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Kirsten Nold Lesson Plan Day 1 Grade Level: 4th Length of Instruction: about 30 minutes Standard(s) Addressed (Common Core) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1 -- Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.A -- Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.B Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. Content Objectives Language Objectives Number of Students: 23 Instructional Location: PBL Eastlawn School

-Students will be able to establish a definition of the word After this lesson, the students will be able to correctly use the persuasion after reading a persuasive mentor text that is word persuasion in reference to writing and reading. similar to a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something. -Students will be able to identify instances of persuasion within a mentor text after the teacher reads the mentor text aloud. Mentor Texts: Strategy Focus: The strategy focus for this first lesson is determining a definition

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Title: I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff and David Catrow (This will be a read-aloud) Genre: Persuasive Title: The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Earrings! By Judith Viorst (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Materials: -mentor texts listed above -document camera/projector/teacher computer -lined paper for each student -chart paper for anchor chart (teacher use)

of the word persuasion, and identifying examples of persuasion and persuasive techniques in a mentor text.

Vocabulary: *I have included extra words in this list because I know that my students have little experience with writing and the writing process. -Audience: the person to whom the author is writing -Authors purpose: the authors reason for writing (in this case, persuasion) -Brainstorm: to think about and compile a list of ideas that relate to a topic -Concluding sentence: a sentence that finishes/closes the writing -Conference: a meeting between the teacher and student to discuss the students writing -Main idea: the big idea, topic, or message about what the author is writing

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-Peer editing: this occurs when a peer reads and offers feedback on the authors writing -Persuasion: a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something -Point of view: the perspective from which the author is writing -Revise: when the author re-reads, makes corrections, and improves his/her writing -Rubric: a chart that explains how the teacher will evaluate and grade the authors writing -Supporting details: examples that explain or strengthen the main idea Add any relevant information that is essential to understanding the context of your lesson: The students in my class do not do much writing at all. As a result, I am writing this lesson with the understanding that the students have little experience with formal writing, and that they will need a lot of guidance throughout the unit. Prerequisite Skills: The school where I am student teaching does not have a writing curriculum, and the students in my class do not write on a regular basis. Consequently, I do not expect them to have significant knowledge of the writing process or persuasive writing. However, if the students previous teachers have implemented the Common Core Standards appropriately, then these students should have had introductory experience with persuasive writing last year in third grade. Prerequisite skills that would be helpful (but not required) for a teacher implementing this unit are knowledge of the writing process, grammatical knowledge and skills, and basic knowledge of persuasive writing. Enduring Understandings (Big Idea): -The purpose of persuasive writing is to convince the reader to believe or act in a certain way, and effective persuasive writers incorporate and link fact and opinion. -Graphic organizers can help writers organize their thoughts before they begin writing. -The writing process is an effective way for writers to construct and develop their texts.

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Essential Questions: -What is persuasive writing? -How can the writer persuade the reader? -How can writers effectively organize a persuasive argument? MINILESSON Setting the Purpose: Persuasion is a fourth-grade writing topic that is addressed in the Common Core Standards. The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the students to the topic of persuasive writing, and to help them identify instances of persuasion in writing. The students will come up with a definition of the word persuasion after reading the book I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orlaff and David Catrow. For this first lesson, the teacher will not specifically set a purpose related to persuasive writing, because the students will be searching for instances of persuasion in a mentor text after identifying that text as persuasive. Consequently, the teacher should not allude to the fact that this lesson is about persuasive writing until after the students have identified this concept on their own. However, the teacher can tell the students that reading books is a great way to analyze different genres of writing. The teacher can also say that for this lesson we will be reading a genre-specific book and examining it closely in order to find strategies for writing that genre. The overall purpose of this lesson is for the students to determine a definition for the word persuasion and to gain an understanding of persuasive writing. Introduce and explain: The teacher can tell the students that this lesson is an introduction to a specific genre, and that they will be determining what that genre is by reading the book I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orlaff and David Catrow. At this point in time, the teacher should not reveal too much information about the topic of the lesson, because a key part of the lesson involves the students identifying the mentor texts genre. Tell the students that we will be reading the book I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orlaff and David Catrow. After we have read the book, we will identify the genre of the book, and find evidence of that genre in the book. Tell the students that this kind of examination of a genre-specific book can help us become better writers. Books are professional works by professional writers who are experts in that genre. Examining their work will help us improve our own writing by applying some of the same strategies and techniques that they used.

