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SPRING 2014

Ofce of the Chancellor


Dear Friends,
It is wonderful to have this opportunity to write to you one last time, to thank you for the encouragement and sup-
port you have given me over the past years. As many of you know, I will be leaving this post in the coming summer.
Ive been extraordinarily fortunate to have spent the bulk of my professional life (33 years now) at the University,
even more so to have been your chancellor for the past nine years. It is so very pleasing to fnish on a high note, with
the University in such good condition as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of its founding. I have been blessed,
indeed.
We are celebrating our remarkable 150-year history throughout the course of the current calendar year, focusing on
the extraordinary people and events that have made DU what it is today: a truly great private university dedicated to
the public good. So much has been accomplished in those 150 years, particularly in the last three decades, and there
is a great deal to be proud of. If you are in Denver or will visit this year, please come to campus to experience our
Tradition and Legacy exhibit in the Anderson Academic Commons [see more on page 40]. Live out the Univer-
sitys mission for the public good as you record your service hours with the 1864 Service Challenge [see page 36].
Celebrate the culminating events of our sesquicentennial this fall during Homecoming & Family Weekend, featuring
the Pioneer Symposium and the All-Class Reunion.
Join us also as we celebrate the completion of the ASCEND campaign. Because of the generosity of more than 46,000
alumni and friends, the campaign has raised more than $460 million to date, with several weeks remaining until its
June 30 conclusion. ASCEND has more than doubled our endowment, creating some 550 new scholarships and a
host of new faculty chairs and professorships, and funding many new academic programs. Our appointed faculty has
grown by 16 percent since the start of the campaign. As a result of ASCEND, our students pursue their dreams in
Rufatto Hall (home of the Morgridge College of Education), in the wonderful new Anderson Academic Commons,
in the Nagel Annex of the School of Art and Art History, in the soon-to-be-built Anna and John J. Sie International
Relations Complex (home of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies and the Sie Cheou-Kang Center), and
in the forthcoming home of the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science, which also will
house laboratories for the Knoebel Center for the Study of Aging. Our athletes work out in the Pat Bowlen Train-
ing Center, and our students live in Nagel Hall and play club sports and intramurals on the spectacular new Diane
Wendt Sports Fields. All of this has come from the generosity of our alumni, parents and friends, and from their
commitment to our future. To all who have been a part of this most successful of all University campaigns, I ofer my
heartfelt thanks.
Te years to come will bring difcult challenges, but they also are rich with opportunity, and we must focus on
the latter. We can do so confdent in the knowledge that our 150 years have made us tough, creative and ready to
embrace change. We know also that the hard work of the past 30 years has provided the tools needed for success:
our wonderful faculty and staf, our committed alumni, our fantastic students and our glorious campus. It is a bright
future, one to be seized by yet another generation of Pioneers.
Best wishes and many thanks,
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Ofce of the Chancellor
Mary Reed Building | 2199 S. University Blvd. | Denver, CO 80208 | 303.871.2111 | Fax 303.871.4101 | www.du.edu/chancellor
Contents
FEATURES
12 Methods of Revolution
Korbel Professor Erica Chenoweth is getting noticed for her work
on nonviolent resistance
By Doug McPherson
17 DU at 150
A trip through the decades
By Magazine Staff
DEPARTMENTS
4 Editors Note
6 Looking back
Departing Chancellor Robert Coombe reflects on his 33 years
at the University
8 Kickin it
Womens soccer player makes Pioneer history
11 Game theory
University a host site for international jam
41 Alumni Connections
On the cover and this page: The University of Denver celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2014. Cover illustration
by Ross Manseld and Cortney Parsons; photo this page: DU Archives
4 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Update
Campus
Six months ago, many of us werent certain how to
pronounce the word sesquicentennial. Now its part of the
campus lexicon, as the celebration of the Universitys 150th
anniversary continues throughout the entire year. Already the
anniversary has added special import to annual events such as
Winter Carnival and Founders Day; still to come are enhanced
versions of Commencement (June 67) and Homecoming &
Family Weekend (Oct. 31Nov. 2), which this year includes an
All-Class Reunion, inductions into the Athletics Hall of Fame
and a new version of Alumni Symposium. Now called Pioneer
Symposium, the event gives attendees the chance to hear
expertsboth faculty and prominent alumnidiscuss hot topics and key issues of the
day. Visit alumni.du.edu for details.
Look also for a brand new eventa free summer family concert series that brings
jazz, bluegrass, classical and more to the Driscoll Green in June, July and August [see
page 40 for more information].
We talked to alumni, faculty, staff and students as we compiled our special timeline
feature that starts on page 17and its clear how much the University means to the
people whose lives it has touched. The feature celebrates the University of Denvers 150-
year legacy with a look back at the people, places and programs that have shaped the
University of Denver into the school it is today. You can see an extended timelineand
share your own memorieson our special sesquicentennial website, du.edu/du150.
We also are collecting DU memories for a special feature in our fall issue. Do you
have a favorite memory, building, class or professor? Let us know by emailing me at
gglasgow@du.edu.
As much as there is to celebrate about the Universitys past, the future also offers
a lot to be excited about. On May 6, we had the official groundbreaking for the new
home of the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science. The
new building coincides with a new interdisciplinary science, technology, engineering
and mathematics (STEM) initiative that will bring together multiple complementary
STEM activities and research already taking place on campus.
Just north of the new STEM building is the site of another exciting development: a
new building for the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. John Sie, founder and
former chairman of Starz Entertainment Group LLC and University of Denver honor-
ary life trustee, along with his wife, Anna, donated $17 million to fund the construction
of the 43,000-square-foot building, which will adjoin the schools existing Cherrington
Hall and Si Chou-Kang Center to form the Anna and John J. Sie International
Relations Complex.
Its an exciting time to be a Pioneer, and you can keep up with all the latest news as
it happens on the University of Denver Magazine website, du.edu/magazine.
Greg Glasgow
www. d u . e d u / ma g a z i n e
Volume 14, Number 3
Publisher
Kevin A. Carroll
Editor
David Basler
Managing Editor
Greg Glasgow
Senior Editor
Tamara Chapman
Editorial Assistant
Annissa Leon
Art Director
Ross Mansfield
Designer
Cortney Parsons
Photographer
Wayne Armstrong
Contributors
Kathryn Mayer (BA 07, MA 10) Doug
McPherson Sarah Satterwhite Ce Shi
Callyn Weintraub
Editorial Board
Julie Reeves, associate vice chancellor, brand
marketing Kristine Cecil, associate vice
chancellor for university advancement and
executive director of alumni relations Julie
Chiron, executive director of communications
for the Office of University Advancement
Sarah Satterwhite, senior director of
development communications Erica Wood,
director of alumni communications
The University of Denver Magazine is published three
times a year (fall, winter and spring) by the University
of Denver, Division of Marketing and Communications,
2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208-4816. The
University of Denver (Colorado Seminary) is an Equal
Opportunity Institution.
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Printed on 10% PCW recycled paper
Editors Note
Update
Campus
John Greene Hall, home of the Department of Mathematics since
1958, was demolished starting in April to make room for a new
home for the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and
Computer Science (inset). The 110,000-square-foot building also
will house the new Knoebel Center for the Study of Aging.
Wayne Armstrong
6 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Update
Campus
Looking back
Departing Chancellor Robert Coombe reflects on his 33 years at the University
By Tamara Chapman
In January 2014, Robert Coombe, the Universitys 17th
chancellor, announced he will retire at the end of June, along
with his wife, Julanna Gilbert, executive director of the Ofce
of Teaching and Learning and a member of the chemistry and
biochemistry faculty.
Coombe assumed the chancellorship in 2005, afer serving
the institution as provost from 2001 to 2005, as dean of what
was then the Division of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and
Engineering from 1995 to 2001, and as chair of the Department
of Chemistry and Biochemistry from 1988 to 1995.
During his 33 years at DU, Coombe witnessed the
Universitys fnancial crisis of the mid- to late 1980s, when the
institution was ofen borrowing money to make payroll and
when its defcit grew to as much as $8 million. As the institution
plotted its return to solvency and launched eforts to transform
the physical campus, as well as its academic, student life and
athletics programs, Coombe served in key leadership roles.
Before leaving the University, Coombe agreed to share
some of his parting insights with the University of Denver
Magazine.
Q In your time here, you have witnessedand
certainly spearheadedmany changes on campus.
Of these, is there one that stands out as particularly
signicant?
A Well, there certainly have been a lot of changes
probably the most obvious is the campus itself. But in my
mind, the greatest diference has to do with the faculty and
the students. When I came in 1981, we had a really broad
distribution of students, some of whom were unbelievably
bright, as capable as you might fnd anywhere. We had others
who struggled. Over time, that changed. When we went
through the terrible crisis in the mid- to later 80s, we lost a
lot of that top end of the distribution. Ten it gradually came back in.
Te big diference between now and when I frst came is, when you think
about that top end of most capable students, now that is the vast majority
of all our students. Weve been able to attract incredibly bright, talented
people, who have had all kinds of life experiences and who bring all kinds
of diferent backgrounds to the table. So in my mind, our intellectual life is
deeper and broader because of the students who are here.
Tats also true of the faculty. One of the things that drew me to DU
in 1981 was the caliber of the faculty. Now we have great faculty, but we
have many, many more of them. Te faculty has grown tremendously,
particularly over the last decade. When you couple those two things
togetherthe students and the facultyyou have a very diferent kind of
institution than we were 30 years ago.
Q How would you compare the student experience of three
decades ago to that of today?
A Certainly, as I mentioned before, the intellectual culture here
is far deeper. And students come expecting that, because it has become
part of our reputation. Te other thing I would say is that we are a good
bit more diverse. Interestingly, one of the things Ive found in the course
of talking with students, particularly over the last decade or so, is that
virtually all of them come to the University looking to fnd a culture and an
environment that is more diverse than the one from which they came, no
matter where they came from.
Q This issue was important to you nine years ago. What
made you realize that inclusive excellence was so important to
the intellectual community of the University?
A I have always been a believer in the notion that diversity is a
driver in building the depth of the intellectual culture we want. Te two
are related, and if we really want to ramp up the bar, we want a much
more diverse population. And we want to develop the mechanisms for
extracting the beneft of that diversity. Tose are two diferent things. An
institution could be very diverse and not realize the benefts if it doesnt
have inclusivity.
We can also look at this in a very pragmatic sense. We know that
now and in the years to follow, the population of 18- to 24-year-olds
will become more and more socioeconomically diverse all the time. Its
growth is largely among people who are far less able to aford a university
education. Tat sets a big agenda for us. Weve got to fnd a way to keep the
doors open as wide as possible to a very broad socioeconomic distribution.
We really do. Its part of our job.
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University of Denver Magazine UPDATE 7
Q Higher education faces many
challenges in the coming yearsrelated to
everything from affordability to changing
demographics. How does DU compare to
its private counterparts in its preparedness
for these challenges?
A I feel good about where we are.
Weve been working hard for 25 years or more
in developing, with a laser focus, the absolute
quality of the academic enterprise, and that has
prepared us for this particular moment. If you
look at the teaching and learning environment
here, the scholarship environment, if you
look at the fnancial environment, how we do
operations, all of those things, were absolutely at
the top of our game.
Tat means we have a platform from which
we can launch into what I view as a time of
extraordinary opportunity. So yes, there are lots
and lots of forces pushing on change in higher
education. One of them is the demographic
issue. Another is the emergence of potentially
disruptive technologies; another is cost and
afordability. All of those kinds of things require
the institution to be fexible and embracing
of change. But if you think about these past
decades, for the past 25 years weve been doing
exactly that. Right? Weve been developing
new ideas, thinking about the best way to
evolve the teaching and learning environment,
thinking about the whole notion of serving the
public good, thinking about the research and
scholarship environment and what it really
does and who its benefciaries really are. Weve
been positioning ourselves as a diferent sort of
institution that can help to resolve some of the
core issues facing the city and the region. Tose
kinds of things are exactly the sort of traits that
are going to be necessary for institutions to
navigate the next 10 or 12 years. So I feel good
that weve developed a set of attributes that will
serve us well.
Q As a scientist, the Universitys
STEM initiative must give you particular
delight. Why are the STEM disciplines
(science, technology, engineering and
mathematics) so important for the future
of the University, and what makes this
initiative distinctive?
A STEM is important to the University
because its so important to so many diferent
disciplines. Its not just a thing unto itself. We
shouldnt think of the University as a collection
of diferent schoolsDaniels, the Sturm
College of Law, the Korbel School, engineering,
the natural sciences, the social sciences. Te
boundaries between those boxes started
dissolving years ago. To the extent that one of
the elements is weaker than it ought to be, then
the entire University sufers. For example, the
strategy in the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of
Engineering and Computer Science is not just to
grow engineering and computer science. It also
involves a hard, hard push toward business and
entrepreneurship, which is a wonderful niche for
Te hardest job in academia
Trygve Myhren, chairman of the Universitys
Board of Trustees since 2009, worked side-by-side
with Coombe to capitalize on the improvements
in fnances, infrastructure and spirit that began
during the chancellorship of Daniel Ritchie.
Bob was able to take that platform and drive
academic quality. He was the architect of our
academic renaissance, Myhren notes.
Running a major university is even
more complicated than running most major
corporations, he explains. Its the hardest job in
academia, unquestionably the hardest job.
Actionable items for change
As dean of the Graduate School of
Professional Psychology, Shelly Smith-Acuna
has long appreciated Coombes ability to capture
the important values of the institution and
his insistence that the academic programs be
substantive and that the faculty be engaged in
something that is meaningful to them and to the
public.
In her role as chair of the Status of Women
at DU study, Smith-Acuna found Coombe to be
unrelenting in his commitment to quality. He
would say, I want actionable items for change. I
want a product, not just a sound byte.
Fostering accountability and inclusivity
From his frst day on campus, senior Daniel
Mason, whose family is originally from Mexico,
took an interest in issues related to diversity.
Mason organized a group, Pioneer to
Pioneer, to address what he saw as a divide
between international and domestic students. He
approached Coombe for help.
Mason says Coombe volunteered assistance
but urged him and other participants to assume
responsibility for fostering change.
Tat was a very productive conversation,
Mason recalls. We kind of held each other
accountable.
us to occupy. We can do better there than any
institution in the region. To the extent we dont
evolve in STEM, Daniels misses an opportunity.
And other units on campus miss an opportunity
as well.
Q As busy as youve been over
the last nine years, have you had time to
continue your study of the cello? Is it still a
passion?
A Very much. I started playing the cello
when I was 50 or 51. Nine years ago I wasnt very
far along, but I loved it. I must tell you, that 1),
Im a lot better than I was nine years ago, and 2),
its become a very important part of life. I just
absolutely love to play.
Q What will you do next? Can we
count on seeing you for periodic visits?
A Most immediately, Julanna and I are
going to move down to our place in Santa Fe. We
started going down to northern New Mexico to
go hiking [several years ago]. It reminded us of
Colorado in the 60s, and so we ended up buying
a place down there about three years ago. But we
have lots of family in Denver, so well be back.
We both love the University, so well certainly be
back here, too.
Tis interview has been condensed for space.
Read the full interview online at du.edu/magazine
The Coombe legacy
As Chancellor Robert Coombe prepares to end his 33-year tenure at the University of Denver,
members of the community are remembering and celebrating his extensive contributions.
8 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Update
Campus
Senior fnance
major Kristen Hamil-
ton made University of
Denver history in Janu-
ary, becoming the frst
Pioneer womens soccer
player to be drafed to
the National Womens
Soccer League. Te
Western New York
Flash picked Hamilton
up in the fourth round.
A standout on
the feld since her frst
year at the University,
Hamilton is successful
of the feld as wellshe
was named a frst-team
scholar all-American by
the NCAA and Capital
One, thanks in part to
her 3.7 GPA. Hamilton
puts her time in in the
community also. She
has done a variety of
work throughout the
Denver community at
the Ronald McDonald
House, at the Denver
Rescue Mission and
at Childrens Hospital,
where she and some
teammates worked on
craf projects with the
siblings of sick kids.
It was a great experience, just seeing how
happy the crafs made the siblings of the kids,
she says. Tey were actually smiling and hav-
ing a good timeits a release. Hospitals can
be kind of depressing, and to have that kind
of outlet to have fun and still be by the side of
their loved ones was really nice.
Hamilton, who grew up in Littleton,
Colo., is the womens soccer teams all-time
points leader and leading goal scorer, and shes
the only NCAA Division I athlete in history to
be named player of the year in three confer-
ences (Summit League, Western Athletic and
Sun Belt). And she did it all while staying close
to home and to her 8-year-old brother, Simon,
who has Down syndrome and cheers on his
big sister any chance he gets.
I thought I wanted to go out of state for
college, but I realized that I wanted to stay
close to home, Hamilton told the NCAA
website in November. By going to Denver,
not only did I become a part of an amazing
soccer program and get a great education, but
my family was there to watch and support me
every step of the way.
Te future pro also attributes some of
her success to her teammates. Being named
conference player of the year three times is
defnitely a huge honor, but I can only attribute
that to my team, she told the NCAA. I def-
nitely would not have won the award without
them.
Hamilton frst discovered soccer while
growing up in Littleton, Colo., as a tomboy
younger and smaller than most of her male
playmates. One friend in particular caught her
attention.
His name was Jeremy, three years older
than me, she says. I watched him play and
thought it looked fun, so when I got home I
told my mom I wanted to play. She signed me
up, and Ive loved the game ever since.
Jef Hooker, womens soccer head coach,
calls Hamilton a truly special player who
has the true it factor [and is] one of the best
all-around athletes our program has ever seen.
Shes one to keep an eye on she has the
capability of doing some great things in her
post-college soccer career.
Kickin it
Womens soccer player makes Pioneer history
By Doug McPherson
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University of Denver Magazine UPDATE 9
Te background image on DuViviers computer screen is a
photo she took of jellyfsh at the New England Aquarium in Boston.
Before becoming a professor, DuVivier frst studied oceanography,
then worked as a geologist, then became a lawyer. I was a double
major in geology and English, she says, and the law brought those
together.
DuViviers 2011 book, Te Renewable Energy Reader, draws
on her expertise in energy law. She is working now on a textbook
for law students interested in the feld.
Last year, students at the Sturm College of Law voted DuVivier
best professor in the Faculty Excellence Awards. Tats the cap on
my career; I just really appreciated it so much, she says. It meant a
lot that they picked me.
DuVivier was director of Sturms lawyering process program,
which teaches frst-year law students the fundamentals of being
a lawyer, including legal writing and research. Te faculty gave
her this clockwhich reads Its about timewhen she received
tenure.
DuVivier believes in engaging students in her energy classes
through a variety of learning experiences, including discussion of
excerpts from energy videos and opportunities to handle relevant
materials such as copper (for electric wires), coal (for fossil-fuel
power plants) and beetle-kill pellets for a wood stove.
DuVivier received this award when she served as president
of the Colorado Alliance of Professional Women, an organization
that supports women in various felds. I dont like the siloing of
diferent interests, and because I was a geologist before, I always try
to cross silos, she says. Im on a national grant proposal with an
atmospheric scientist and an economist. I try to do cross-profession
things because I think its important not to miss connections by
having too narrow a viewpoint.
From the desk of
K.K. DuVivier, professor of environmental law in the Sturm College of Law
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10 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Update
Campus
When hes not doing homework for his
triple major in physics, math and computer
science, University of Denver senior Matthew
Watwood is pursuing his passion for magic,
performing at Colorado Avalanche games
and at Elitch Gardens, where he also leads
physics presentations for high school
students.
Magic is a hobby that lets me work
on the other part of my mindthe creative
side, says Watwood, a Boettcher Scholar
who also has received the Robison Family
Memorial Endowed Scholarship, the Edgar
Everhart Endowed Scholarship and the David
C. and Betty S. Hess Endowed Scholarship.
Also on Watwoods plate is a concurrent
masters degree in computer science and
minors in intercultural global studies and
electrical engineering. He does it all with a
3.92 overall GPA.
Watwood, who grew up in Oak Creek,
Colo., says he appreciates the Universitys
smaller size and the personal attention
he receives from professors. He also is a
biophysics research assistant on campus
and plans to apply for a summer physics
internship.
He enthusiastically accepts challenges,
says Mark Siemens, assistant professor of
physics. Matt doesnt look for corners to cut
or easy outshe wants to know the best way
to do things, and hes willing to put in the
work to do them right.
Afer graduation, Watwood plans to
pursue a PhD in physics with an emphasis in
complex systems. Eventually he would like to
teach at the high school or university level.
You should have teachers who are
the best in their felds to inspire the future
generation, Watwood says.
Siemens is excited to see where
Watwoods interests take him.
Im confdent that he will make an
important contribution to helping people
wherever he goes, Siemens says.
Annissa Leon
One to watch
Matthew Watwood, physics, math and computer science
Afer coming to DU, Mike Schutte discovered his passion for people and the
environment. Now he is a leader among his peers, participating in the Pioneer
Leadership Program and serving in student government. Hes majoring in
environmental science and sociology, preparing to encourage positive change as a
professor of sociology or human geography. Te Paul Stanford Bernhard Endowed
Memorial Scholarship helped Mike to explore his passion and fnd his path.
Find out how you can make a gif that supports students like
Mike while providing yourself with additional income.
GIFTPLANNING.DU.EDU | 303.871.2739 | 800.448.3238
Transforming Passion INTO PURPOSE
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University of Denver Magazine UPDATE 11
Its not ofen you see students giving up a
weekend in the pursuit of art.
But such was the case in late January, when
about 50 University of Denver students joined other
members of the citys game-making community for
the 2014 Global Game Jam, a worldwide event that
challenges teams to make a playable video game in
48 hours.
DU was a Game Jam host sitethe only one
in Denverfor the ffh year, welcoming 95 game
makers to the technology-rich second foor of the
Shwayder Art Building. Participants arrived with
laptops, notebooks, pillows and blankets as they
prepared for a weekend of game making.
Te event began the evening of Friday, Jan. 24,
with a video welcome that played to Game Jam teams
around the world. Participants divided into teams
later that night and worked until Sunday afernoon,
when each team walked the larger group through
its game. Game creators in Denver fnished the
challenge with 20 completed games, some of which
may go on to further development and possible
commercial distribution.
I think everybody who participated felt like
they learned something, says Rafael Fajardo, an
associate professor in the Universitys Emergent
Digital Practices program and organizer of the DU
host site. Tats really important for me, that they
value this as a learning opportunity, a way to stretch
themselves.
Many of the University of Denver students
who participated were from the computer science
departmentthe frst such department at a four-year
university to ofer a degree in game development.
Others were Lamont School of Music students who
helped set up a service bureau to provide sound and
music for the games being created. Its all evidence,
Fajardo, says, of the community hes trying to create
via the Game Jam.
Were trying to create a community of game
makers and contribute to the one that already exists
in Colorado, he says. We have novices come and
we have experts that come, and by not making it a
competition, that lowers the barriers between the
novices and the experts, so theyre willing to work
with each other and share each others expertise
and experience. For me, thats crucial in creating a
multigenerational community.
For students looking to enhance their resums,
the weekend had an even more tangible beneft: real-
world experience designing a game from scratch,
under a tight deadline.
Crunch time is not something you would
want to do all the time, but its still a good skill to
have, says game development major and Game Jam
participant Scott Davis.
It also allows you to have a valid addition
to your portfolio. When people say Global Game
Jam, its like, Yes, I know what that is. Its valid, and
it will almost always be a positive aspect of your
portfolio. It allows for a little bit of uniqueness on
your application. Teres a lot of upside for a student
to do it.
>> globalgamejam.org
Game theory
University a host site for international jam
By Greg Glasgow
Photography by Wayne Armstrong
12 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 13
Te Philippines famed Yellow Revolution of the 1980s, which
resulted in the departure of President Ferdinand Marcos from ofce and
the restoration of democracy in the country, also was one of historys
greatest nonviolent protests. Te streets were flled with thousands of
unarmed Filipinosso many weaponless citizens that, when the order
came down to shoot, security forces ignored the command or deliberately
jammed their weapons.
Now imagine if the mass uprising had been an armed one, says
Erica Chenoweth, an associate professor at the University of Denvers Josef
Korbel School of International Studies. Security forces wouldnt have
hesitated to shoot.
Chenoweth, who joined the Korbel School in 2012, has focused her
research on investigating whether and when nonviolence worksand
infuential groups around the world are taking notice. In December, she
was named to Foreign
Policy magazines
list of Top Global
Tinkers. Te editors
said Chenoweth earned
her spot on the list for
proving Gandhi right.
She uses her data
to show that nonviolent
campaigns over the
last century were twice
as likely to succeed as
violent ones, [along with]
arguments about current
events [and] why U.S.
strikes on Syria werent wise, and why Egypts pro-government sit-ins over
the summer were unlikely to work, the editors wrote.
Chenoweth has had her fndings published in Te New York Times,
Te Washington Post, Te Boston Globe, Foreign Afairs, Foreign Policy,
Te Economist and elsewhere. In 2013, Chenoweth and her co-author,
Maria Stephan, took home the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving
World Order, along with a $100,000 prize, for their book, Why Civil
Resistance Works: Te Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Confict (Columbia
University Press, 2011). Te book also won the prestigious 2012 Woodrow
Wilson Foundation Award, which is given annually for the best book on
government, politics or international afairs.
In the book, Chenoweth asserts that nonviolent resistance to
oppressive governments outperforms violent resistance by a two-to-one
margineven in highly repressive, powerful and authoritarian contexts.
Te source of this success, she contends, is people power: mass, broad-
based participation by ordinary people.
Chenoweths research raises interesting questions about how
governments respond to resistance. Many resort to violence, she notes,
because they still operate on so-called realist assumptions: that every
country has to fend for itself; that even if they would like to pursue
nonviolent policies, their enemies will see this as weakness and take
advantage of it; and that to show strength they must demonstrate the
willingness and capacity to deploy violent force to infict harm on
would-be aggressors.
Chenowethwho teaches classes on international relations,
terrorism, civil war, nonviolent resistance and contemporary warfare
admits the nonviolent path is an uphill battle. Efective nonviolent action
takes a lot of preparation, planning, training and discipline, she says.
Just going into the streets and demonstrating doesnt mean that anything
is going to change. Strategy must lead tactics, not the reverse. Te good
news is there are a lot of resources for people who want nonviolence:
training programs and books and DVDs about how people have used civil
resistance to confront oppression.
Despite the amount of violence reported in the media, Chenoweth
says the world probably just lived through the most peaceful decade in
human history, in terms of deaths from war. As of 2011, all of the worlds
wars were concentrated in just a handful of countries.
But, she says, 2013 was an especially troubling year. Heated clashes
continued or erupted in Syria, Central African Republic, Sudan and
South Sudan, Iraq, Afghanistan, Nigeria, Pakistan, Myanmar and Mexico.
Confict-related deaths swung back up to early-1990s levels. So were
moving in the wrong direction.
Still, episodes of mass nonviolent action are making headway, she
says, noting that more nonviolent conficts occurred in the frst 13 years of
the new millennium than in any similar period in recorded history.
Te overall picture is that the world is a pretty contentious place
right now, she says. Its just that some people are using violence, and
others are using ofen highly disruptive and efective nonviolent action.
Chenoweth traces her interest in the nonviolence movement to a
2006 workshop held by the International Center on Nonviolent Confict,
a private educational foundation. I became intrigued, especially when I
realized there wasnt a lot of systematic empirical research on the topic,
she says. Te feld was defned mostly by comparative case studies and
theory.
Chenoweth relished the opportunity to contribute original research to
the cause.
I get immense satisfaction from being of service to others, she says.
My major motivation is to be as useful as possible to those who are trying
to bring about peace in the world.
Korbel Professor
Erica Chenoweth is getting
noticed for her work on
nonviolent resistance
By Doug McPherson
Methods of REVOLUTION
14 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

