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Subject/Content: Language Arts Time Frame: April

Topic Area: Poetry Grade Level: 3rd


Designed by Chelsey Gibbard Length of Unit: 2 weeks (10 days)
School District: Utica School: Beacon Tree Elementary
Unit Overview
This unit gets students excited about writing poetry and all the elements in it. Students will be introduced to various works by different
authors and become familiar with themes. They will identify literal/nonliteral language and sound patterns in poetry, as well as be able to write
their own poetry with these literary devices. We will talk about the different styles of poetry writing and students will be able to identify the
type when they see it. Creating their own poems based on the types we learn will be another big skill learned. They will also have the chance to
work through the writing process, type their finished poems in Microsoft Word, and perform them orally in front of the classroom.



Francis Fall 2013: Adapted from - UbD Template 2.1 - Grant Wiggins & Jay McTighe 2011
Stage 1 Desired Results
ESTABLISHED GOALS/ STANDARDS

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.2
Recount stories, including fables, folktales,
and myths from diverse cultures;
determine the central message, lesson, or
moral and explain how it is conveyed
through key details in the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.4
Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from nonliteral
language.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.3.4.b
Read grade-level prose and poetry orally
with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression on successive readings.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.6
With guidance and support from adults,
use technology to produce and publish
writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as
to interact and collaborate with others.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.10
Write routinely over extended time frames
(time for research, reflection, and revision)
and shorter time frames (a single sitting or
a day or two) for a range of discipline-
specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

BIG IDEAS and KEY SKILLS from established goals
The Central Concepts, BIG IDEAS, and KEY SKILLS of this unit are

Big Ideas:
-Every poem carries a unique theme (RL.3.2)
-Poems use literal and nonliteral language (RL.3.4)
-Poems use sound patterns
-Authors use different styles of poetry to portray different meaning and emotion

Key Skills:
-Identify the theme of a poem (RL.3.2)
-Create own poems with similar themes as those read

-Identify literal and nonliteral language in poetry (RL.3.4)
-Write poems using literal and nonliteral language

-Identify different sound patterns of writing poetry
-Write poems using sound patterns

-Identify different styles of poems
-Write different styles of poetry

-Read poems orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression (RF.3.4.b)

-Type poems using with MS Word (W.3.6)

-Write routinely over extended time frames for different purposes (W.3.10)
Understandings At the end of this unit, students will understand THAT

-Poems carry unique themes to send a message (RL.3.2)
-Poems contain literal and nonliteral language to express ideas, convey meaning, and create images
(RL.3.4)
-Poems can use different sound patterns to help create additional meaning and descriptions
-Poems are written in different styles to help convey specific messages and emotions
-Reading a poem with the correct tone, speed, and expression helps to deliver the message effectively
(RF.3.4.b)
-Using a computer to type your work is a professional way to let readers see your finished piece
(W.3.6)
-Writing requires multiples steps in order to create a final draft (W.3.10)
Central or Essential Questions Questions that drive unit inquiry in a CLEAR conceptual order

-What is poetry?
-How is poetry the same/different from other types of writing?
-How do I use punctuation, word choice, literal and nonliteral language, sound patterns, lyrics to make
my poetry better?
-How does poetry use different styles to portray a specific meaning?
-How can I perform my poetry so that others enjoy it?



Learning Objectives What will students be able to do with their knowledge after instruction?

-Students will be able to recall the theme of a poem and compare/contrast it to others (RL.3.2)
-Students will be able to develop their own poems with similar themes as those read (RL.3.2)
-Students will be able to identify literal and nonliteral language (RL.3.4)
-Students will be able to construct poems using literal and nonliteral language (RL.3.4)
-Students will be able to identify different sound patterns
-Students will be able to produce different sound patterns when writing poetry
-Students will be able to identify different styles of poetry
-Students will be able to write different styles of poetry
-Students will be able to perform poems orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression
(RF.3.4.b)
-Students will be able to use computers to type their poems with MS Word (W.3.6)
-Students will be able to write routinely over extended time frames for different purposes (W.3.10)
-Students will be able to critique poems of their own and their peers (W.3.10)