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Strategy Teaching: The strategy that the students will focus on for this lesson is identifying persuasion in writing. In order to introduce and practice this strategy with the students, the teacher will read the book I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orlaff and David Catrow. After reading the book with the students, the teacher will help the students identify the genre (persuasive) of the book. MINILESSON (explicit instruction, modeling, reading mentor texts, applying to writing): The teacher will say, As we just talked about, we can read books and look at them closely to help us become better writers. Today, we are going to be reading a book called I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orlaff and David Catrow. Together, we are going to read the book and use it to help us become better writers. The teacher will now read the book aloud to the students without alluding to the genre while reading (reading mentor texts). After the teacher has read the book aloud, she will ask, What was Alex trying to do all throughout this story? Have the students think for a minute to themselves, and then have them talk with a neighbor about what they think Alex was trying to do. Finally, have the students share their ideas with the whole class. Make sure the students recognize that Alex was trying to convince his mom to let him have an iguana. Then, tell the students that convincing someone to do something is called persuasion (explicit instruction). Tell the students that we will be learning about, practicing, and writing with persuasion during this unit. Say, before we move on with the lesson, lets decide on a definition of the word persuasion. Let the students lead this discussion, and help guide them toward a definition of persuasion that is similar to a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something. Active Engagement: Whole group: Then say, Now that we have decided that this book is persuasive and written a definition for persuasion, lets look back in the book and find evidence that Alex was trying to persuade his mom. Re-read the first letter that Alex wrote to his mom, and say, In this letter, Alex tries to convince his mom to let him have the iguana by connecting with her emotionshe wants her to feel that if she doesnt let him have the iguana, it will be eaten by Lurchs dog. He uses phrases like, You dont want that to happen, do you? (modeling) Read the next letter and use the same process. Persuasive words to emphasize from the second letter are: quiet, cute, adorable, really Small group: Say, Now I am going to read the next two letters that Alex wrote to his mom. When I finish reading, I want you to talk in your groups about what strategies Alex used to convince his mom to let him have the iguana in these letters. Have the groups share the evidence of persuasion that they found in these letters. Persuasive words to emphasize from these letters: never, small, zillion, 15 years, smart, mature

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Partners: Say, I am going to read the next two letters. When I finish reading, I want you to talk with a partner about what strategies Alex used to convince his mom to let him have the iguana in these letters. Have the partners share the evidence of persuasion that they found in these letters. Persuasive words to emphasize from these letters: now, brother, lonely, always Independently: Say, I am going to read the last four letters. When I finish reading, I want you to think to yourself about what strategies Alex used to convince his mom to let him have the iguana in these letters. Have a few students share the evidence of persuasion that they found in these letters. Persuasive words to emphasize from these letters: baby, fun, knew, never, learned, every day, sure, responsible, really, listen, wizard Link to Independent Writing Say, Now that we have gone back through the book and found evidence that Alex was trying to persuade his mom and identified strategies that Alex used to persuade his mom, I want you to think about how to effectively persuade someone. What are some strategies you could use when you are trying to persuade someone of something? Make a list with the students of strategies or techniques that they can use to make their persuasive writing stronger. Include things like appealing to the readers emotions, using facts/data, referencing experts, trying to make the reader trust you, reflecting a sense of urgency, etc. Tell the students that this list will be very useful for them as we continue through this unit. Introduce the assignment of this unit to the students. Tell them that they will need to write a letter to Mrs. Francisco (my cooperating teacher), the school principal, or myself about a school or classroom rule that they want to be changed or added. (applying to writing) INDEPENDENT WRITING During independent writing today, the students will be brainstorming rules that they could write about for this assignment. They will have some time to brainstorm independently and in their groups. The teacher will walk around the room at this time listening in on the groups conversations and seeing what the students are brainstorming. The teacher will offer guidance and/or assistance at this time whenever necessary. SHARING TIME The students will share their list of rules from the brainstorming session. First the students will share only in their groups, and then students who want to can share with the whole class.

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TEACHER-STUDENT CONFERENCES There will be no formal conferences on this day. The teacher will observe the students in the initial phases of the writing process by observing their lists of rules and listening to their group conversations. The teacher should take notes on what she observes at this time. Assessment(s): -The teacher will informally assess the students participation in the lesson today, and also their productivity during the brainstorming session. The teacher will look for a solid list of rules that the students developed during the brainstorming session, and active participation during class discussions. In addition, the students will fill out an exit slip at the end of the lesson answering the question, What does it mean to persuade? The students responses will give the teacher a clear idea of whether or not the students grasped the meaning of persuasion from this first lesson. How might you extend this lesson? I could extend this lesson by reading another persuasive book with the students and completing the process of identifying persuasive elements again. Discuss how you differentiated instruction for your learners during this lesson? I would differentiate this unit for low-achieving students by o Giving the student a copy of the book I Wanna Iguana to follow along with as I read it aloud o Providing him/her with notes about persuasive writing to follow along with as the class determines a definition and makes an anchor chart for persuasive writing o Provide the student with more guidance during the brainstorming session I would differentiate this unit for high-achieving students by o Providing the student with less guidance and more constructive advice during conferences

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Brief Reflection Notes: What went well: The students really enjoyed the mentor text that I read with them. They were very engaged in this read aloud, and it effectively captured their interest in the lesson. The mentor text successfully helped the students gain an understanding of persuasive writing. They were able to establish a definition of the word persuasion after a short discussion about the book. Additionally, the students were able to identify instances of persuasion within the mentor text. The small group portion of the lesson where the students identified examples of persuasion from the mentor text worked really well. The students appreciated the opportunity to discuss the book with their classmates, and these conversations definitely helped the students acquire a more clear understanding of persuasion. What did not go well: A few of the students did not exit the lesson with an understanding of persuasion. I administered an exit slip in which the students wrote the definition of persuasion in their own words, and some students definitions were incorrect. Re-reading letters throughout the lesson to help the students identify examples of persuasion became a bit monotonous and repetitive. Linking the lesson to independent writing and getting the students to identify specific strategies for persuasion was a challenge. The students struggled to come up with concrete persuasive techniques without a lot of teacher guidance and support. ! Kirsten Nold Lesson Plan Day 2 Grade Level: 4th Number of Students: 23 Instructional Location: PBL Eastlawn School

Length of Instruction: about 30 minutes Standard(s) Addressed (Common Core) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1 -- Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.A -- Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which

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related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.B Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. Content Objectives -Students will be able to provide appropriate and relevant feedback to their peers on their ideas and rough drafts of their persuasive letters. -Students will be able to use the writing process to develop a persuasive argument into a final, published letter. -Students will be able to develop a list of arguments that relate to the rule they have chosen. -Students will be able to complete a graphic organizer for their rule and arguments. Mentor Texts: Title: I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff and David Catrow (This will be a read-aloud) Genre: Persuasive Title: The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Earrings! By Judith Viorst (This will be provided to the Language Objectives -Students will be able to use appropriate persuasive language during peer editing sessions, including words like persuasion, audience, and supporting details. -Students will be able to correctly use the word argument with regards to persuasive writing.

