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Julie Roberts

Strategy Demonstration #1: Monitoring Comprehension


Content Area: Math
Grade Level: 4
th
Grade
Topic: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Content Area Standard: 4.0 A: Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve
problems.
Literacy Anchors:
Craft and Structure: 4. Determine the meaning of general academic and
domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject
area.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: 7. Interpret information presented
visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines,
animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the
information contributes to an understanding of the text in which is appears
Essential Questions:
What facts are known from the information in the problem?
Which information from the problem is not needed?
What is the problem asking students to find?
What strategy, operations, or tools will students use to solve the problem?
Name of Strategy: K-N-W-S Strategy
Category: Monitoring Comprehension
Brief Description of Strategy: The KNWS strategy is very similar to the KWL strategy
and follows a similar format. Students will read a word problem and record what facts
they know (K), what information is not relevant (N), what the problem is asking them to
find (W), and what strategy or operation they will use to solve the problem (S). Students
will be asked to read a problem and will chart the information in the proper columns.
This strategy allows the teacher to be aware if students comprehend how to properly read
and solve word problems as well as if students are able to pull-out unnecessary
information. The KNWS strategy helps students plan, organize, and analyze how to solve
a word problems while also allowing students to master effective strategies to use when
reading word problems. Also, like the KWL strategy, the KNWS strategy provides
students a purpose for reading, allows them to activate prior knowledge, and gives an
opportunity for students to make connections between new information and familiar
ideas.
Step-By-Step Recipe:
I will start by telling the class we are going to work on proper ways to read and
analyze word problems. I will explain that sometimes when reading any form of
Commented [JNR1]: NCATE/NCTE Standards: 4.3:
integrate interdisciplinary teaching
Commented [JNR2R1]: This document is a collection of
lessons that all incorporate strategies to promote reading
comprehension in mathematics.
text, even mathematical problems, there may be some extra information that is not
needed to comprehend the information and answer the question that is presented.
Students will each receive a copy of the K-N-W-S and mixed problem
worksheets.
Students will be asked to read what each column says to ensure that they
understand what information is needed in each column.
On the Doc-Cam, I will demonstrate how to properly use the K-N-W-S strategy
by using the first problem on the worksheet as an example. Students will be asked
to first just pay attention and watch my demonstration. When I am finished they
can fill in my example on their worksheet to use as a guide for completing the
remainder of the worksheet.
o Example that will be used: Fred has 6 blue and 5 red marbles. Nancy has 7
blue marbles. How many blue marbles do they have in all?
K: Fred has 6 blue marbles and 5 red marbles. Nancy has 7 blue
marbles.
N: Fred has 5 red marbles.
W: How many blue marbles do Fred and Nancy have in all?
S: I will use addition to find the answer. (6+7=13)
Once everyone finishes copying down my example, I will put a copy of the words
and phrases to math symbols aid on the doc-cam for students to reference
throughout the strategy. This aid will help students determine what strategy or
operation they should use to solve a problem.
Students will be asked to work independently on the remainder of the worksheet.
If they finish early they may discuss quietly with someone who is also finished in
their group about how they knew what information belonged in each category.
After everyone is finished I will collect both worksheets.
Formative Assessment: I will collect the students mixed word problems worksheet
along with their KNWS chart worksheet to make sure they comprehend how to properly
read and solve word problems using all four operations.
Materials Used: K-N-W-S worksheet (one for each student + one for teacher
demonstration), mixed word problem worksheet (one for each student + one for teacher
demonstration), one completed K-N-W-S worksheet and mixed work problems work
sheet, and words and phrases to math symbols aid.