Value of Content
By learning this content and these skills, students will

-Use literal and nonliteral language, sound patterns, proper punctuation, etc. to express their own
feelings and emotions and portray meaning in everyday life. They can use these devices in everyday
conversation to explain feelings about things happening around them. (Today is hot and humid
(imagery). That wind felt like a tornado (simile). She was as quiet as a mouse (metaphor).
-Create different styles of poetry in future schooling based on what they want to convey to others
about a particular theme. Students will be more comfortable talking about and writing these poems
for future projects.
-Practice typing works on the computer with their finished pieces for others to view in a professional
way. Becoming efficient in computer programs will help students be more marketable for the future.
-Perform poetry for their classmates appropriately for entertainment and fun. Presenting what they
have written will help students become more comfortable speaking in front of a crowd for various
purposes.


Acquisition
Students need to learn these component parts of the knowledge and skills

-Authors of poetry: Shel Silverstein, Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Jenkins, etc.

-Themes of poetry: power of nature/animals, friendship, etc.

-Literal and nonliteral language:
-Imagery- author's use of vivid and descriptive language to add depth to his or her work. It appeals
to human senses to deepen the reader's understanding of the work. Ex: It was dark and dim in the
forest. (dark and dim are visual images)
-Similes- rhetorical figure expressing comparison or likeness that directly compares two objects
through some connective word such as like, as, so, than, or a verb such as resembles. Ex: Curly was
flopping like a fish on a line.
-Metaphors- figure of speech that describes a subject by asserting that it is, on some point of
comparison, the same as another otherwise unrelated object. (does not use like or as like simile) Ex:
The assignment was a breeze.
1. -Personification- the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something
nonhuman, or the representation of an abstract quality in human form. Ex: The sky weeps.
2.
-Sound patterns:
1. -Rhyme- correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, especially when these
are used at the ends of lines of poetry. Ex: balloon, moon.
-Alliteration- a literary stylistic device. Alliteration occurs when a series of words in a row (or close
to a row) have the same first consonant sound. Ex: She sells sea-shells down by the sea-shore.
-Onomatopoeia- the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with
it. Ex: buzz, hiss, giggle, growl
-Repetition- literary device that repeats the same words or phrases a few times to make an idea
clearer. Ex: Because I do not hope to turn again, Because I do not hope, Because I do not hope to
turn

Styles of poetry: (Examples shown in class)
-Acrostic- the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the
text spells out a word or a message
-Haiku- unrhymed three-line poem that usually talks about nature. The 1
st
and 3
rd
lines are five
syllables each and the 2
nd
line is seven.
-Concrete- sometimes also called shape poetryis poetry whose visual appearance matches the
topic of the poem. The words form shapes which illustrate the poems subject as a picture, as well
as through their literal meaning.
-Color- Using the five senses (taste, touch, smell, see, hear) to describe a color.
-Diamante- unrhymed seven-line poem. The beginning and ending lines are the shortest, while
the lines in the middle are longer, giving diamante poems a diamond shape. It serves to compare
two nouns or contrast them.

-Reading poems:
1. -Accuracy- the quality or state of being correct or precise.
-Rate- speed of reading.
-Expression- process of making known one's thoughts or feelings. (facial expression, body
language)

-Writing process:
-Brainstorm- gathering a list of ideas spontaneously about a specific topic
-First Draft- the first copy of ones writing
-Revise- Going back and making changes to the first draft to make it better.
-Final Draft- the final piece of work free of errors. (typed)



Existing Student Knowledge
Anticipated preconceptions

-All poetry rhymes (Ex: Roses are red, violets are blue)
-Poetry is boring and hard to write
-Poetry is not meant for everyone especially if you are not creative
Anticipated Challenges

-Students may have trouble reading poetry in class and at home on
their own
-Students may have trouble writing on their own in class and at home
-Students may have difficulty with vocabulary terms







How instructor will use preconceptions

-Show them poetry that does not rhyme
-Show them poems that are fun and free-flowing and can solely be
used for entertainment purposes. Also, have students bring in their
favorite song lyrics to incorporate into a poem.
-Poetry can be written in many styles to help spark ideas




