Students with special needs may work in pairs with counters to complete worksheet. Students working below level will receive re-teaching worksheet. For students needing more direct instruction meet in a small group. Read and discuss division and sharing in the stories Sharing and Dividing by Richard Leffingwell and Divide It Up! by Tonya Leslie. ELL students- will use their math journals and vocabulary sheet from the previous lesson. The key vocabulary will be

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Division Detectives Math Unit placed on the word wall for the class. Advanced students will receive more difficult problems without pictures or models. Review and Assessment On the following day, review the homework in small groups. This will be homogenous groups, unlike previous groupings. As students finish allow them to practice and study in pairs or independently. Review concepts and vocabulary from previous lessons with the whole class. Use this time to solicit questions and clarify any discrepancies from homework and previous lessons. Have students complete the Lesson Review before the next lesson. See Assessment in Lesson One. Group Practice Worksheet Names ___________________________________________ Date _____________________ Show your answers to the questions with a number sentence. Draw a model to show how you found the answer. Explain your answer in words. 1. a. We had five bags of rocks and 30 students. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? b. We opened the five bags of rocks. There were two smaller bags inside. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? c. We had five groups of six students and each group was divided by two. How many groups of students do we have all together? 2. Mike has 20 rocks in his rock collection. He groups the rocks by type: slate, marble, granite, and pumice.

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Division Detectives Math Unit a. How many groups of rocks does Mike have? b. How many rocks are in each group? c. Mike wants to share his rocks equally with his friend Sam. How many rocks of each kind will they get? 3. Mike and Sam played in the field behind Mikes house. They saw purple flowers. They picked 20 flowers. The boys decided to give the flowers to their parents. a. How many flowers will Mike and Sam each take home to their moms and dads? b. If the parents share the flowers equally, how many flowers will each parent get? c. How many vases will Mike need? 4. Which rocks did your group have? Each person: Write something different about the rocks in your own words. For example, Bricks are hard. Bricks are harder than wood. Pebbles are smooth. Pebbles are smoother than bricks and wood. 1. 2. 3. Practice Worksheet Name______________________________________ Date ____________________

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Division Detectives Math Unit Solve each problem. You may draw a model to solve the problem on the back or on another sheet of paper. You can use repeated subtraction to solve the problem. Write you final answer in the space.
1. 10 2 = _____ 5. 4 2 = _____ 9. 15 5 = _____ 13. 20 2 = _____ 17. 20 5 = _____ 2. 6 2 = _____ 6. 50 5 = _____ 10. 8 2 = _____ 14. 35 5 = _____ 18. 45 5 = _____ 3. 14 2 = _____ 7. 5 5 = _____ 11. 2 2 = _____ 15. 25 5 = _____ 19. 16 2 = _____ 4. 18 2 = _____ 8. 30 5 = _____ 12. 10 5 = _____ 16. 12 2 = _____ 20. 40 5 = _____

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Re-teaching Worksheet Name________________________________________________ Date _____________ 1. Mike has 10 new toy cars. He sorts them by color green, yellow, orange, blue, and red. How many cars will be in each group?

You can solve with subtraction and grouping. Sort the cars one at a time by color. How many green cars can you subtract from the group of 10 cars? There are two green cars. Cross out the green cars. 10-2=8. Repeat the subtraction with each color.

Green

Yellow

Orange

Blue

Red

10-2=8

8-

Division Detectives Math Unit You can count backwards as you match the cars.
10 8

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You can divide. 10 5 = _____ Solve the problem. Use repeated subtraction and grouping. 2. A.J. and Mike play basketball one-on-one. The game ended in a tie. They scored 20 points all together. How many points did each player score? 3. Leigh has 20 dolls. She invites four friends to play. Leigh wants to share the dolls equally with her friends. How many dolls will Leigh and her friends have each?

Advanced Worksheet Name _________________________________________________ Date ______________ Find the pattern. Name the rule for the pattern. 1. 80, 75, 70, 65, ____, ____, ____ Rule: _______________________ 2. 36, 34, 32, 30, ____, ____, ____ Rule: _______________________

Division Detectives Math Unit 3. ____, 55, ____, _____, 40, 35, ____ Rule: _________________________ 4. 50, _____, 46, _____, 42, _____, 38, _____ Rule: ________________________________ Write your own word problem for each. Show the solution in two ways. 5. 40 5= 6. 20 2 = 7. 8 2 = 8. 15 5=

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Group Practice Worksheet Answer Key Names ___________________________________________ Date _____________________ Show your answers to the questions with a number sentence. Draw a model to show how you found the answer. Explain your answer in words. 1. a. We had five bags of rocks and 30 students. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? Answers: 30 5 = 6 We divided the students into five groups to share the five bags. Each group had six students. Wording and Models may vary.

Division Detectives Math Unit b. We opened the five bags of rocks. There were two smaller bags inside. How did we divide or share the rocks equally? Answers: 6 2= 3 Each group of six students divided into two groups to share two bags. Wording and Models may vary. c. We had five groups of six students and each group was divided by two. How many groups of students do we have all together? Answers: 30 3= 10 We had 30 students that divided into five groups of six and divided again into 10 groups of three. We have 10 groups all together. Wording and Models may vary. 2. Mike has 20 rocks in his rock collection. He groups the rocks by type: slate, marble, granite, and pumice. a. How many groups of rocks does Mike have? Answer: 20 4= 5 Mike had 20 rocks and divided them into four groups. b. How many rocks are in each group? Answer: 205 =4 There were five types of rocks so there were five groups of four rocks. c. Mike wants to share his rocks equally with his friend Sam. How many rocks of each kind will they get? Answer: 4 2 =2 There are four of each kind of rock and two friends. Mike and Sam get two of each of rock. 20 2= 10 They will have 10 rocks each.