Strategy Focus: The strategy that the students will focus on for this lesson is building a strong persuasive argument. The students will reexamine the mentor text from the previous lesson (I Wanna Iguana) and identify the most convincing arguments that the character used in the book.

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students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Materials: -mentor texts listed above -document camera/projector/teacher computer -lined paper for each student -chart paper for anchor chart (teacher use) -graphic organizer handout for each student (found here) -peer editing evaluation sheet for each student (found here) -writers revision checklist (found here) *Source of the graphic organizer, peer editing evaluation sheet, and writers revision checklist: Tompkins, G. E. (2012). Teaching Writing: Balancing Process and Product. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Vocabulary: *I have included extra words in this list because I know that my students have little experience with writing and the writing process. -Audience: the person to whom the author is writing -Authors purpose: the authors reason for writing (in this case, persuasion) -Brainstorm: to think about and compile a list of ideas that relate to a topic -Concluding sentence: a sentence that finishes/closes the writing -Conference: a meeting between the teacher and student to discuss the students writing -Main idea: the big idea, topic, or message about what the author is writing -Peer editing: this occurs when a peer reads and offers feedback on the authors writing -Persuasion: a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something -Point of view: the perspective from which the author is writing -Revise: when the author re-reads, makes corrections, and improves his/her writing -Rubric: a chart that explains how the teacher will evaluate and grade the authors writing

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-Supporting details: examples that explain or strengthen the main idea Prerequisite Skills: The first lesson in this unit introduced the topic of persuasive writing to the students through the use of a mentor text. The students developed a definition of the word persuasion (a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something) and identified instances of persuasion in a mentor text. All of this knowledge will be essential for this second lesson. Enduring Understandings (Big Idea): -The purpose of persuasive writing is to convince the reader to believe or act in a certain way, and effective persuasive writers incorporate and link fact and opinion. -Graphic organizers can help writers organize their thoughts before they begin writing. -The writing process is an effective way for writers to construct and develop their texts. Essential Questions: -How can the writer persuade the reader? -How can writers effectively organize a persuasive argument? -How can writers utilize graphic organizers to improve their writing? -How does the writing process help writers organize their ideas and develop their text? MINILESSON Setting the Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to help the students understand how to develop evidence/examples/facts to support their opinion while writing a persuasive text. The students will (with guidance from the teacher) compile a list of the characters persuasive arguments in the book I Wanna Iguana, which is the same mentor text that was used in the first lesson of this unit. The teacher will tell the students that todays lesson is a continuation of yesterdays lesson, and that today we will be focusing on creating a strong persuasive argument. This is an important lesson, because if the students cannot develop strong arguments, then their letters will not be very convincing.

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Connect to prior learning: Remind the students that in the first lesson, they decided that persuasion means a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something. They also found examples of persuasion in the book I Wanna Iguana. Review some of the examples of persuasion that the students identified yesterday. Introduce and explain: Tell the students, Writers use facts/examples/evidence and their own opinions to develop a strong persuasive text. Today, we are going to look back at I Wanna Iguana to find Alexs arguments, and determine whether he used facts, examples, evidence, or his own opinions to persuade his mother. We will decide which of his arguments were the strongest, and we will decide why they were stronger. This exercise will help us develop our own arguments for our persuasive letters. Make sure the students understand that this lesson is very important, because it will help them write letters that are convincing. The more convincing their letters are, the more likely it is that their rule will be changed or added. Strategy Teaching: The strategy that the students will focus on for this lesson is building a strong persuasive argument. The students will re-examine the mentor text from the previous lesson (I Wanna Iguana) and identify the most convincing arguments that the character used in the book. MINILESSON (explicit instruction, modeling, reading mentor texts, applying to writing): The teacher will say, We have just reviewed what we learned yesterday, and we talked about the idea that persuasive writing that is effective involves having a strong argument. Lets look back at I Wanna Iguana and find each of Alexs arguments. (reading mentor texts). The teacher will lead the students through the first letter, identifying Alexs argument (modeling). The teacher will say, Before we begin, what is the overall argument of this book? (Alexs mom should let him have Mikey Gulligans baby iguana). Then, the teacher will say, In Alexs first letter, his argument is that the iguana will be eaten by Stinkys dog if his mom does not allow Alex to take in the iguana. The teacher will create a list of the arguments either on chart paper or on the whiteboard, and she will add this first argument to the list. Active Engagement: Whole group: The teacher will say, Lets look at the second letter. What is Alexs argument in this letter? As a class, the students will decide that