How instructor will mediate these challenges

-Read with students in class and give them 2 poems to read at home
each night and an assignment to write notes/make marks on the poem
where they do not understand
-Give students writing prompts or ideas to write a poem. This can
include graphic organizers. Give them examples of the type of poem I
want them to create.
-Create worksheet with terms that include the literal and nonliteral
language, sound patterns, etc. where they have to match each one
correctly

Other notes on Stage I







Stage 2 Determining Acceptable Evidence
Performance Tasks/Assessments
1. Task: Students will write a free-form poem and apply a theme we have covered in class as well as include two literary devices. One must
be nonliteral language, one must be a sound pattern. (See blueprint below)


2. Assessment: Students will complete a poetry project where they must identify and label the five types of poetry we have discussed in
class. They will create five of their own poems based off the models using nonliteral language and sound patterns. They will peer-edit
their poems with a partner and choose two to type in Microsoft Word. These two poems will be read aloud to the class at during the
Readers Theater. (See blueprint below)


Formal Assessments (Multiple choice quizzes or tests, essay questions)
3. Students will complete a worksheet where they name what literary device is being used after each example. There are eight items and a
word bank to for them to refer to. (See blueprint below)


Student self-assessment and reflections








Performance Task Blueprints-Provide a blueprint for at least one task.
What understandings and goals will be assessed though this task? What essential questions will be
uncovered in this performance task?
1. Performance Task:

Name:
Date:

Directions: Write a free-form poem with a theme on nature/animals or friendship that shows two literary devices we have learned. One
must be a form of nonliteral language (imagery, simile, metaphor, personification) and one must be a sound pattern (rhyme, alliteration,
onomatopoeia, repetition). You may include more than one of each for extra points. Your poem must be at least at eight lines. Refer to the
examples we have read in class for ideas. Good luck!

2. Performance Assessment:

Page 1:
Poetry Project!
Its Time to Get Creative!

Name:
Date:

Directions:
In this packet you will receive five different types of poems all of which we have discussed in class.
Step 1: Identify and label the type of poem that is written for each one. Write your answer in the space provided next to Type:
Step 2: Create your own poem based on the model. Be sure to give each poem a title. Look for and identify examples of nonliteral language
and sound pattern devices in each. You will include some of these in your own poems. Write a draft in the space below each model
poem.
Step 3: I will be assigning you each a peer-edit partner. You will read your partners poems and revise them and give them helpful
suggestions.
Step 4: You will choose two poems to be typed into Microsoft Word as your final draft. We will be typing these in the computer lab during
class time.
Step 5: You will read the two poems you have selected to the class on the final day of our unit in our Readers Theater. I will go over the
proper way to read using appropriate rate, expression, and fluency. You will have time to practice.
*This is a process and will not be completed in one day. The entire project will be completed in one week. We will break this up into
sections each day. A rubric will be given to you for grading purposes.

Now lets get started!

Page 2:

Candy
Crunchy chewy
Awesome
Nice and sweet
Delightful and delicious
Yummy treat
Type:
Now write your draft in the space below.
Page 3:
Winter
The last winter leaves
Clinging to the black branches
Explode into birds.
Type:
Now write your draft in the space below.
Page 4:
Blue

Blue is the color of the sky
Blue is like a smile
Blue tastes like cotton candy
Blue smells like blueberries
Blue feels like a feather duster
Blue sounds like the water flowing down a stream
Blue looks like a present
Blue makes me happy
Blue is my favorite color

Type:
Now write your draft in the space below.


Page 5:

Gingerbread Man

Type:
Now write your draft in the space below.

Page 6:

Flames to Ice

Flames,
Powerful, shiny
Burning, swooshing, killing
Fire, embers, snow, hail
Freezing, cracking, slipping
Cold, wet
Ice
Type:

Now write your draft in the space below.