ASCEND: The Campaign for the University of Denver concludes in June.
Already, more than 46,000 generous ASCEND donors have helped achieve
the most successful campaign in University history, including DUs three
highest fundraising years, impacting lives now, and far into the future.
MEET US AT THE
$143.5 MILLION
for scholarships
Join us in making history.
Make your gift now.
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 15
$460
MILLION
RAISED AS OF APRIL 2014
$$460 460
participation in the
senior class giving
campaign (FY13)
More than 111,000 GIFTS to the campaign were
$1,000 or less
Our students contact 55,000 ALUMNI, FRIENDS
AND PARENTS each year as part of our student
calling program
Anderson Academic Commons opened in 2013
thanks to 5,000+ DONORS
Fundraising during the campaign has more
than doubled the Universitys endowment from
$194 million to $442 MILLION
$115.9 MILLION for endowed scholarships
$27.6 MILLION for annual scholarships
558 NEW SCHOLARSHIPS established
during the campaign
$143.5 MILLION
for scholarships
MORE THAN 46,000
donors to the campaign
participation in
the faculty-staff
campaign (FY13)
31.1%
20%
R
E
C
O
R
D
Join us in making history.
Make your gift now.
ASCEND.DU.EDU
16 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Update
Campus
GIVING.DU.EDU | 800.448.3238
150 YEARS OF GENEROSITY.
150 YEARS OF LEARNING.
In 1864, local businessmen backed John Evans in founding the
University of Denver. Today, your gif is essential in providing
scholarships to this generation of bright, talented DU students.
Your contributionof any amount, to the area of your choice
makes a diference in the lives of our students.
Be part of our sesquicentennial celebration
and make your gif today!
Donne and Sue Fisher are investing $5 million in the future
of early childhood education through a gif to the University of
Denver. Longtime supporters of the University whose generosity
named the Fisher Early Learning Center at its inception, the
Fishers demonstrate their ongoing commitment to young
children through their latest gif. Teir generosity will have a
lasting impact on the youngest and most vulnerable population
in our society by addressing their educational needs from
two sidespreparing more professionals for careers in early
childhood education and increasing access for more young
children.
Te Donne and Sue Fisher Endowed Graduate Scholarship
Fund will provide scholarship support to graduate students in
the early childhood special education masters program at DUs
Morgridge College of Education. Awarded to students pursuing a
graduate degree in early childhood special education or a degree
with an emphasis in early childhood, these scholarships will
enable more individuals to enter the feld who otherwise might
not have chosen that path.
Te scholarship for graduate students is established through
a bequest gif from the Fishers, and it will be matched dollar-to-
dollar through the Universitys scholarship matching program.
Funds from the match will enable students to begin receiving
the scholarship in fall 2014, and the bequest will strengthen the
scholarship fund in perpetuity.
Also established through this gif is the Donne and Sue
Fisher Endowed Preschool Scholarship Fund, which will provide
scholarship support to preschool students with demonstrated
fnancial need to attend the Fisher Early Learning Center on the
University of Denver campus. By flling the unmet need beyond
what other preschool funds provide, this scholarship allows
children to attend the center who otherwise might not consider
applying for admission. It will open the centers doors to children
in underrepresented populations, as well as those who are at risk
due to socioeconomic and other factors.
Sarah Satterwhite
GIVING
Donne and Sue Fisher make $5 million gift to University of Denver
A trip through the decades
Te past 150 years have seen wave afer wave of change
for the University of Denver. From our humble
beginnings in 1864 in a single downtown building, the
University has grown into the citys signature institution,
and today, we are known for our distinctive campus, our
international presence, and our highly regarded
academic programs. In the following pages, we take a
look back at life at the University throughout the past
century and a half.
We also have created a special website dedicated to the
University's sesquicentennial. You can view an expanded
and interactive version of this timeline at du.edu/150,
and share your memories of life at DU.
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 17
A trip through the decades
Te past 150 years have seen wave afer wave of change
for the University of Denver. From our humble
beginnings in 1864 in a single downtown building, the
University has grown into the citys signature institution,
and today, we are known for our distinctive campus, our
international presence, and our highly regarded
academic programs. In the following pages, we take a
look back at life at the University throughout the past
century and a half.
We also have created a special website dedicated to the
University's sesquicentennial. You can view an expanded
and interactive version of this timeline at du.edu/150,
and share your memories of life at DU.
18 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