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Division Detectives Math Unit 3. Mike and Sam played in the field behind Mikes house. They saw purple flowers. They picked 20 flowers. The boys decided to give the flowers to their parents. a. How many flowers will Mike and Sam each take home to their moms and dads? Answer: 202=10 There were 20 flowers and two friends so each friend gets 10 flowers. b. If the parents share the flowers equally, how many flowers will each parent get? Answer: 204= 5 Sam has two parents and Mike has two parents. They have four parents all together. Each parent gets five flowers. Or 10 2 = 5 Each friend has 10 flowers to give his two parents. c. How many vases will Mike need? Answer: 10 5=2 Mike each get five flowers. Mike will need two vases. 4. Which rocks did your group have? Answers will vary. Each person: Write something different about the rocks in your own words. For example, Bricks are hard. Bricks are harder than wood. Pebbles are smooth. Pebbles are smoother than bricks and wood. 1. Answers will vary. 2. 3. Practice Worksheet Answer Key

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Division Detectives Math Unit Name______________________________________ Date ____________________ Solve each problem. You may draw a model to solve the problem on the back or on another sheet of paper. You can use repeated subtraction to solve the problem. Write you final answer in the space.
1. 10 2 = 5 5. 4 2 = 2 9. 15 5 = 3 13. 20 2 = 10 17. 20 5 = 4 2. 6 2 = 3 6. 50 5 = 10 10. 8 2 = 4 14. 35 5 = 7 18. 45 5 = 9 3. 14 2 = 7 7. 5 5 = 1 11. 2 2 = 1 15. 25 5 = 5 19. 16 2 = 8 4. 18 2 = 9 8. 30 5 = 6 12. 10 5 = 2 16. 12 2 = 6 20. 40 5 = 8

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Re-teaching Worksheet Answer Key Name________________________________________________ Date _____________ 1. Mike has 10 new toy cars. He sorts them by color green, yellow, orange, blue, and red. How many cars will be in each group?

You can solve with subtraction and grouping. Sort the cars one at a time by color. How many green cars can you subtract from the group of 10 cars? There are two green cars. Cross out the green cars. 10-2=8. Repeat the subtraction with each color.

Division Detectives Math Unit


Green Yellow Orange Blue Red

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10-2=8

8-2= 6

6-2= 4

4-2= 2

2-2=0

You can count backwards as you match the cars.


10 8 6 4 2

You can divide. 10 5 = 2 Solve the problem. Use repeated subtraction and grouping. 2. A.J. and Mike play basketball one-on-one. The game ended in a tie. They scored 20 points all together. How many points did each player score? Answer: 20 2= 10. They both scored the same number of points. So 20 points are divided by the two players. 3. Leigh has 20 dolls. She invites four friends to play. Leigh wants to share the dolls equally with her friends. How many dolls will Leigh and her friends have each? Answer: 20 5 = 4 Five friends share 20 dolls equally so each friend gets four dolls.

Advanced Worksheet Name _________________________________________________ Date ______________

Division Detectives Math Unit Find the pattern. Name the rule for the pattern. 1. 80, 75, 70, 65, __60__, __55__, __50__ Rule: ________Subtract five_______________ 2. 36, 34, 32, 30, _28___, __26__, __24__ Rule: _______Subtract two________________ 3. _60___, 55, __50__, _45____, 40, 35, __30__ Rule: __________Subtract five_______________ 4. 50, __48___, 46, ___44__, 42, __40___, 38, __36___ Rule: _________Subtract two_______________________ Write your own word problem for each. Show the solution in two ways. 5. 40 5= 8 Word problems will vary. 6. 20 2 = 10 7. 8 2 = 4 8. 15 5= 3

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Annotated Bibliography Giganti, P. Jr. (1992). Each orange had 8 slices: A counting book. New York, NY: Mulberry Books.

Division Detectives Math Unit This book is an easy read for students. Large colorful pictures and word problems teach the concept of division or multiplication as grouping. This was inspiration for the lesson. Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) The most recent standards were retrieved from this booklet. IXL Learning (2011). IXL division word problems facts to 10 3rd grade math practice. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/division-word-problems-facts-to-10 This site has several forms of interactive math practice. Students will use this cite to address varied levels of math literacy. Students will be directed to the activities that challenged them at the appropriate level. Leffingwell, R. (2006). Sharing and dividing. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library. This colorful book presents division as sharing. This book inspired the lesson plan. Leslie, T. (2005). Divide it up!. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. This book is written in simple language. Lower level readers will be able to read this book independently. Pictures and words are used to teach the concept of division as sharing. This book was inspiration for the lesson. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website. Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example.

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Division Detectives Math Unit Utah State University (2010). Rectangle division: NLVM. Retrieved from http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=category_g_2_t_1.html This is an online manipulative library. The library has manipulatives for grades PreK-12 for the five main math content areas. The division rectangle allows the student to see the division and multiplication operations at the same time. Students can practice division with this activity. Lesson Three: Remainders Subjects Math and Reading Duration Two 1 hour sessions Second session will include review, guided practice, and independent work from a similar lesson in the textbook. Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS) Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing Expectation: use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4) Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension) Expectation: retell, summarize/paraphrase stories, and relate setting, characters, and events to real life (GPS, CE) (3LA_B2009-19)

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Division Detectives Math Unit Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills Expectation: begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J2009-98) Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations recognize problem-solving situations in which division may be applied and write corresponding mathematical expressions (GPS) (3MA_B2007-31) explain the different meanings of the remainder in division problems (GPS) (3MA_B2007-32) Behavioral Objectives When given an example, the student will summarize events related to real life independently with 80% accuracy. When given a word problem, the student will summarize important ideas independently with 90% accuracy. When given an example, the student will explain the meaning of the remainder in a division problem independently with 90% accuracy. When given a model, the student will use oral language to inform others about fact related to the lesson topic independently with 80% accuracy. When given a graphic organizer and journal, the student will take notes in his or her own words using key vocabulary appropriately with 90% accuracy. Instructional Objectives

