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Osmosis in Animal Cells 1

Osmosis in Animal Cells



Alexa Golbus, Ellen Wilkins, Zachary Comose

Chapin High School

6B ALA Biology

Mrs. Latham

10/9/11,10/11/13, and 10/18/13
















Osmosis in Animal Cells 2
Introduction
The inside of an egg is made of protein, fat (lipids) and a trace amount of carbs
(nutritionandeggs.co.uk). An isotonic solution has equal concentrations of solute both
inside and outside of the cell. A hypertonic solution has a higher solute concentration
compared to another solution. (Osmosis.) A hypotonic solution has a lower solute
concentration compared to another solution. (Osmosis.) The solution that the egg was
placed in included gelatin, vegetable oil, and water. Gelatin is a protein and vegetable
oil is a lipid. By adding these ingredients, an isotonic solution for the egg was attempted
to be made. In this way, osmosis in animal cells was explored.
The independent variables were the ingredients added and the amounts of the
ingredients added, which would cause the solution to be either isotonic, hypertonic, or
hypotonic compared to the egg. The dependent variable was the change in mass in the
egg, or lack thereof, of the original mass of the egg versus the mass of the egg after it
was in the solution for seven days. The control was the mass of the egg before it was
placed into the solution. The change in the mass of the egg, will signify if the solution
that was created was isotonic, hypertonic, or hypotonic. If the solution is isotonic, the
mass of the egg will remain constant. If the solution is hypotonic, the mass of the egg
will increase. If the solution is hypertonic, then the mass of the egg will decrease.


Materials and Methods
200 mL Beaker, egg (one raw), gelatin (10 mg), graduated cylinder (2), one
piece of Saran Wrap, scale, stirring rod, vegetable oil (18 mL), water (180 mL)
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First, gently wipe off the raw egg (whose shell has been previously dissolved
using Vinegar) and weigh the egg. Then, take a picture of the egg. Pour 150 mL of tap
water into a 200 mL beaker. Then, measure out 10 mg of gelatin. In a graduated
cylinder, stir 10 mg of gelatin into 30 mL of tap water. Pour the mixture into the beaker.
In another graduated cylinder, measure out 18 mL of vegetable oil. Stir the 18 mL of
vegetable oil into the first beaker. Place the raw egg, which was previously weighed,
into the beaker with the solution that was just created. Cover with Saran Wrap. Leave
for seven days. After 7 days, remove the egg from the solution, and gently dry off the
egg and weigh it. Take a picture of the egg. To determine the percent difference in the
egg's mass, subtract the initial mass of the egg from the egg's mass after it was in the
solution for seven days . Then divide that number by the egg's initial mass. Multiply this
number by 100 to find percent. If the egg's mass has decreased, then the solution was
hypertonic, if the egg's mass has increased, then the solution was hypotonic. If the
egg's mass has remained constant, then the solution was isotonic. The control will be
the egg's original mass. The same egg is used in all parts of the experiment.

Results
Figure 1
Change in Mass of Egg
This data table shows the change (in grams) of the egg's mass after it sat in the solution
for seven days. This data table also shows the percent change in the mass of the egg.
Osmosis in Animal Cells 4
The equation used to determine percent change in the egg's mass is:
(final mass of egg - original mass of egg)/ original mass of egg= percent change
77.22-77.3=-.08
-.08/77.3=-0.00103
-0.00103*100= -.10%

Figure 2
Egg Before Being Placed in the Solution






This is a photo of the egg before it was placed into the previously described solution, for
seven days.

Original Mass of
Egg (g)
Final Mass of Egg
(g)
Percent Change
77.30 g 77.22 g -0.10%
Osmosis in Animal Cells 5
Figure 3
Egg After Being Removed from Solution
This is a photo of the egg after it was removed from the solution, which was previously
described, after being in the solution for seven days.

Figure 4
Original Mass of Egg versus Final Mass of Egg
Change in Mass of Egg
M
a
s
s

(
g
)
0
20
40
60
80
Egg
Original Final
77.22 77.3
Mass (g)
Osmosis in Animal Cells 6
This graph shows the mass of the egg (in grams) before and after it was placed into the
solution, for seven days.

Discussion
Based on the hypothesis, the solution that the egg was placed into was slightly
hypertonic. The egg's mass, after it had been is the solution for seven days, was
slightly lesser than the mass of the egg before it went into the solution, according to
Figure 1. Percent decrease was -.10%, according to Figure 1. A hypertonic solution, as
previously stated, is a solution with a higher solute concentration, as compared to
another solution. A hypertonic solution will pull water out of the other solution, so that
the solute concentrations of both solutions are equal. This will cause the cells that the
hypertonic solution pulled water from, to have a lower mass than they originally had. If
the mass of the egg increases after it has been in the solution, then the solution would
have been hypotonic. As previously stated, hypotonic solution is a solution with a lower
solute concentration compared to another solution. If the egg would have been placed
in a hypotonic solution, then the egg would have increased in mass. As previously
stated, an isotonic solution is a solution with equal concentrations of solute both inside
and outside of the cell. If the egg would have been placed in an isotonic solution, the
mass of egg would not have changed.
Sources of error are that an isotonic solution was not made because it is inferred
that the solution made was hypertonic due to the fact that the egg's mass decreased
after it was placed into the solution. The solution made was hypertonic, instead of
isotonic, because too much solute was added to the solution. This investigation could
Osmosis in Animal Cells 7
be improved by using salt as our sole solute and by adding slightly less solute to the
solution. This would cause the solution to be isotonic, and would cause no mass change
in the egg.




















Osmosis in Animal Cells 8
WORKS CITED

Difference between Hypertonic, Hypotonic, Isotonic Solutions | DBriers.com. (n.d.).
Retrieved from http://www.dbriers.com/tutorials/2012/11/difference-between-
hypertonic-hypotonic-isotonic-solutions/

Nutritional value of eggs | nutritionandeggs.co.uk. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://.
www.nutritionandeggs.co.uk/nutritional-value-eggs

Steinberg, J. B. (2005). Osmosis. Retrieved from http://www2.nl.edu/jste/
osmosis.htmWebpage