Big Ideas:
-Authors use different styles of poetry to portray different meaning and emotion
-Poems use literal and nonliteral language (RL.3.4)
-Poems use sound patterns

Enduring Understandings:
-Poems contain literal and nonliteral language to express ideas, convey meaning, and create images
-Poems can use different sound patterns to help create additional meaning and descriptions
-Poems can use different sound patterns to help create additional meaning and descriptions
-Poems are written in different styles to help convey specific messages and emotions
-Reading a poem with the correct tone, speed, and expression helps to deliver the message effectively
-Using a computer to type your work is a professional way to let readers see your finished piece
-Writing requires multiples steps in order to create a final draft

Key Skills:
-Write poems using literal and nonliteral language
-Write poems using sound patterns
-Identify different styles of poems
-Write different styles of poetry
-Read poems orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression (RF.3.4)
-Type poems using with MS Word (W.3.6)
-Write routinely over extended time frames for different purposes (W.3.10)

Formal Assessment: Students will complete a worksheet where they name what literary device is being used after each example. There
are eight items and a word bank to for them to refer to.

Name:
Date:

Directions: Identify the literary device used in each example. Write your answer next to sentence. The bolded words are there to help you.

Word Bank:

Imagery Rhyme Simile Alliteration Personification
Metaphor Onomatopoeia Repetition

3. Her hair shined like the moon.

4. The bee buzzed around my head for hours.

5. Today is hot and humid outside.

6. The rain cried all afternoon.

7. I do not want to leave my house, my house, my house.

8. That assignment was a breeze.

9. My cat curled up inside my hat.

10. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.

Answer Key

1. Simile
2. Onomatopoeia
3. Imagery
4. Personification
5. Repetition
6. Metaphor
7. Rhyme
8. Alliteration




Students will understand that
-See above
-Every poem has attributes that make it unique



Essential Questions:
-What is poetry?
-How is poetry the same/different from other types of writing?
-How do I use punctuation, word choice, literal and nonliteral language, sound patterns to make my poetry better
-How can I perform my poetry so that others enjoy it?


Through what authentic performance task will students demonstrate understanding? Describe task(s) in
detail so students clearly understand the expectations. (Optional use of GRASPS here)
The performance task will allow students to write a free-form poem and apply a theme we have covered in class as well as include two
literary devices. One must be nonliteral language, one must be a sound pattern. This will be a good practice activity before they
incorporate literary devices into specific styles of poetry in the unit performance assessment.

The formal assessment will give students the chance to complete a worksheet where they name what literary device is being used after
each example. There are eight items and a word bank to for them to refer to. This will be a good activity to do after all the devices have
been gone over in detail before the performance task and before the performance unit assessment.

Through the performance assessment students will complete a poetry project where they must identify and label the five types of poetry
we have discussed in class. They will create five of their own poems based off the models using nonliteral language and sound patterns.
They will peer-edit their poems with a partner and choose two to type in Microsoft Word. These two poems will be read aloud to the class
during the Readers Theater.
What student products and/or performances will provide evidence of desired understandings?
Students will have completed the performance task and formal assessment correctly. They will also have completed the unit assessment
project effectively while understanding the big idea, key skills, and understandings. The objectives will be met through through each
assessment. Students will enjoy having gone through the writing process and producing different styles of poems on their own. The read
aloud during the Readers Theater will give them the opportunity to perform what they have written.





By what criteria will student products and performances be evaluated? Provide standards or rubrics
by which the task will be judged.


From: http://csrms.pasco.k12.fl.us/wp-content/uploads/csrms/2013/04/Poetry-Rubric.png

Instructional Sequence for the Assessment
1. Students will read directions at the top of the page with teacher. (Day 6)
2. Student will identify and label each poem on their own. (Day 6)
3. Student will write a poem based on each model. (Day 6 & 7)
4. Students will revise their partners poems. (Day 8)
5. Students will choose two poems to type in Microsoft Word. (Day 9)
6. Students will read their two poems aloud in the Readers Theater. (Day 10)