cornerstone
Te University Park campus was built on land
donated by Denver farmer Rufus Potato Clark, and
the cornerstone was for University Hall, the frst
building on campus. A teetotaler, Clark donated the
land on the condition that the campus would remain
dry in the future.
1864
1913
1911
1890
First May Days
Te May Days Festival involved the
crowning of a queen and a maypole
dance. Te event evolved into an annual
carnival/festival that still delights
students today.
John Evans, founder of
Northwestern University
in Chicago, wanted to
create a college in Denver
so future generations of
students would not have
to travel back east for
their higher education.
We are in favor of progress and
construction, President William
Howard Taf told his fellow
Republicans on Oct. 3, 1911. We
are in favor of prosperity and of
doing nothing that will interfere
with the business growth of this
country, provided that business
growth be along lines that are
legitimate and within the statutes.
University opens
Taft speaks on campus
University Hall
Check out more DU
history and photos at
du.edu/udenver150
1892: Law school founded
1884: First Commencement
1898: College of Education founded
1894: Chamberlin Observatory built
1908: Business school opens
1910: Mens tennis becomes
a varsity sport
1880: David Hastings Moore becomes chancellor
1890: William Fraser McDowell becomes chancellor
1899: Henry Augustus Buchtel becomes chancellor
1900: First African-American graduate, Emma Azalia Hackley
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 19
cornerstone
Te University Park campus was built on land
donated by Denver farmer Rufus Potato Clark, and
the cornerstone was for University Hall, the frst
building on campus. A teetotaler, Clark donated the
land on the condition that the campus would remain
dry in the future.
1864
1913
1911
1890
First May Days
Te May Days Festival involved the
crowning of a queen and a maypole
dance. Te event evolved into an annual
carnival/festival that still delights
students today.
John Evans, founder of
Northwestern University
in Chicago, wanted to
create a college in Denver
so future generations of
students would not have
to travel back east for
their higher education.
We are in favor of progress and
construction, President William
Howard Taf told his fellow
Republicans on Oct. 3, 1911. We
are in favor of prosperity and of
doing nothing that will interfere
with the business growth of this
country, provided that business
growth be along lines that are
legitimate and within the statutes.
University opens
Taft speaks on campus
University Hall
Check out more DU
history and photos at
du.edu/udenver150
1892: Law school founded
1884: First Commencement
1898: College of Education founded
1894: Chamberlin Observatory built
1908: Business school opens
1910: Mens tennis becomes
a varsity sport
1880: David Hastings Moore becomes chancellor
1890: William Fraser McDowell becomes chancellor
1899: Henry Augustus Buchtel becomes chancellor
1900: First African-American graduate, Emma Azalia Hackley
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 19
20 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

1926
1925
1932
First Homecoming
Hilltop Stadium
debuts
Mary Reed Building
completed
1929
Constructed of 1 million feet of lumber, 7,000 cubic feet of concrete and 295 tons
of steel, Hilltop Stadium was dedicated on Oct. 2, 1926. DU played its frst
football game there that day, defeating the Colorado School of Mines 277. Over
the years, Pioneers football was Hilltops primary draw, and the big event was the
biannual Tanksgiving showdown with the University of Colorado. In 1971, a
crumbling Hilltop met the wrecking ball to make way for multipurpose
intramural felds.
Vance Kirkland
becomes director of art school
Te famed modern artist turned out about 1,200 works in a 54-year career as a painter and educator.
Kirklands paintings have hung in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and
the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He is regarded as one of Colorados most important
modern artists, and his paintings, when available, command prices in the tens of thousands of dollars.
Homecoming tradition
dates back to the 1920s,
when the highlight of
the three-day event was
the annual showdown
between the University
of Denver and
University of Colorado
football teams. In the
1960s, the football
rallying cry shifed to
hockey.
Homecoming tradition
dates back to the 1920s,
when the highlight of
the three-day event was
the annual showdown
between the University
of Denver and
University of Colorado
football teams. In the
1960s, the football
rallying cry shifed to
hockey.
Named for University of
Denver benefactor Mary
Reed (mother of
Marjorie) and originally
constructed as the
University's library, the
building today houses
administrative ofces,
including those of the
chancellor and provost.
1923: Business school accredited by the
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
1927: Law Professor Thompson Marsh
(MA, JD 24) becomes rst full-time faculty member
1927: Famed aviator Charles Lindbergh
visits campus
1928: Alpine Club founded
1931: Department of Social Work founded
1922: Heber Reece Harper
becomes chancellor
1928: Frederick Maurice Hunter
becomes chancellor
1935: David Shaw Duncan
becomes chancellor
20 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 21
1926
1925
1932
First Homecoming
Hilltop Stadium
debuts
Mary Reed Building
completed
1929
Constructed of 1 million feet of lumber, 7,000 cubic feet of concrete and 295 tons
of steel, Hilltop Stadium was dedicated on Oct. 2, 1926. DU played its frst
football game there that day, defeating the Colorado School of Mines 277. Over
the years, Pioneers football was Hilltops primary draw, and the big event was the
biannual Tanksgiving showdown with the University of Colorado. In 1971, a
crumbling Hilltop met the wrecking ball to make way for multipurpose
intramural felds.
Vance Kirkland
becomes director of art school
Te famed modern artist turned out about 1,200 works in a 54-year career as a painter and educator.
Kirklands paintings have hung in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago and
the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He is regarded as one of Colorados most important
modern artists, and his paintings, when available, command prices in the tens of thousands of dollars.
Homecoming tradition
dates back to the 1920s,
when the highlight of
the three-day event was
the annual showdown
between the University
of Denver and
University of Colorado
football teams. In the
1960s, the football
rallying cry shifed to
hockey.
Homecoming tradition
dates back to the 1920s,
when the highlight of
the three-day event was
the annual showdown
between the University
of Denver and
University of Colorado
football teams. In the
1960s, the football
rallying cry shifed to
hockey.
Named for University of
Denver benefactor Mary
Reed (mother of
Marjorie) and originally
constructed as the
University's library, the
building today houses
administrative ofces,
including those of the
chancellor and provost.
1923: Business school accredited by the
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
1927: Law Professor Thompson Marsh
(MA, JD 24) becomes rst full-time faculty member
1927: Famed aviator Charles Lindbergh
visits campus
1928: Alpine Club founded
1931: Department of Social Work founded
1922: Heber Reece Harper
becomes chancellor
1928: Frederick Maurice Hunter
becomes chancellor
1935: David Shaw Duncan
becomes chancellor
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 21
22 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

1925
1946
1947
Barbara Kidder
captures individual
ski championship
Barbara Kidder was the frst DU athlete to win
a national championship. In 1946 she was
named the outstanding woman skier in the
United States; she was elected to the National
Ski Hall of Fame in 1977.
Hilltop Football Stadium
KVDU begins broadcasting
1941
When KVDU started in November 1947, the
station broadcast campus news and original
radio dramas and played classical music and
the popular bebop of the time. As a
carrier-current station, however, KVDU
could only reach students living on campus.
By the late 1960s, KVDU was comparably
equipped to any commercial radio station,
but it still needed licensing from the Federal
Communications Commission to extend its
operating power throughout the city.
Motivated by the belief that a university like
DU needs to be attached to the community
around it, sophomore John Nile
Wendorf (BA 72) took on the
challenge of obtaining an FCC
license when he became
general manager in 1969.
On April 15, 1970, the
University received a license
to broadcast to an area
stretching from Colorado
Springs, Colo., to Cheyenne,
Wyo. Te FM station, known
as KCFR, started broadcasting
on Sept. 17, 1970. In 1984,
KCFR became an indepen-
dent community radio
stationone of two stations
that founded the Colorado
Public Radio network.
DU and World War II
When America ofcially entered World War II in 1941, a number of students
joined the war efort as soldiers, and Chancellor Caleb Gates resigned to serve in
the Army. Te University had a civil aeronautics program prior to the war that
trained a number of pilots who would go on to serve in the Air Force. Nearly all
students volunteered in some capacity, from rolling bandages to planning war
bond drives. Afer the war, enrollment increased 30 percent to a total of 2,539
students, of whom 428 were World War II veterans. Fourteen new faculty
members were hired to keep up with rapidly rising enrollments, and in the
spring quarter of 1946, enrollment hit 5,716.
[In 1966], we inaugurated KVDUs
rst live play-by-play coverage of
Pioneers hockey and basketball, began
hourly newscasts and launched DUs
rst campus interview program, on
which one of my early guests was Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Peter Funt (BA 69)
1941: Lamont School of Music merges with the University
1942: Department of Social Work renamed
Graduate School of Social Work
1944: Mens ski team rst takes
to the slopes
1947: Crimson and gold selected
as ofcial school colors
1948: Downhill skiing great Willy Schaefer
becomes ski coach. He coached the Pioneers
to a record 13 NCAA championships.
1941: Caleb Frank Gates
begins rst term as chancellor
1943: Ben Mark Cherrington
becomes chancellor
1946: Caleb Frank Gates
begins second term as chancellor 1948: James Price becomes chancellor
1949: Albert Charles Jacobs
becomes chancellor
22 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 23
1925
1946
1947
Barbara Kidder
captures individual
ski championship
Barbara Kidder was the frst DU athlete to win
a national championship. In 1946 she was
named the outstanding woman skier in the
United States; she was elected to the National
Ski Hall of Fame in 1977.
Hilltop Football Stadium
KVDU begins broadcasting
1941
When KVDU started in November 1947, the
station broadcast campus news and original
radio dramas and played classical music and
the popular bebop of the time. As a
carrier-current station, however, KVDU
could only reach students living on campus.
By the late 1960s, KVDU was comparably
equipped to any commercial radio station,
but it still needed licensing from the Federal
Communications Commission to extend its
operating power throughout the city.
Motivated by the belief that a university like
DU needs to be attached to the community
around it, sophomore John Nile
Wendorf (BA 72) took on the
challenge of obtaining an FCC
license when he became
general manager in 1969.
On April 15, 1970, the
University received a license
to broadcast to an area
stretching from Colorado
Springs, Colo., to Cheyenne,
Wyo. Te FM station, known
as KCFR, started broadcasting
on Sept. 17, 1970. In 1984,
KCFR became an indepen-
dent community radio
stationone of two stations
that founded the Colorado
Public Radio network.
DU and World War II
When America ofcially entered World War II in 1941, a number of students
joined the war efort as soldiers, and Chancellor Caleb Gates resigned to serve in
the Army. Te University had a civil aeronautics program prior to the war that
trained a number of pilots who would go on to serve in the Air Force. Nearly all
students volunteered in some capacity, from rolling bandages to planning war
bond drives. Afer the war, enrollment increased 30 percent to a total of 2,539
students, of whom 428 were World War II veterans. Fourteen new faculty
members were hired to keep up with rapidly rising enrollments, and in the
spring quarter of 1946, enrollment hit 5,716.
[In 1966], we inaugurated KVDUs
rst live play-by-play coverage of
Pioneers hockey and basketball, began
hourly newscasts and launched DUs
rst campus interview program, on
which one of my early guests was Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr.
Peter Funt (BA 69)
1941: Lamont School of Music merges with the University
1942: Department of Social Work renamed
Graduate School of Social Work
1944: Mens ski team rst takes
to the slopes
1947: Crimson and gold selected
as ofcial school colors
1948: Downhill skiing great Willy Schaefer
becomes ski coach. He coached the Pioneers
to a record 13 NCAA championships.
1941: Caleb Frank Gates
begins rst term as chancellor
1943: Ben Mark Cherrington
becomes chancellor
1946: Caleb Frank Gates
begins second term as chancellor 1948: James Price becomes chancellor
1949: Albert Charles Jacobs
becomes chancellor
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 23
24 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