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Division Detectives Math Unit The students will discover how to group remainders in scenarios related to real-life situations. The teacher will define remainders as the amount left when a dividend is not divided equally by the divisor. The teacher will demonstrate scenarios in word problems, algorithms, and models. The students will paraphrase the definitions, model the meanings of vocabulary, and record them in their math journals. Resources and Materials
Manipulatives Unifix cubes Chip counters Reading Material Textbook for follow up lesson. Other Whiteboard Dry erase markers Computer with internet access Projector Multiplication chart KWL chart Student Jourals Teacher made graphic organizer (with vocabulary definitions filled in for ELL and students with special needs)

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Instructional Sequence 1. Introduce the topic. 2. Review essential questions and discoveries from previous lessons-KWL chart 3. State objectives and solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Provide clarification. 4. Provide information with sample problem. 5. Solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Allow student to student and teacher to student discourse. Provide clarification.

Division Detectives Math Unit 6. Guided practice. Complete up to two problems as a class. Introduce the problem one at a time. Allow students to work in groups to model their solutions. Reflect on each groups response with a class discussion. Provide clarification. 7. Re-teaching provide- direct instruction to students in small groups as other students complete graphic organizers, math journals, and individual work. 8. Close lesson with summary and KWL chart Lesson Delivery and Guided Practice This is the third lesson in an instructional unit on conceptual division. This lesson focuses on the concept of remainders. Students will discover not all division problems result in equal groupings. The students will discover real-life situations where division results in unequal groupings or remainders. Classroom Management- Students should be seated in pairs or small groups of 3 -4 students. Make sure all students have their math journals and pencils ready before the lesson. Make sure all materials for group work is presorted. Select a volunteer to pass out the materials (unifix cubes and chip counters) to each group just before the activity. Instructional Strategy- Direct instruction, group, and independent practice. Anticipatory Set- Display the Rectangle Division (Utah State University, 2010) activity on the whiteboard. Adjust the dividend and divisor to show 7 = 23 +1. Tell the students they will learn about remainders. Ask the class, Do you know what a remainder is? What is the remainder in this problem? Paraphrase student responses and provide clarification. Write the algorithm 7 = 2 3 +1 and 73= 2 R 1 on the board. Circle or highlight the remainder in both problems. Ask

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Division Detectives Math Unit the class, Does anyone know why I write it this way? The R stands for remainder. The remainder is the amount left over when the dividend is not divided into equal parts by the divisor. Ask students to think about situations when something was left over or extra. We are going to work on some word problems together to discover some situations where remainders might turn up. Then we will share our own definitions of remainders. Lesson Display the following word problem on the board. Clara is having a birthday party. Her mom made seven special cookies for her guests. Clara, Cher, and Luke shared the seven cookies. Each friend had the same number of cookies Pass out the manipulatives. Tell students to work in their groups to find the quotient and remainder. Walk around the room to assess student progress and provide assistance. After each group has settled on an answer or up to two minutes have past discuss the word problem. Solicit volunteers to write the algorithm. Clarify any discrepancies. Ask one member of each group to explain the model. Display the next word problem on the board. Thirty-four people are standing in line for a carnival ride. The ride only seats five people at a time. Tell students to find the quotient and remainder. Allow students wanting a challenge to work the problem independently. Walk around the room to assess student progress and provide assistance. After no more than two minutes, solicit a volunteer to write the algorithm. Clarify any discrepancies. Ask volunteers to explain their models. Clarify any discrepancies. Show a model with chips and another with unifix cubes. Ask students to share the definition of remainders in their own words. Write them on the board. Allow students to copy the samples problems and definitions into their journals. Closure

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Division Detectives Math Unit Summarize the main points of the lesson. Review the KWL chart. Make sure to explore the following questions. What are remainders? Where will we find remainders in everyday life? What else did you learn about remainders? Independent Practice Each student will complete the independent practice that matches his or her level of math literacy. Practice Worksheet Name__________________________________________ Date ___________________ Find the quotient and the remainder. Draw a model to match your answer.
1. 7 2= 2. 22 5 = 3. 9 2 =

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4. 13 5 =

5. 25 2 =

6. 15 2 =

7. 34 5 =

8. 42 5 =

9. 26 5 =

Re-teaching Worksheet Name________________________________________________ Date _________________ Find the quotient and the remainder. Use the model to match your answer. Circle each group.
1. 7 2= ___ R ___ 2. 9 2 = ___ R ___ ******* *********

Division Detectives Math Unit


3. 13 5 = ___ R ___ *************

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Challenge Work Use the same worksheet from week one independent practice. We have 25 students in our class and 28 desks. How many ways can I group the students. Each student must be in a group. You may use any manipulatives you like. Write a number sentence for each. Record two models for each. Divide the students into groups of five. How many desks remain empty? Divide the desks into groups of four. How many students are in each group? Divide the desks into groups of seven. How many students are in each group? Show another way to divide into groups with remainders. Differentiated Instruction As students work in groups, pull out four to five students and assess their comprehension and skills with two word problems. Use the information to develop a mini-lesson for re-teaching with directing instruction. For special need students use smaller dividends and allow students to work in pairs. For ELL students provide a graphic organizer with labeled pictures to learn vocabulary. For gifted students use larger dividends and more complex story problems. Notice each student will use manipulatives and graphic organizers. Assessment Teacher observations and student independent work will serve as the assessment for this lesson.