Stage III

Calendar
Day Lesson Name Goal Activities Assessment
1 Song Lyrics & Intro to
Poetry
Engage students & become
familiar with different
authors and themes and
their meanings
-Hooking Activity (Song Lyrics)
-Read famous poems and
identify themes
-Discussion of poems and their
meanings
-Informal- Observe
students interest and
activity level
2 Follow-up to Hooking
Activity & Nonliteral
Language
Students will explain what
they liked about their song
and what feelings they had
about it. Nonliteral
language will be
introduced.
-Reasons why you chose your
song & writing of short poem
with some of the lyrics
-Definitions of types of
nonliteral language & examples
Informal- Exit slip out the
door of one thing they
learned today
3 Sound Patterns Students will be introduced
to sound patterns and
review what they learned
the last 2 days about
literary devices.
-Definitions of types of sound
patterns and examples
-Review material for formal
assessment tomorrow
Informal- Thumbs up,
thumbs down to assess
student understanding of
material from today
4 Formal Assessment &
Examples of 3 Poetry Styles
Review previous material
and assess students on
literary devices. Introduce
three different poetry
styles and examples.
-Ask for questions
-Complete formal assessment
-Show examples and give
definitions of 3 of the poetry
styles we will cover (acrostic,
haiku, concrete)
Formal assessment &
informal observation of
active listening
5 Performance Task &
Examples of 2 Poetry Styles
Assess students ability to
write a free-form poem
with a theme we have
discussed as well as include
two literary devices we
-Complete performance task
-Show examples and give
definitions of the last 2 poetry
styles we will cover (color,
diamante)
Performance task &
informal observation of
student progress
have covered. Introduce
the remaining two poetry
styles.
6 Performance Assessment-
Poetry Project
Students will begin their
poetry project, identify
poems, and begin their
drafts
-Hand out poetry project & go
over directions
-Students will identify each
poem
-Begin working on drafts
Informal Observation.
Make note of any student
confusion/questions.
7 Performance Assessment-
Poetry Project
Students will finish their
five poem drafts
-Continue working on poem
drafts
Informal Observation
8 Performance Assessment-
Poetry Project
Students will edit their
partners drafts and give
them constructive
criticism.
-Peer-edit your partners drafts
-Think about what two poems
you want to type & read in the
Readers Theater
Informal-Check next to
each students name if they
are following the writing
and revision process. Make
notes if needed.
9 Performance Assessment-
Poetry Project
Students will type two
poems and understanding
how to read out loud
effectively
-Computer lab typing of poems
-Talk about how to read poems
with appropriate rate,
expression, and accuracy
Informal- Pass out paper
and have students write
any questions they have on
it and turn in anonymously
10 Performance Assessment-
Poetry Project
Students will each read
two poems to the class to
end our unit
-Readers Theater (this may
continue on to the next day)

Informal-Listen to see if
student engages in reading
of the poems. Give each
student a sticker or jolly
rancher for completing the
project.
Formal-Use rubric to grade
performance assessments.





Daily Plans
Hooking Activity

Title of lesson: Whats your favorite song?

Your Name: Ms. Gibbard

Length of activity: 10-15 minutes

Overview: Students will be told how poetry can be fun and incorporate song lyrics. Students will bring in their favorite song
lyrics the following day to create a short poem. This will give them the opportunity to think about why they are choosing this
song, what they like about it, and how it makes them feel.

Central problem/ Essential question:
-What is poetry?
-How is poetry the same/different from other types of writing?
-How do I use punctuation, word choice, literal and nonliteral language, sound patterns, lyrics to make my poetry better?

Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding: Students think that all poetry rhymes or is boring. Giving
them the opportunity to think about their favorite song and how they can incorporate it into a poem will be a new experience
for them. Making them engaged and passionate about what they are learning is the goal of this activity. If students cannot
think of what would be there favorite song would be, then giving them the opportunity to hear some of their classmates
answers will help.

Materials/Evidence/Sources:
Internet (at home)
Printer
Discussion of what poetry is to students
Discussion of misconceptions

Instructional Sequence:

1. Begin by asking students, what do you think poetry is? How is it the same/different from other types of writing?
Listen to a few examples. (3 minutes)
2. Follow up by talking about the misconceptions students have that all poetry rhymes and is boring. Explain that
poetry can be fun to write and include many different devices and techniques. (3 minutes)
3. Ask them to think about what their favorite song is right now in class (silently) and why its their favorite song. (How
does it make you feel? What is the meaning?) (2 minutes)
4. Tell students that I want them to go home tonight and look on the internet for their favorite song lyrics and to print
them. (1 minute)
5. Then tell them that tomorrow we will be doing a follow-up activity where you will be creating your own short poem
and include some of the lyrics you have found. (1 minute)
6. Tell students to be prepared to explain why they chose their song. (1 minute)
7. End the hooking activity by asking students to give a few examples of the song they have chosen by raising their
hands. (2 minutes)
8. Tell them that the purpose of this activity is to realize that not all poetry is boring and it can be about a personal
connection you have to something. Tomorrow they will be following up with this activity and begin talking about
nonliteral language. Make sure they get the idea that we should get excited about writing in this new and creative way!
(1 minute)

Assessment: Informal observation during lesson to make sure students are interested and engaged. Thumbs up, thumbs down
after lesson to check understanding of what they are assigned to do.