1955
Alpha Phi Alpha meeting
1956
Afer publishing his frst novel, Nothing But the Night,
John Williams came to the University of Denver, where he
received his bachelors degree in 1949 and his masters the
following year. Williams joined the faculty in 1954 and
became director of the Universitys budding creative
writing program in 1955. In 1965, Williams published his
academic novel Stoner, which has achieved cult status
since Williams death in 1994.
Founded in 1949, the Pioneers hockey program won its frst NCAA title in
1958 under the legendary coach. Armstrong led the team to back-to-back
championship wins in 196061 and 196869.
I suppose I treated [the players] the way they wanted to
be treated. In my playing days, it always got to me to see
how guys behaved on the road. I never cheated, I never
drank, I never smoked. Te boys knew that.
Murray Armstrong, in 2004
1958
Johnson-McFarlane Hall is built
1950
John Williams becomes
head of creative writing program
Murray Armstrong begins
21- year run as hockey coach
1950: President Dwight Eisenhower visits campus
1953: Chester Alter becomes chancellor
1957: Westminster Law School
merges with the University
1956: Womens Library Association founded
1960: Evans Chapel moved from
downtown home to campus
Tis photo from the 1950
Kynewisbok shows the DU
chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, the
frst intercollegiate Greek-letter
fraternity established for
African-Americans. Alpha Phi
Alpha served as a fraternity for
graduate students at the
University as far back as the
early 1930s.
24 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 25
1955
Alpha Phi Alpha meeting
1956
Afer publishing his frst novel, Nothing But the Night,
John Williams came to the University of Denver, where he
received his bachelors degree in 1949 and his masters the
following year. Williams joined the faculty in 1954 and
became director of the Universitys budding creative
writing program in 1955. In 1965, Williams published his
academic novel Stoner, which has achieved cult status
since Williams death in 1994.
Founded in 1949, the Pioneers hockey program won its frst NCAA title in
1958 under the legendary coach. Armstrong led the team to back-to-back
championship wins in 196061 and 196869.
I suppose I treated [the players] the way they wanted to
be treated. In my playing days, it always got to me to see
how guys behaved on the road. I never cheated, I never
drank, I never smoked. Te boys knew that.
Murray Armstrong, in 2004
1958
Johnson-McFarlane Hall is built
1950
John Williams becomes
head of creative writing program
Murray Armstrong begins
21- year run as hockey coach
1950: President Dwight Eisenhower visits campus
1953: Chester Alter becomes chancellor
1957: Westminster Law School
merges with the University
1956: Womens Library Association founded
1960: Evans Chapel moved from
downtown home to campus
Tis photo from the 1950
Kynewisbok shows the DU
chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, the
frst intercollegiate Greek-letter
fraternity established for
African-Americans. Alpha Phi
Alpha served as a fraternity for
graduate students at the
University as far back as the
early 1930s.
26 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

1967
1961
End of football
Te frst Winter Carnival was held the weekend of
Jan. 13, 1961. Activities included an on-campus
snow sculpture contest and a Snow Queen
competition. Te Snow Queen winner, freshman
political science major Nancy Sand, of Oceanside,
N.Y., was announced at the Friday night hockey
game against North Dakota. On Saturday, chartered
buses lef the old Student Union bound for Winter
Park. Ticket price for the round trip was $3.75. Tat
evening, a torchlight parade was held on the slopes,
and a dance ($1 admission) was held at the Winter
Park Lodge. Read about the 2014 Winter Carnival on
page 37.
Dr. Korbel was a magnicent storyteller. He was some-
one who made international politics and the Soviet Union
come alive. He did it through wonderful stories about his
time as a diplomat, about his time in the dark days of
World War II. Suddenly this world opened up to me, of
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, and I thought,
thats what I want to do. It really was this course that led
me to believe there was another future for me.
Condoleezza Rice (BA 74, PhD 81)
1961
First Winter Carnival
On Jan. 9, 1961, Chancellor
Chester Alter announced the
Universitys decision to end the DU
football program. With hockey
emerging as the Universitys
fagship sport, football attendance
had been declining for years. In a
2004 interview for the University
of Denver Magazine, Alterthen
98 years oldwas asked whether
he regretted dropping football.
DUs still there, isnt it? Alter
responded. It seems to have
survived just fne.
1964
As a rising star in the Czechoslovakian government in the 1930s and
1940s, Josef Korbel seemed destined for an exemplary diplomatic career
but for the Nazi occupation that forced him to fee to London in 1939 and
the Communist coup that led to his 1948 immigration to the United
States. Instead, Korbel launched what ultimately became a 27-year career
in academia. He joined the University as an international afairs professor
in 1949, became founding dean of the Graduate School of International
Studies in 1964 and remained until his 1977 death from cancer. Te
school he created was renamed the Josef Korbel School of International
Studies in May 2008.
Graduate School
of International Studies opens
First issue of literary
journal Denver
Quarterly published
1966
Martin Luther King Jr.
speaks on campus
Martin Luther King Jr. visited campus twice, frst
in 1964 and later in 1967. In 1964, he spoke before
a crowd of 600 in the old Student Union (now the
south end of the Driscoll Student Center) in an
appearance sponsored by the local Shorter
Community AME Church. Te next year, he
became the youngest person ever to win the Nobel
Peace Prize. King returned to campus on May 18,
1967, to speak at the 5,000-seat DU Field-
houselocated where the Ritchie Center now
stands. Admission was $1 for students and faculty
and $2 for the general public. His topic was Te
Future of Integration.
1962: Boettcher Center for Science, Engineering and Research constructed
1964: DU celebrates
its centennial year
1965: Lady Bird Johnson visits campus
1966: President Lyndon Johnson
awarded honorary degree
1968: Graduate School of Social Work
offers one of the countrys rst social work
doctoral programs
1967: Maurice Bernard Mitchell
becomes chancellor
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 27
1967
1961
End of football
Te frst Winter Carnival was held the weekend of
Jan. 13, 1961. Activities included an on-campus
snow sculpture contest and a Snow Queen
competition. Te Snow Queen winner, freshman
political science major Nancy Sand, of Oceanside,
N.Y., was announced at the Friday night hockey
game against North Dakota. On Saturday, chartered
buses lef the old Student Union bound for Winter
Park. Ticket price for the round trip was $3.75. Tat
evening, a torchlight parade was held on the slopes,
and a dance ($1 admission) was held at the Winter
Park Lodge. Read about the 2014 Winter Carnival on
page 37.
Dr. Korbel was a magnicent storyteller. He was some-
one who made international politics and the Soviet Union
come alive. He did it through wonderful stories about his
time as a diplomat, about his time in the dark days of
World War II. Suddenly this world opened up to me, of
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, and I thought,
thats what I want to do. It really was this course that led
me to believe there was another future for me.
Condoleezza Rice (BA 74, PhD 81)
1961
First Winter Carnival
On Jan. 9, 1961, Chancellor
Chester Alter announced the
Universitys decision to end the DU
football program. With hockey
emerging as the Universitys
fagship sport, football attendance
had been declining for years. In a
2004 interview for the University
of Denver Magazine, Alterthen
98 years oldwas asked whether
he regretted dropping football.
DUs still there, isnt it? Alter
responded. It seems to have
survived just fne.
1964
As a rising star in the Czechoslovakian government in the 1930s and
1940s, Josef Korbel seemed destined for an exemplary diplomatic career
but for the Nazi occupation that forced him to fee to London in 1939 and
the Communist coup that led to his 1948 immigration to the United
States. Instead, Korbel launched what ultimately became a 27-year career
in academia. He joined the University as an international afairs professor
in 1949, became founding dean of the Graduate School of International
Studies in 1964 and remained until his 1977 death from cancer. Te
school he created was renamed the Josef Korbel School of International
Studies in May 2008.
Graduate School
of International Studies opens
First issue of literary
journal Denver
Quarterly published
1966
Martin Luther King Jr.
speaks on campus
Martin Luther King Jr. visited campus twice, frst
in 1964 and later in 1967. In 1964, he spoke before
a crowd of 600 in the old Student Union (now the
south end of the Driscoll Student Center) in an
appearance sponsored by the local Shorter
Community AME Church. Te next year, he
became the youngest person ever to win the Nobel
Peace Prize. King returned to campus on May 18,
1967, to speak at the 5,000-seat DU Field-
houselocated where the Ritchie Center now
stands. Admission was $1 for students and faculty
and $2 for the general public. His topic was Te
Future of Integration.
1962: Boettcher Center for Science, Engineering and Research constructed
1964: DU celebrates
its centennial year
1965: Lady Bird Johnson visits campus
1966: President Lyndon Johnson
awarded honorary degree
1968: Graduate School of Social Work
offers one of the countrys rst social work
doctoral programs
1967: Maurice Bernard Mitchell
becomes chancellor
28 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

After playing for more than two hours straight, the Mothers
launched into a full-blown rock n roll set that just knocked
out the audience and was the nale for the evening. People
were so juiced by the music that no one wanted to leave at
the end. What a scene, and what a concert it was.
Patrick Stanford (BA 72, MSJA 77)
Colorado entrepreneur
Spencer Penroses El
Pomar Foundation
donated $4.5 million for
the construction of
Penrose Library in 1972.
Te library was renovated
in 2011 and transformed
into the Anderson
Academic Commons, but
its orange walls and
retro-mod furniture will
never be forgotten.
Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention played to a jammed University of
Denver arena on Oct. 24, 1971. Many students didnt know what to expect
from the legendary rocker, known for his anarchical shows. Other classic
rockers who performed on campus in the 60s and 70s included the Doors,
the Association, James Taylor, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Simon and Garfunkel.
Frank Zappa performs on campus
Penrose Library
opens
1972
Woodstock West
On May 6, 1970, DU studentsdistressed by President Richard
Nixons April 30 order to invade Cambodia and the May 4 shooting
deaths of four Kent State students by members of the National
Guardwent on strike against the University. Woodstock West was
founded two days later in the area bounded by Margery Reed Hall,
Carnegie Hall and the Science Building as students gathered,
constructing shelters and memorials. To end the protest, Colorado
Gov. John Love (BA 39, LLB 41) called in National Guardsmen, who
arrived on May 13. Woodstock West was dismantled that day without
incident.
Te emotions were so high. We
needed a release. Tere was so much
frustration about not being able to do
anything about the war and feeling
like no one was listening to us.
Susan (Foster) Gould (BA 71)
1974
DU adds womens
varsity athletics
Tough women had played
intramural sports at DU for
years, the University ofcially
added womens varsity
sportsincluding basketball,
feld hockey, gymnastics, skiing
and tennisafer the 1972
passage of Title IX legislation.
1976: Graduate School of Professional Psychology opens
1981: University College founded
1983: Festival of Nations created to celebrate
the Universitys international focus
1982: Groundbreaking for
Driscoll Student Center
1984: Ricks Center for
Gifted Children open its doors
1978: Ross Pritchard
becomes chancellor
1984: Dwight Morrell Smith
becomes chancellor
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 29
After playing for more than two hours straight, the Mothers
launched into a full-blown rock n roll set that just knocked
out the audience and was the nale for the evening. People
were so juiced by the music that no one wanted to leave at
the end. What a scene, and what a concert it was.
Patrick Stanford (BA 72, MSJA 77)
Colorado entrepreneur
Spencer Penroses El
Pomar Foundation
donated $4.5 million for
the construction of
Penrose Library in 1972.
Te library was renovated
in 2011 and transformed
into the Anderson
Academic Commons, but
its orange walls and
retro-mod furniture will
never be forgotten.
Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention played to a jammed University of
Denver arena on Oct. 24, 1971. Many students didnt know what to expect
from the legendary rocker, known for his anarchical shows. Other classic
rockers who performed on campus in the 60s and 70s included the Doors,
the Association, James Taylor, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Simon and Garfunkel.
Frank Zappa performs on campus
Penrose Library
opens
1972
Woodstock West
On May 6, 1970, DU studentsdistressed by President Richard
Nixons April 30 order to invade Cambodia and the May 4 shooting
deaths of four Kent State students by members of the National
Guardwent on strike against the University. Woodstock West was
founded two days later in the area bounded by Margery Reed Hall,
Carnegie Hall and the Science Building as students gathered,
constructing shelters and memorials. To end the protest, Colorado
Gov. John Love (BA 39, LLB 41) called in National Guardsmen, who
arrived on May 13. Woodstock West was dismantled that day without
incident.
Te emotions were so high. We
needed a release. Tere was so much
frustration about not being able to do
anything about the war and feeling
like no one was listening to us.
Susan (Foster) Gould (BA 71)
1974
DU adds womens
varsity athletics
Tough women had played
intramural sports at DU for
years, the University ofcially
added womens varsity
sportsincluding basketball,
feld hockey, gymnastics, skiing
and tennisafer the 1972
passage of Title IX legislation.
1976: Graduate School of Professional Psychology opens
1981: University College founded
1983: Festival of Nations created to celebrate
the Universitys international focus
1982: Groundbreaking for
Driscoll Student Center
1984: Ricks Center for
Gifted Children open its doors
1978: Ross Pritchard
becomes chancellor
1984: Dwight Morrell Smith
becomes chancellor
30 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

