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Robin Esch Gower Shakespearean Sonnets

Describe the context: (Students, grade level, content, students strengths, students weaknesses, learning styles, special needs, ELL,etc.) Ninth grade advanced English Students are analytical and enjoy engaging in class discussions

Enduring Understanding/Essential Question(s): (What are the big ideas? What thought provoking question(s) will guide the lesson?) Are Shakespeares sonnets accessible? Are Shakespeares sonnets relevant? What are the similarities between sonnets and contemporary/popular music? What do Shakespeares sonnets tell us about language? What do they tell us about the human experience?

Assessment: (How do you know what needs to be taught; How will you assess learning?) Pre-Assessment Discussion with cooperating teacher o Students are studying Shakespeare, but have not been introduced to Shakespeares sonnets Other o Students will be assessed by their classroom participation

Affective Objectives: (related to student attitudes and values; think dispositions) Students will reflect on what they think about poetry/popular songs/ Students will reflect on what they think about poetry as a means of expression Students will respond to Shakespeares sonnets Cognitive: (related to the mastery of knowledge: think Bloom; Include the State Standards) Students will analyze and evaluate a Shakespearean sonnet Students will communicate their understanding of Shakespeares language Students will compare Shakespeares language with contemporary language Students will record information in their Shakespeare Survival Guides

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Robin Esch Gower Shakespearean Sonnets


Reading Standards:
1.Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 2.Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. 3.Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. 4.Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Speaking and Listening Standards:


1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 910 topics, texts, and issues, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

Vocabulary (What vocabulary needs to be taught, reviewed; whats central to comprehending instruction?) o o o o o o Shakespearean Sonnet: 14 line lyric poem in iambic pentameter Quatrian: Stanza of four lines Couplet: 2 consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme Iamb: meter of poetry that follows a stressed/unstressed pattern Pentameter poetic line of five feet Satire: Blends ironic humor and wit

Differentiation/Planning for Individual Needs: Tapping out rhythm to understand iambic pentameter Annotate on Smart Board for visual learners Resources and Materials: (Include technology where applicable/available/appropriate) One copy each of Shakespeares sonnets #130 and #43 Smart Board Procedures/Learning Strategies: (Be sure to include specific strategies to develop literacy of content)

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Robin Esch Gower Shakespearean Sonnets


Throughout this lesson, students will be using vocabulary guide strategy to incorporate words/phrases into their Shakespeare vocabulary guides

Pre (How will you motivate, activate prior knowledge, . . .) Discussion about the class experiences reading A Midsummer Nights Dream o How does the class feel about Shakespeare? Are they enjoying his work? Do they find it difficult to understand? Are they finding his work relevant? Irrelevant? o What does the class think about love poems? Apparently Shakespeare, at times, grew a little weary of sappy love poetry and clichs During What is a Shakespearean sonnet? o Discuss Shakespeares historical context for writing sonnets o 14 line lyric poem in iambic pentameter o Typically a comparison/juxtaposition of two usually contrasting ideas: emotions, states of mind, beliefs, actions, events, images o Either resolves or reveals the tensions between the two Post sonnet 130 o Explain the structure of a sonnet 3 quatrains/1 couplet Includes a turn or shift, called the volta typically found in line 9, but often delayed until the final couplet (could be a consequence) abab, cdcd, efef, gg Distinct rhythm: Iambic pentameter Iamb: metrical foot consisting of 2 syllables o Unstressed/stressed Pentameter: poetic line of five feet Ask for volunteers to read each quatrain Label rhyme scheme Label iambic pentameter Close reading/annotate each line: put each line in contemporary language What does it say as a whole?

Closing
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Robin Esch Gower Shakespearean Sonnets


Are there any similarities between sonnets and contemporary poetry/music? Were people of Shakespeares historical epoch similar to people today, or are we completely unable to relate to them and their experiences? Consider our past discussion about relevancy/timelessness of literature. Are students able to find relevancy in Shakespeares work?

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