Attach all handouts, texts, images, lecture notes, etc.
















Extended Lesson Plan I

Title of lesson: Performance Task & Two Remaining Poetry Styles- Day 5

Your Name: Ms. Gibbard

Length of lesson: 45 minutes

Context of Lesson: Prior to this lesson comes the formal assessment (literary devices identification worksheet) and the
examples of three poetry styles including haiku, acrostic, and concrete. The lesson today gives the students a performance task
where they will write a free-form poem with a theme we have discussed and include two literary devices, one must be
nonliteral language and one must be a sound pattern. They will also learn the final two poem styles which include color and
diamante. The lesson after will be the first day of their performance assessment poetry project where they will identify the
poem styles in their packet and begin working on their drafts.

Overview: Day 5- Performance Task and Two Remaining Poetry Styles. Students will complete the performance task and
show examples and definitions of the remaining two poetry styles (color, diamante).

Central problem/ Essential question:
-How do I use punctuation, word choice, literal and nonliteral language, sound patterns, lyrics to make my poetry better?
-How does poetry use different styles to portray a specific meaning?


Objectives: Use bullet points to specify the lesson objectives (Big IDEAS and SKILLS as learning goals). Use the format:
Students will Be sure to ground your objectives in state content expectations and/or national standards, and cite which
expectations you use (place the number of the expectation in parentheses following each objective).

Students will be able to develop their own poems with similar themes as those read (RL.3.2)
Students will be able to construct poems using literal and nonliteral language (RL.3.4)
Students will be able to produce different sound patterns when writing poetry
Students will be able to identify different styles of poetry


Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding: Students may think poetry is not meant for everyone to be
able to write, but I will reinforce in this lesson that the different styles help spark ideas for different meanings and that students
may find one they relate to in many ways. Students may have trouble with the performance task of writing their own poem,
but I will spend time reviewing. The previous lesson with the formal assessment also serves as a review for this task.

Materials/Evidence/Sources:
Performance task worksheets (blueprint in stage 2)
Definitions of color and diamante poems (shown below)
Examples of color and diamante poems (shown below)
Dry erase markers for white board
Projector/Smart Board to show example poems in front of class
Pencils for students
Notebooks for students

Instructional Sequence:

1. Begin lesson by saying, Today we will begin by completing a specific task. Yesterday you completed a worksheet on
the literary devices and today you will be creating your own poem with a theme we have learned and include two
literary devices. You will have 20 minutes to work on this. The goal here is to get students very familiar with the
elements in poetry. (2 minutes)
2. Pass out the performance task worksheet. (1 minute)
3. Tell students to begin working on it. They may write on the paper given to them. If they have questions, tell them to
raise their hands and you will be by shortly. There should be no talking. (20 minutes)
4. Collect student performance tasks. (1 minute)
5. Next tell students, Now we are going to continue to be introduced to 2 new poetry styles. Get out your notebooks
and pencils. (2 minutes)
6. Start by writing the words Color Poem on the white board with a dry erase marker. Then write the definition next
to it. Tell students to write this in their notebooks. (4 minutes)
7. Show examples of two color poems that students have written before. Display them on the projector or SMART
board. Read the poems out loud. Tell them the qualities of color poems. They use similes, metaphors, and our five
senses to talk about a specific color. (5 minutes)
8. Next, write the words Diamante Poem on the white board with a dry erase marker and write the definition next to
it. Tell students to write this in their notebooks as well. (4 minutes)
9. Show two examples of some diamante poems that students have written before. One will be a comparison or
synonym poem and the other will be a contrasting or antonym poem. Make sure they see the difference between the
two. Display them on the projector or SMART board. Read the poems out loud. Tell them the qualities of diamante
poems. Explain that they are seven lines and can compare or contrast something. They use descriptive words
(adjectives). (5 minutes)
10. Finish lesson by telling students to put away their notebooks. Ask them for questions and do an informal
observation of student progress. Tell students, You did a great job today. Tomorrow we will begin a poetry project
(performance assessment) that I think you will enjoy. (2 minutes)

Assessment: The performance task will measure assessment as well as my informal observation of student progress
throughout. I will ask for questions at various points.