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Alexs argument in the second letter is that iguanas are cuter than hamsters. The teacher will add this argument to the list on the chart paper/white board. Small group: The teacher will say, In your groups, decide what is Alexs argument in the third letter. Give the students some time to discuss in their groups, and then have the groups share with the class. The argument should be, Alexs argument is that his mom will never have to see the iguana. The teacher will add this argument to the list on the chart paper/white board. Repeat this process with the fourth letter. The argument is that it takes 15 years for an iguana to grow to over six feet long. Repeat this process again with the fifth letter. The argument is that Alex needs a new friend, and the iguana could be that friend. Partners: The teacher will say, With a partner, decide what Alexs argument is in the sixth letter. Give the students some time to discuss with their partners, and then have the partners share with the class. The argument should be, Alex argued that he could teach the iguana tricks, and he cant teach his little brother tricks. Repeat this process with the seventh letter. The argument is that Alex learned his lesson with the last pet that he had, and he wont let anything bad happen with the iguana. Independently: The teacher will say, By yourself, decide what Alexs argument is in the eighth letter. Give the students some time to think independently, and then have a few students share with the class. The argument should be, He would be responsible and take care of the iguana. Repeat this process with the last letter. The argument should be that Alex will pay for the iguanas food and keep his cage clean. Link to Independent Writing Say, Now that we have identified each of Alexs arguments, lets go through the list and decide which arguments were the strongest. In your groups, talk about and decide which three arguments were the strongest, and make sure you are thinking about why they are the strongest. Allow the students some time to talk in their groups about the arguments, and make sure to circulate around the groups and listen in on their conversations. After a few minutes, bring the class back together and have a few groups share which arguments they think are the strongest and why. Once the students have shared their thoughts, let them know what your thoughts are as the teacher. Tell the students that the three strongest arguments, in your opinion, are the iguana will be eaten by Lurchs dog if his mom does not allow Alex to take in the iguana, it takes 15 years for an iguana to grow to over six feet long, and Alex learned his lesson

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with the last pet that he had, and he wont let anything bad happen with the iguana. Tell the students that the first argument is strong because it makes this decision seem very important, and even a matter of life and deathif Alex gets to keep the iguana, it will live; if Lurch gets to keep the iguana, it will die. Tell the students that the second argument is strong because Alex is stating what he believes to be a fact. The third argument is strong because Alex knows he is writing this letter to his mom, and that she does not want him to have the iguana because of their experience the last time he had a pet. This last argument is very important Alex considered the audience of his letter when he was writing. He knew that he was writing the letter to his mom, and this definitely affected the way he wrote it and the arguments he included. Say, When we write persuasive texts we have to carefully consider who will be reading the text, and this is part of building a strong argument. You may have a very strong argument for your persuasive letter, but if you write it thinking that one of your classmates is going to read it instead of Mrs. Francisco, Mr. Wright, or myself it will not be very strong. Why is that? (Lead students to thinking that your arguments will vary depending on your audience. If you want a friend to do something, you will write as if you are writing to a friend. If you want a teacher or principal to do something, then you need to write it with that person in mind. This understanding is likely to affect your arguments). (apply to writing) Say, So, we have just identified each of Alexs arguments, and we chose the three best arguments. Today, you are going to make a list of arguments for why your rule should be added or changed for your own letter. At the end of class today, you will need to decide which three arguments are the strongest to use in your final letter. Remember how we decided which of Alexs arguments were the strongest when you examine your own arguments. INDEPENDENT WRITING During independent practice today, the students will begin creating a list of arguments for the rule that they have chosen to write about. At the end of class, the students will narrow down their list to the three strongest arguments. For homework, the students will fill out the graphic organizer for their letter using the three arguments they chose. At this time, the teacher will be going to each group and talking with the students about their lists/arguments. The teacher will help any student who seems stuck or needs assistance. SHARING TIME At the end of class, the students will share their rule and their three arguments with a partner. The focus of sharing today is to make sure that the three arguments are strong. The students will critically evaluate their partners arguments and offer advice or ideas if they believe the arguments could be improved. The teacher will emphasize that the students must be respectful during this sharing time, and that if anyone makes inappropriate comments they will no longer be permitted to share or receive a partners feedback for the rest of the unit.

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TEACHER-STUDENT CONFERENCES There will be no formal conferences on this day. The teacher will observe the students in the initial phases of the writing process by observing their lists of arguments and listening to their group conversations. The teacher should take notes on what she observes at this time. Assessment(s): -Formative, Summative, and Self-Assessment The teacher will informally assess the students participation in the lesson today, and also their productivity during the independent writing time. The teacher will look for a solid list of arguments that the students developed, and active participation during class discussions. In addition, for homework the students will fill out a graphic organizer including the rule they have chosen and their three arguments. This graphic organizer will be submitted at the end of the unit with the students final letters, and the teacher will be able to assess how effectively the students used the writing process to construct their letters. Overall, the teacher should be looking for an understanding of how to develop clear, relevant arguments to support ones opinion. How might you extend this lesson? I could extend this lesson by having the whole class together create a list of arguments for a rule. Discuss how you differentiated instruction for your learners during this lesson? I would differentiate this unit for low-achieving students by o Giving the student a copy of the book I Wanna Iguana to follow along with as I read it aloud o Providing him/her with notes about persuasive writing to follow along with as the class determines a definition and makes an anchor chart for persuasive writing o Provide the student with more guidance during the brainstorming session I would differentiate this unit for high-achieving students by o Providing the student with less guidance and more constructive advice during conferences Brief Reflection Notes: What went well:

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The students were able to remember yesterdays lesson and the definition that they established for persuasion. After modeling and explicit instruction, the students began to understand what it takes to construct a successful persuasive argument. The students were able to identify the characters arguments from the mentor text. The students were still engaged in the mentor text, and they participated successfully in the lesson.