Colorado Women's College was founded
in 1888 as a place for women throughout
the Rocky Mountain region to achieve a
higher education. Today, it's one of only
46 women's colleges in the U.S. and
Canada, and the only women's college
directly serving undergraduate women
who live and work in Colorado.
A collaboration involving
community representatives and
faculty members of the Graduate
School of Social Work, the Bridge
Project aims to reduce educational
barriers, increase educational
opportunities and improve
learning outcomes for children and
youth living in Denvers public
housing communities. Te Bridge
Project now has four sites and 350
volunteer mentors and tutors and
has touched the lives of thousands
of kids.
Colorado Womens College
merges with DU
1982
Among several buildings
constructed during the tenure
of Chancellor Daniel Ritchie,
who served in that post from
19892005, the Ritchie Center
is home to Magness Arena and
the Coors Fitness Center. Te
building also houses Denvers
only Olympic-sized swimming
pool.
1991
Bridge Project
founded
1999
1999
Named for the Universitys
12th chancellor, the
arboretum is home to about
2,239 trees representing
more than 240 species and
varieties. Te arboretum
includes 10 state
champions, the largest
specimens of a particular
species growing in
Colorado.
Chester M Alter
Arboretum opens
Opening of Daniel L. Ritchie
Center for Sports & Wellness
1994: College of Business
renamed in honor of cable TV pioneer Bill Daniels
1996: Meyer-Womble Observatory opens
atop Mount Evans, offering one of the highest
vantage points of any telescope on Earth
1995: Pioneer Leadership Program founded
1998: Spirituals Project created to preserve
the music written by African-American slaves
2000: Fisher Early Learning Center opens
1989: Daniel Ritchie becomes chancellor
2003: Ricketson Law Building opens as the
countrys rst LEED-certied law school building
30 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 31
Colorado Women's College was founded
in 1888 as a place for women throughout
the Rocky Mountain region to achieve a
higher education. Today, it's one of only
46 women's colleges in the U.S. and
Canada, and the only women's college
directly serving undergraduate women
who live and work in Colorado.
A collaboration involving
community representatives and
faculty members of the Graduate
School of Social Work, the Bridge
Project aims to reduce educational
barriers, increase educational
opportunities and improve
learning outcomes for children and
youth living in Denvers public
housing communities. Te Bridge
Project now has four sites and 350
volunteer mentors and tutors and
has touched the lives of thousands
of kids.
Colorado Womens College
merges with DU
1982
Among several buildings
constructed during the tenure
of Chancellor Daniel Ritchie,
who served in that post from
19892005, the Ritchie Center
is home to Magness Arena and
the Coors Fitness Center. Te
building also houses Denvers
only Olympic-sized swimming
pool.
1991
Bridge Project
founded
1999
1999
Named for the Universitys
12th chancellor, the
arboretum is home to about
2,239 trees representing
more than 240 species and
varieties. Te arboretum
includes 10 state
champions, the largest
specimens of a particular
species growing in
Colorado.
Chester M Alter
Arboretum opens
Opening of Daniel L. Ritchie
Center for Sports & Wellness
1994: College of Business
renamed in honor of cable TV pioneer Bill Daniels
1996: Meyer-Womble Observatory opens
atop Mount Evans, offering one of the highest
vantage points of any telescope on Earth
1995: Pioneer Leadership Program founded
1998: Spirituals Project created to preserve
the music written by African-American slaves
2000: Fisher Early Learning Center opens
1989: Daniel Ritchie becomes chancellor
2003: Ricketson Law Building opens as the
countrys rst LEED-certied law school building
32 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

Deciding to study abroad is the best decision I ever made. Te hospitality
of the Senegalese people, the vibrancy of the countrys art and music and
the overall richness of the culture deeply impacted how I see our world.
Merrill Pierce (BA 13), who studied in Senegal in fall 2011
2001
Cherrington Global
Scholars program
established
Te global scholars program gives
students an unparalleled
opportunity to explore the world
beyond their front doors, allowing
them to spend a quarter abroad with
no additional cost for tuition, room
and board. Students can choose
from more than 150 locations
around the world for their
study-abroad program.
Bill Tierney came to DU afer 22 years and six national titles with
the Princeton Tigers. In his fve years with the Pioneers, Tierney
has led the team to the NCAA Tournament fve times.
Bill Tierney hired as lacrosse coach 2009
Te small cofee shop in the Joy
Burns Center gives students in the
Daniels College of Business Fritz
Knoebel School of Hospitality
Management a hands-on opportu-
nity to serve customers and run a
business.
Beans Cof opens
It would have been easy enough to stay at
Princeton and walk o into the sunset, but that
wasnt me. I was excited for a new challenge.
Bill Tierney
Robert and Judi Newman Center
for the Performing Arts opens
2004
A crown jewel of the campus and one
of the Universitys most visible faces to
the larger Denver community, the
Newman Center is home to the
Lamont School of Music. Its Byron
Teatre, with more than 40 stage
confgurations, is home base for DUs
theater department. Its concert halls of
various sizes make it a favorite rental
for local music, dance and theater
groups. And the centers very existence
gave birth to Newman Center
Presents, a series that brings
international names in classical, jazz,
dance, opera, theater and more to
campus every yearand ofen gives
Lamont students the opportunity to
interact and perform with the visiting
artists.
Check out more DU
history and photos at
du.edu/udenver150
2003: School of Engineering and Computer Science
introduces countrys rst four-year degree in game development
2005: Robert Coombe becomes chancellor
2005: International Disaster Psychology
program founded in Graduate School of
Professional Psychology
2009: Denver Teacher Residency program launches
in Morgridge College of Education
2006: Graduate School of Social Work
launches Institute for Human-Animal Connection
2009: University creates a sustainability
minor that students can tailor to work with
their selected major
32 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 33
Deciding to study abroad is the best decision I ever made. Te hospitality
of the Senegalese people, the vibrancy of the countrys art and music and
the overall richness of the culture deeply impacted how I see our world.
Merrill Pierce (BA 13), who studied in Senegal in fall 2011
2001
Cherrington Global
Scholars program
established
Te global scholars program gives
students an unparalleled
opportunity to explore the world
beyond their front doors, allowing
them to spend a quarter abroad with
no additional cost for tuition, room
and board. Students can choose
from more than 150 locations
around the world for their
study-abroad program.
Bill Tierney came to DU afer 22 years and six national titles with
the Princeton Tigers. In his fve years with the Pioneers, Tierney
has led the team to the NCAA Tournament fve times.
Bill Tierney hired as lacrosse coach 2009
Te small cofee shop in the Joy
Burns Center gives students in the
Daniels College of Business Fritz
Knoebel School of Hospitality
Management a hands-on opportu-
nity to serve customers and run a
business.
Beans Cof opens
It would have been easy enough to stay at
Princeton and walk o into the sunset, but that
wasnt me. I was excited for a new challenge.
Bill Tierney
Robert and Judi Newman Center
for the Performing Arts opens
2004
A crown jewel of the campus and one
of the Universitys most visible faces to
the larger Denver community, the
Newman Center is home to the
Lamont School of Music. Its Byron
Teatre, with more than 40 stage
confgurations, is home base for DUs
theater department. Its concert halls of
various sizes make it a favorite rental
for local music, dance and theater
groups. And the centers very existence
gave birth to Newman Center
Presents, a series that brings
international names in classical, jazz,
dance, opera, theater and more to
campus every yearand ofen gives
Lamont students the opportunity to
interact and perform with the visiting
artists.
Check out more DU
history and photos at
du.edu/udenver150
2003: School of Engineering and Computer Science
introduces countrys rst four-year degree in game development
2005: Robert Coombe becomes chancellor
2005: International Disaster Psychology
program founded in Graduate School of
Professional Psychology
2009: Denver Teacher Residency program launches
in Morgridge College of Education
2006: Graduate School of Social Work
launches Institute for Human-Animal Connection
2009: University creates a sustainability
minor that students can tailor to work with
their selected major
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 33
34 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

The University
hosts rst
presidential
debate of the
2012 election
cycle
President Barack Obama and former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney came to
Magness Arena Oct. 3 to argue about
domestic policy under the supervision of
moderator Jim Lehrer. Hundreds of media
outlets from around the world covered the
event. On the other side of campus,
DebateFest ofered live music, food trucks,
games and debate viewing on giant screens.
Six former and current Pioneers trekked to Sochi, Russia, in February for
the 22nd Winter Olympics: alumni Paul Stastny (attd. 200406), a member
of the U.S. mens hockey team; Kevin Dineen (attd. 198183), head coach of
the Canadian Womens Olympic hockey team; skier Leif Kristian Haugen
(BSBA 12); and freeskier Keri Herman (BSBA 05), along with current
students Trevor Philp (pictured at right) and Sebastian Brigovic.
Pioneers compete at Winter
Olympics in Sochi 2014
Anderson Academic
Commons opens
2013
Created with the support of more than 5,000 donors
and a lead gif from trustee Ed Anderson (BFA 71)
and his wife, Linda Cabot, the fully remodeled
former Penrose Library features several dozen
tech-equipped group study areas, deep quiet zones
for intense study and an in-house caf with patio
seating and a menu of seasonal, locally sourced
cuisine. Project teams can meet in rooms equipped
with fat-panel monitors to put the fnishing touches
on class presentations. An array of connection
points means students and faculty members can
plug in a tablet or phone to share their mobile work
with others.
Combining the former digital media studies and electronic media arts and
design programs, EDP appeals to students who want to work on the
cutting edge of technology, generating innovative forms and practices of
collaboration, interaction, research and creative expression. Te program
ofers bachelors and masters degrees.
Emergent Digital Practices
program formed 2011
2012
People are beginning to realize that we dont just need new technology
to solve our problems. We need creative, knowledgeable and engaged
problem solvers.
Trace Reddell, associate professor in the EDP program
2010: Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall opens as new
home of the Morgridge College of Education
2011: Holocaust Memorial Social Action Site opens on campus
2012: New logo debuts
2014: Groundbreaking on new building for the
Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science
34 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 35
The University
hosts rst
presidential
debate of the
2012 election
cycle
President Barack Obama and former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney came to
Magness Arena Oct. 3 to argue about
domestic policy under the supervision of
moderator Jim Lehrer. Hundreds of media
outlets from around the world covered the
event. On the other side of campus,
DebateFest ofered live music, food trucks,
games and debate viewing on giant screens.
Six former and current Pioneers trekked to Sochi, Russia, in February for
the 22nd Winter Olympics: alumni Paul Stastny (attd. 200406), a member
of the U.S. mens hockey team; Kevin Dineen (attd. 198183), head coach of
the Canadian Womens Olympic hockey team; skier Leif Kristian Haugen
(BSBA 12); and freeskier Keri Herman (BSBA 05), along with current
students Trevor Philp (pictured at right) and Sebastian Brigovic.
Pioneers compete at Winter
Olympics in Sochi 2014
Anderson Academic
Commons opens
2013
Created with the support of more than 5,000 donors
and a lead gif from trustee Ed Anderson (BFA 71)
and his wife, Linda Cabot, the fully remodeled
former Penrose Library features several dozen
tech-equipped group study areas, deep quiet zones
for intense study and an in-house caf with patio
seating and a menu of seasonal, locally sourced
cuisine. Project teams can meet in rooms equipped
with fat-panel monitors to put the fnishing touches
on class presentations. An array of connection
points means students and faculty members can
plug in a tablet or phone to share their mobile work
with others.
Combining the former digital media studies and electronic media arts and
design programs, EDP appeals to students who want to work on the
cutting edge of technology, generating innovative forms and practices of
collaboration, interaction, research and creative expression. Te program
ofers bachelors and masters degrees.
Emergent Digital Practices
program formed 2011
2012
People are beginning to realize that we dont just need new technology
to solve our problems. We need creative, knowledgeable and engaged
problem solvers.
Trace Reddell, associate professor in the EDP program
2010: Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall opens as new
home of the Morgridge College of Education
2011: Holocaust Memorial Social Action Site opens on campus
2012: New logo debuts
2014: Groundbreaking on new building for the
Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 35
36 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