Attach all handouts, texts, images, lecture notes, etc.

-Blueprint of performance task above in stage 2.

Color Poem Definition- Using the five senses (taste, touch, smell, see, hear) to describe a color.

Examples of color poems I will show students-



Green
Green is apples, markers, and cool.
Green is the taste of vegetables.
Green smells like grass and rain.
Green makes me feel envious.
Green is the sound of a lawnmower and a sigh.
Green is a garden, forest, and a swamp.
Green is renewal.
Green is beginning again.
Green is spring.


Yellow
Yellow is the color of bananas
Yellow is sweet
Yellow tastes like a lemon
Yellow smells like sweet dandelions
Yellow sounds like people turning lights on and off
Yellow looks like fresh pineapple
Yellow makes me smile
Yellow is my favorite color









Diamante Poem Definition- unrhymed seven-line poem. The beginning and ending lines are the shortest, while the lines in the
middle are longer, giving diamante poems a diamond shape. It serves to compare two nouns or contrast them.

Examples of diamante poems I will show students-


(Synonym Example)


(Antonym Example)

Flames,
Powerful, shiny
Burning, swooshing, killing
Fire, embers, snow, hail
Freezing, cracking, slipping
Cold, wet
Ice









Extended Lesson Plan II

Title of lesson: Performance Assessment- Poetry Project- Day 9

Your Name: Ms. Gibbard

Length of lesson: 45 minutes

Context of Lesson: Prior to this lesson was Day 8 of the poetry project where students had to peer-edit their partners drafts
and think about which two poems they want to type for todays work. Today, they will be going to the computer lab and
typing two of their poems. I will discuss how to read poems effectively out loud. Tomorrow, we will begin the Readers
Theater and that will conclude our poetry unit.

Overview: Day 9 Performance Assessment- Poetry Project. Students will go to the computer lab to type two of their five poems
they have completed. They will pick their two favorite or best two. Once completed, I will talk about how read poetry orally
with the appropriate rate, expression, and accuracy.

Central problem/ Essential question:
-How can I perform my poetry so that others enjoy it?

Objectives:

Students will be able to perform poems orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression (RF.3.4.b)
Students will be able to use computers to type their poems with MS Word (W.3.6)

Anticipated student conceptions or challenges to understanding: Students may have a hard time deciding what two poems to
type. They may also need practice with typing on a keyboard. I will make sure to help them to decide what poems they find
most enjoyable and to assist in any trouble with the computer. If students are nervous to perform, I will let them know that
nerves are okay and that no one is judging them or will be making fun of one another.

Materials/Evidence/Sources:

Computers (MS Word)
Printer Paper
Notes on appropriate rate, expression, and fluency (for teacher to read/shown below)
Small slips of paper for anonymous questions
Bucket for anonymous questions

Instructional Sequence:

