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Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond
 

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Operations Manual

 

THOME

Revision Record

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

RECORD OF CHANGES

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Change No. 1

01

Jan

     

2005

OPS Docs 000, 008, 013, 022 - 024 OMD Checklist 001-006, 008-016 OME Docs 001, 008 OME Checklist 001- 004

Change No. 2

01

Apr

     

2005

OPS Docs 001-006, 009-012, 017, 019, 020 OMD Checklist 007 OME Docs 004, 009, 011-014 OME Checklist 005

Change No. 3

01

Sep

     

2005

OPS TOC OMD Docs 017, 023 OME Doc 015

Added

01

Jan

     

2006

OMD Doc 025 OMD Checklist 004A, 017-019

Replaced

OMD Doc 006, 013 OMD Checklist 006

Change No. 4

OPS TOC OMD Doc 003 – Pg 2 “Bridge Watch I”, Pg 13-16 “3.6 Masters Standing Orders” OMD Doc 017 – Pg 14 “17.11 Cargo Sampling Procedures – Loading Samples” OMD Doc 020 – Pg 10 “Gas Detection” OMD Checklist 001 – No. 1r, s, t added OMD Checklist 002 – No. 1h, 1k removed, No. 1j added OMD Checklist 003 – No. 3m, n, o, No. 10 added OMD Checklist 007 – No. 6 added OMD Checklist 008 – No. 6a, No. 7c, k, l m, No.

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description Date of Date of Initials Signature Change Update 11, No. 14, No.
Change No. And Description
Date
of
Date
of
Initials
Signature
Change
Update
11, No. 14, No. 15 added
OME Checklist 003 & 005
Gear Test
Pg
1-3
– Steering
Change No. 5
01
Oct
2006
OMD Doc 003 – 004, 006 – 007, 010, 017 – 019,
025
OMD Checklist 002 – 003, 006, 009, 013
OME Doc 005, 007, 011, 014
OME Checklist 003, 005
Added
01
Jun
2007
OME Checklist 006 – Regular Testing of Safety
System and Critical Equipment
Replaced
OME Checklist 001 – 002
Change No. 6
Release of 3rd generation HSSEQ System to
include OHSAS 18001 Management Standard
OPS TOC
OMD Doc 003, 005 – 007, 010, 013 – 014, 023,
017, 019 – 020, 022 – 023
OMD Checklist 001, 003
OME Doc 004, 006, 013-014
OME Checklist 006
Global changes:
SQEMS  HSSEQ System
QA  HSSEQ
Quality Department  HSSEQ Department
QA Manager  Group HSSEQ Manager
Managing Director  President and CEO
Director of
Fleet
Personnel
Fleet
Personal
Manager
Chief Mate  Chief Officer
Second Mate  Second Officer
Third Mate  Third Officer

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Added

01

Mar

     

2008

OMD Doc 026 – Cargo Heating

Change No. 7

OMD Doc 017, 024 OMD Checklist 001 – 013 Global changes:

Group HSSEQ Manager Director of Marine & HSSEQ

Change No. 8

01

Jun

     

2008

OPS Doc 015 OMD Doc 006, 012, 013, 017, 018, 019, 020, 023 OMD Checklist 005, 014, 017 OME Doc 001, 004, 014 OME Checklist 001, 006

Change No. 9

01

Sep

     

2008

OMD Doc 006

Added

01

Mar

     

2009

OMD Doc 027 – Crude Oil Washing System

Change No. 10

OMD Doc 004, 013, 017 OMD Checklist 003 OME Doc 003

Change No. 11

Global Changes:

01

Jun

     

2009

OMD Doc 004, 006, 017

Crewing Manager Director of Group Crewing and HR

“SAFIR” removed

Change No. 18

01

Mar

     

2010

OME 003

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Change No. 19

01

Jan

     

2010

OMD 018, 023, 027 OMD Checklist 001 – 004, 017 – 018

Change No. 20

01

Apr

     

2010

OMD 006

Change No. 21

17

Jun

     

2010

OMD 002

Change No. 22

01

Jul

     

2010

OMD 001, 004

Change No. 23

01

Sep

     

2010

OMD 003 OMD Checklist 007

Change No. 24

01

Oct

     

2010

OMD 005, 007 – 010, 012 – 014, 022 OMD Checklist 001 – 004, 010 - 012

Change No. 25

01

Nov

     

2010

OMD 028

Change No. 26

01

Dec

     

2010

OMD 017 OME 006 – 009

Change No. 27

01

Jan

     

2011

OMD 015 – 016, 021

Change No. 28

01

Feb

     

2011

OMD 029

Change No. 29

28

Mar

     

2011

OMD 011

Change No. 30

18

Apr

     

2011

OMD Checklist 004A, 005

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Change No. 31

24

May

     

2011

OMD 020

Change No. 32

22

Jun

     

2011

OME 014

Change No. 33

01

Jul

     

2011

OMD checklist 007

Change No. 34

01

Aug

     

2011

OMD 17A

Change No. 35

01

Sep

     

2011

OMD 004

Change No. 36

01

Apr

     

2012

OMD 001 – 003, 007 – 011, 013 – 017, 018 – 022, 024 – 029

OMD Checklist 004A, 011, 014 OME 001 – 003, 005 - 015

Change No. 37

02

Apr

     

2012

OMD 023

Change No. 38

17

Aug

     

2012

OME 004

Change No. 39

31

Aug

     

2012

OMD Checklist 006

Change No. 40

06

Sep

     

2012

OMD 021

Change No. 41

15

Oct

     

2012

OMD 015

Change No. 42

31

Oct

     

2012

OMD Checklist 009

Change No. 43

01

Nov

     

2012

OMD 023

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Change No. 44

14

Nov

     

2012

OMD 010 OMD Checklist 001 – 003, 007 – 008

Change No. 45

22

Nov

     

2012

OMD 017

Change No. 46

6

Dec

     

2012

OMD 004

Change No. 47

01

Mar

     

2013

OMD Checklist 014 and 015

Change No. 48

01

Apr

     

2013

OMD Checklist 005

Change No. 49

22

Jul

     

2013

OMD 012

Change No. 50

23

Jul

     

2013

OMD 005

Change No. 51

26

Jul

     

2013

OMD 023

Change No. 52

27

Jul

     

2013

OMD 020

Change No. 53

01

Aug

     

2013

OMD 002, 003, 009, 011, 019

Change No. 54

23

Sep

     

2013

OME 004

Change No. 55

28

Oct

     

2013

OMD 015

Change No. 56

05

Dec

     

2013

OMD 025

OME 005

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

Operations Manual Revision Record

Change No. And Description

Date

of

Date

of

Initials

Signature

Change

Update

Change No. 57

06

Dec

     

2013

OMD 006

Change No 58

09

Dec

     

2013

OMD 017

OME 014

         

Note: The table above is to be completed every time a revision is received and included. The discarded sections or pages are to be destroyed.