Division Detectives Math Unit Practice Worksheet Answer Key Name__________________________________________ Date ___________________ Find the quotient and the remainder. Draw a model to match your answer. Models may vary.
1. 7 2= 3 R 1 2. 22 5 = 4 R 2 3. 9 2 = 4 R 1

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4. 13 5 = 2 R 3

5. 25 2 = 12 R 1

6. 15 2 = 7 R 1

7. 34 5 = 6 R 4

8. 42 5 = 8 R 2

9. 26 5 = 5 R 1

Re-teaching Worksheet Answer Key Name________________________________________________ Date _________________ Find the quotient and the remainder. Use the model to match your answer. Circle each group.
1. 7 2= 3 R 1 2. 9 2 = 4 R 1 3. 13 5 = 2 R 3 ** ** ** *

** ** ** ** * ***** ***** ***

Challenge Work Answer Key Use the same worksheet from week one independent practice. We have 25 students in our class and 28 desks. How many ways can I group the students. Each student must be in a group. You may use any manipulatives you like. Write a number sentence for each. Record two models for each. Models and algorithms may vary.

Division Detectives Math Unit Divide the students into groups of five. How many desks remain empty? 25 5 = 5 and 28 5 = 5 R 3 There will be 3 empty desks. Divide the desks into groups of four. How many students are in each group? 28 4 = 7 and 25 4 = 6 R 1 There will be at least four students in six groups and one student in the seventh group. Divide the desks into groups of seven. How many students are in each group? 28 7 = 4 and 25 7= 3 R 6 There will be seven students in the first three groups and six students in the fourth. Show another way to divide into groups with remainders.

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KWL Chart
What We Know What We Wonder What We Learned

Vocabulary Chart
Word Dividend Divisor Quotient Remainder Definition The number being divided in a division problem The number used to divide the dividend. The result of division. The amount left over when the dividend is not divided equally by the divisor. Visual Example 324=8 324=8 324=8 Your own words

Division Detectives Math Unit Annotated Bibliography Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) The most recent standards were retrieved from this booklet. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website. Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example. Utah State University (2010). Rectangle division: NLVM. Retrieved from http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=category_g_2_t_1.html This is an online manipulative library. The library has manipulatives for grades PreK-12 for the five main math content areas. The division rectangle allows the student to see the division and multiplication operations at the same time. Students can practice division with this activity. Lesson Four: Division Inverse of Multiplication Subjects Mathematics and Reading Duration Two 1 hour sessions Second session will include review, guided practice, and independent work from a similar lesson in the textbook. Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS)

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Division Detectives Math Unit Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing Expectation: use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4) Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension) Expectation: retell, summarize/paraphrase stories, and relate setting, characters, and events to real life (GPS, CE) (3LA_B2009-19) Expectation: summarize important ideas in informational text (GPS) (3LA_B2009-20) Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills Expectation: begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J2009-98) Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: B - Numbers and Operations Expectation: explain the relationship between division and subtraction and division and multiplication (GPS) (3MA_B2007-29) recognize and explain the two models of division: determining how many equal parts of a given size or amount may be taken away from the whole (repeated subtraction) and determining the size of the parts when the whole is separated into a given number of equal parts (sharing model) (GPS) (3MA_B2007-30)

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Division Detectives Math Unit recognize problem-solving situations in which division may be applied and write corresponding mathematical expressions (GPS) (3MA_B2007-31) Behavioral Objectives When given a passage, the student will summarize events related to real life independently with 80% accuracy. When given a passage, the student will summarize important ideas independently with 90% accuracy. When given a passage, the student will summarize important ideas in informational text independently with 90% accuracy. When given a model, the student will explain the operations of division independently with 80% accuracy. When given a model, the student will use oral language to inform others about facts related to the lesson topic independently with 80% accuracy. When given a graphic organizer and journal, the student will take notes in his or her own words using key vocabulary appropriately with 90% accuracy. When given a set of manipulatives the student will solve division problems in a group with 90% accuracy. When given manipulatives the student will solve division problems independently with 80 % accuracy. Instructional Objectives The students will discover division is the inverse of multiplication.

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Division Detectives Math Unit The teacher will demonstrate how to use division to undo or reverse multiplication operations. The teacher will introduce key vocabulary, provide definitions, and examples. The teacher will define division and multiplication as inverse operations (opposites). The students will paraphrase the definitions, model the meanings of vocabulary, and record them in their math journals. Resources and Materials
Manipulatives Unifix cubes Chip counters Reading Material Burns, M. (1997). Spaghetti and meatballs for all!. New York, NY: Scholastic Press Other Whiteboard Dry erase markers Computer with internet access Projector Teacher made activities Multiplication chart KWL chart Student Jourals Teacher made graphic organizer (with vocabulary definitions filled in for ELL and students with special needs)

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Instructional Sequence 1. Introduce the topic. 2. Review essential questions and discoveries from previous lessons-KWL chart 3. State objectives and solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Provide clarification. 4. Provide information with sample problem. 5. Solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Allow student to student and teacher to student discourse. Provide clarification.