Strategy Demonstration #2: Activating and Connection
Content Area: Math
Grade Level: 4
th
Grade
Topic: Geometry
Content Area Standard: 4.G: Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by
properties of their lines and angles.
Literacy Anchors:
Key Ideas and Details (1): Refer to details and examples in a text when
explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the
text.
Craft and Structure (4): Determine the meaning of general academic and
domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject
area.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas (7): Interpret information presented
visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines,
animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the
information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
Essential Questions:
What strategies did students use to come up with their before reading pictures?
How did completing a pre-reading, during reading, and post reading assignment
help activate students prior knowledge and allow them to make meaningful
connections?
What strategies did students use to come up with real-word examples not used in
the book?
Was the use of the manipulative (the shape shifter tool) effective for students?
Name of Strategy: Interactive read aloud with a pre-reading, during reading, and post
reading assignment
Category: Activating and Connecting
Brief Description of Strategy: Interactive read alouds allow students to hear fluent
reading as they develop higher level thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis and
inference. During an interactive read aloud the teacher will stop at planned points to ask
questions that require a student response. Interactive read alouds help students learn to
think deeply about text, to listen to others, and to grow their own ideas. Including a pre-
reading activity will help students activate their prior knowledge and get them prepared
for the reading. The during reading activity will help students follow along with the story
and help them pick out the main ideas. A post-reading assignment allows students to
think about the big picture and develop a deeper understanding while also having them
make connections between the story and the real world.

Commented [JNR3]: NCATE/NCTE Standards: 3.5
Know/use extensive range of literature
Commented [JNR4R3]: In a variety of strategies
presented in this document, including this one, I use a
variety of different texts to promote reading
comprehension in math.
Step-By-Step Recipe:
Students will be given a copy of The Greedy Triangle worksheet and will be
asked to work on the first page (pre-reading) only. Once students are finished
working on the pre-reading activity I will introduce the story to them.
I will instruct the class to turn to the second page of their worksheet and have
them complete the during reading activity as I read through the book. I will begin
reading the story, stopping each time the shape transforms into something else. I
will ask students what changed about the shape and what new characteristics the
shape has. I will call up one student to create the new shape on the Doc-Cam. The
students in their seats can use their manipulative tool (shape shifter) to create the
shape as well.
Once the story is finished, students will be asked to complete the post-reading
activity on the third page of their worksheet. This activity calls on students to
activate their prior knowledge as well as the new knowledge they just learned.
Students are also asked to make connections between the text and the real-word.
Formative Assessment: I will collect the students worksheets to make sure it has been
completed and accurately filled out.
Materials Used: The Greedy Triangle book, The Greedy Triangle worksheet, The shape
shifter tool, Doc-Cam



Strategy Demonstration #3: Questioning
Content Area: Math
Grade Level: 5
th
Grade
Topic: Geometry
Content Area Standard: 5.G: Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on
their properties.
5.G.3. Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two dimensional
figures also belong to all subcategories of that category. For example, all
rectangles have four right angles and squares are rectangles, so all squares have
four right angles.
Literacy Anchors:
Craft and Structure (4): Determine the meaning of general academic and
domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject
area.
Essential Questions:
Did the reading of the book The Greedy Triangle help to develop the students
basic vocabulary skills and prepare them for the I have, who has strategy? (this
book was read for strategy demonstration #2, I would play this game after the unit
on shapes and angles was complete)
How did playing I have, who has help students to develop a more fluent
mathematics vocabulary?
Did having students begin to think about what the question for their card might be
help them develop a more in depth understanding of the words?
Name of Strategy: I have, Who has
Category: Vocabulary
Brief Description of Strategy: The I have, who has strategy should be used when
students have developed a basic understanding of the vocabulary words and need to begin
to develop fluency with the words. This strategy can be used as daily practice and will
motivate students to master the basic vocabulary words. The I have, who has strategy
can be used in any topic across all content areas. This strategy also provides opportunities
for students to practice academic vocabulary and listening skills.
Step-By-Step Recipe:
I will start by reminding the class that we began the lesson on geometry by
reading the book The Greedy Triangle. I will then explain that today we are going
to work on our geometry vocabulary skills.
A card will then be distributed to each student. The extra cards will be distributed
to the strong students in the beginning and to random students as the class
becomes more familiar with the deck.
Commented [JNR5]: INTASC Standards: 4: Multiple
Instructional Strategies: The teacher understands and uses a
variety of instructional strategies to encourage student
development and critical thinking, problem solving, and
performance skills.
As the cards are being distributed I will tell the class to think about what the
question for their card might be so that they will be prepared with a response.
The I have, who has strategy will continue into the game loops back around to
the starting card.
NOTE: For the purpose of this in-class strategy demonstration I have written the
answer to the I have, who has on the cards so it runs smoothly. I would not play
this game in my actual classroom until all students have a basic understanding of
the words, however, I do not want to assume everyone in the class has an
understanding of the words.
Formative Assessment: After the I have, who has strategy is complete I will put a
complete list of the words used on the cards on the doc-cam. I will ask the students to
write a story similar to The Greedy Triangle using at least 5 of the words.
Materials Used: The Greedy Triangle, I have, Who has geometry playing cards, list of
all the words used on the cards, doc-cam