What did not go well: The students struggled to choose the characters most effective arguments from the mentor text without a lot of teacher guidance and support. Many of the students did not successfully apply what they learned in the lessons without explicit guidance from the teacher. Some students did not understand the purpose of the graphic organizer. ! Kirsten Nold Lesson Plan Day 3 Grade Level: 4th Number of Students: 23 Instructional Location: PBL Eastlawn School

Length of Instruction: about 30 minutes Standard(s) Addressed (Common Core) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1 -- Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.A -- Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.B Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.D

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Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. Content Objectives -Students will be able to provide appropriate and relevant feedback to their peers on their ideas and rough drafts of their persuasive letters. -Students will be able to use the writing process to develop a persuasive argument into a final, published letter. -Students will be able to identify effective persuasive elements of a mentor text. -Students will be able to develop a clear rule (topic) and three strong arguments. Mentor Texts: Title: I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff and David Catrow (This will be a read-aloud) Genre: Persuasive Title: The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Earrings! By Judith Viorst (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Language Objectives -Students will be able to use appropriate persuasive language during peer editing sessions, including words like persuasion, audience, and supporting details. -Students will be able to correctly use the term conclusion with regards to persuasive writing.

Strategy Focus: The strategy that this lesson will focus on is structuring and developing the final persuasive letter, and determining what makes a persuasive letter effective.

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Materials: -mentor texts listed above -document camera/projector/teacher computer -lined paper for each student -chart paper for anchor chart (teacher use) -iPads with internet access (4 total) -graphic organizer handout for each student (found here) -peer editing evaluation sheet for each student (found here) -writers revision checklist (found here) *Source of the graphic organizer, peer editing evaluation sheet, and writers revision checklist: Tompkins, G. E. (2012). Teaching Writing: Balancing Process and Product. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Vocabulary: *I have included extra words in this list because I know that my students have little experience with writing and the writing process. -Audience: the person to whom the author is writing -Authors purpose: the authors reason for writing (in this case, persuasion) -Brainstorm: to think about and compile a list of ideas that relate to a topic -Concluding sentence: a sentence that finishes/closes the writing -Conference: a meeting between the teacher and student to discuss the students writing -Main idea: the big idea, topic, or message about what the author is writing -Peer editing: this occurs when a peer reads and offers feedback on the authors writing -Persuasion: a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something -Point of view: the perspective from which the author is writing -Revise: when the author re-reads, makes corrections, and improves his/her writing -Rubric: a chart that explains how the teacher will evaluate and grade the authors writing -Supporting details: examples that explain or strengthen the main idea

Prerequisite Skills:

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The first lesson in this unit introduced the topic of persuasive writing to the students through the use of a mentor text. The students developed a definition of the word persuasion (a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something) and identified instances of persuasion in a mentor text. During the second lesson, the students learned all about identifying persuasive arguments in the mentor text. They also gained an understanding of how to develop evidence/examples/facts to support their arguments. All of this knowledge will be essential for this third lesson. Enduring Understandings (Big Idea): -The purpose of persuasive writing is to convince the reader to believe or act in a certain way, and effective persuasive writers incorporate and link fact and opinion. -Graphic organizers can help writers organize their thoughts before they begin writing. -The writing process is an effective way for writers to construct and develop their texts. Essential Questions: -How can writers effectively organize a persuasive argument? -How can writers utilize graphic organizers to improve their writing? -How does the writing process help writers organize their ideas and develop their text? MINILESSON Setting the Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for the students to gain an understanding of what an effective persuasive letter that is formatted like their letters looks like. The teacher needs to write her own persuasive letter for the students to analyze during this lesson. The teacher will show the students her graphic organizer and final letter, and the students will identify elements of the letter that are effective and well written. As the students identify the effective aspects of the letter, the teacher will compile a list of the elements that the students identify. The teacher can then say, These are all the things you guys said that I did well in my letter, and these are all things I expect you guys to do in your letters too. We are going to use the ideas you guys came up with to write a rubric for me to use when I grade your letters. You can use the rubric when you are writing your letters to make sure that you are writing effective persuasive letters. This exercise will allow the students to see a final product of the assignment that fulfills the criteria presented in the rubric, and the