Help us reach 186,400 hours of service
By Greg Glasgow
At the University of Denver, community service is a way of life
that starts with the Universitys visionto be a great private university
dedicated to the public goodand continues through the lives of students,
alumni, faculty and staf.
As part of its sesquicentennial year celebration, the University is
emphasizing service to communities via the 1864 Service Challenge, a
web-centered initiative that urges Pioneersstudents, alumni, faculty
and stafto join forces to shoot for a combined yearlong total of 186,400
service hours to refect the Universitys founding in 1864. Participants
can log their hoursand track their individual or group totalsat the
1864 Service Challenge site, which is part of the sesquicentennial website,
du.edu/du150.
Universities have choices about how they are going to connect
with communities, says Anne DePrince, director of the Universitys Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning
(CCESL). One choice is simply not to connect, and another choice is to say, we have a lot of capacity on campus because of the
people who are here, and getting out of your house and serving is bringing that capacity into action. You can contribute by doing
service, and you also have this really unique opportunity to learn on the ground. Service is a way of continuing a DU education.
Visit du.edu/du150 to learn more about or sign up for the 1864 Service Challenge. Check out CCESLs volunteer opportunity database
at volunteer.du.edu. Te Challenge runs through the end of the 2014 calendar year, and all community service completed in 2014 can
be counted as part of the challenge.
Digging into history
By Greg Glasgow
To prepare for a sesquicentennial exhibit at the Anderson Academic
Commons, University of Denver archivists dug deep into their collections to fnd
photographs, uniforms and other artifacts that help tell the DU story.
Tradition and Legacyan interactive exhibit that opened Jan. 13
features 13 stations spread throughout all three foors of the building and
divided into themes such as campus life, athletics and performing arts. In
addition to large banners that tell the University of Denver story in words and
pictures, many stations also include cases full of artifactsfrom vintage athletics
and cheerleading uniforms to Commencement scepters and DU beanies.
[Te artifacts] tell the kind of story you can really only tell if you have
something that was worn by a particular person or owned by themit tells
you something about a time in history that you cant necessarily get from a
re-creation, says archivist Kate Crowe. It grounds what youre saying in reality
because its a real physical thing that existed at that time.
One of Crowes favorite fnds relates to Woodstock West, the Universitys famous 1970 protest against the Vietnam War and the Kent
State shootings. Among the news clippings and telegrams related to Woodstock West is a handwritten journal in which history professor
Donald Hughes chronicled the protest minute by minute.
He was live-tweeting years before live-tweeting existed, Crowe says.
Other artifacts on display include the very frst issue of the Denver Quarterly, a copy of the original Colorado Seminary charter,
architectural models of campus buildings and side-by-side aerial photos of campus in the 1950s and today.
Te exhibit also includes videos on the presidential debate and the changing campus landscape, as well as footage from
Homecoming in 1955.
Tradition and Legacy runs throughout 2014; visit library.du.edu.
W
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Winter Carnival welcomes alumni,
faculty and staff
By Annissa Leon
Winter Carnival, a University of Denver student tradition for 53 years, carved new
ground this year, opening its gates to the extended Pioneer community.
Weve had opportunities for faculty and staf to register before, but ofcially, this was
the frst year, says Jill Dufy, assistant director of student activities.
Even though the celebration landed on Super Bowl weekend, there were about 1,000
participants, including many alumni, parents and friends. With a successful launch, the
planning team intends to continue inviting the entire University community for future
Winter Carnivals.
Since its such a student tradition, it will take a few years to get the word around, Dufy
says.
Skiing, ice-skating, snow tubing and a winter concert were among the activities at the
carnival, which took place Jan. 31Feb. 2 in Keystone, Colo. Other events including a chili
cookof, Instagram photo competitions and painting sessionstook place on campus and
were open to anyone with ties to the University community.
I think everybody was ready for it, says Neda Kikhia, co-chair of the DU
Programming Board traditions committee. DU is so good at having fun, doing
something that hasnt been done and making a community.
Kikhia, a sophomore majoring in communications and religion, says she was
excited to plan a memorable college experience and loved how creative and passionate
her committee got with the events.
Tis is a unique DU tradition, Kikhia says. Its one of
the most incredible experiences, especially if youre not from
Colorado.
Visit the special sesquicentennial website, du.edu/du150,
and share your own memories of Winter Carnival and other
University of Denver traditions.
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Sesquicentennial
Founders Day 2014 celebrates
University legacy in style
By Greg Glasgow
Photography by Wayne Armstrong
Eschewing the typical Founders Day format for a party beftting the University of Denvers
150th anniversary, the 2014 Founders Day Gala was a grand celebration of the Universitys long
history. Te event took place March 5 at the Hyatt Regency Colorado Convention Center in
Denver and welcomed more than 1,100 attendees.
Our volunteer committee, led by trustee Navin Dimond (MBA 86), felt strongly that the
theme of the Founders Day sesquicentennial gala should be
about the fact that we all are a part of the DU storyits past,
present and future, says Kristine Cecil, associate vice chancellor
for university advancement and executive director of alumni
relations. We wanted our guests to feel like they were a part of a
once-in-a-lifetime celebration.
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock opened the event with
comments that highlighted the Universitys faithful partnership
with the city of Denver; this was followed by the screening of a
video in which students, parents, alumni and friends wished the
University a happy birthday and a recorded video message from
Gov. John Hickenlooper in which he proclaimed March 5, 2014,
as University of Denver Sesquicentennial Founders Day.
Te University chose not to name new award winners at
this years Founders Day gala; instead, all past award winners
were invited to the celebration. Eighty-six of the 150 living past
honorees were in attendance, including graduates from
the 1940s through 2005.
Current students played a large part in the
galamusicians from the Lamont School of
Music performed afer the mayors remarks, and
seven students dressed in costume to bring to life
diferent moments in the Universitys history.
Junior Constantine Johns portrayed the
Universitys frst graduate, John Hipp, who
collected his degree in 1884, while senior
Katy Williams spoke about the Universitys
frst homecoming celebration, in 1925.
Paul David Wade, a graduate student
in the Josef Korbel School of
International Studies, looked back to
1958, when the Pioneers won their
frst NCAA hockey championship;
senior Cheyenne Michaels and sophomore Mawukle Yebuah
remembered Martin Luther King Jr.s 1967 speech on campus.
First-year student Trevor Fulton recalled 1970s Woodstock West
protest; and senior Megan Fleischmann looked to recent history as
she spoke about the 2012 presidential debate on campus.
One student speaker appeared as himself: sophomore business
student Cameron Simmons, a Daniels Fund scholar who spoke
about the life-changing impact the University has had on him
during his time as a student.
Te student narrators really helped to
embody the spirit of the evening and to tie the
past and present of the University together, and
the audience really enjoyed it, Cecil says. We are
also so thankful to all of our volunteers who not
only helped make the evening a success, but who
have helped shape who we are today and who we
will be tomorrow.
Spreading the Founders Day celebration to
others in the University of Denver community,
the March 5 gala was surrounded by seven days
of special events on campus. Dubbed 1864
Week, the series featured a Pioneers hockey
game; a musical performance at the
Newman Center for the Performing
Arts; and the BIG EVENT, a late-night
celebration for students and alumni
that featured casino games, a zip line,
carriage rides, laser tag, a dance party,
live comedy and more.
Te week also included several
academic presentations, including
a panel discussion on the legacy of
Bill Driscoll (BA 42, MS 48), a
member of the biology faculty
from 194483 and associate dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences
from 196883; University Chaplain
Gary Browers exploration of religion at
DU over the years; a look at the life of DU
benefactor Mary Reed; and University
Historian Steve Fishers slide show on the
history of the school.
Sesquicentennial
Join us for these sesquicentennial events
Through December 24
TRADITION AND LEGACY, ANDERSON ACADEMIC COMMONS
Mixing artifacts and video clips with text and archival photographs,
this interactive exhibit shows how aspiration and vision came to animate
the DU experience. Individual displays focus on everything from athletics
and recreation to campus life, Homecoming festivities to Commencement
traditions.
May 18
DU POWWOW, DRISCOLL GREEN Te Universitys Native Student
Alliance hosts this daylong celebration of Native American culture, with
drumming, dancing, a blanket ceremony, food and more. Te event also
honors the Native American students graduating in June. Visit du.edu/cme/
powwow.html for details.
June 67
COMMENCEMENT WEEK Te annual Commencement ceremony will
be expanded to include a senior barbecue and other events that celebrate the
time that seniors and graduate students have spent on campus. Te week also
includes two days of activities for the Class of 1964s 50th reunion.
Summer
FAMILY CONCERT SERIES A new family-friendly, free concert
series featuring a variety of musical styles will take place on campus
in June, July and August. Featured artists are the Pan Nation Steel
Orchestra (Caribbean, July 24); the Denver Municipal Band
(classical/concert, Aug. 14); City Sky (bluegrass, Aug. 21); and the
Jason Klobnak Quintet (jazz, Aug. 28). Concerts begin at 7 p.m. on
Driscoll Green. Te series also includes carillon concerts on June 22,
July 6, July 20 and Aug. 17 on the lawn outside the Ritchie Center.
September 12
DENVER 150 FESTIVAL AND CRIMSON CLASSIC Te
inaugural Crimson Classic 5K on campus in September 2013 drew
more than 200 participants. Te race will occur again in 2014 as a
companion event to the Denver 150 Festival, an afernoon of music,
food and fun on Driscoll Green.
October 30November 2
HOMECOMING & FAMILY WEEKEND, ALL-CLASS REUNION
AND PIONEER SYMPOSIUM Te annual celebration will be
enhanced for the Universitys sesquicentennial year, with an all-class
reunion, inductions into the Athletics Hall of Fame, lifelong learning
opportunities, special guest speakers, parent sessions, Taste of DU,
campus tours and Pioneer hockey games against powerhouse Boston
College. Visit alumni.du.edu to learn more.
View a full list of events at du.edu/du150
University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014 41
Connections
Alumni
Whats your favorite memory of DU?
This photo, taken in 1964, the Universitys centennial year, shows theater students performing
Shakespeares The Taming of the Shrew. Fifty years later, and in honor of our sesquicentennial
year, the University has created a special website filled with historical photos, maps and stories
from our first 150 years, as well as opportunities for you to connect with fellow alumni and share
your own stories from your time on campus. Check it out at www.du.edu/du150.
42 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014

U.S. government. Leola taught for several
years in the Denver Public Schools, then
taught preschool in Oak Ridge. She retired
in 1988. The couple enjoyed many years of
travel, music, dancing, bridge playing and
various volunteer activities.
1951
Gene Knupke (BA 51) of Denver has
published a book after 20 years of research.
Profiles of American/Canadian Sports Sta-
diums and Arena (Xlibris, 2006) contains
109 stories and 86 photographs and statistics
on 355 venues.
1952
Jerry Pankow (BS 52) of Slidell, La.,
published a book, Snags and Sawyers
(Wagonbridge Publishing, 2012), about his
2,000-mile canoe trip with two other DU
students. Based on diary entries, letters and
newspaper articles from 1949, the book
tracks the students from Pueblo, Colo., to
New Orleans.
1953
Maydelle (Smith)
Meier (MA 53)
of Albuquerque,
N.M., is retired
after teaching
kindergarten for
20 years. Maydelle
was listed in
Outstanding
Elementary Teach-
ers of America in 1974. She traveled with
the American Red Cross for five years to
Korea, Morocco and France. Maydelle is
married and has three children, four grand-
children and three great-grandchildren. She
now enjoys genealogy and photography as
hobbies.
1960
Sandra Dallas (BA 60) of Denver pub-
lished her 13th novel, Fallen Women (St.
Martins Press, 2013). Set in the Wild West
of the late 1800s, the book tells the story
of a socialite investigating the death of her
1947
Barbara French
(BA 47) of
Anaheim, Calif.,
published a
memoir, Radio
Actress: Romping
through the 40s
(PublishAmerica,
2013). The book
features DU and
references many Denver sites. Barbara has
performed on more than 1,000 radio shows
and commercials and has written for radio
and fashion. She currently teaches creative
writing in Southern California.
1950
Donald Shepherd (BS 50) of Kingston,
Tenn., is widowed after nearly 65 years of
marriage to Leola (Pope) Shepherd (BA
48). Donald worked with the U.S. Bureau of
Reclamation in Denver until being relocated
to Oak Ridge, Tenn. He retired in 1987, after
30 years of working as an engineer for the
The classes
DU ON THE ROAD
Our history. Our story. Our future.
DU is hitting the road to celebrate our
150th birthday in cities across the
country. Experience DUs best minds
sharing their expertise in compelling
talks by faculty and notable alumni.
Hear the latest University update
from top administrators and connect
with fellow alumni, parents and friends.
F A L L 2 0 1 4 CI T I E S
San Francisco
Los Angeles
New York City
Chicago
Washington DC
HE A R OU R S T OR Y
Engage with presenters
Discover DUs future plans
Connect with fellow Pioneers
Celebrate our history
L E A R N MOR E
alumni.du.edu/duontheroad
303.871.2701
S AN F R ANCI S CO