Strategy Demonstration #4: Visualizing
Content Area: Math
Grade Level: Fourth
Topic: Number and Operations-Fractions
Content Area Standard:
4. NF: Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous
understandings of operations on whole numbers.
4. NF: Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
Literacy Anchors:
Craft and Structure (4): Determine the meaning of general academic and
domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject
area.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas (7): Interpret information presented
visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines,
animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the
information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.
Essential Questions:
How did completing the fraction flipbook increase students understanding of
fractions, decimals and percents?
Did creating the visual representation of each fraction help students better
understand the concepts being taught?
Was the use of the foldable in the classroom effective? Did it benefit all student or
just kinesthetic and visual learners?
Name of Strategy: Foldable (Fraction Flipbook)
Category: Visualizing
Brief Description of Strategy: Foldables are 3-D interactive graphic tools that help
students organize and master complex information. They are a fun and engaging way for
students to create a learning tool for themselves. Paper is folded, stapled or cut in a
certain way and information is written inside or outside so that topics can be practiced
and learned. Using foldables in the classroom is beneficial to both kinesthetic and visual
learners. It presents information in a way that makes it easy for students to comprehend
while also making it easier for students to visualize the information being presented.
Step-By-Step Recipe:
I will remind the class that we are coming to the end of the unit about converting
decimals, fractions, and percents. I will let them know that we are going to be
creating a fraction flip book that will help them review the entire lesson.
My Fraction Flipbooks will be handed out to each table. The first page of the
flip book has been completed for students as an example. Students will be asked
to work with a partner to fill in the remaining parts of the flipbook.
Commented [JNR6]: IINTASC Standards: 3: Diverse
Learners: The teacher understands how students differ in
their approaches to learning and creates instructional
opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners
Commented [JNR7R6]: This document includes 6
different strategies to promote reading comprehension in
math.
o NOTE: in my classroom, where time isnt as restricted, I would have the
students create their own flipbook from scratch and have them work
independently to finish the flipbook. The flipbook would also go from
halves through twelfths but for the sake of time I made the ones for the
demonstration halves through sixths.
As a tool to help guide the students through the flipbook activity I will put the
Converting: fractions, decimals, and percents review poster on the doc-cam for
the students to reference throughout the activity.
After students have completed their flipbooks with their partners, I will have
students come up and show their work on the doc-cam. To ensure participation,
certain flipbooks will have a star sticker located next to one of the sections. When
it is time to review that section of the flipbook the student that has the star next to
that section will come up and show the class their work.
Formative Assessment: Students will be assessed on the accuracy of their finished
fraction flip book
Materials Used: Doc-Cam, fraction flip-book, review page


