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OWNER’S MANUAL

SOLON FACILITY RIVERSIDE FACILITY THORNBURY FACILITY
30625 Solon Industrial Drive, 3464 DURAHART ST. 35 ELGIN ST.,
SOLON OHIO, RIVERSIDE,CALIF. THORNBURY,ONT.
44139 U.S.A. 92507 U.S.A. N0H 2P0 CANADA
PH. 440-542-3720 PH. 909-369-0878 PH. 519-599-2015
FAX. 440-542-3721 FAX. 909-369-8281 FAX. 519-599-6803
B
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TB SERIES HYDRAULIC BREAKERS
General Installation
Breaker Operation
Breaker Service
Revision : 11/2001
Manual # : 150-2079
CONTENTS
3 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Sizing The Breaker .......................
Typical Hydraulic Circuits ..............
Breaker Tool Troubleshooting .......
General Information ......................
Safety ............................................
Operation ......................................
Maintenance .................................
Service ..........................................
Breaker Disassembly ....................
Breaker Reassembly .....................
Breaker Removal & Storage .........
Underwater Applications ...............
Troubleshooting Guide ..................
Small Breaker Torques .................
Medium Breaker Torques ..............
Large Breaker Torques .................
Serial Number Location ................
General Specifications ..................
Warranty ........................................
4
7
10
12
15
16
20
22
23
34
42
43
44
47
48
49
50
51
54
4 Breaker Owner’s Manual
This is the most critical factor in choosing the breaker size.
Up to 1200-ft.lbs. (1627 Joules), are typically used in concrete and other light duty
work.
1200 - 4000-ft.lbs. (1627 - 5423 Joules) are used in both concrete and rock applications
with limitations on the size and amount of material to be broken.
Over 4000 ft. lbs. (5423 Joules), are typically used in rock and large scale concrete dem-
olition projects.
When breaking oversize material the breaker is expected to break the material down the
middle into two pieces. This is optimum production. If the operator has to re-position
the breaker towards the edge of the rock and gradually downsize the material, produc-
tion rate slows down. To assess what size of breaker will effectively handle this applica-
tion, the size and hardness of the material must be known. If a 4 cu. yard piece of hard
rock (20,000 psi or greater) needs to be broken in half you will require a 7,500-ft. lb. or
larger breaker. If a 2 cu.yd. piece of limestone (20,000 psi or less) needs to be broken in
half you will require a 3,000 - 5,000-ft. lb. breaker.
When trenching, the breaker is expected to fracture a solid mass of rock into manage-
able pieces. The size of the material could be 100's of cu.yds, and the energy will be
quickly absorbed. This is why it is recommended to work from a bench so the rock has
somewhere to break out. We recommend that when trenching in limestone or medium
hard rock, to use a 3,000 - 5,000-ft. lb. breaker. When working in hard material we rec-
ommend a 7,500 - 10,000-ft.lb. breaker, and if high production is critical, a 13,500-ft.lb.
breaker would be beneficial.
When breaking Concrete, the breaker is expected to penetrate the material, allowing it to
crack and shake loose from the reinforcing steel. High frequency breakers tend to pro-
vide better performance in this application as it is not the energy per blow, but the fast
blow rate that destroys the concrete's structural integrity. We recommend on concrete
walls, footings, and floors to use a 750 - 1,500-ft. lb. breaker. With larger projects, con-
sisting of large footings greater then 4 cu. yards, use a 2,000 - 5,000-ft. lb. breaker. The
high production demand of bridge and building demolition requires a 7,500 - 10,000-ft.
lbs. breaker.
SIZING THE BREAKER
SIZING BREAKER BASED ON TYPE OF WORK:
SMALL BREAKERS:
MEDIUM BREAKERS:
LARGE BREAKERS:
BREAKING OVERSIZE MATERIAL:
TRENCHING:
BREAKING CONCRETE:
SIZING THE BREAKER
The breaker must be sized properly for both the work it will do and the carrier on which
it will be mounted.
After considering the application work, determine the carrier on which the breaker will
be installed. BTI has assigned a ‘Recommended Carrier Weight’ (see chart on page 6)
range for each breaker. If the operating weight of the carrier falls within this range, the
carrier will safely handle this model of breaker. If the desired breaker falls outside of
this recommended carrier weight range, the carriers lifting capacity and oil flow will
need to be verified to ensure a proper fit.
Provided the weight of the breaker does not exceed the maximum lifting capacity at any
position, the carrier is assumed to be stable. On most loader backhoes and excavators,
the maximum lifting capacity is lowest when the boom is at full reach. This is the value
that must be compared to the operating weight of the breaker.
A required oil flow range is specified for each breaker (see chart on pages 51-31). Oil
flow to the breaker within this range is adequate for operation. However, for maximum
productivity the carrier should be capable of providing the maximum required flow.
Compare the maximum oil flow requirement of the breaker with the oil flow capacity of
the carrier. Remember the breaker operates at 1400-2600-psi. therefore, oil flow should
be evaluated at operating pressure.