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond
 

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Operations Manual

 

OPS Document

THOME

 

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

No. 000

  • 0. TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART A

OPERATIONS M ANUAL DECK DOCUMENTS

  • 001 Bridge Team Management

  • 002 Passage Planning

  • 003 Bridge Watch

  • 004 Safe Navigation

  • 005 Deck Log and Bell Book

  • 006 Operational Reporting

  • 007 Stay in Port

  • 008 Bills of Lading

  • 009 Charter Parties

  • 010 Navigation Equipment

  • 011 Under Keel Clearance

  • 012 Ballast Operations

  • 013 Vessel Moorings

  • 014 Stevedore Damage

  • 015 Bulk Carrier / Dry Cargo Operation 1

  • 016 Container Loading

  • 017 Tank Vessel Operations

017A

Tank Cleaning Guidelines

  • 018 Inert Gas Systems

  • 019 Bulk Liquid Cargo Transfer

1 st Apr 2012

1 st Aug 2013

1 st Aug 2013

6 th Dec 2012

23 rd Jul 2013

6 th Dec 2013

1 st Apr 2012

1 st Apr 2012

1 st Aug 2013

14 th Nov 2012

1 st Aug 2013

22 nd Jul 2013

1 st Apr 2012

1 st Apr 2012

28

th

Oct 2013

1 st Apr 2012

9 th Dec 2013

1 st Aug 2011

1 st Apr 2012

1 st Aug 2013

1 Distributed only to Bulk Carriers, refer to OMD 015 Bulk Carrier Operations Manual

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OPS Document No. 000 Table of Contents

  • 020 Gas Tanker Operations 2

27 th Jul 2013

  • 021 Statutory Certificates and Records

6 th Sep 2012

  • 022 Cargo Gear Register

1 st Apr 2012

  • 023 Chemical Tanker Operations 3

26 th Jul 2013

  • 024 Asphalt Tanker Operations

1 st Apr 2012

  • 025 Anchors and Anchoring

5 th Dec 2013

  • 026 Cargo Heating

1 st Apr 2012

  • 027 Crude Oil Washing System

1 st Apr 2012

  • 028 Electronic Chart Display and Information System

1 st Apr 2012

  • 029 Ice Navigation

1 st Apr 2012

PART B

OPERATIONS M ANUAL DECK CHECKLISTS

  • 001 Bridge Familiarization

14 th Nov 2012

  • 002 Bridge – Daily Tests and Checks

14 th Nov 2012

  • 003 Bridge – Preparation for Sea

14 th Nov 2012

  • 004 Bridge – Embarkation / Disembarkation of Pilot

1 st Oct 2010

004A

Pilot Card

1 st Apr 2012

  • 005 Bridge – Pilot Information Exchange

1 st Apr 2013

  • 006 Bridge – Coastal Waters / Congested Waters / Traffic Separation Schemes

31 st Oct 2012

  • 007 Bridge All Watches – Changing Over the Watch

14 th Nov 2012

  • 008 Preparation for Arri val in Port

14 th Nov 2012

  • 2 Distributed only to Gas Tankers, refer to OMD 020 Gas Tanker Operations Manual
    3 Distributed only to Chemical Tankers, refer to OMD 023 Chemical Tanker Operations Manual

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OPS Document No. 000 Table of Contents

  • 009 Anchoring and Anchor Watch

31 st Oct 2012

  • 010 Restricted Visibility

1 st Oct 2010

  • 011 Navigating in Heavy Weather

1 st Apr 2012

  • 012 Ice or Extreme Cold Conditions

1 st Oct 2010

  • 013 Vital Systems Survey

1 st Mar 2008

  • 014 LNG / LPG Pre Arrival Checklist

1 st Mar 2013

  • 015 Cargo Engineer Pre Arrival Checklist

1 st Mar 2013

  • 016 LNG Cargo Engineer Departure Checklist

1 st Jan 2005

  • 017 LNG Change of Watch during Cargo Operation

1 st Jan 2010

  • 018 LNG In Cargo Tank Checklist

1 st Jan 2010

  • 019 LNG Prior to Gas Freeing of Cargo Tanks

1 st Jan 2006

PART C

OPERATIONS M ANUAL ENGINE DOCUMENTS

  • 001 The Engineer of the Watch (EOW)

1 st Apr 2012

  • 002 Work Planning

1 st Apr 2012

  • 003 Engine Room Operational Requirements

1 st Apr 2012

  • 004 Main Engine Maintenance

23 rd Sep 2013

  • 005 Planned Maintenance

5 th Dec 2013

  • 006 Documentation

1 st Apr 2012

  • 007 Spare Parts

1 st Apr 2012

  • 008 Readiness of Machinery

1 st Apr 2012

  • 009 Engine Precautions against Freezing

1 st Apr 2012

  • 010 Dry Dock / Repair Periods

1 st Apr 2012

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OPS Document No. 000 Table of Contents

  • 011 Maintenance

 

1 st Apr 2012

  • 012 New Building Guarantee Claims

 

1 st Apr 2012

  • 013 Fuel and Lube Oil Analysis

1 st Apr 2012

  • 014 Bunkering Management and Operations

 

9 th Dec 2013

  • 015 LNG Technical Operations

 

1 st Apr 2012

PART D

OPERATIONS M ANUAL ENGINE CHECKLISTS

 
  • 001 Engine Checklist Prior Arrival / Departure

 

1 st Jan 2010

  • 002 Engine Operation in Extreme Cold 1 st Jan 2010

  • 003 LNG Engine Checklist Prior Arrival Departure

 

1 st Jan 2010

  • 004 Testing

Regular

of

Safety

Systems

&

Critical

1 st Jan 2010

 

Equipment

Operations Manual Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Operations Manual

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

 

Deck

OMD Document

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

 

No. 001

  • 1. BRIDGE TEAM M ANAGEMENT

    • Purpose To specify requirements for Bridge Team Management

    • Application All vessels

    • Responsibility Master Navigating Officers Watch Keepers

  • 1.1 INTRODUCTION TO BRIDGE TEAM M ANAGEMENT

Bridge Team Management is the interaction of team members which allows the Team to adapt to and fulfil Team roles that have been identified and assigned. Bridge Team Management is the use of all physical and personnel assets and the creation of an environment to maximise their effectiveness.

Thome requires that all company vessels carry the publication by the International C hamber of Shipping, Bridge Procedures Guide. Thome requires that all vessels be navigated in accordance with the Bridge Team Management Principles contained within.

Bridge Team Management is a concept that when accepted by the Mariner is the single most important method for eliminating “one person error”. The term Bridge Team Management is not a navigational skill or management act by one person, nor should it be confused or interpreted as navigation by committee. Bridge Team Management is the interaction of team members which allows the Team to adapt to and f ulfil Team roles that have been identified and assigned.

  • 1.2 GOALS OF BRIDGE TEAM M ANAGEMENT

The primary goal of Bridge Team Management is the elimination of “one person errors.” All members of the Bridge Team are to keep themselves aware of all vessel operations. Pilots are considered team members and they play a critical role on the Br idge. It is the responsibility of the Bridge Team to assist the pilot whenever practical.