L OS ANGE L E S NE W Y OR K CHI CAGO WAS HI NGT ON DC
University of Denver Magazine CONNECTIONS 43
Heather McHugh (MA 73) has run
the gamut since her days at the University
of Denver. She is a respected poet with a
MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant to
her name, a professor at the University of
Washington, and the executive director of
CAREGIFTED, a nonprofit committed to the
well-being of caregivers around the country.
McHughwhose first collection of poems
was published by Houghton Mifflin in 1977
eventually found herself in a dry spell as a
writer. On top of that, in 2011 her godsons
first child was born with severe neurological
challenges. This changed the childs parents
lives overnight, forcing them to leave their
much-loved jobs abroad and come back to
the U.S. to find the best possible services and
therapies.
All I could thinkafter my first burst of
utter love for this helpless childwas right
now, shes a tiny baby, McHugh says. But 10 years from now, these parents are still going to be
diapering, and they wont even be able to lift her anymore. They are going to be exhausted.
Suddenly, she knew who did deserve a break: Every caregiver in this country who is isolated,
inundated and ignored; all those women and men who, in their 40s and 50s and 60s, will still be
diapering someone, and feeding, and carrying and protecting them at the expense of their own
resourcesemotional and financialfor the rest of their lives.
McHugh set out to see if she could help bring some respite to caregivers who have been doing
the primary care for severely disabled family members for at least a decade. Her Seattle-based
organization, CAREGIFTED, founded in 2012, has awarded more than a dozen getaways to the
caregivers of people who cant care for themselves. We whisk them away to beautiful island
or vineyard settings and treat them like royalty for once in their lives, McHugh says. You cant
imagine the boost they get from just a week away within fine surroundings with nature and art to
stimulate their senses.
Caregivers whom CAREGIFTED has helped share their stories on the organizations website,
where one woman recently wrote of feeling free, relaxed, peaceful, youthful, energized, [and] in
a way, renewed during a recent getaway.
McHugh came to the University of Denver in 1970 to pursue a graduate degree in English,
having already published poems in The New Yorker and other major magazines while an
undergraduate at Harvard. Since then, she has published several acclaimed collections, including
Eyeshot (Wesleyan University Press, 2004), which was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize, and
Hinge & Sign: Poems 19681993 (Wesleyan, 1994), a finalist for the National Book Award and a
New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year.
McHugh has been honored for her work with various prizes, including a 2009 MacArthur
Foundation Genius Grant, two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and, in 2006,
one of the first United States Artists awards.
>> caregifted.org
Callyn Weintraub
Profile
CARETAKER Heather McHugh
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younger sister. Sandra is a New York Times
bestselling writer who also has authored one
young-adult novel and 10 nonfiction books.
1962
Lawrence Shriner
(BA 62) of Highlands
Ranch, Colo., was named
the 2013 Outstanding
Library Volunteer by
the Colorado Association
of Libraries. Lawrence
was manager of rides and
games at Elitch Gardens
for 11 seasons, a teacher at Denver Public
Schools for 32 years and an assistant principal
for three years. Lawrence has served at the
Douglas County Library since retiring in
2006.
1963
Marlow Ediger (EdD 63) of North Newton,
Kan., will have his biography listed in the
2014 Whos Who in the World. Marlow was
a member of the editorial board of Experi-
ments in Education, a research journal, for 40
years. He has had seven recent manuscripts
accepted for publication.
1965
Susan Kelley (BA 65) of Tampa, Fla., is
professor emeritus of
behavioral health at the
University of South
Florida and distinguished
alumna in postsecondary
education at Florida State
University. Susan is a
consultant in behavioral
medicine and medical psy-
chotherapy with a private practice in Tampa;
she has authored more than 50 scholarly
publications on neuropsychiatric disabilities.
1966
Leroy Tsutsumi (BA 66) of Honolulu is
researching the history of the Christian
church for a minister of the New Hope
Fellowship.
1971
Norman Caedo Jr. (MBA 71) of Longboat
Key, Fla., retired in November 2013 after
42 years in financial services. Norman was a
partner at Northern Trust for 34 years.
44 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Daniel L. Ritchie Center
for Sports & Wellness
RitchieCenter.du.edu
303.871.3845
Keeping Alumni
Connected Through
Sports & Wellness
Come in for a visit and get
reconnected today!
Special alumni rates are
available for most programs.
training and advances to nobility. Davids
first book, Gunbird Driver (Naval Institute
Press, 2008), was a well-received Vietnam
War memoir.
David Brand (JD 79) of Boulder, Colo.,
in October was named director of strategic
operations for the Financial Planning Asso-
ciation. David has worked with End-of-Life
Choices, the Institute of Certified Financial
Planners, the Colorado and Denver bar
associations and Continuing Legal Education
in Colorado.
1980
Kathaleen (Reid) Martinez (MA 80) of
Tulsa, Okla., is provost at Oral Roberts
University. Kathaleen previously served as
provost of Mid-America Christian Univer-
sity in Oklahoma City.
1981
Craig Blietz (BSBA 81) of Sister Bay, Wis.,
had works of art on display at the Misciagna
Family Center for Performing Arts at Penn
State in January through March 2014. Craigs
work has been exhibited in several museums;
he is best known for his rural and agrarian-
inspired imagery.

1982
Mark Hartlaub (BA 82) of Corpus Christi,
Texas, is associate dean of the College of
Liberal Arts and School of Arts, Media and
Communication at Texas A&M University.
David Reiter (PhD 82)
of Carindale, Australia,
was awarded the 2012
Western Australia Pre-
miers Award for Digital
Narrative for his latest
transmedia work, My
Planets Reunion. The
work includes an e-book,
My Planets: a Fictive Memoir (Interac-
tive Publications, 2011), and an interactive
website. David also wrote a picture book
for children, Bringing Down the Wall (IP
Kidz, 2012), which was recognized by the
Canadian Childrens Book Council as one of
2013s best books for kids and teens.
1983
Gail Mencini (MT 83) of Greenwood Vil-
lage, Colo., published her first novel, To
Tuscany with Love (Capriole Group, 2014).
The story of eight friends reuniting after
30 years is set amid Italys landscape and
culinary culture.
1972
Rob Armstrong (BA
72) of Saint Augus-
tine, Fla., published
Who Iced Fat Pauli
(Amazon Digital
Services Inc., 2013),
his third e-book in
an espionage thriller
series. The son of former DU hockey coach
Murray Armstrong, Rob has authored 10
books and spent 24 years as a CBS news
correspondent on radio and TV and 13 years
as a journalism professor at Flagler College
in St. Augustine. Rob and his wife, Barbara
Stafford (BA 71), split their time between
their homes in St. Augustine and Charlot-
tesville, Va.
1974
William Ris Jr. (JD 74) of Washington, D.C.,
is senior vice president of government affairs
for American Airlines Group. William also
serves as chairman emeritus of the board
of directors of Green Door Inc., a nation-
ally recognized organization that provides
services for the chronically mentally ill in
Washington, D.C.
1975
Phil Goodstein (MA
75) of Denver has
published his 20th book.
The Denver History
Index (New Social
Publications, 2013) is a
reference guide to his
other books on Denver,
including common
abbreviations, definitions
of terms and historical
controversies. Phil also published The
Ghosts of University Park, Platt Park, and
Beyond (New Social Publications, 2010).
1976
Suzanne Graham (MA 76) of Black Hawk,
Colo., received the Alan Andolsen Mentor of
the Year Award from the Institute of Certi-
fied Records Managers in Las Vegas. Suzanne
is president of Graham Information Manage-
ment Associates.
1979
David Ballentine (PhD 79) of Overland
Park, Kan., published Rodrigo Salazar:
A Warriors Tale (First Edition Design
Publishing, 2013). Davids second book is
set in 10th-century Spain, where a boy rises
through monastery education and warrior
University of Denver Magazine CONNECTIONS 45
1991
Kandace Gerdes (LLM 91) of Denver
was appointed as district court judge in the
2nd Judicial District. Kandace previously
was a senior deputy district attorney in the
economic crimes unit for the 2nd Judicial
District. She also was an associate attorney at
the law firm of Joseph H. Thibodeau.
Robert Weisberg (BS 91) of Nesconset,
N.Y., was a first responder during 9/11.
Robert had been a volunteer firefighter for
eight years before Sept. 11, 2001. He was in
charge of helping the injured at Ladder Co.
10 and is registered for DUs 9/11 Memorial
alumni event in New York this September.
1992
Patricia Chapman (BSBA 92, MBA 94)
of Denver launched an artisan chocolate
company, Veree Chocolate, at retail locations
in Vail, Colo. Patricias company is expanding
into Denver.
Elizabeth
Montgomery
(MA 92) of
Mount Juliet,
Tenn., is a
professional
singer and has
performed in
3,000 venues.
Elizabeth is
a Christian
recording artist and recently released a
classics/big band CD. This fall she will
debut a signature line dance to line-dance
instructors in France. She was featured in
Englands Line Dancer Magazine last fall.
Kyle Torke (MA 92) of Colorado Springs,
Colo., published his fifth book, Sunshine
Falls (Bondfire Books, 2013). The nonfic-
tion book is a collection of essays, written as
stories of his life. Kyle currently teaches at
Waldorf College in Iowa and has taught at
the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Col-
lege, the University of Colorado-Colorado
Springs and Elon University in North
Carolina.