SIZING BREAKER BASED ON CARRIER SIZE:
LIFTING CAPACITY:
OIL FLOW & OPERATING PRESSURE:
5 Breaker Owner’s Manual
SIZING THE BREAKER
6 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Carrier Weight in Metric Tonnes
How to Use This Chart
Find your carrier weight along the top of this chart.
Draw a line straight down from that weight. Any
black breaker bars this line intersects will give you
a breaker suitable for your carrier.
TB125 / TB135
TB225 / TB235
TB275 / TB285
TB325 / TB335
TB425ME
TB425QA / X
TB625QA
TB625X
TB725QA
TB725X
TB830
TB980
TB1430
TB1680
TB2080
TB2580
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80
Skidsteer
Mini Excavator
Backhoe
Excavator
Wheel Loader
Figure 1
7 Breaker Owner’s Manual
FOR HYDRAULIC BREAKERS:
To operate a Hydraulic Breaker you only need hydraulic flow and pressure in one direc-
tion. The supply line should be directed out the left side of the boom and the return line
on the right.
These attachments will operate within a range of flow. The operating pressure will
depend on the amount of oil flow, the return line pressure, and internal efficiency of the
individual attachment. The relief valve in the supply line should be set at least 350 psi
(24.1 bar). greater than the maximum stated operating pressure.
The carrier will quite often be equipped with an aux. control valve. (see Fig.2) In this case
the auxiliary control can be used to control the supply of oil. It can usually be adjusted to
provide the correct amount of flow and a relief cartridge can be installed to protect the
hydraulic circuit.
Notice when using the auxiliary control valve that oil is not routed back through the return
port on the valve. It is recommended to send the oil directly back to the cooler, filter, and
tank. If the circuit is plumbed using both ports on the auxiliary valve, the return line
should have a bleed line connected to tank. This will prevent a pressure spike in the return-
ing oil, which is damaging to the hydraulic breakers.
TYPICAL HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS
CARRIER WITH AUXILIARY CIRCUIT:
Figure 2
8 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TYPICAL HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS
SETTING FLOW & PRESSURE:
When setting the flow, connect a flow meter in place of the attachment. Measure the
"No-Load" flow when activating the control valve. Then put a load on the circuit to sim-
ulate the attachment working (refer to the operating pressure) and measure the flow at
this point. This is the flow that needs to be adjusted to the specified oil flow for the
attachment.
Continue to load the circuit until the flow drops to zero. Measure the pressure at which
this happens and adjust the relief valve setting to ensure this pressure is at least 350 psi
(24.1 bar) greater than the maximum operating pressure of the attachment.
If more than one attachment will be used on this circuit with different flow require-
ments, you will need to measure the flow and note the adjustment in two locations.
Be sure to record this information on the BTI Warranty Card provided with each new
attachment.
9 Breaker Owner’s Manual
SIZING BREAKER BASED ON TYPE OF WORK
If the carrier is not equipped with an auxiliary control valve, you will need to install a
priority flow control valve to direct the correct flow away from the normal circuit and
operate the attachment (see Fig.3).
The priority flow control is usually equipped with a flow adjustment and pressure relief.
These valves often need a check valve on the regulated port to completely close the
flow. If dividing too much flow, this circuit will generate heat and will need cooling
capacity.
TYPICAL HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS
Figure 3
10 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TYPICAL TOOL FAILURES:
TOOL TROUBLESHOOTING
Tool breakage due to improper contact
between the tool’s tip and the rock or
concrete.
Typical failure caused by misalign-
ment between down pressure,
breaker and tool (from prying, lever-
ing, etc.)
Mushrooming or fast wearing caused
by operating too long on the same
spot.
Fatigue breakage with typical fatigue
wrinkles due to steel defect.
Failure due to operation with worn-out
retaining pins, blank-firing, or twisting
the tool.
NO
WARRANTY
Failure due to blank-firing or exces-
sive wear of bushings and/or front
head.
NO
WARRANTY
NO
WARRANTY
100%
WARRANTY
NO
WARRANTY
NO
WARRANTY
Mushrooming due to operating with
worn bushings.
NO
WARRANTY
Figure 4
11 Breaker Owner’s Manual
EXTERNAL FORCES:
The main cause of increased fatigue stress in a tool is any form of side force during
operation which creates bending. Therefore using the tool to pry, using the incorrect
working angle, or attempting to break ground using the pull of the machine, are all
detrimental to the life of a tool and must be avoided. The hydraulic power available in a
carrier far exceeds the strength of a tool, and if being used incorrectly, can “snap a tool
like a twig”.
This is any situation where the breaker piston strikes the top of the tool, but the working
end of the tool is not in contact with the work. This happens when the tool slides off the
work, and also on a break-through of thin concrete slabs or boulders.
Low temperatures cause the tool to be more susceptible to fatigue failure. Tools should
be warmed before extensive use by moderate or light breaking.
Any form of damage to the surface of a tool renders it more liable to suffer fatigue fail-
ure. Care must be taken to prevent scratches, gouges, weld marks on the tool, or pick up
between the tool and tool bushing due to lack of lubrication or excessive bending. Avoid
scratches or gouges to the surface of the tool.
