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Spring 2014

Immersion I Lesson Plan Format Field Study Teacher: Jule Peterson School: Park Elementary Grade Level: 2nd Number of Students in Class: 18 Unit: Writing Lesson Duration: 1 hour 10 minutes Day, Date, and Time of Lesson: 3/14 @ 8:009:10 AM 1. Objective(s): After a lesson on what peace is, students will be able to demonstrate empowerment and the skills to act, with others or alone, against hateful actions.

2. Colorado Academic Standards: Content area: Social Studies Standard: 4. Civics Concepts and skills students master: 2. People use multiple ways to resolve conflicts or differences evidence outcomes: a. Give examples of ways that individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote equality, justice, and responsibility.

3. Learning Target(s): I can act, with others or alone, to promote equality.

4. Assessment: Students will write about what peace means to them in four sentences or more. They will also include how they could promote peace in their school, classroom, or community.

5. Materials: The book, Peace Begins with You, 18 dove templates, 18 sheets of writing paper.

6. Introduction/Anticipatory Set: Teacher will begin lesson by showing students the World Population at http://www.eahdfoundation.org/world_live_clock.php Explain to students what population is first. Population is a word we use to talk about all the people from one area, for example, Durangos population is about nineteen thousand. This counter (show link) is showing the population of the entire world over seven billion people! Briefly talk with students about how big the number is and how that is a lot of people trying to work together. Transition to, In our classroom, there are a lot of problems between friends. Can you

Spring 2014

imagine how many problems would happen with seven billion people if everyone treated each other poorly? Allow students to make any comments. Teacher will then ask about students schema and the background knowledge they have about peace. After a 2 minutes discussion, tell students to move to the library where we will sit and read a book.

7. Essential Questions or Big Picture Statement: How can we create an environment that does not tolerate hateful actions? 8. ****Step-by-Step Lesson Process:**** 1. Teacher will begin with anticipatory set. 3 minutes 2. Class will transition from desks to the library, where teacher will preface reading with the question, What does peace mean? Allow time for students to think and answer. 2 minutes. 3. Teacher will begin to read, Peace Begins with You. 15- 20 minutes 4. Direct instruction: After reading the book, ask students again, So what does peace mean? Allow time for students to think and answer. Next, ask, How can we be peaceful to our friends? (allow think time) Strangers? (allow think time) People who are from a different place? In our community of Durango? (allow think time). 10 minutes 5. After all students have responded to how we can be peaceful to each other, reiterate that we can be peaceful to each other by respecting each others differences. We can also be peaceful by standing up for something that does not look very nice. Sometimes conflict occurs, and it is our job to create peace by standing up to unfairness or meanness. 1 minute 6. Next, teacher explains to students that we are going to create peace doves. Pull one dove out and Model what the assignment will look like. Write on dove a method for creating peace, example: Do not make fun of someone for looking different than me. Students will create their own peace idea and they can color the dove after they have written something. Check for understanding by asking for a thumbs up or down if everyone understands the instructions. 5 minutes 7. Students will then move back to desks and begin independent practice by creating their own peace doves. Students who have trouble writing will receive a peace dove that has a template-- I can create peace in ___(place)__ by ___(insert one or two words)___. This template will provide differentiation for students who need more support for thinking or writing. (Teacher will walk around and assess students comprehension of the content, and help clarify any questions individual students haveformative assessment). 15 minutes 8. Once peace doves are finished, tape to the window. Allow students to look at each others. 2 minutes 9. For closure, ask students to write about what peace means to them in four sentences

Spring 2014

or more on writing paper. They will also include how they could promote peace in their school, classroom, or communitythis is also the assessment piece. 8 minutes (or remaining time)