Strategy Demonstration #5: Determining Importance
Content Area: Math
Grade Level: 4
th
grade
Topic: Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Content Area Standard: 4.0A: Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve
problems.
Literacy Anchors:
Craft and Structure: (4) Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-
specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: (7) Interpret information presented visually,
orally, or quantitatively and explain how the information contributes to an
understanding of the text in which is appears
Essential Questions:
How did breaking the problem up into steps help the students better understand
the proper way to read and solve word problems?
What part of the RIDGES strategy seemed to benefit students the most?
Did any part of the RIDGES strategy seem to confuse students?
Name of Strategy: RIDGES
Category: Determining Importance
Brief Description of Strategy: The RIDGES strategy is an appropriate strategy to use
with elementary school children through secondary grade level students. It can be used
for math word problems to help a student formulate an appropriate plan to solve the
problem. The RIDGES strategy uses a clever acronym to help teach students the steps in
problem solving. Each step is associated with a letter: R (read the problem) I (identify
given information, circle needed information, cross out unneeded information) D (draw a
picture) G (goal statement) E (equation development) S (solve the problem).
Step-By-Step Recipe:
I will start by reminding students that we have been working on finding different
ways to solve word problems. I will tell them that today we are going to learn a
new strategy called RIDGES.
I will introduce the RIDGES strategy by putting an overview of the strategy on
the doc-cam. I will ask individual students to read what each letter stands for to
make sure they have an understanding of the strategy.
I will go over an example of a completed word problem using the RIDGES
strategy on the doc-cam.
After reviewing the strategy, students will receive a copy of the RIDGES strategy
worksheet and will be asked to solve the problem using the new strategy. I will
put the explanation of the RIDGES strategy back on the doc-cam so students can
reference it.
Commented [JNR8]: NCATE/NCTE Standards: 4.9:
demonstrate that students reading strategies permit access
to range
When everyone is finish, I will ask one student to come up and show their work
on the doc-cam
Formative Assessment: For a formative assessment, I will make sure students have
successfully completed the problem by accurately using the RIDGES strategy.
Materials Used: explanation of RIDGES strategy sheet, RIDGES strategy worksheet,
completed RIDGES example worksheet, doc-cam
























Strategy Demonstration #6: Summarizing
Content Area: Math
Grade Level: 4
th
Grade
Topic: Operations and Algebraic Thinking & Measurement and Data
Content Area Standard: 4.1A: Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve
problems & 4.4MD: Represent and interpret data
Literacy Anchors:
Craft and Structure: (4) Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-
specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topics or subject area.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: (7) Interpret information presented visually,
orally, or quantitatively and explain how the information contributes to an
understanding of the text in which is appears
Essential Questions:
How did summarizing all of the information from the word problem into the Venn
diagram help the students in solving the problem?
What were some problems students were having when figuring out where in the
Venn diagram to put the given information?
Did this strategy help show students that by summarizing and condensing the
information in a word problem it becomes easier to solve?
Name of Strategy: Venn Diagrams
Category: Summarizing
Brief Description of Strategy: A Venn diagram is a type of graphic organizer that can
be used to summarize information in a word problem visually. Putting the information
from a word problem into a Venn diagram can help show students relationships between
sets and also can help them come to the correct answer. Information is usually presented
to students in linear text. Especially when there is a lot of information, it is difficult to see
relationships in this format. Venn diagrams enable students to summarize information
visually so they are able to see the relationships between two or three sets of items.
Step-By-Step Recipe:
I will introduce the lesson by telling the class that sometimes it becomes easier to
solve a word problem when we summarize and condense the information
provided into a graphic organizer. I will then introduce the Venn diagram to the
class and explain how a Venn diagram works.
I will do two practice problems using the Venn diagrams to show the students that
once the information is summarized onto the graphic organizer it becomes much
easier to answer the questions. One practice problem will be comparing two sets,
and one practice problem will be comparing three sets.
Students will be handed two similar problems to work on independently. After
students have independently worked on the problem, they will be asked to share
Commented [JNR9]: INTASC Standards: 7: Planning: The
teacher plans instruction bases on knowledge of subject,
students, community, and curriculum goals
Commented [JNR10R9]: The new common core
standards focus on reading comprehension in every subject,
which is something I am trying to incorporate with the
strategies in this document.
their work with a partner while one student comes up and puts their work on the
doc-cam.
Formative Assessment: I will collect the students worksheets to make sure they have
correctly filled in the Venn diagram.
Materials Used: Doc-Cam, example problem, Venn diagram worksheet