Division Detectives Math Unit 6. Guided practice. Complete up to three problems as a class. Introduce the problem one at a time. Allow students to work in groups to model their solutions. Reflect on each groups response with a class discussion. Provide clarification. 7. Re-teaching provide- direct instruction to students in small groups as other students complete graphic organizers, math journals, and individual work. 8. Close lesson with summary and KWL chart Lesson Delivery and Guided Practice This is the fourth lesson in a unit on conceptual division. Students will learn to detect division concepts in the story and relate them to everyday life. This lesson explores division as an inverse operation of multiplication. Some real-life scenarios related to this concept are arranging items as in the story, borrowing and returning items as in sharing, or even separating a group into smaller groups and recombining into the original group as a familys daily schedule. Classroom Management- Students should be seated in groups of four. Ask a volunteer to pass out presorted materials just before the activity. Instructional Strategy- Direct Reading Thinking Activity and group work. Review the KWL chart and vocabulary introduced in previous lessons. Anticipatory Set- Today we will explore the relationship between division and multiplication. Who knows the meaning of the word relationship? In earlier lessons, we learned that multiplication is a faster way to add or count and sometimes this is called repeated addition. We learned that division is a faster way to subtract and called repeated subtraction. We know that multiplication combines groups of things just as addition combines groups of things. We also

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Division Detectives Math Unit know that division separates a group into smaller groups just as subtraction separates a group into smaller groups. Do you recall the relationship between addition and subtraction? Let me show you an example. If I have five markers and I borrow two from Jackson (any student). How many markers will I have all together? 5+2=7 When I am finished using the markers, I will give back the markers I borrowed. How many markers will I have? 7-2=5 Make sure to write the algorithms on the board as use say the word problems. Can someone explain the relationship between 5+2= 7 and 7-2= 5? Draw the algorithms in a ring. (See addition subtraction ring below) Clarify the students responses. Subtraction can be used to reverse or undo addition. Can addition be used to undo subtraction? Why? Provide an example. Allow students to discuss their answer with their group before sharing it with the class. Clarify students responses. If I have seven colored pencils and Jackson borrows two How many colored pencils will I have? 7-2=5 When Jackson is finished with the colored pencils he gives them back to me. How many colored pencils will I have all together? 5 +2=7 Act out the scenario for students during or after the explanation. Solicit feedback. Clarify any discrepancies. Make sure students write the example in their journals. Now let us look at the relationship between multiplication and division. Write this story problem on the board. Sam and Mike want to play cars but Mike forgot to bring his cars to Sams house. They share six of Sams cars equally. Before Mike goes home, he gives back the borrowed cars. Tell students to show the division and multiplication in this problem. 62=3 and 3 x 2= 6. Draw the algorithms in a ring. (See multiplication division ring below) Clarify any discrepancies. Draw models to show the groupings. Allow students to take turns practicing the concept in their groups. Walk around and observe student progress. Ask questions to assess understanding and clarify any discrepancies.

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Division Detectives Math Unit Addition Subtraction


Ring Addition Subtraction Ring and Multiplication Division Ring both adapted from (The Concord Consortium Multiplication Rings, 2011) 5

Multiplication Division Ring 6

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+2 -2

=7

=3

Tell the students you will read aloud the book, Spaghetti and Meatballs for All! By Marilyn Burns. Show students the pictures. Ask students, What do you think this story is about? In this story, a family uses math during a dinner party to make sure everyone has a seat and plenty of food to eat. Tell the students to think about what will happen each time a new set of guests arrive. Ask students, What do you think Mrs. Comfort is thinking now? Why were there fewer places to sit when the tables were pushed together? How else could Mrs. Comfort arrange the tables to make enough room for 32 people? Write all of the students comments and questions on the board for a follow up discussion. Students will record the questions and comments in their journals and KWL charts. If you have not already defined inverse operation and relationship, do so now. Allow students to record the definitions in their own words. Lesson- After reading the story ask students, What did you notice about this story? How did the guests use math? Ask students to read passages from the story and write algorithms and models to help explain. Show the following problem on the board. Jacksons 16 cousins came to visit. Half of them came in a blue van. The other half came in a red van. How many cousins were in each van? 162=8 Display the webpage http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=grade_g_2.html on the

Division Detectives Math Unit whiteboard. Adjust the dividend to 16. Adjust the toggle on the left to show a divisor of two and quotient of eight. Indicate the multiplication algorithm shown next to the division rectangle 16 = 2 x 8. Write the algorithm below the division algorithm so that the digits and symbols are aligned. Ask the students to work in their groups to write the second part of the story to match the multiplication algorithm. Ask each group to share their ending. Repeat with two more word problems and algorithms one at a time. Walk around the room to observe students. Provide a fourth set of algorithms for students to complete individually. Allow students to draw pictures and models to show their work. Walk around the room and observe students. Pull out individuals for small group assessment. Clarify any discrepancies. Write another set of problems on the board. 10 2= __ and 2 __ =10. Ask students, What is the missing number? Use what you know about the relationship between multiplication and division to discover the answer. Closure Summarize the main points of the lesson. Review the KWL chart. Make sure students fill in essential questions from the discussion. What is the relationship between multiplication and division? How do we use multiplication and division as inverse operations in everyday life? Remind students to practice their fact families to five every night. Tell students to practice writing multiplication and division algorithms for the same fact family. Independent Practice Students will complete the Divide and Multiply Ring sheet in pairs or individually depending on their strengths. Students that finish early will work on practice activities in pairs or individually. Students may practice trading items and writing down the algorithms. Individuals

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Division Detectives Math Unit may practice with fact family triangles, concrete manipulatives, online manipulatives, or online word problems. Differentiated Instruction As students work in groups, pull out four to five students and assess their comprehension and skills with two word problems. Use the information to develop a mini-lesson for re-teaching with directing instruction. For special need students, use smaller numbers. For ELL students provide a graphic organizer with labeled pictures to learn vocabulary. For gifted students use larger dividends and more complex story problems. Notice each student will use manipulatives and graphic organizers. However, the expectations for how they use them will vary. Students will also take turns completing math practice online. All students will use the same practice worksheet. Some will work in pairs, as individuals, or in a small group with the teacher. Assessment The worksheet and teacher observation will serve as assessments. The teacher will review concepts during the next lesson. KWL Chart
What We Know What We Wonder What We Learned

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Vocabulary Graphic Organizer


Word Dividend Definition The number being divided in a division problem Visual Example 324=8 Your own words

Division Detectives Math Unit


Divisor Quotient Inverse operation relationship The number used to divide the dividend. The result of division. Opposite Connection to something or someone 324=8 324=8 The relationship between multiplication and division is they are opposites.