Thome's Bridge Team is expected to achieve these goals by the effective use of:

Appropriate Steaming Watch Conditions and assignment of tasks to Team members

All Bridge equipment and personnel

Manoeuvring characteristics of the vessel

Management of stress and distractions

Creation of a Team environment

Communications

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

Bridge Team / Pilot Information Exchange

Operational and emergency checklists

Formulation, usage, and monitoring of Passage Plans

  • 1.3 M ANAGEMENT OF STRESS AND DISTRACTIONS

Each Bridge Team member should be conscious of the inherent stress and distractions in Bridge situations. Stress affects each individual differently. Stress levels may increase or decrease our effectiveness in performing our tasks on the Bridge. Team members need to be aware of how stress affects the other Team members. Bridge tasks may need to be reassigned or changed, depending on the stress levels and the personnel involved. Tasks that are stressful to one person may not be stressful to another.

Signs of stress include:

Difficulty in thinking

Inattention

Slow reactions

Procedural violations or skipping procedures

Muscle aches

Chills

Pale complexion

Dull or bloodshot eyes

The inability to deal with distractions and prioritise is often an indication that situational awareness is breaking down. Distractions can be caused by stress, excessive work load, fatigue, emergency conditions, and all too often inattention to detail. Assigning tasks is one way of not allowing stress and distractions to disrupt the effectiveness of the Bridge Team.

  • 1.4 CREATING A TEAM E NVIRONMENT

It is the responsibility of all Team members to create an environment conducive to the free exchange of observations and information. Masters shall ensure that all Team members participate in Bridge Operations and dispel any possible belief of a Team member that his/her information may be irrelevant, redundant, or obvious.

Masters are to ensure that:

Individual team members are well aware of their duties and responsibilities as well as the chain of command when the Pilot is on board

They are also to clarify without doubt, the limitation of the Pilots authority whilst he is on board and working as part of the bridge team

A discipline within their Bridge Teams is established so that no member hesitates to question the decision/command of anyone else

To bring about an awareness in their Bridge Teams, of the ‘Human Factor’ and errors arising from the same

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

1.5

COMMUNICATIONS

Clear and concise communications are essential to Bridge Team Management. Every member of the Bridge Team should pass information or orders in a loud and clear voice so that all other Team members stay informed.

The reasons for using proper communications are to:

o

o

o

Make for a better understanding in all matters

Promote a safer and more efficient operation

Establish a professionally run Bridge

Elements of proper communication are:

o Clarity

o Accuracy

o Brevity

o

o

o

Standard Protocol

Listening Skills

Feedback (Avoidance of Disagreement)

Barriers to proper communication - external:

o Noise

o

o

Crew workload / distractions

Physical location of equipment

Barriers to proper communication - internal:

o

Voice (tones inflection, clarity, speed, cadence, volume)

o

Body Language (eye contact, facial expression, distance)

o

Choice of Words (technical vs. non-technical)

o

Rank / Position / Age

o

Fear / Intimidation

o

Background / Education

o

Disorganized Thought

o

Wishful Hearing

o Assumptions Attitude / Bias / Perceptions / Mind Set

o

o Ego Poor Self Image Unwillingness to Communicate Conflict in Relationships Stress / Fatigue

o

o

o

o

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

  • 1.6 STANDARD PROTOCOL FOR VHF RADIO USE:

All Deck officers shall utilise the IMO Recommended Phraseology for Maritime Communications and comply with FCC regulations i.e. Use of call signs.

The IMO Book is supplied to all Managed vessels.

  • 1.7 STANDARD ORDERS TO THE HELM

One of the barriers to good communication is the use of vague or unfamiliar language . For this reason, all Masters and Deck Officers shall use the Standard Orders to the Helm. The helmsman is an important part of the Bridge team. Deck Officers shall train and ensure that all helmsmen clearly understand the Standard Orders to the Helm. It must be understood that it is the responsibility of the Bridge Watch to assist Pilots with the use of Standard Orders to the Helm.

Figure 1-1 Standard Orders to the Helm

Order

Meaning and Action Required

 

Midships

Rudder to be held in the fore and aft position

 

Port/Stbd five, ten, twenty

5 degrees, 10 degrees, or 20 degrees Port or Stbd rudder to be held

Hard Starboard / Port

Rudder to be held fully over Starboard or Port

 

Ease to five, ten, twenty

Reduce the amount of

rudder

to

5

degrees,

10

degrees or 20 degrees and hold.

 

Steady or Steady as she goes

Steer a course on the compass heading indicated at

the

time of

the order.

Helmsman is

to

call out

the

compass heading (in three digits) upon receiving the

order.

When the ship is

steady on that heading the

helmsman is

to

call out

“Steady on XXX”

(course in

three digits)

Nothing to the Port of XXX (course)

Use appropriate rudder in either direction to keep the vessel on or to the starboard of a given course but nothing to the port.

When the conning officer requires a course to be steered by compass, the direction in which he wants the wheel turned shall be stated followed by each numeral being said separately (course in three digits).

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

Figure 1-2:

Order

Course to be Steered

Port, steer one eight two

  • 182 degrees

Starboard, steer zero eight two

  • 082 degrees

Port, steer three zero five

  • 305 degrees

On receipt of an order to steer a course, the helmsman should repeat the order and bring the ship around steadily to the course ordered calling out the heading every ten degrees in the process. When the ship is steady on the course ordered, the helmsman is to call out: "Steady on XXX" (course in three digits). The conning officer should then acknowledge the helmsman's call out with: “Very Well,” or “182 Very Well,” etc.

  • 1.8 BRIDGE TEAM / PILOT EXCHANGE

The Pilot is an important part of the Bridge Team. It is the responsibility of the Master and the Watch Officers to incorporate the Pilot into the Bridge Team. The Bridge Team / Pilot exchange needs to take place in a timely manner and at an appropriate pace. In conjunction with the Master / Pilot Exchange Card, a copy of the Passage Plan shall be made available to the Bridge Team / Pilot and discussed at an appropriate time.

While discussing the Passage Plan, special reference should be m ade to the following:

Parallel Indexing techniques

Alteration points to be marked off with bearings/ranges of terrestrial targets and/or geographical co-ordinates

“No Go” areas to be clearly marked off taking into account the draught of the v/l, the proxim ity of navigational hazards and the possibility of other vessels in the vicinity

Means of position fixing are to be in strict conformance with the Passage Plan. It has been noted in instances that the Passage Plan reflects position fixing means by way of GPS, terrestrial as well as celestial observations. However, the only means used have been GPS fixes. In other instances, terrestrial fixes are plotted using only one bearing and range where a fix constitutes at least three reference lines to make a ‘Cocked Hat’

Frequency of Position fixing to be at intervals not exceeding that as indicated in the Passage Plan. Repeated non-conformance is evident here also

The importance of inserting the T&P notices on relevant Charts

The importance of filing and keeping logs of T&P notices and Navtex messages segregated for Navigation warnings and Weather messages)

The importance of using all navigation equipment applicable in the prevailing circumstances and conditions with special reference to marking off Echo sounders and course recorders at relevant times such as E.O.P., Pilot boarding, etc.

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

The proper calculation and interpretation of the UKC requirements

  • 1.9 OPERATIONAL AND EMERGENCY CHECKLISTS

Checklists required to be completed:

prior to getting underway

changing over the watch (underway or at anchor)

arrival

after daily (noon) Bridge tests

A checklist is a written memory aid used to accomplish a series of tasks.