1. Begin lesson by saying, Today we are going to be going to the computer lab and typing our poems. Yesterday I told
you to be thinking about which two you want to read to the class tomorrow in our Readers Theater. Take a minute to
choose two and talk with your partner about why you are choosing them. (4 minutes)
2. Once students have decided, direct them to the computer lab. Have them line up at the door. Call table groups in
line by who is sitting quietest first. Once students are lined up, walk to the computer lab. I have already designated a
time slot to be in there at this time. (2 minutes)
3. Tell students to pick any computer and wait until I give further directions. (1 minute)
4. Once students are seated at the computers, tell them to open Microsoft Word and begin typing. The font should be at
least 12 point Times New Roman. If they have extra time, then they may use clip art images as well. Give them 20
minutes or so to do this. (20 minutes)
5. Students will print their two poems at the printer in the computer lab. If they finish early, they may surf the internet
for a few minutes. (5 minutes)
6. Once time is up, take students back to classroom. Have them line up quietly at the door. (2 minutes)
7. Have students go back to their seats. Tell them that in order to read their poems effectively for tomorrow, they must
know what appropriate rate, expression, and accuracy are. Tell them that I will be looking for all of these things
tomorrow during the performances. (2 minutes)
8. Explain what each thing means: rate, expression, accuracy. Ask for questions. Students will just listen. No need for
students to take notes. (6 minutes)
9. Pass out a small slip of white paper and tell students to write down any questions they may have before tomorrow.
Tell them not to write their names down and to turn it in to the bucket that is at the front of the room anonymously. (5
minutes)
10. End the lesson, by saying Practice your poems tonight at home and tomorrow we will begin. I cant wait to see
what you all have written! The goal here is to make an entertaining performance for your classmates and the teacher.
The performances will end the poetry unit. (1 minute)


Assessment: Informally, I will assess students while they are typing in the computer lab and while they are listening to me
explain how to read their poems out loud. I will make sure they are following directions. I will also pass out a slip of paper to
each student and have them write down any questions they have before tomorrow and turn it in anonymously.

Attach all handouts, texts, images, lecture notes, etc.

Definitions to help in explaining what appropriate rate, expression, and accuracy are:

-Rate- speed of reading.

-Expression- process of making known one's thoughts or feelings. (facial expression, body language)

-Accuracy- the quality or state of being correct or precise.

















Works Cited

Family Friend Poems. (2014). In Poems about Friendship online. Retrieved from http://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poems/friend/

Learning About Poetry. (2011). In Mrs. Warners 4
th
Grade Classroom online. Retrieved from
http://mrswarnerarlington.weebly.com/poetry.html

Poetry Rubrics. N/A. In Google Images online.
Retrieved from http://csrms.pasco.k12.fl.us/wp-content/uploads/csrms/2013/04/Poetry-Rubric.png.

Poetry Unit. (2012). In edhelper.com online. Retrieved from http://edhelper.com/poetry/poetry_units.htm









Stage IV (Brain Dump #5)

The entire experience of creating a unit in this class has been very rewarding. Even though the process was a lot of new
information to absorb and apply, it was well worth it to see the finished result. I now know what it takes to create effective units where
my students are engaged and answering questions about the big ideas that are aligned to national standards. This is after all, the goal
for teachers to make lessons that students can relate to and apply to. We want to teach them concepts in content areas that can translate
into real-world experiences.
Stage one was definitely the most challenging. Once I got that, stage two and three followed right behind. Stage two and three
are set up to connect with stage one because you are create your assessments and lessons based on your standards, skills, and
objectives. I am able to understand the difference between each component in stage one now, where before it was a difficult task. I
think that this is how all teachers need to teach. The rock star teachers are definitely doing this and its sad that there is only may
one out of twenty teachers who are like this. After taking this class, I will strive to be this type of teacher.
Learning the Danielson framework is extremely beneficial as well. To know what evaluators are going to be looking
for when they come to observe me in the classroom is a huge benefit. The framework outlines every single thing they look for and
what is acceptable and not acceptable behavior. It is kind of scary to think about all of the things that I need to remember how to do
while teaching, but I know that all comes with practice and time. The first five years of teaching you are becoming familiar with
everything and trying things out for the first time. I cant wait to learn from veteran teachers and use their tools and resources as well
as my own.
I will use all that I have learned in the future in my teaching. The biggest difficulty I faced was deciding what standards
to use initially. I felt like I wanted to do so much and include everything, but in reality it was better to focus on just a few standards
and then create the rest based off that. There are plenty of opportunities to teach other big ideas in other units. I learned a lot from the
misconceptions and challenges section because I never really thought about what the childs perceptions are going into a lesson. I kind
of just assumed that they would know some of what I know. It is helpful to think about the challenges you may face beforehand. Also,
thinking about the value of content and how the skills and ideas can be used in real-life is one of the most important things. By
knowing how the information can be useful for students in the future, it makes teaching the material more enjoyable and purposeful.