1993
Debra Crew (BA 93) of Chicago, Ill., is
president of PepsiCo Americas Beverages
and was named to the board of directors at
Stanley Black & Decker in December. Debra
formerly was an officer in the U.S. Army
and also has worked at Mars Inc., Kraft
Foods and Nestle.
1984
Laurie Gabriel (BME 84) of Colorado
Springs, Colo., is in the postproduction
stages of a film, Hear Our Teachers. Laurie,
who has 28 years of teaching experience,
invested her own money in the documentary,
in which she interviews well-known teacher
advocates and highlights teacher-led schools.
1985
Marshall
Clevenger (BA
85) of Lawton,
Okla., publishes
two award-winning
magazinesRed
River Family in
Oklahoma and
Texas, and Rio
Grande Family in New Mexicovia the
OK Family Publishing and Media Group.
Marshall and his wife opened the group in
2008. Marshall, who retired from the Army
in 2010, after 28 years of service, also works
for Raytheon as a field systems representative
for joint services command-and-control
software. He has two daughters, 16 and 21.
1986
Navin Dimond (MBA 86) of Englewood,
Colo., is CEO at Stonebridge Companies,
a privately owned hotel development and
management company. Navin founded the
company in 1991; its current project is a 131-
room Marriott Residence Inn at Washington
State University.
1988
Daniel Payne (BSBA
88) of Newport, R.I.,
was named national
sales manager for the
Mitchelle Group, a
textile source and
converter for furniture
manufacturers and
retailers and the con-
tract and hospitality, boating and RV markets.
1989
Stephanie OMalley (JD 89) of Denver was
appointed executive director of the Depart-
ment of Safety for the City and County of
Denver. Stephanie also serves on the Denver
Urban Redevelopment Authority board,
the Zion Baptist Church trustee board,
the steering committee for Forest Street
Compassionate Care Center and the advisory
committee for the Denver School of Science
and Technology.
46 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
vacation in Europe to celebrate, including a
two-week cruise and a tour of Normandy,
France.
1995
James Shulman (BSBA 95) of Lake
Oswego, Ore., is Oregon president of
Northwest Bank. James started in 1995 with
what became US Bank in Denver, moving to
Seattle, Portland and Phoenix through vari-
ous individual and leadership roles. He and
his wife, Denise, have a 3-year-old son.
1994
Abdulfattah Sharaf (BA 94) of Dubai is
CEO of HSBC Bank for the Middle East
and North Africa. Abdulfattah serves on the
board of a nonprofit organization that helps
restore eyesight to people in Third World
countries.
Sally (Groves) Swenson (MA 94) of Red-
lands, Calif., retired from the Esri training
services department in April 2013, along with
her husband, David. They took a three-week
University of Denver alumnus Paul Kuscher-Dapena (BSBA 97) and Alba Marina Hidalgo, of
Manizales, Colombia, were married in Cartagena, Colombia, on Aug. 3, 2013. Alumni gathered from
around the world to attend the festivities.
The group topped off the celebration with a traditional Rumba en Chiva bus and a walking tour of
the walled city from professors of the University of Cartagena. The alumni reunited from their current
homes in Texas, Florida, Connecticut and Denver.
Photo: Back row: Jon Schlegal (BSBA 97), Andrew Wiener (BA 97), Ted Graeber (BSBA 97),
Dan DAcquisto (BA 97), Frank Uddo (BSBA 97), Charles Eggleton (BSBA 98), Josh Hensley
(BSBA 96), James Graeber (BSBA 97)
Middle: James Shirley (BA 97), Jon Zadok (BA 97), Carla (Knowles) Graeber (BA 97)
Front: Paul Kuscher-Dapena (BSBA 97), Alba Marina Hidalgo
REUNIONS
1996
Dorothea Deley (MS 96) of Paonia, Colo.,
wrote and performs Jesus Loves You, a
one-woman show that uses humor and
performance art to tell Dorotheas story of a
childhood in the religious right and how she
found a deeper spirituality along the way.
David Knapp (PhD 96) of Thornton,
Colo., is turning 50 years old in 2014 and is
celebrating by running 50 marathons during
the year. David is running as a fundraiser for
University of Denver Magazine CONNECTIONS 47
the Colorado Chapter of the Alzheimers
Association in memory of his mother, who
died in 2001. His goal is to raise at least
$50,000 to benefit the patient care, caregiver
support and medical research efforts of the
Alzheimers Association.
1998
Spoma Jovanovic (MA 98, PhD 01) of
Greensboro, N.C., won the Sue De Wine
Distinguished Scholarly Book award for
her book Democracy, Dialogue and Com-
munity Action: Truth and Reconciliation in
Greensboro (University of Arkansas Press,
2012). Spoma is a professor at the University
of North Carolina, Greensboro.
1999
Patricia Aaron
(MFA 99) of
Greenwood
Village, Colo.,
exhibited new
encaustic and
ink paintings at
the Museum of
Outdoor Arts
in Englewood,
Colo., from November 2013 to March 2014.
2000
Efe Poturoglu (BSBA
00) of Washington,
D.C., received the
Power Player of the
Year Award from
Washington Smart
CEO magazine in the
category of immigra-
tion law. Efe was
profiled in the December 2013 edition of the
magazine. He is an attorney and shareholder
with Butzel Long. Efe is a member of the
American Immigration Lawyers Association
and also serves as the Washington, D.C., area
liaison to the Turkish Resource Center of
North America.
Christopher Stuart (BSAC, MACC 00) of
Centennial, Colo., was promoted to partner
at EKS&H, an audit, tax and consulting
firm. Christopher has been with EKS&H
for 13 years and is a member of the AICPA,
the COCPA, the DFK International Tax
Committee and the World Trade Centers
Association.
2002
John Bly (MT 02) of Matthews, N.C.,
released his first book, Cracking the Code:
An Entrepreneurs Guide to Growing Your
Company Through Mergers and Acquisi-
tions for Pennies on the Dollar (Advantage
Media Group, 2013). John is founding part-
ner of LB&A Certified Public Accountants.
He was named to the 2013 M&A National
Advisor 40 Under 40 and the Charlotte Busi-
ness Journal 20 Under 40 and received the
2013 Accounting Today Award for Managing
Partner Elite.
2003
Kevin Charles (MBA 03) of Kannapolis,
N.C., and his wife, Caitlin, welcomed their
first daughter, Lydia Ruth Charles, on Nov.
18, 2013. Kevin is finance director at Cabar-
rus Cooperative Christian Ministry in Kan-
napolis, and Caitlin is a nurse at Carolinas
Medical Center in Concord, N.C.
Lia Chavez (BA 03) of New York City
published a photography monograph, Lia
Chavez: A Thousand Rainbows (Damiani,
2013), internationally distributed through
Artbook D.A.P. Lia explores the nature of
interpersonal, material and spiritual relation-
ships through the manipulation of light in
her photography.
William Ford (BSBA 03) of San Diego
is co-founder and president of PetBox, a
monthly delivery service for pet owners.
Each box contains fun, healthy new pet
products, and for every box delivered, Pet-
Box feeds a hungry pet in need.
Daniel Lupa-Chazan (BSAC, MACC 03)
of Los Angeles is finance and accounting
manager for an outdoor sports startup. Dan-
iel also is an actor and was the lead in Tale
of Two Dads, a short film co-directed by
Lance Bass from boy band N Sync.
2004
Laurie Clark (JD 04) of Denver was
appointed juvenile court judge for the 2nd
Judicial District. Laurie previously served as
a district court magistrate in the 17th Judicial
District and also was in private practice at
Clack & Associates and Brandes & Clark.
Alumni of ACTION
supports DU alumni by advocating, collabora-
tion, outreach and networking. If you identify
as Asian, black, Latino, indigenous or
LGBTIQA and are interested in connecting
with fellow alumni, please join us at our
upcoming events. Visit du.edu/alumni.
The perfect combination
of a winning team and
championship course,
Highlands Ranch Golf Club
is the home of the Denver
Pioneers. Call or visit to
learn more about our
alumni daily play &
membership options.
303.471.0000
HighlandsRanchGolf.du.edu
48 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
Dave Greenberg (BSBA 04) of Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, led the marketing develop-
ment team that created Fuleco, the armadillo
mascot for the 2014 World Cup.
Jason Jacoby (BA 04) of Chicago, Ill.,
received his PhD in neuroscience from the
University of Illinois at Chicago. Jason has
accepted a postdoctoral research fellowship
at Northwestern University in the Depart-
ment of Ophthalmology, Feinberg School of
Medicine. There he will map the functional
circuitry of visual processing in the inner
retina.
2005
Barisa Meckler
(BA 05) of Denver
was married to
Joel Bruckman on
July 20, 2013, in
Chicago. Barisa
is a political
organization professional who most recently
worked as human resources coordinator for
Obama for America.
Anthony Schwairy
(BS, MBA 05) of
Lakewood, Colo., and
his wife, Jennifer, wel-
comed a son, Owen
Edward Schwairy, on
June 3, 2013. Owen joins older sister Scar-
lett. Anthony works at Great-West Financial
in investments and is a commissioner for the
city of Lakewood.
2007
Erik Gano (MBA 07) of Denver and his
wife, Lily, welcomed a new baby, Elizabeth
Grace Gano, on Dec. 12, 2013. Erik is a
senior process analyst at CenturyLink.
Michael Sias (JD 07, MBA 08) of Austin,
Texas, was promoted to director of corporate
development and legal at ESO Solutions.
Michaels role includes legal, strategy, busi-
ness development and sales operations for the
software company.
2008
Jessica Dale (MA 08) of Chagrin Falls,
Ohio, was designated
a certified consultant
of the Association
for Applied Sport
Psychology (AASP).
Jessica is a clinical sport
psychologist with the
Eating Disorder Center
of Denver and serves
as an adjunct faculty member in the Sport
and Performance Psychology program at the
University of Denver. In 2012, she received
the Distinguished Student Practice Award
from AASP.
Peter Kapuranis
(BSBA, MBA 08) of
Centennial, Colo., mar-
ried Nicole Sheldahl
(BS 06) of Aurora,
Colo., on Sept. 28,
2013, in Denver. Peter
is an asset manager for
J&B Building Co., and
Nichole is a pharmacist
for Kaiser Permanente.
Profile
ACTOR Rob Gleeson
Rob Gleeson (BSBA 10) isnt just a business-school grad in real life
he also plays one on TV.
Gleeson, 26, played Jeffrey, a quiet, intense numbers guy, on season
three of Showtimes comedy series House of Lies, which stars former
Denverite Don Cheadle as a ruthless management consultant. The third
season, which ran January through April, found Cheadles character leaving
Galweather & Stearn to open his own shop; Gleeson played one of the
new companys junior analysts.
Im one of the few people on the show who went to business
school, says Gleeson, 26. Having that background is really nice, because
its a lot of financial jargon they throw around on the show. I can walk on
the set knowing what this world is like because I went to school for finance
and I have a lot of friends who are working in that sector now.
The role is Gleesons latest step in a career that includes standup
comedyhe tours to more than 20 colleges each yeara 2012 AT&T ad
campaign with Will Arnett, and guest appearances on TV shows such as
How I Met Your Mother and iCarly.
Gleeson started his comedy career while he was studying at the
University of Denver, performing at open-mics around the city as well as
on the DU campus for various school organizations. Recently he has added
more personal stories to his act, even adding jokes about coming out of the
closet as gay.
I found Id just hit a wall with my material and I felt like it was time,
Gleeson told the Denver Post in January. The only way to get over that
hurdle was to start talking more about my personal life, and its resonated
really well.
Gleeson returns to his alma mater a couple of times a year,
performing at orientation events for first-year students and at an ethics
boot camp for business students. He says he enjoys keeping the University
of Denver a part of his life.
Its an incredible community for me to come back to because
theyre so supportive, he says. Its a place where I could do everything
from test new stuff to see old friends. Its an incredible ally to have a
university on your side.
>>robgleeson.com
Greg Glasgow
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University of Denver Magazine CONNECTIONS 49
Which alum guest-starred on
How I Met Your Mother?
The answer can be found some-
where on pages 41-50 of this issue.
Send your answer to du-magazine@
du.edu or University of Denver
Magazine, 2199 S. University Blvd.,
Denver, CO 80208-4816. Be sure
to include your full name and mail-
ing address. Well select a winner
from the correct entries; the winning
entry will win a prize.
Congratulations to Steve Corman
(BA 64) for winning the winter
issues pop quiz.
Erica Rosenfield (MA 11) was
photographed by her fianc last summer as the
two traveled through Canada. This picture
was taken in Cape Breton Highlands National
Park in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Rosenfield
writes. More specifically, the picture was taken
at the end of the Skyline Trail, an incredible
7-kilometer hike through the wilderness that
ends on spectacular windy cliffs overlooking the
Atlantic Ocean. In the background you can see
the Cabot Trail, a world-famous scenic highway
that runs through the national park along the
coast and over the Cape Breton highlands. The
Cabot Trail is named after explorer John Cabot,
who first landed in Atlantic Canada in 1497. This
hike was the highlight of our two-week road trip
through the eastern provinces of Canada (New
Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward
Island).
As you pioneer lands far and wide, be sure
to pack your DU gear and strike a pose in front
of a national monument, the fourth wonder of
the world or your hometown hot spot. If we
print your submission, youll receive some new
DU paraphernalia to take along on your travels.
Send your print or high-resolution digital
image and a description of the location to:
Pioneer Pics, University of Denver Magazine,
2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208-
4816, or email du-magazine@du.edu. Be sure
to include your full name, address, degree(s) and
year(s) of graduation.
Contact us
Name (include maiden name)
University of Denver degree(s) and graduation year(s)
Address
City
State ZIP code Country
Phone
Email
Employer Occupation
What have you been up to? (Use a separate sheet if necessary.)
Question of the hour: How are you recognizing DUs sesquicentennial?
Post your class note online at www.alumni.du.edu, email du-magazine@du.edu or mail your note
to: Class Notes, University of Denver Magazine, 2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208-4816.
Tell us about your career and personal accomplishments, awards, births, life events or whatever
else is keeping you busy. Do you support a cause? Do you have any hobbies? Did you just
return from a vacation? Let us know! Dont forget to send a photo. (Include a self-addressed,
postage-paid envelope if you would like your photo returned.)
Let us know
Post your class note online at www.du.edu/alumni, e-mail
du-magazine@du.edu or mail in the form below.
Pioneer pics Blake Utne
(BSBA 08) of San
Francisco is brand
strategist for the
Puccini Group, a
hospitality con-
sulting and design
agency. Blake pre-
viously worked for
Carlson Rezidor
Hotel Group and
the Target Corp.
2010
Erin (Beskid) Harding (MA 10) of Vail,
Colo., was designated a certified consultant
of the Association for Applied Sport Psy-
chology. Erin is a peak performance coach at
the Ski and Snowboard Club in Vail and is
owner of Mind Performance LLC.
2011
Luke Crane (BS 11) of New York City
works for Coach Inc. as a merchandise
planner. Luke recently graduated from Duke
Universitys Fuqua School of Business.
Carissa (Stidger) Cruse (BSBA 11) of
Houston, Texas, married Clayton Cruse
on Oct. 11, 2013. Carissa is a food broker
at Acosta Sales and Marketing, where she
works closely with Colorado-based White
Wave Foods.
Andrew Lay (BS 11) of Amherst, Mass., is
an assistant lacrosse coach for Amherst Col-
lege. Previously, Andrew was an assistant at
50 University of Denver Magazine SPRING 2014
1940s
Harold Agnew (BA 42), Solano Beach, Calif., 9-29-13
Wendell Reese (BA 42, MA 52), Centennial, Colo., 8-2-09
William Muller (BS 43), Casper, Wyo., 9-17-13
Jesse Winzenried (MS 46), Cody, Wyo., 12-3-13
Frederick Carter (attd. 194547), Newport News, Va., 8-5-13
Eugene Frink Jr. (BA 47), Ashland, Ore., 7-30-13
David Boardman (BS 48), Colorado Springs, Colo., 4-13-12
Leola (Pope) Shepherd (BA 48), Kingston, Tenn., 5-13-13
Gene Steinke (BA 48), Denver, 12-23-13
Harvey Garner (BS 49, MS 51), Delaware, Ohio, 3-24-13
Robert Markham (BA 49, MA 73), Loveland, Colo., 11-24-13
Marilyn Nichols (BS 49), Martinez, Calif., 11-1-12
1950s
Frances (Isenhart) Anderson (BA 50), Colorado Springs, Colo., 3-19-13
Harold Lemke (BS 50), Salt Lake City, 11-18-13
Anthony Maisto (BS 50), Denver, 11-7-13
Ned Mohr (BS 50), Walcott, Iowa, 1-8-12
James Redmond (BA 50), Yampa, Colo., 10-20-13
Patricia (Carney) Tilton (BA 50), Denver, 10-31-13
Elmer Bernson (BS 51), Washington, Ill., 5-3-13
John Beard (MA 52), Cathedral City, Calif., 12-1-13
Robert McClinton (BFA 52), Colorado Springs, Colo., 11-24-13
H. Carl Anderson Jr. (BA 53, MA 57), Colorado Springs, Colo., 10-11-13
Heino Arras (BS 54), Port Orange, Fla., 2-18-13
Faye Long (MA 56), Colleyville, Texas, 1-1-14
Eugene Hanson (MA 57), Carlisle, Pa., 9-6-13
Barbara Sprague (BA 57), Red Cloud, Neb., 1-9-14
Peter Windfeldt Jr. (BS 57, MBA 59), Golden, Colo., 3-19-13
Robert Herbold (BSBA 58), Denver, 10-10-13
John Thompson (BS 58), Aurora, Colo., 12-17-13
Everett King (BSBA 59), San Diego, 04-12-13
Nolan Moody (BS 59), Longmont, Colo., 10-27-13
Donald Strong (PhD 59), Fremont, Calif., 2-17-13
1960s
Dorothy Lee Fischer (BSBA 60), Mount Prospect, Ill., 6-5-13
George Russell (BS 60), Lincoln, Neb., 1-16-14
Dan Free (MA 61), Sun City, Ariz., 5-20-12
Thomas Kruse (BSBA 61, MSBA 62), Vancouver, Wash., 4-20-13
Rodman Underwood (MSW 65), Port Orange, Fla., 7-1-13
John Polich (BSBA 66, MBA 68), Longmont, Colo., 10-5-13
Ira Feldman (BSBA 69), Van Nuys, Calif., 11-18-13
Grant Hunt (BA 69, MA 75), Canon City, Colo., 10-10-13
1970s
Kurt Graetzer (BA 71), Tuxedo Park, N.Y., 6-13-13
Larry Antony Jr. (BA 72), Copper Harbor, Mich., 10-28-13
Gladys (Dickerson) Ligon (MA 72), Greeley, Colo., 1-12-14
Roger Parsell (PhD 72), Denver, 09-15-13
1980s
Kimberly Carpenter (BA 81, MA 83), Las Cruces, N.M., 10-14-13
Jena Kelly (MSW 87), Lakewood, Colo., 10-18-13
1990s
Craig Buth (MEPM 98), Lakewood, Colo., 12-8-12
2010s
Nickolas Williams (BS 13), Denver, 09-28-13
Faculty and staff
Lawrence Larson, assoc. professor emeritus in Dept. of Philosophy, 01-01-13
Jack McCroskey, retired economics professor, Denver, 1-8-14
Gloria Nahmensen, retired Student Financial Services staff member,
Englewood, Colo., 04-10-13
Marilyn Skelton, professor emeritus in School of Hotel, Restaurant, and
Tourism Management, Centennial, Colo., 5-22-13
Bohdan Wynar (MA 58), former head of technical services for University
Libraries and former assoc. professor in the Graduate School of Librarianship,
Aurora, Colo., 11-9-13
Share your news for in memoriam by emailing du-magazine@du.edu
East High School in Denver and a volunteer
for Denver City Lax, a nonprofit organiza-
tion for inner-city youth.
Jessica Williams (MA 11)
of Denver was designated
a certified consultant of
the Association for Applied
Sport Psychology. Jessica
is a sport and performance
consultant with her private practice, the
Mental Edge LLC. She also is a competitive
ice dancer and a member of the U.S. Figure
Skating Professional Skating Association.
2013
Elizabeth Phillips (JD 13) of Denver is an
associate attorney practicing in labor and
employment for Polsinelli.
Betsy Proffitt (JD 13) of Denver was added
to the intellectual property practice of Hol-
land & Hart LLP in its Boulder, Colo., office.
Betsy previously was a legal extern with the
firm.
Travis Smith (MBA 13) of Centennial,
Colo., is opening the Bistro Colorado Res-
taurant in Evergreen, Colo. Travis also owns
the Bistro Colorado food truck.
In Memoriam
University of Denver Magazine CONNECTIONS 51

Enjoy Taste of DU and Hall of Fam
e

Cheer on the Pioneers as they battle the
Boston College Eagles on the ice

Reconnect at the all-class reunion,
featuring a Casino N
ight and live DJ

Be a student again at Pioneer Sym
posium

as you hear from
expert faculty and alum
ni

A
ttend sessions for parents
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ctober 30 N
ovem
ber 2
FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO ALUMNI.DU.EDU OR CALL 303.871.2701
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