A checklist is

not

a

substitute for thorough knowledge of the ship or procedures. The use of a check list prior to port entry/departure, change of the watch, and for the daily (noon) Bridge check is required. The completed check lists must be signed and retained aboard the vessel for one year.

Benefits of a checklist:

Focus attention on the task at hand

Help establish priorities

Serve as an aid against failure of human memory, especially during periods of stress and emergency

Help to balance workloads

Eliminate guesswork and substitute standard procedures

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 001 Bridge Team Management

  • Experience Feedback HSSEQ Circular 13-2006 - Incident Awareness – Grounding HSSEQ Circular 02-2008 - Incident Awareness – Contact with container vessel in Singapore Straits HSSEQ Circular 11-2008 - Incident Awareness – Collision with a fishing vessel HSSEQ Circular 14-2009 - Incident Awareness – Grounding of bulk carrier – Port of Ningde, China HSSEQ Circular 10-2010 - Incident Awareness – Grounding of managed tanker

  • Documentation and filing ICS Bridge Procedures Guide - "Bridge Check -Lists"

o

File No. 21.1

  • Distribution Full Management Vessels

o

File originals

  • References ICS Bridge Procedures Guide Nautical Institute's Bridge Team Management

Operations Manual Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Operations Manual

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

 

Deck

OMD Document

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SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

 

No. 002

  • 2. PASSAGE PLANNING

    • Purpose To specify requirements for Passage Planning

    • Application All Vessels

    • Responsibility Master

2.1

PASSAGE PLANNING

Use of a Passage Plan is compulsory. The Purpose of a Passage Plan is to establish a navigational procedure to pre-plan a vessel’s route and monitor its progress along the route. A Passage Plan is a means of sharing information with all Bridge T eam members, including the pilot. The Passage Plan also incorporates a system of procedures and checks to guard against "one person errors."

Passage plans shall be on a berth to berth basis. The arrival port passage plan shall be completed on passage prior to arrival when all details are well known such as berthin g schedule, anchorage times etc.

Passage plan should take the environmentally sensitive areas into consideration

Passage plans shall remain onboard for a period of one year

The aim of the bridge team is safe passage for the ship for each of its voyages. To achieve this each passage needs careful preparation, plann ing, execution and monitoring

Upon receipt of the voyage orders, the Navigating Officer, under the guidance of the Master, is to plan t he voyage by the most expeditious route bearing in mind that the safety of the vessel is of the prime importance

The Master exercises management control over the passage plan by approving the plan before commencing the intended voyage

2.2

PREPARATION

The charts and publications for the intended voyage are to be on board and corrected up to the latest Notice to Mariners, including temporary (T) and preliminary (P) notices and any radio navigational warnings (Navtex, EGC, etc.).

The Master is to ensure that the d eclaration as stated in Checklist A of the TSM 001 – Passage Plan (Master’s declaration) is complied with before intended voyage.

If the charts for the intended voyage are not available onboard, the Master should contact the Marine

& HSSEQ Department or the Marine Manager. taken:

At the same time, the following measures are to be

Try obtaining the charts from the departure port or via an agent enroute if possible. Consider the possibility of obtaining the charts at the anchorage before proceeding in bound to berth

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 002 Passage Planning

The Marine & HSSEQ Superintendent is to ensure that electronic copies of the charts are provided to the vessel

The Marine & HSSEQ Superintendent should evaluate the extracts from the Office ECDIS and determine if it is feasible for the vessel to proceed with just the electronic charts

Original charts are to be obtained for office evaluation

Master to provide Risk Assessment to proceed with scanned charts

A full review of all documents received by the Office will be done along with the Marine Manager prior any approval being given

The final approval for the vessel to proceed without original charts must be obtained in writing from the DPA or the Marine Manager.

Routing Charts and Current Atlases Current directions and rate of set

Expected weather conditions, fog etc. and whether avoidable

Recommended routes

Tides - Times, heights, direction and rates of set

Draft of the ship during the voyage, allowances for squat and effects of heel - See under Keel Clearance Section

Advice and recomm endations of Sailing Directions

Navigational aids:

o

Light characteristics, anticipated rising range etc.

o Land marks, radar conspicuous and visual ranges (For beam bearings, transit bearings, parallel indexing etc.)

Traffic separation and routing schemes

Means of position fixing to be used:

o

Radio Navaids: availability, accuracy, frequency and limitations

o

Visual fixes: availability, quality and reliability

Vessel’s limitations i.e. draft, speed, manoeuvring characteristics, defects etc.

Organisation of bridge watches: Identifying areas where additional manpower may be

required as per bridge watch conditions VHF channels and Contact frequencies for vessel traffic systems and Pilot

Availability of weather routing advice

Directives contained in this guide

Areas of political unrest / piracy

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Indian Charts

In February 2013, the Gujarat Maritime Board (GMB) issued a notice that Indian charts were to be kept on board when entering into the Gujarat Coast.

So far there is no penalty for not having the charts on board, but that could change after 1st June

2013.

Please refer to HSSEQ Circular 21 – 2013 for further guidance.

2.3 PLANNING
2.3
PLANNING

Having made the fullest preparation, using all available information, the Navigating Officer will make a detailed passage plan. This plan must cover the whole passage i.e berth to berth, including all the waters where a pilot will be onboard. The formulation of the plan will involve the following:

Plot the intended passage on the appropriate charts and mark clearly, on the largest scale charts available, all the areas of danger and the intended track, taking into account all the margins of allowable error. Where appropriate, due regard should be given to the need for an advance warning on one chart of the existence of a navigational hazard upon trans fer to the next. The planned track should be plotted to clear hazards at as safe a distance as circumstances allow. A greater distance should always be accepted in preference to a shorter, more hazardous route. The possibility of machinery breakdown at a critical moment must not be overlooked

Indicate clearly, in 360 degree notation, the true direction of the planned track on all charts

Mark on the chart any transit marks, clearing bearings or clearing ranges, which may be

used to advantage Decide upon the key elements of the plan, these should include but not be limited to:

o Safe speed having regard to the manoeuvring characteristics of the ship and, in ships restricted by draft, due allowance for reduction of draft due to squat and heel effect when turning Speed alterations necessary to achieve desired ETA’s en-route, e.g. where there may be limitations on night passages, tidal restrictions etc. Positions where a change in machinery status is required Course alteration points with wheel over positions - where appropriate, on large scale charts taking into account the ships turning circle at the planned speed and the effect of any tidal stream and current on the ships movement during the turn Minimum clearance required under the keel in critical areas Air draft clearance required, as appropriate Points where accuracy of position fixing is critical and the primary and secondary methods by which such positions must be obtained for maximum reliability Contingency arrangements i.e. alternative routes, emergency anchoring etc. in the event of an emergency Point of no return

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

o

In addition to noting the details of the plan onto the “Passage Plan” forms the prominent details of the plan should be marked on the charts.

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SPOS, a weather forecasting software, has been rolled out to the majority of our fleet vessels to assist our Masters in the consideration of weather conditions, with up to date weather forecasts received twice a day by e-mail direct into the program.

Within the vessels passage plan the Master must ensure the 2/O utilises this medium to support his passage plan, both in the attempt to prevent weather related incidents onboard while maximising weather conditions for speed efficiencies.