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Annotated Bibliography Burns, M. (1997). Spaghetti and meatballs for all!. New York, NY: Scholastic Press This story is about a couple that invites family and friends over for a dinner party. The wife makes a seating chart with just enough seating for 32 people. As guests arrive they rearrange the seating repeatedly only to return it to the original configuration in the end. This story inspired the lesson plan because it shows the effect multiplication and division has on each other as inverse operations. The Concord Consortium (2011). BA: Balanced assessment task e007: Multiplication rings. Retrieved from http://balancedassessment.concord.org/e007.html This assessment inspired the lesson. The assessment provides a simple visual for students to discover the effect multiplication and division has on each other as inverse operations. This is important for students to understand higher algebraic concepts. Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) The most recent standards were retrieved from this booklet. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website.

Division Detectives Math Unit Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example. Utah State University (2010). Rectangle division: NLVM. Retrieved from http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/frames_asid_193_g_2_t_1.html?from=category_g_2_t_1.html This is an online manipulative library. The library has manipulatives for grades PreK-12 for the five main math content areas. The division rectangle allows the student to see the division and multiplication operations at the same time. Students can practice division with this activity. Lesson Five: Algebraic Thinking Subjects Mathematics and Reading Duration Two 1 hour sessions Second session will include review, guided practice, and independent work from a similar lesson in the textbook. Standards GA- Gwinnett County Public Schools Academic Knowledge and Skills (AKS) Grade Level: Third Grade Subject Area: Language Arts Topic: A - Listening, Speaking, and Viewing Expectation: use oral language to inform, persuade, or entertain (GPS) (3LA_A2009-4) Topic: B - Reading (Strategies and Comprehension)

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Division Detectives Math Unit Expectation: retell, summarize/paraphrase stories, and relate setting, characters, and events to real life (GPS, CE) (3LA_B2009-19) Topic: J - Accessing Information/Reference Skills Expectation: begin to take notes from lectures, reading, viewing, and interviewing (GPS) (3LA_J2009-98) Subject Area: Mathematics Topic: E Algebra use a symbol own and find the value of the un

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known in a number sentence (GPS) (3MA_E2007-60) demonstrate equivalent relationships using numbers, objects, pictures, words, and symbols (GPS) (3MA_E2007-61) Behavioral Objectives unknown values in a number sentence independently with 80% accuracy. When given a word problem, the student will demonstrate equivalent relationships with models or manipulatives independently with 90% accuracy. When given a word problem, the student will demonstrate equivalent relationships orally and in written number sentences with 90% accuracy. When given an example, the student will summarize events related to real life independently with 80% accuracy.

Division Detectives Math Unit When given a word problem, the student will summarize important ideas independently with 90% accuracy. When given a model, the student will use oral language to inform others about fact related to the lesson topic independently with 80% accuracy. When given a graphic organizer and journal, the student will take notes in his or her own words using key vocabulary appropriately with 90% accuracy. Instructional Objectives The students will discover use variables in scenarios related to real-life situations. The teacher will define a variable as an unknown number. The teacher will demonstrate scenarios in word problems, algorithms, and models. The students will paraphrase the definitions, model the meanings of vocabulary, and record them in their math journals. Resources and Materials
Manipulatives Unifix cubes Chip counters Reading Material Textbook for follow up lesson Other Whiteboard Dry erase markers Computer with internet access Projector Teacher made activities Multiplication chart KWL chart Student Jourals Teacher made graphic organizer (with vocabulary definitions filled in for ELL and students with special needs)

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Instructional Sequence 1. Introduce the topic.

Division Detectives Math Unit 2. Review essential questions and discoveries from previous lessons-KWL chart 3. State objectives and solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Provide clarification. 4. Provide information with sample problem. 5. Solicit feedback to assess comprehension. Allow student to student and teacher to student discourse. Provide clarification. 6. Guided practice. Complete up to two problems as a class. Introduce the problem one at a time. Allow students to work in groups to model their solutions. Reflect on each groups response with a class discussion. Provide clarification. 7. Re-teaching provide- direct instruction to students in small groups as other students complete graphic organizers, math journals, and individual work. 8. Close lesson with summary and KWL chart Lesson Delivery and Guided Practice This is the fifth lesson in an instructional unit on conceptual division. In this lesson, students will discover the meaning of variables. The students will discover variables in word problems related to real-life situations. The teacher will demonstrate the use of variables in a familiar context used through the unit in models, manipulatives, and word problems to help students make connections. Classroom Management- Students should be seated in pairs or small groups of 3 - 4 students. Make sure all students have their math journals and pencils ready before the lesson. Make sure

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Division Detectives Math Unit all materials for group work is presorted. Select a volunteer to pass out the materials (unifix cubes and chip counters) to each group just before the activity. Instructional Strategy- Direct instruction, group, and independent practice. Anticipatory Set Tell the class, Today we are going to work with variables. You have worked with variables in word problems. Lets start with a word problem we have worked on before. Open your math journals to the sample problems from our lesson on inverse operations. Write the first word problem on the board. Under the word problem, write the algorithm with a missing variable like such. If I have five markers and I borrow two from Jackson . How many markers will I have all together? 5 + 2= What is the variable in this number sentence? How do you know? Allow students to discuss their answers amongst their group before sharing with the whole class. Repeat the same process with the next sample question. This time make the divisor the variable. Sam and Mike want to play cars but Mike forgot to bring his cars to Sams house. They share six of Sams cars equally. Before Mike goes home, he gives back the borrowed cars. 6=3 Allow students to discuss their answers as a group before sharing with the whole class. Ask students, What do you think a variable is? Write down their answers on the board. Clarify any discrepancies by asking students to test their definitions with what they know about the word problem. Define a variable as an unknown number. Ask students to provide an example of a variable in a real-life situation or word problem. Lesson Display the following problem on the board. Clara put 21 bottles of water in the refrigerator. She wanted to group them equally on three shelves. How many bottles of water are in each group? Ask a volunteer to pass out the manipulatives to each group. Tell students to work in their groups to find the missing number. Hint, the divisor is the missing number. What