Dove Template: http://www.first-school.ws/t/cp_animals/dove_1.html

Spring 2014

Anti-Bias Lesson Evaluation a) What worked well? The anti-bias lesson that I taught showed me areas of strength and areas of improvement. As far as strengths, I thought this lesson was interesting for students and they were engaged in each part of the lesson. More specifically, the book I chose to read seemed to be really appropriate for this class. They raised their hand often to make connections to the book, ask a question, or answer a question the book posed. It was really neat to see that they were so interested in understanding what peace and conflict really is. When we transitioned to making the peace doves, the whole class participated, even those students who rarely enjoyed writing anything. That was a really pivotal moment for me because I was able to grab the attention and curiosity of students who rarely participated in activities, such as this one. All of the students had really great ideas that they wrote on their peace doves. Additionally, while they were working, it was quiet and everyone was working diligently. This was reassuring for me because I was worried this activity would cause a lot of talking, but all the students were so interested in writing something about peace on their dove, that no one was talking to each other. b) What did not work well? The main part of my lesson that did not go as planned was the timing. I thought that I would be given about an hour to do this lesson; however, it turned out to be only 35 minutes. I cut out the anticipatory set of showing the world clock because I thought it was more crucial to talk about what they know about peace and their schema before reading the book. I was glad I made this choice, because we had such a short amount of time to do the actual activity.

Spring 2014

Reading the book also took a lot longer than I imagined because students were conversing with me about the book and asking questions. I did not want to tell them to not make any more connections because the things they were saying were so relevant and great discussions. I was glad that the reading took longer because the children were so engaged. However, this did mean that I had to cut out certain parts of my lesson, such as shortening my explanations, less time for the peace doves, and completely omitting the closure part. I was really hoping we could get to the closure because then they could write a lot more sentences and reflect on what peace means to them. However, I was happy all the students were able to finish writing and coloring their doves, at least. c) How well students met Anti-Bias Ed objectives My essential question for this lesson was, how can we create an environment that does not tolerate hateful actions? I thought students answered this question really well. Many students made a connection while reading the book that their grandparent went to war to stop conflict. They also wrote on their peace dove ways that they have stopped hateful actions, such as, sticking up for someone or putting a stop to a fight. As far as the anti-bias objective to demonstrate empowerment and the skills to act against hateful actions, students seemed to meet this objective. I thought their responses to my questions, such as, How do we create peace in our school? or What are some ways we resolve conflict? showed their understanding of the objective. By the end of the lesson, most students understood what peace is, how to resolve conflict, and ways to act against hateful actions. This assessment comes from the observations I was making during the reading, their responses, and what they wrote on their peace doves. If the students had been given enough time to do the closure part, I would

Spring 2014

have had a better idea of who actually understood the concepts and who may have been struggling. d) How well you executed culturally responsive pedagogy During the discussions we had, I was very aware of what I was saying to avoid any pitfalls or bias comments. The book, Peace Begins with You was very culturally responsive because included many different cultures in the book and talked about different types of people and how we all have our own problems and points of view. I believe one of the best discussions we had was about different cultures. Students saw a picture of this old woman wearing a hijab, and they asked where she was from and why she was wearing it. Some students chimed in and said she is from India, and I corrected them and I said she could be from any country, just because she dresses a certain way does not mean she is from a particular country, it just means she has a different culture. Students then asked what culture meant, and we discussed what it is and how we all come from different cultures. Soon, students put it together on their own that we have a lot of disagreements (conflict) because we come from different cultures and do not always get along. Overall, I feel that I could have executed culturally responsive pedagogy a little better because I caught myself saying things that could exclude students. For example, I asked if there is conflict at home with mom and dad or sisters and brothers. After I said it, I realized that some students may have felt left out from that question. Thankfully, I know these students and that they all have a mom and dad, but that question was one that I would normally be wary of asking. e) How would you change the lesson in the future?

Spring 2014

If I had more time, I would do the entire lesson without rushing through it. The time management definitely affected the way I wanted the lesson to go, nonetheless, it was still a productive lesson. I would also add more time for discussion. I underestimated all the connections and observations that students would make about this topic, and I think in the future I would set aside much more time for me to converse with students about how we create peace and resolve conflict.