This software tool does not relieve any watch keeping officer from his dut y in ensuring all practical means of monitoring the vessels safe position and track at all times.

Particularly sensitive sea areas

When an area is approved as a particularly sensitive sea area, specific measures can be used to control the maritime activities in that area, such as routeing measures, strict application of MARPOL discharge and equipment requirements for ships, such as oil tankers; and installation of Vessel Traffic Services (VTS).

List of adopted PSSAs

The following PSSAS have been designated:

The Great Barrier Reef, Australia (designated a PSSA in 1990)

The Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago in Cuba (1997)

Malpelo Island, Colombia (2002)

The sea around the Florida Keys, United States (2002)

The Wadden Sea, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands (2002)

Paracas National Reserve, Peru (2003)

Western European Waters (2004)

Extension of the existing Great Barrier Reef PSSA to include the Torres Strait (proposed by Australia and Papua New Guinea) (2005)

Canary Islands, Spain (2005)

The Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador (2005)

The Baltic Sea area, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Sweden (2005)

The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, United States (2007)

The Strait of Bonifacio, France and Italy (2011)

Ships routeing measures to protect PSSAs

A PSSA can be protected by ships routing measures – such as an area to be avoided: an area withi n defined limits in which either navigation is particularly hazardous or it is exceptionally important to avoid casualties and which should be avoided by all ships, or by certain classes of ships.

The IMO Publication Ships' Routeing includes General provisions on ships' routeing, first adopted by IMO in 1973, and subsequently amended over the years, which are aimed at standardizing the design, development, charted presentation and use of routeing measures adopted by IMO.

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2.4

VOYAGE PLANNING STANDARD FORMAT

 

TSM Form 001, Voyage Plan is to be compiled in accordance with the IMO STCW Code, and the ICS Bridge Procedures Guide.

 

The plan is to be prepared by the officer responsible for navigation, and approved by the Master prior to comm encement of the intended voyag e

In case the port of destination is not known, the plan shall cover a minimum of 72 hours of the intended voyage prior to departure

2.5

INFORMATION FOR VOYAGE PLANNING

 

General info

Intended speed shall be the speed as per charter-party or as indicated by the charterers

Acknowledgement o All officers involved in navigating the vessel, including deck cadets, are to

 

study

the

plan

prior

to

departure, and sign acknowledgement and

understanding Port of departure

 

Estimated Draft On Departure - this part must always be completed prior to departure

Port of destination

o If the port of destination is known, the general details must be completed. Times of high and low water may be entered later when a more accurate time of arrival is available

General waypoint information

 

Charts and publications to be used during the voyage

 

o

The numbers of all charts to be used during the voyage shall be entered, followed by NZ for New Zealand, Aus for Australia, etc.

 

Navigational information between waypoints to be completed only when there is significant information between waypoints. If the additional information permits, more waypoints may be entered on one page (e.g. Ocean Passages, Great Circle, etc.). If more pages than available in this plan are needed, loose pages may be inserted

Parallel indexing information

 

o Whenever possible, parallel indexing must be used as an aid to navigation, not only to keep the vessel on her intended track, but also for accurate planning of course alterations. Officers must compare the intended course alteration against the actual track in order to become fully familiar with the behaviour of the vessel

 

2.6

MONITORING

 

The close and continuous monitoring of the ship’s progress along the pre- planned track is essential for the safe conduct of the passage. If the of ficer of the watch is ever in any doubt as to the position of the ship, he must at once call the Master and, if necessary, take whatever action he may think necessary for the safety of the ship.

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The performance of the navigational equipment should be check ed prior to sailing, prior to entering restricted or hazardous waters and at regular intervals during the passage.

Advantage should be taken of all navigational equipment with which the ship is fitted for monitoring, bearing in mind the following points:

Visual bearings are usually the most accurate means of position fixing

Every fix should, if possible, be based on at least three pos ition lines

Transit marks, clearing ranges and clearing bearings can be of great assistance

When checking fixes, use systems which are based upon different data

Positions obtained by navigational aids should be checked by visual means

The value of the echo sounder as a navigational aid

Buoys should not be relied upon for fixing but may be used for guidance when shore marks are difficult to distinguish visually

The functioning and correct readings of instruments used

The frequency with which the position is required to be fixed

Radar can be used to advantage in monitoring the position of the ship by the use of parallel indexing techniques. Parallel indexing, as a simple and most effective way of continuously monitoring the ship’s progress in restricted waters, can be used in any situation where radar conspicuous navigation mark s are available

o Parallel Indexing is compulsory when in coastal navigation

  • 2.7 COMPANY REVIEW OF PASSAGE PLAN.

Company should carry out Radom sampling of the Passage plan and UKC at regular intervals. These should be also checked and verified during the Superintendents visits and during the internal audit.

The main purpose for checking is to confirm compliance with Company’s requirement.

Confirm that the relevant sailing directions, available port information been studied and information contained therein been given consideration when planning the passage, whether the current / tidal stream atlases been consulted, whether the charted aids to navigation been studied and highlighted for landfall and position monitoring purposes, whether the requirements regarding traffic separation schemes / vessel traffic routing services Particularly Sensitive Sea Areas (PSSA's), Archipelagic Sea Lanes (ASL) been considered when planning the passage , whether the planned route takes into account applicable Environmental protection measures, whether study of pilot boarding are as and anchorages been made.

Below is a list of items to be checked for compliance:-

Checklist A

-columns for Navarea / Warning and Charts affected have been completed. -Master’s Declaration section signed by Master. -Signatures and Dates signed by all Duty Officers.

Checklist B - Completion of the “Passage Plan Appraisal & Checklist” to check the various Publications used in the planning of Voyage.

Master’s Comment sheet – To check whether specific remarks regarding anticipated Ocean currents, Visibility & Other Metrological Conditions; Areas of high traffic density ; Ship

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operations which may require additional sea room e.g. tank cleaning or pilot embarkation; the availability and reliability of navigation aids, marks lights and radar conspicuous objects etc have been completed.

DEPARTURE PORT INFO Sheet - To verify all details such as Drafts, Tidal Information, Remarks column and Prevailing Current / Weather Information has been completed.

Berth to Pilot sheet - Details on Frequency of Position fixing / T&P notices/ UKC Remarks column and Watch Level to be checked for accuracy.

Sea Passage sheet- Details on Frequency of Position fixing / T&P notices/ UKC Remarks column and Watch Level to be checked for accuracy.

ARRIVAL PORT INFO Sheet- To verify all details such as Drafts, Tidal Information, Remarks column and Prevailing Current / Weather Information has been completed.

Pilot to Berth sheet- Details on Frequency of Position fixing / T&P notices/ UKC Remarks column and Watch Level to be checked for accuracy.

IMPLEMENTATION SHEET- Has it been confirmed by the Duty Officer in whose watch the next Voyage Chart is to be used. This should not be Ticked “YES” on computer, but to be done manually by pen.

Under Keel Clearance Calculation(TSM Form 002) should be reviewed to see that Company’s Minimum Under-Keel Clearance policy for ocean passage, shallow water, within port limits and while alongside the berth has been complied.