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Division Detectives Math Unit is the divisor? Walk around the room to assess student progress and provide assistance. After each group has settled on an answer or up to two minutes have past discuss the word problem. Solicit volunteers to write the algorithm. Clarify any discrepancies. Ask one member of each group to explain the model. Display the next word problem on the board. Mike has 15 toy cars to wrap as presents. He wants to group them equally to give them to three friends. How many cars are in each group? Tell students to find the quotient and remainder. Allow students wanting a challenge to work the problem independently. Walk around the room to assess student progress and provide assistance. After no more than two minutes, solicit a volunteer to write the algorithm. Clarify any discrepancies. Ask volunteers to explain their models. Clarify any discrepancies. Show a model with chips and another with unifix cubes. Ask students to share the definition of remainders in their own words. Write them on the board. Allow students to copy the samples problems and definitions into their journals. Closure Summarize the main points of the lesson. Review the KWL chart. Make sure to explore the following questions. What is a variable? Where will we find variables in everyday life? What else did you learn about variables? Independent Practice Students will complete the worksheet that matches his or her level of math literacy. Differentiated Instruction As students work in groups, pull out four to five students and assess their comprehension and skills with two word problems. Use the information to develop a mini-lesson for re-teaching

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Division Detectives Math Unit with directing instruction. For special need students, use smaller numbers. For ELL students provide a graphic organizer with labeled pictures to learn vocabulary. For gifted students use larger dividends and more complex story problems. Notice each student will use manipulatives and graphic organizers. However, the expectations for how they use them will vary. Students will also take turns completing math practice online. Assessment The students independent work will serve as an assessment. The teacher will review the concepts again in a follow up lesson before providing a short quiz. This will allow the teacher to decide if more exploration is needed on the topic before the unit test. Practice Worksheet Name __________________________________________ Date ______________________ Find the missing number.
1. 5= 15 4. 3 = 3 7. 5 = 35 2. 2 = 16 5. 24 = 4 8. 28 = 7 3. 3 = 21 6. 4 = 20 9. 32 = 8

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Re-teaching Worksheet Name ______________________________________________ Date _____________________ Find the missing number.
15 16

Division Detectives Math Unit


1. 5= 15 2. 2 = 16 3. 3 = 3

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Challenge worksheet Name __________________________________________ Date ____________________ Find the missing number.
1. 5= 30 2 4. 3 = 3 7. 5 = 35 2. 2 = 32 2 5. 24 = 12 3 8. 28 = 7 3. 3 = 21 6. 4 = 20 9. 32 = 2 4

Write a word problem to find to match the number sentence. 10. 6 =54 11. 40 = 8 Variable Quiz Name __________________________________ Date ____________________________ Find the quotient. Draw a model to match the answer. 1. 24 2= Find the divisor. Draw a model to match the answer. 3. 45 = 9 4. 32 = 8 2. 30 5 =

Find the missing number. Write a number sentence to match the fact family.
24 18 14

Division Detectives Math Unit Unit Test Name ________________________________________ Date ___________________________ 1. Multiplication and division are __________ ____________ or opposites just as addition and subtraction are opposites. 2. In 15 3 = 5, the number 5 is the ___________, the number 3 is the, ___________ and the number 15 is the ___________. 3. When you spate something into equal parts you ______________. 4. How many groups of 4 are in 12 ? A. 4 B. 6 C. 2 D. 3

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5. Sam had 21 bananas. He put 3 bananas each picnic lunch. How many picnic lunches have bananas. A. 2 B. 5 C. 7 D. 4

6. Which division sentence matches the repeated subtraction? 24-4= 20, 20-4= 16, 16 -4= 12, 12-4 = 8, 8-4= 4, 4-4= 0 A. 24 3 = 8 B. 16 4 = 4 C. 24 4= 6 D. 12 3= 4 7. Which division sentence belongs with the multiplication facts? 9 4= 36 A. 36 2 = 13 4 9 = 36 B. 36 4 = 9 C. 36 3= 12 D. 36 6 = 6

Division Detectives Math Unit 10. Which division fact matches the array? 3 rows of 8 = 24 ******** ******** ******** A. 24 6= 4 B. 24 3= 8 C. 24 2 =12 D. 24 12=2

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11. Which number should replace the to make the number sentence true? 40 =5 A. 6 B. 5 C. 8 D. 10

12. Which number should replace the to make the number sentence true? 18 =6 A. 4 B. 3 C. 6 D. 5 Alternative Unit Test Name _____________________________________________ Date _______________ 1. Label the number sentence.
a. divisor

15 3 = 5
_______ _______ _______ 2. Write the inverse operation for each number sentence.

b. quotient c. dividend

Division Detectives Math Unit A. 15 3=5 _____________ 3. Divide the array into equal groups.
A. **** **** **** B. ***** ***** ***** *****

64 B. 2 6 = 12 _____________

4. Write a multiplication sentence for each fact family. A. 4,8,32 __________ B. 2,6,12 __________ C. 5,7,35 ___________

5. Write a division sentence for each fact family. A. 4,8,32 __________ B. 2,6,12 __________ C. 5,7,35 ___________

6. Draw an array to show how many groups of 4 are in 12. 7. Draw an array to find the missing number. A. 40 =5 =? B. 18 =6 =?_ Practice Worksheet Answer Key Name __________________________________________ Date ______________________ Find the missing number.
1. 3 5= 15 4. 9 3 = 3 7. 5 7= 35 2. 2 8= 16 5. 24 6 = 4 8. 28 3 = 7 3. 7 3 = 21 6. 4 5= 20 9. 32 4 = 8