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students will also have the chance to provide their input in the rubric creation. Connect to prior learning: Briefly review with the students what they learned the two previous days of the unit. On the first day, the students learned what persuasion means, and defined it as a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something. On the second day, the students learned how to develop effective arguments for a persuasive text, and they began developing their own arguments for their letters. They learned that effective writers use facts/examples/evidence and their own opinions to develop a strong persuasive text. Today, the students are going to see what a successful final product of this assignment could look like. Introduce and explain: Tell the students, Today, we are going to look at the persuasive letter that I wrote for this assignment. We are going to analyze what I have written, and identify the effective elements of the letter. After we have decided what I did well, we are going to use that information to create a rubric that I will use to grade this assignment at the end of the unit. This exercise will help you see what a final product should look like, and it will give you all the opportunity to have a say in how your letters will be graded. Strategy Teaching: The strategy that this lesson will focus on is structuring and developing the final persuasive letter, and determining what makes a persuasive letter effective. MINILESSON (explicit instruction, modeling, reading mentor texts, applying to writing): The teacher will say, We have just reviewed what we learned the past two days in this unit, and now we are going to look at what a final copy of a letter for this assignment could look like. I have written my own persuasive letter to each of you. What we are going to do is read my letter and decide what makes it (or doesnt make it) an effective persuasive letter. The teacher will then pass out copies of her letter and graphic organizer to each student, and read the letter out loud to the students (reading mentor texts). After reading the letter aloud, the teacher will explain how she used her graphic organizer to write her letter. The teacher will say, If you look at my graphic organizer, I have my main argument (which is the rule I want to be added), and branched off of that I have three different arguments. In the last box, I have an idea for a conclusion sentence/paragraph. When I wrote my letter, I took all the same steps that you guys have taken so farI brainstormed a list of rules, compiled a list of arguments for a specific rule, chose three of those arguments, filled out this graphic organizer, and then I finally wrote my final letter. When I wrote my letter, I used the graphic organizer to guide meI introduced the rule in the first paragraph, discussed my three arguments in the second paragraph, and concluded my letter in the final paragraph (modeling).

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Active Engagement Small group: After reading and discussing the letter, the teacher will have the students discuss in their groups what is effective about the letter. The students will have 5 minutes to come up with ideas about what makes the letter successful. While the students are discussing the letter, the teacher will walk around the room listening in on the students conversations and taking notes on what the students are saying. After the students have had time to discuss the letter, the teacher will bring the class back together. Whole group: The teacher will say, We are going to compile a list of aspects of the letter that make it an effective persuasive letter. The teacher will then have students volunteer to share something that their group discussed, and the teacher will write everything that is said on the whiteboard/chart paper. After the class has compiled a list, the teacher will add anything to the list that the students did not address (the teacher should make sure that the students address the word choice in the letter I included several strong persuasive words that helped enhance the effectiveness of the letter) (explicit instruction). The teacher will then say, Now that you have read my letter and identified effective elements of my persuasive writing, we are going to use the list that we have created to design a *rubric that I will use to grade your letters. The teacher will allow the students to identify/brainstorm category titles for the rubric, but the teacher can/will modify the rubric at any time by adding a new category that the students did not address. The students will then decide (along with the teachers guidance and approval) how many points each category will be worth, and what they need to do to earn the points. Finally, once the rubric is complete, the class will return to the teachers letter and together assign it a grade. *I have pre-designed a tentative rubric (see below) that the teacher can use to help in the creation of the students rubric. The categories listed in the rubric below are categories that the teacher should emphasize during the rubric creation activity. However, the students input will be a significant factor in the creation of the final rubric.

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Link to Independent Writing Make sure that the students understand how they can use the rubric to help them write their own letters. Say, Now that you know what I am expecting to see in your final letter, you can use this information to help you while you are writing. Make sure to focus on the elements of your letter that are addressed in the rubric, and let me know if you have any questions about the rubric that we have designed. Not only is it important for you to use the rubric so that you will get a good grade on this assignment, but in our rubric we identified aspects of persuasive writing that make it effective. This means that if you follow the expectations in the rubric, you will

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have written an effective and successful persuasive letter. INDEPENDENT WRITING At this time, the students will begin writing their letters as they wait for a conference with the teacher. The students will be working independently, and the teacher will be conferencing with the students one at a time. SHARING TIME Sharing time during this lesson will involve peer editing. The teacher will match the students with a peer to engage in a peer editing session with. The students will need to fill out the peer-editing checklist for their classmates letter/graphic organizer (depending on how far the student has come in their assignment). TEACHER-STUDENT CONFERENCES I will hold conferences with each student during this lesson. I will ask them to explain their rule to me, and their three arguments for the rule. I will also ask them to share their graphic organizer with me, and explain how they have felt about the writing process so far. I will take notes on each conference regarding the students answers to my questions and their progress on the assignment so far. Assessment(s): -For this lesson, the students will be assessed according to their conferences with the teacher, peer-editing sessions, and through a selfassessment checklist. During the conference, the teacher will be looking for a clear rule (topic), three strong arguments, and that the students have successfully used the writing process to help them through this assignment (brainstorming, graphic organizer, rough drafts, revisions). The peer-editing and self-assessment checklists will help the teacher see how the students are evaluating each other and themselves. How might you extend this lesson? I could extend this lesson by having the students engage in more extensive peer editing sessions in which they peer-edit their classmates final rough draft. Discuss how you differentiated instruction for your learners during this lesson? I would differentiate this unit for low-achieving students by o Giving the student a copy of the book I Wanna Iguana to follow along with as I read it aloud

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o Providing him/her with notes about persuasive writing to follow along with as the class determines a definition and makes an anchor chart for persuasive writing o Supplying the student with additional graphic organizers that would help him/her identify his/her position, decide on his/her evidence, and sequence his/her ideas o Providing the student with an example of a persuasive letter in addition to the mentor text, and with a letter template in which he/she could write the letter o Providing more guidance and support during the conferences, and conference with the student more than once I would differentiate this unit for high-achieving students by o Providing the student with less guidance and more constructive advice during conferences o Encouraging them to write a more detailed introduction and conclusion instead of just once sentence o Encouraging them to refute potential counterarguments in their letter