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  • Experience Feedback HSSEQ Circular 13-2006 - Incident Awareness – Grounding HSSEQ Circular 19-2007 - Incident Awareness – Contact with Dock HSSEQ Circular 02-2008 - Incident Awareness – Contact with container vessel in Singapore Straits HSSEQ Circular 05-2008 – Navigation – Breach of IMO Regulations HSSEQ Circular 08-2008 – Navigation – Contravention of TSS Navigation rules HSSEQ Circular 11-2008 - Incident Awareness – Collision with a fishing vessel HSSEQ Circular 19-2008 - Grounding HSSEQ Circular 14-2009 - Incident Awareness – Grounding of bulk carrier – Port of Ningde, China HSSEQ Circular 10-2010 - Incident Awareness – Grounding of managed tanker HSSEQ Circular 11-2010 - Incident Awareness – Collision during the ice convoy

  • Documentation and filing TSM Form 001 - "Voyage Plan"

o

File No. 21.2

  • Distribution Full Management Vessels

o

File originals

  • References ICS Bridge Procedures Guide HSSEQ Circular 03-2006 – Marine Department Feedback

Operations Manual Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Operations Manual

Quality Assurance into the 21st Century and beyond

Deck

OMD Document

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No. 003

  • 3. BRIDGE WATCH

    • Purpose To specify Bridge Watch Conditions, duties, and tasks

    • Application All vessels

    • Responsibility Master Navigating Officers Watchstanders

  • 3.1 BRIDGE WATCH CONDITIONS

Bridge manning requirements vary substantially depending upon location, traffic density and weather conditions. This section describes how underway Bridge Watches should be manned, and the duties of watch officers and crew members involved for each different Bridge Watch set. The Pilot is not considered part of the vessel’s complement. However he may be considered the 2nd or the 3rd licensed officer on the Bridge in pilotage waters. These are a minimum and should be increased if considered necessary by the master.

The Master has a responsibility to set the proper Bridge Watch and to ensure a proper vessel lookout

A change of Bridge Watch condition (i.e., from Bridge Watch I to Bridge Watch II) does not automatically change the Con. Until the senior officer orders a change, the con will remain with the Deck Watch Officer who had it before the change of Bridge Watch condition. Any change of con must be logged in the Deck Logbook

All personnel, including officers and unlicensed seamen who may be assigned to any duty station in any Bridge Watch, shall understand fully the duties expected of them. It is the Master's responsibility to ensure that all officers and crew members are properly trained. All watch personnel shall be entered in the deck log book

When underway, Bridge Watches shall be set at the Master's direction and discretion according to prevailing conditions

o Refer to Table 3.1-1

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Table 3.1- 1: Bridge Watch Conditions

Primary Conditions

Open Waters

Clear Weather, little or no traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch I / Engine UMS

 

Clear Weather, higher density traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch II

Restricted visibility, little or no traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch II

Restricted visibility, higher density traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch III

Restricted Waters (Limited Manoeuvring Room)

 

Clear Weather, little or no traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch II

Clear Weather, higher density traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch II or III

 

Restricted visibility, little or no traffic

Bridge / Engine watch II or III

 

Restricted visibility, higher density traffic

Bridge / Engine Watch III

Restricted waters should be specifically recognized in the Passage plan. They include but are not lim ited to:

Port arrival and departure

Anchorages arrival and departure

Ship to ship manoeuvring operations (which includes ship to barge operations, storing operations with supply launch etc.)

Mooring and tug handling operations

 

Pilot boarding and disembarkation

Traffic Separation Scheme

High traffic density area, fairway and roadstead transit

The Bridge level III of manning would require the concerted effort of the bridge team and not normally be in force for prolonged durations, keeping the fatigue factor in consideration.

The following as minimum can be considered High density traffic areas where standby:

the

ME

to

be on

Singapore Straits and One Fathom Bank

 

Sections of the English Channel, especially in the Dover Straits

The Bosporus and Dardanelles

Baltic Sea areas at Master’s discretion

The Magellan Strait

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Any other waterways or in any other circumstances at Master’s discretion

At any Time When the Following Conditions Exist:

 

High navigational intensity plus collision avoidance

Bridge / Engine Watch III

Bridge Watch I

This watch has only one Deck Watch Officer on the Bridge during daylight hours providing that all conditions and recommendations stated in OMD Document 004, “Lookouts” are fulfilled.

Assistance should be immediately available to the bridge when any of the conditions change. When at sea, a minimum of one crew member (other than the Deck Watch Officer) should be in constant contact with the bridge by radio at all times and to perform lookout duties when required. When in coastal waters, the crew member (other than the Deck Watch Officer) should be on the bridge or close to the bridge.

In

addition to the above,

a watchman is

also required during hours of

darkness from sunset to

sunrise.

Bridge Watch II

This watch requires two Deck Watch Officers on the Bridge. Though one officer is usually the Master, under special circumstances the Master may delegate authority to another Deck Watch Officer. By doing so, the Master does not thereby delegate responsibility. If it is anticipated that the vessel will be in this condition for a long period of time it would be normal to double watches with the Master in charge of one watch and the Chief Officer in charge of the other.

Conning Officer

o The Conning Officer is the watch coordinator and supervisor and shall ensure that the vessel’s course and speed are regulated for safe navigation. He is normally the senior officer

Watch Officer

o The Watch Officer's primary duties shall be radar operation for both col lision avoidance and navigation

Aside from other duties ordered by the Master, the Deck Watch Officer shall:

o

Acknowledge the Conning Officer's helm and engine orders, making sure they are carried out properly

o

Operate the engine order telegraph or throttle and watch for proper response. The RPM indica tor shall be checked to ensure correct response to engine orders as well as to ensure radar plot calculation accuracy with respect to speed over the bottom

o

Be aware of the vessel’s speed to ensure compliance with VTS local regulations, and to ensure accuracy of rapid radar plotting and ARPA data

o

Keep current radar and other navigation plots (using soundings when applicable) on the appropriate charts. Any problems maintaining the track must be promptly communicated to the Conning Officer who shall take corrective action

o

Plot closing targets a Duty Officer others called for by the Conning Officer to obtain Closest Point of Approach, CPA, time of CPA, and the course and

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speed of the targets. Data must be promptly and accurately reported to the Conning Officer who shall acknowledge receipt of the data

o

Properly maintain all Bridge logs and records

o

Handle all communications

Bridge Watch III

This watch requires three Deck Watch Officers on the Bridge. The senior officer is always the Master. The Master will take the Con. This watch is the most critical and demanding and calls for the most rigorous attention to priorities.