Re-teaching Worksheet Answer Key

Division Detectives Math Unit Name ______________________________________________ Date _____________________ Find the missing number.
15 16 9

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5 1. 3 5= 15

5 2. 2 8= 16

8 3. 9 3 = 3

Challenge worksheet Answer Key Name __________________________________________ Date ____________________ Find the missing number.
1. 3 5= 30 2 4. 9 3 = 3 7. 5 7 = 35 2. 2 8= 32 2 5. 24 6 = 12 3 8. 28 4 = 7 3. 7 3 = 21 6. 4 5 = 20 9. 32 4 = 2 4

Write a word problem to find to match the number sentence. Word problems may vary 10. 6 =54 11. 40 = 8 Variable Quiz Answer Key Name __________________________________ Date ____________________________ Find the quotient. Draw a model to match the answer. Models may vary. 1. 24 2= 12 Find the divisor. Draw a model to match the answer. 3. 45 5 = 9 4. 32 4 = 8 2. 30 5 = 6

Division Detectives Math Unit Find the missing number. Write a number sentence to match the fact family. Sentences may vary.
24 18 14

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40

Unit Test Answer Key Name ________________________________________ Date ___________________________ 1. Multiplication and division are inverse operations or opposites just as addition and subtraction are opposites. 2. In 15 3 = 5, the number 5 is the quotient the number 3 is the, divisor and the number 15 is the dividend. 3. When you separate something into equal parts you divide. 4. How many groups of 4 are in 12 ? A. 4 B. 6 C. 2 D. 3

5. Sam had 21 bananas. He put 3 bananas each picnic lunch. How many picnic lunches have bananas. A. 2 B. 5 C. 7 D. 4

6. Which division sentence matches the repeated subtraction? 24-4= 20, 20-4= 16, 16 -4= 12, 12-4 = 8, 8-4= 4, 4-4= 0

Division Detectives Math Unit A. 24 3 = 8 B. 16 4 = 4 C. 24 4= 6 D. 12 3= 4 7. Which division sentence belongs with the multiplication facts? 9 4= 36 A. 36 2 = 13 4 9 = 36 B. 36 4 = 9 C. 36 3= 12 D. 36 6 = 6

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10. Which division fact matches the array? 3 rows of 8 = 24 ******** ******** ******** A. 24 6= 4 B. 24 3= 8 C. 24 2 =12 D. 24 12=2

11. Which number should replace the to make the number sentence true? 40 =5 A. 6 B. 5 C. 8 D. 10

12. Which number should replace the to make the number sentence true? 18 =6 A. 4 B. 3 C. 6 D. 5

Alternative Unit Test Answer Key Name _____________________________________________ Date _______________ 1. Label the number sentence.
a. divisor b. quotient c. dividend

Division Detectives Math Unit

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15 3 = 5
dividend divisor quotient 2. Write the inverse operation for each number sentence. A. 15 3=5 3 x 5 = 15 B. 2 6 = 12 12 2=6

3. Divide the array into equal groups. Groups may vary.


A. **** **** **** B. ***** ***** ***** *****

4. Write a multiplication sentence for each fact family. Sentences may vary. A. 4,8,32 __________ B. 2,6,12 __________ C. 5,7,35 ___________

5. Write a division sentence for each fact family. Sentences may vary. A. 4,8,32 __________ B. 2,6,12 __________ C. 5,7,35 ___________

6. Draw an array to show how many groups of 4 are in 12. Array may vary 7. Draw an array to find the missing number. A. 40 =5 =8 B. 18 =6 =3

KWL Chart

Division Detectives Math Unit


What We Know What We Wonder What We Learned

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Vocabulary Chart
Word Dividend Divisor Quotient Inverse operation relationship Definition The number being divided in a division problem The number used to divide the dividend. The result of division. Opposite Connection to something or someone An unknown number Visual Example 324=8 324=8 324=8 The relationship between multiplication and division is they are opposites. Your own words

variable

Annotated Bibliography Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) The most recent standards were retrieved from this booklet. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website. Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example.

Division Detectives Math Unit References Burns, M. (1997). Spaghetti and meatballs for all!. New York, NY: Scholastic Press The Concord Consortium (2011). BA: Balanced assessment task e007: Multiplication rings. Retrieved from http://balancedassessment.concord.org/e007.html Eather, J. (2011). A math dictionary for kids 2011 by Jenny Eather. Retrieved from http://www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com/dictionary.html Giganti, P. Jr. (1992). Each orange had 8 slices: A counting book. New York, NY: Mulberry Books. Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) IXL Learning (2011). IXL division word problems facts to 10 3rd grade math practice. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/division-word-problems-facts-to-10 Leffingwell, R. (2006). Sharing and dividing. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library. Leslie, T. (2005). Divide it up!. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. Pinczes, E. J. (1993). One hundred hungry Ants. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin. University of Phoenix (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website. Organization of the lesson is modeled after this example. Utah State University (2010). Rectangle division: NLVM. Retrieved from

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Division Detectives Math Unit

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Gwinnett County Public Schools (2011). Academic Knowledge and Skills. Retrieved from http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcpsmainweb01.nsf/pages/AcademicKnowledgeandSkills(AKS) IXL Learning (2011). IXL division word problems facts to 10 3rd grade math practice. Retrieved from http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/division-word-problems-facts-to-10 Pinczes, E. J. (1993). One hundred hungry Ants. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin. University of Phoenix. (2011). Unit plan example. Retrieved from University of Phoenix, EED/415 Elementary Methods: Mathematics website.