Brief Reflection Notes: What went well: The students were able to recall their prior knowledge from the first two lessons of this unit. The students gained a more clear understanding of what their letters should look like by examining my example letter. The students were able to identify elements of my example letter that were effective. They even agreed that my letter was successful at persuading them to complete their homework! The students really enjoyed the process of modifying my original rubric. They were creative in their category titles, and they felt empowered by the opportunity to have a say in how they would be graded. What did not go well: We were not able to modify the rubric in its entirety because we ran out of time. The only aspect of the rubric that the students were able to provide their input on was the point value titles. We did not have time to assign a grade to my example letter, because we had to spend much more time discussing what a successful persuasive letter looks like that I anticipated. ! ! Kirsten Nold

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Lesson Plan Day 4 Grade Level: 4th Number of Students: 23 Instructional Location: PBL Eastlawn School

Length of Instruction: about 30 minutes Standard(s) Addressed (Common Core) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1 -- Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.A -- Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.B Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.C Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. Content Objectives -Students will be able to provide appropriate and relevant feedback to their peers on their ideas and rough drafts of their persuasive letters. -Students will be able to use the writing process to develop a persuasive argument into a final, published letter. -Students will be able to write a final letter that shows their awareness of the audience, includes strong arguments and three relevant details, utilizes persuasive transition words, and includes an introduction and conclusion. Language Objectives -Students will be able to use the term conclusion correctly with regards to persuasive writing. -Students will be able to discuss elements of a strong conclusive paragraph of a mentor text.

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Mentor Texts: Title: I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufman Orloff and David Catrow (This will be a read-aloud) Genre: Persuasive Title: The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Earrings! By Judith Viorst (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Title: Dont Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems (This will be provided to the students to read if they choose) Genre: Persuasive Materials: -mentor texts listed above -document camera/projector/teacher computer -lined paper for each student -chart paper for anchor chart (teacher use) -iPads with internet access (4 total) -graphic organizer handout for each student (found here) -peer editing evaluation sheet for each student (found here) -writers revision checklist (found here) *Source of the graphic organizer, peer editing evaluation sheet, and writers revision checklist: Tompkins, G. E. (2012).

Strategy Focus: The strategy that this lesson focuses on is writing a strong conclusion to a persuasive text. The students will re-examine the teachers persuasive letter and identify elements that make it a strong conclusion. The students will also discuss why it is important to write a strong conclusion sentence or paragraph in their persuasive letters.

Vocabulary: *I have included extra words in this list because I know that my students have little experience with writing and the writing process. -Audience: the person to whom the author is writing -Authors purpose: the authors reason for writing (in this case, persuasion) -Brainstorm: to think about and compile a list of ideas that relate to a topic -Concluding sentence: a sentence that finishes/closes the writing -Conference: a meeting between the teacher and student to discuss

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Teaching Writing: Balancing Process and Product. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

the students writing -Main idea: the big idea, topic, or message about what the author is writing -Peer editing: this occurs when a peer reads and offers feedback on the authors writing -Persuasion: a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something -Point of view: the perspective from which the author is writing -Revise: when the author re-reads, makes corrections, and improves his/her writing -Rubric: a chart that explains how the teacher will evaluate and grade the authors writing -Supporting details: examples that explain or strengthen the main idea

Prerequisite Skills: The first lesson in this unit introduced the topic of persuasive writing to the students through the use of a mentor text. The students developed a definition of the word persuasion (a kind of writing in which the author tries to convince the reader to believe or do something) and identified instances of persuasion in a mentor text. During the second lesson, the students learned all about identifying persuasive arguments in the mentor text. They also gained an understanding of how to develop evidence/examples/facts to support their arguments. During the third lesson, the students should have gained an understanding of what an effective persuasive letter that is formatted like their letters looks like. All of this knowledge will be important for this final lesson of the unit. Enduring Understandings (Big Idea): -The purpose of persuasive writing is to convince the reader to believe or act in a certain way, and effective persuasive writers incorporate and link fact and opinion. -Graphic organizers can help writers organize their thoughts before they begin writing. -The writing process is an effective way for writers to construct and develop their texts. Essential Questions:

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-How can writers effectively organize a persuasive argument? -How can writers utilize graphic organizers to improve their writing? -How does the writing process help writers organize their ideas and develop their text? MINILESSON Setting the Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is to help the students understand how to write a conclusion sentence/paragraph for their persuasive letters. Conclusions are a very important part of persuasive writing because the reader could become disinterested or unconvinced if the conclusion does not successfully and completely end the letter. In this lesson, the students will re-examine the letter that the teacher wrote, and they will discuss why it is important to end persuasive letters in this way. Connect to prior learning: Tell the students, The past few days, we have spent a lot of time figuring out what it means to persuade, exploring how to develop effective persuasive arguments, and how to use graphic organizers to structure a persuasive letter. Today, we are going to focus on writing a conclusion sentence/paragraph for our letters. Introduce and explain: Tell the students, Effective writers end their texts with a strong conclusion sentence or paragraph. Today, we are going to re-examine the conclusion that I wrote in my letter. We are going to decide what makes it a good conclusion for my letter, and we will discuss why it is important to write a successful conclusion to our persuasive letters. Strategy Teaching: The strategy that this lesson focuses on is writing a strong conclusion to a persuasive text. The students will re-examine the teachers persuasive letter and identify elements that make it a strong conclusion. The students will also discuss why it is important to write a strong conclusion sentence or paragraph in their persuasive letters. MINILESSON (explicit instruction, modeling, reading mentor texts, applying to writing): The teacher will say, Today we are going to focus on writing strong conclusions to our persuasive letters. Lets look back at the conclusion that I wrote in my letter. The teacher will read the conclusion to her letter out loud to the students (reading mentor texts).