Conning Officer

 

o

The Master is the watch coordinator and supervisor and shall ensure that the vessel’s course and speed are regulated for safe navigation. The Master must use the two Deck Watch Officers on the Bridge with maximum effectiveness and minimum confusion. Given the demanding conditions of this Bridge Watch, watch personnel must operate as a smoothly functioning team. The Master must manage the watch in a manner which optimises communication. Deck Watch Officers must be alert and not hesitate to advise each other and the Master quickly of any significant navig ational or traffic developments

o

The Master shall assign one Deck Watch Officer as the Radar Watch Officer and the other as the Navigation Watch Officer

Radar Watch Officer

o

This Deck Watch Officer shall have no responsibilities other than to operate the vessel's radar as ordered by the Master with specific r eference to collision avoidance

o

The radar-derived information must be promptly and accurately reported to the Master who must acknowledge it

o

Radar navigation data shall be provided to the Navigation Watch Officer, preferably using the alternate radar

Navigation Watch Officer

o

This Deck Watch Officer shall be responsible for all navigation duties, excluding radar operation. In addition, he will also handle communication duties

o

Particular, attention must be paid to the vessel's plotted navigational progress, especially with regard to speed and possible position de viations from the planned track

  • 3.2 STEAMING WATCH CONDITIONS AND BRIDGE TEAMS TASK

It should be recognised that assigning Team members to specific tasks will create the most effective Team, especially in high stress situations. Accidents are always unexpected. Most accidents occur because there is no system in place to detect and prevent one person from making a mistake

Table 3.2- 1: Steaming Watch Conditions and Tasks

 

CON

TRAFFIC

COMMS

NAVIGATION

OTHER

HELM

LOOK

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DUTIES

 

OUT

 

Con

Radar

 

Handle

Fix ship’s

Tend EOT

Steer

Keep

ship

and

external

position

ship

Lookout

ARPA

 

VHF

comms

Monitor helm

and engine

 

Keep Logs

Equipment tests / checks

BW I

Watch Officer

 

AB available

BW II

Master

Watch Officer

 

AB

Lookout

BW III

Master

Watch Officer

 

Watch Officer

AB

Lookout

 

BW II, assuming the Con is at the discretion of the Master and must be clearly stated when it occurs

BW

II,

the

Chief

Officer may substitute for the Mas ter under special

circumstances The pilot is not to be considered part of the vessel's complement and shall not assume any of the Bridge Watch organisational positions other than the Con Con is the person giving the orders for the navigat ional control of the vessel Figure 3-2 is an example of how Bridge Team tasks may be delegated o Tasks should be delegated depending on the personnel involved and the specific circumstances For watch keeping matrix, please refer to OMD Document 004 Section 4.1 “Lookouts”.

  • 3.3 DUTIES OF THE OFFICER OF THE WATCH

The Officer of the Watch is the Master's representative, and his primary responsibility at all times is the safety of the ship. He is responsible for ensuring that the planned passage is properly carried out during his watch. He must at all times comply with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and the Basic Principles to be Observed in Keeping a Navigational Watch of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watch-keeping for Seafarers, STCW Convention. He will also comply with any additional instructions (verbal or written) of the Master.

The Officer of the Watch should keep his watch on the bridge: Under no circumstances should he leave the bridge until properly relieved. A fundamental responsibility of the officer of the watch is to ensure the efficiency of the navigating watch. It is therefore of particular importance that he ensures that an efficient lookout is maintained at all times. On a vessel with a separate chart room, the Officer of the Watch may visit it, when essential, for a short period in order to carry out his navigational duties, but he should first satisfy himself that it is safe to do so and that a good lookout is being kept

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The Officer of the Watch continues to be responsible for the safety and navigation of the vessel despite the presence of the Master on the bridge until the Master informs him specifically that he has assumed that responsibility

The Master should establish a recognized procedure for monitoring the actions of the Officer of the Watch in preference to taking over control himself, since in this way he will be able to train the officer by correcting errors and at the same time satisfy himself of the safety of the ship

It is the duty of the Officer of the Watch to be aware of any work being carried out near the radar and radio aerials, and of sound signalling apparatus, so that the appropriate warnings can be given. The use of warning notices to hang on equipment controls when such work is in progress is recommended

If the duty watch officer is in any way unclear as to his responsibilities or duties, he shall immediately advise the Master

Full duties of the various navigating officers are fully listed in HSSEQ S ystem Main Manual

Newly joining officers are to report to the Master and, with the officer being relieved, inspect all items for which he is responsible. Only when he is familiar with the operation of all equipment and procedures will he take over responsibility for the watch. The time taken for this will be dependent on the officer’s experience with the equipment and the vessel etc.

Keeping a Good Watch

The Officer of the Watch is responsible for the maintenance of a continuous and alert watch. This is one of the most important considerations in the avoidance of collisions, stranding and other casualties.

In order to keep an efficient watch the Officer of the Watch should ensure the following:

an alert all-round visual and aural lookout to allow a full grasp of the current situation, including the presence of ships and landmarks in the vicinity

close observation of the movements and bearing of approaching vessels

identification of ship and shore lights

close monitoring that the course is being steered accurately and that wheel orders are correctly executed

observation of the radar and echo sounder displays

Observation of changes in the weather, especially the visibility

Changing Over the Watch

If a manoeuvre or other action to avoid a hazard is taking place at the moment the Officer of the Watch is to be relieved, hand over should be deferred until the action is completed, i.e. The vessel is on track proceeding towards the desired waypoint at the ordered speed.

The Officer of the Watch should not hand over the watch if he has any reason to believe that the relieving officer is suffering from any disability (including illness, drink, drugs or fatigue) which would preclude him from carrying out his duties effectively. The oncoming officer must comply with the work hours and rest period requirements laid down. If in doubt, the duty officer should consult t he Master prior to handing over

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The relieving Officer of the Watch should ensure that members of his watch are fully capable of performing their duties and in particular that they have adjusted to night vision. He should not take over the watch until his vision has fully adjusted to the prevailing light conditions and he has personally satisfied himself concerning the use and condition of Bridge navigating instruments and equipment

The officer being relieved shall complete all Log book entries and check operation of all recorders prior to leaving the bridge

After handing over the watch, the officer relieved should carry out rounds on board to check for fire, flooding or any other unusual circumstances (e.g. Oil escaping from hydraulic lines)

Periodic Checks of Navigational Equipment

The Officer of the Watch should make regular checks to ensure that:

the helmsman or the automatic pilot is steering the correct course

 

the standard magnetic compass error is established at least once a watch and after any major alteration of course

the standard magnetic and gyro compasses are compared frequently and repeaters synchronised

the automatic pilot is tested in the manual position at least once a watch

 

The

navigation

and

signal

lights

and

other

navigational

equipment

are

functioning properly

Restricted Visibility

When restricted visibility is encountered or expected, the first responsibility of the Officer of the Watch is to comply with the Intern ational Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGS) and the Master's Standing Orders, particularly with respect to:

Informing the Master

Posting lookout(s) and calling additional personnel

Advising Engine Room of prevailing conditions

Exhibiting navigation lights and observing sound signal requirements

Operating the radar

All these actions should be taken in good time before visibility deteriorates

All actions / precautions taken shall be duly logged in the deck logbook.

Calling the Master

The Officer

of

the Watch

should notify the Master

immediately under any of

the following

circumstances:

 
 

If in doubt as to the correct action to take for any reason

 

If

visibility

deteriorates

to

the

level

laid

down

in

the

Master's

Standing

Instructions If the movements of other vessels are causing concern

 

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If difficulty is experienced in maintaining course due to heavy traffic or to meteorological or sea conditions

Failure to sight land or a navigation mark or to obtain soundings by the expected time

If either land or a navigation mark is sighted unexpectedly or if an unexpected reduction of sounded depth occurs

If an unexpected hazard to navigation is sighted

If in doubt of the vessels position or the accuracy of any navigational equipment

T he breakdown of the engines, steering gear or any essential navigational

equipment If it is necessary to reduce speed for any reason

If traffic density increases substantially

If in any doubt about the possibility of weather damage

Sighting any distress signal or receipt of a distress message

Despite the requirement to notify the Master immediately in the foregoing circumstances, the Officer of the Watch should not hesitate to take immediate action to ensure the safety of the ship whenever circumstances require.