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Active Engagement: Whole group: After the teacher has read her conclusion aloud to the class, she will say, Now that we have read my conclusion, lets think about what makes it strong and a successful way to end my letter. The first thing I notice when I look at my conclusion is that I restated my opinion about the rule that I chose. Restating your opinion at the end of your letter reminds the reader what the purpose of your letter is, and it also makes sure that they havent forgotten your opinion. (modeling). Small group: The teacher will say, Now, in your groups, I want you to think about another reason why my conclusion successfully ends my letter. The teacher will give the groups some time to discuss the conclusion, and she will walk around the room listening to the students conversations and taking notes on what they say. After some time has passed, the teacher will bring the class back together for the groups to share what they discussed. The teacher will respond to each of the students ideas, confirming that they are indeed reasons why the conclusion is strong. Partners: Now that the students have discussed the conclusion in their small groups, they will discuss the conclusion again with a partner. The teacher will say, Now I want you to discuss my conclusion with a partner. You need to come up with a different reason why my conclusion is strong. Again, the teacher will listen in on the students conversations with their partners and take notes on what the students discuss. After sufficient time has passed (about 2 minutes), the teacher will bring the class back together. The teacher will ask for a few partners to share their thoughts, and the teacher will respond to each of the students ideas again confirming that the students are correct. Link to Independent Writing The teacher will say, Now that we have discussed why my conclusion was a successful way to end my persuasive letter, lets talk about why it is important for us to write conclusions for our letters. Does anyone have any ideas? The teacher will allow the students to offer their reasoning for why it is important to write a conclusion. If none of the students volunteer to speak, the teacher will say, If I had ended my letter with You better do what I say! would you be convinced and want to do what I was trying to convince you to do? Probably not! This kind of conclusion may offend the reader, and no conclusion may lead the reader to being confused or just not being convinced. You dont want to write a whole letter with strong arguments and then have the reader not be convinced because you didnt write a strong conclusion. If we look back to I Wanna Iguana, Alexs last letter said, I really really really wanna iguana, mom! He ended his stream of letters by reminding his mother how much he wanted an iguana. In my letter, I reminded you what my

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rule was and reviewed each of my arguments again. A strong conclusion should remind the reader what the letter is about and refer back to the arguments that were made throughout the letter. (explicit instruction). Each of us should make sure that we write strong conclusions for our letters, as good persuasive writers do. INDEPENDENT WRITING The students will use this time to revise their letters based on their peer feedback and self-assessment checklist, as well as the feedback they received from their conferences with the teacher. While the students are working, the teacher may be finishing up a few last conferences with students. If all of the conferences are finished, the teacher will walk around the room monitoring the students independent writing time and providing assistance when necessary. SHARING TIME The focus of sharing time today will involve the students conclusions. The students will share their conclusion with their small group. PUBLISHING For homework and to publish their final letters, the students will write a final copy of their letters, put them in an envelope, and address the envelop to the appropriate person. TEACHER-STUDENT CONFERENCES I will hold conferences with any students who I missed during the previous lesson, and/or any students who I feel need a second conference based on their progress through the writing process thus far. If I am conferencing with any students for a second time, I will ask them to update me on their progress since our last conference. I would ask to see their rough draft of their letter, and I would take notes on their progress since our last conference. Assessment(s): -The summative assessment for this unit is the students final persuasive letter that fulfills the requirements of the rubric that we designed as a class. How might you extend this lesson? -The students could share their final letter with the class/a peer. -The class could have a reflective discussion about the writing process and whether or not it helped them write their letters. -The students could write a follow-up letter to the recipient if they receive a response.

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Discuss how you differentiated instruction for your learners during this lesson? I would differentiate this unit for low-achieving students by o Giving the student a copy of the book I Wanna Iguana to follow along with as I read it aloud o Providing him/her with notes about persuasive writing to follow along with as the class determines a definition and makes an anchor chart for persuasive writing o Supplying the student with additional graphic organizers that would help him/her identify his/her position, decide on his/her evidence, and sequence his/her ideas o Providing the student with an example of a persuasive letter in addition to the mentor text, and with a letter template in which he/she could write the letter o Providing more guidance and support during the conferences, and conference with the student more than once I would differentiate this unit for high-achieving students by o Providing the student with less guidance and more constructive advice during conferences o Encouraging them to write a more detailed introduction and conclusion instead of just once sentence o Encouraging them to refute potential counterarguments in their letter Brief Reflection Notes: What went well: The students graphic organizers really helped them develop and structure their letters more effectively. My conferences with the students allowed them to ask questions about their writing, and they also helped me see what the students had learned. I was able to steer the students who were a bit confused back in the right direction. The students letters improved a lot between their rough drafts and their final copies. What did not go well: The students were slightly confused about the purpose of a conclusion. They struggled to understand why it was necessary to repeat your arguments at the end of the letter. We did not have time for the students to engage in any peer editing sessions, because the lesson about conclusions took longer than I anticipated. !