If the Master can not be contacted, either the ships public address system or two short rings on the ships alarm shall be used. Alternately, the Chief Officer or another crew should be called to assist.

Watch-Keeping Personnel

The Officer of the Watch should give the watch-keeping personnel all appropriate instructions and information necessary for maintaining a safe watch, including a proper lookout and ensure the Bridge is manned as per the Passage Plan Watch Level requirements.

Main Engines

The Officer of the Watch should bear in mind that the engines are at his disposal for assistance in manoeuvring. He should not hesitate to use them in case of need, although timely notice of an alteration of engine movements should be given when possible. He should also be fully aware of the manoeuvring capabilities of his ship, including its stopping distance.

The Officer of the Watch should pay particular attention to the following when controlling main engines:

Control of revolutions ahead and astern. The officer of the watch should be familiar with the operation of the engine/propeller mechanism and aware of any limitations. He should appreciate that the type and configuration of the ship's engines will have implications when changing speed or motion. Direct drive diesel, diesel through gearbox or clutch, turbo-electric and gas turbine engines have relatively quick responses to change provided the engines are on "stand- by". Geared turbines are not as responsive, neither is their change from ahead to astern or vice versa achieved as quickly. The delays and constraints built into engines when operating unmanned will have a substantial bearing on ship manoeuvring. The officer of the watch should therefore be familiar with the actual mechanical procedures initiated by an unforeseen variation in engine speed

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Condition and readiness. The Officer of the Watch should know the time taken to achieve both an emergency and a routine stop in both 'open sea' and manoeuvring conditions

Standby Condition

The Officer of the watch should ensure that whenever a vessel is navigating in restricted waters as identified under Table 3.1 1: ‘Bridge Watch Conditions’, navigating in adverse weather conditions, in high density traffic areas, port approach or in any other circumstances deemed necessary, the main engine should be in a state of increased readiness or in standby condition as required by the Master.

The bridge will normally give the engine room one hour’s notice before manoeuvring speed and additional systems are required. On expiry of this notice period the main engine will be on standby for immediate manoeuvring as required by the bridge.

At the time of giving one hour’s notice to the engine room, requirements regarding doubling up of steering gear systems, requirements for additional alternators, requirements for hydraulic machinery and or steam driven machinery must also be considered and similar notice to be given.

Appropriate entries are to be made in both the bridge and engine room log books regarding the notice period and standby condition requirements.

The OOW should bear in mind that it may not always be possible to give the one hour’s notice as described above and that the main engine is available for use at all times. However, when the vessel is in UMS mode and where circumstances permit, time should be allowed for the Duty Engineer Officer to man the Engine Room before using the engine.

Arrival Port Preparations:

The following should be marked on the chart, where it enhances safe navigation:

Notice to ER – 2 hours or 1 hours notice to be determined taking into account the traffic density, port which the vessel is calling etc.

Changes in machinery status; - ME testing to be marked on the chart which should be carried out at least 6 miles before pilot station.

Master calling point and position when he has to be on bridge.

Master taking over of Con.

Parallel indexing (not from floating objects unless they have been first checked

for position); Chart changes;

Methods and frequency of position fixing;

Prominent navigation and radar marks;

No-go areas (the excessive marking of no-go areas should be discouraged)

Landfall targets and lights;

Clearing lines and bearings;

Transits, heading marks and leading lines;

Significant tides or current;

Safe speed and necessary speed alterations;

Minimum under keel clearance;

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Positions where the echo sounder should be activated;

Crossing and high density traffic areas;

Safe distance off;

Anchor clearance;

Contingency plans;

Abort positions;

VTS and reporting points, etc.,

Helmsman/Automatic Pilot

The widespread use of automatic pilots may mean that helmsmen are less experienced than in the past. Provided the equipment is reliable, the autopilot may therefore provide the most accurate means of keeping track in congested waters.

T he Officer of the Watch should bear in mind the need to station the helmsman and change over the steering to manual control in good time to allow any potentially hazardous situation to be dealt with in a safe manner. With a vessel under automatic steering, it is highly dangerous to allow a situation to develop where the officer of the watch is without assistance and has to break the continuity of the lookout in order to take emergency action. The changeover from automatic to manual steering and vice versa should be made in good time by the Officer of the Watch or under his supervision

The watch officer must be aware of the possibility that auto-pilot may malfunction and carefully monitor its performance particularly during change over between systems

The use of a manual override at the conning position, giving the Officer of the Watch direct access to the steering gear, should be encouraged

Instructions for change over between systems and emergency operation of system must be clearly displayed by the steering console. All officers must be familiar with the proper method of change over

All Deck Officers and Helmsmen must be thoroughly familiar with the sound and operation of the alarm indicating the helm is being turned while in automatic steering mode. This alarm signals the need to change from the automatic steering mode to manual steering mode in order to initiate steering manually

Helicopter Operations

Masters and officers of the watch of vessels likely to be engaged in the transfer of personnel or stores by helicopter should make themselves familiar with the ICS Guide to Helicopter/Ship Operations.

System Controls - Monitoring and Operation

The Officer of the Watch is responsible for monitoring other systems and their controls which are located on the bridge. These will include some or all of the following:

fire detection

watertight integrity

machinery condition

THOME

SHIP MANAGEMENT PTE LTD

OMD Document No. 003 Bridge Watch

radio communications

o GMDSS equipment located at the bridge ballast control

cargo humidity

reefer condition

gas pressure and detection

other specialised requirements

During critical phases, enough manpower must be available to operate all system controls which are fitted on the bridge.

Bridge and Emergency Check Lists

The Officer of the Watch should be fully conversant with the procedures in this guide. When time permits, whether the action taken is routine or emergency, the appropriate check list should be consulted in order to ensure that all necessary steps are taken. Vessels fitted with bow thrusters, shaft generators, auxiliary engines, ballast pumps etc. which are controlled from the bridge should have their check lists appropriately supplemented by the procedures to be followed with respect to these controls. Masters should develop Vessel Specific check lists when necessary. The checklist is to be delivered using the samples in the ICS Bridge Procedure Guide.

Compass Error

Conditions permitting, compass error shall be determined at least once each watch at sea and at anchor, and for each course steered. This data shall be recorded in the Compass Record Book and Deck Logbook. In restricted or pilotage waters, compass error shall be determined by the use of transit bearings and ranges, and the results similarly logged.

During the watch, simultaneous checks between the gyro and magnetic compasses shall be made at least hourly

Frequent checks shall be made between the master gyro and all repeaters, and other equipment utilising the gyro including the course recorder. Significant discrepancies shall be investigated, corrected if possible, and logged in the Deck Logbook

A current deviation table shall be maintained and available to the Deck Watch Officer

Determining the Vessel’s Position

All of the vessel’s navigational equipment must be used, as necessary, to determine the vessel's position. The advantages and limitations of each aid must be fully understood.