Metal to metal contact causing pick up could cause deep damage marks which, in turn,
lead to the formation of fatigue cracks and eventual failure of the tool. Ensure that the
tool shank is well lubricated before inserting it into the tool holder. Molybdenum disul-
fide grease is recommended for the application at 2 hour intervals, with the tool pushed
fully up inside the breaker. (Refer to Fig. 14).
Keep tools well greased and sheltered from the weather when not in use. A rusty tool is
more likely to suffer fatigue failure. For greasing instructions refer to Fig 14.
CAUSES OF TOOL FAILURE
BLANK-FIRING:
COLD TEMPERATURES:
MECHANICAL & THERMAL DAMAGE:
POOR LUBRICATION:
CORROSION:
12 Breaker Owner’s Manual
GENERAL INFORMATION
BREAKER STRUCTURE & DESIGN:
A BTI hydraulic breaker represents the state of the art in rock and aggregate breaking.
Our hydraulic breaker is a self-actuated hammer that delivers rock-breaking power with
the minimum of parts. The main sections of a BTI breaker are the front head, cylinder,
rear head, and control valve.
The FRONT HEAD contains the breaker tool, bushings, and retainer pins. By removing
the retainer pins, the tool can be quickly changed.
The CYLINDER contains the moving piston, which strikes the tool. The seals for both
ends of the piston are also located in the cylinder.
The REAR HEAD houses the cushion chamber, which is charged with nitrogen gas. The
gas in the cushion chamber absorbs the piston's upward recoil and stores this energy for
the next blow.
The CONTROL VALVE is mounted on the cylinder and directs the flow of hydraulic oil
and therefore the movement of the piston. Located directly above the control valve are
the hydraulic oil inlet and outlet ports.
Two side plates hold the breaker and protect it during operation. The breaker is attached
to the carrier by a bracket fastened to these plates.
Rear Head
Cylinder
Tie Rod
Air Valve
Front Head
Figure 5
13 Breaker Owner’s Manual
GENERAL INFORMATION
PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION:
Pressure Pressure Pressure Pressure
Return Return Return Return
Nitrogen Return Pressure
1
2 2
3
7 7 7 7
4
6
6
5
A B C D
5
(A) UPWARD MOVEMENT
Oil flows into cylinder chamber (1) and control valve
chamber (7). The piston is pushed up towards the cushion
chamber (5), and the control valve spool is forced down.
(B) REVERSING DIRECTION
When the lower flange fills with oil, it will reach cylinder
chamber (2). At this time both control valve chambers (6)
and (7) have the same pressure, but the spool moves up due
to the flange surface area differences.
(C) DOWNWARD MOVEMENT
When the control valve spool rises and reaches chamber
(7), the flow moves through the control valve to chamber
(4). Due to the area difference between the piston flange
and the extra force from the cushion chamber pressure (5),
the piston accelerates down.
(D) IMPACT
The piston hits the tool. The mid section of the piston will
hit chamber (2). As a result, chamber (6) will remove pres-
sures through chambers (2) and (3). Since chamber (6) is
exhausted, chamber (7) is constantly pressurized and the
control valve will moves down.
Control
Valve
Spool
Breaker Body
Piston
Cushion
Chamber
Tool
Tool Retainer Pin
Breaker Parts
Hose Adaptors
Figure 6
Figure 7
GENERAL INFORMATION
14 Breaker Owner’s Manual
OPERATING VISCOSITY RANGE:
For optimum efficiency and service life we recommend that the operating viscosity (at
operating temperature) be selected in the range. V opt = opt.
Operating viscosity 16…45 mm
2
/s referred to tank temperature (open loop circuit)
The following values are valid for extreme operating conditions:
V min = 10mm
2
/s for short periods at max. leakage oil temperature of 90
0
C
V max = 800 mm
2
/s for short periods upon cold start.
Temperature range (see figure 8) t min = -20
0
C t max = +75
0
C
For correct selection of the fluid it is assumed that the operating temperature in the tank
is known, in relation to the ambient temperature.
The fluid should be selected so that, within the optimum range (V opt ), (see shaded
section of selection diagram). We recommend that the higher Viscosity grade is selec-
tion in each case.
Example: At an ambient temperature of X
0
C. The operating temperature in the tank will
be 60
0
C. In the optimum operating viscosity range (V opt ; shaded section) this corre-
sponds to viscosity grade VG 46 or VG 68; VG 68 should be selected.
Important: The leakage oil temperature is influenced by pressure and speed and always
higher than the tank temperature. At no point in the system, however may the tempera-
ture be higher than 90
0
C.
If it is not possible to comply with the above conditions because of extreme operating
with the operating parameters or higher ambient temperature, please contact us.
LIMITS OF VISCOSITY RANGE:
NOTES ON FLUID SELECTION:
Figure 8
HYDRAULIC FLUID:
15 Breaker Owner’s Manual
SAFETY
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS:
Danger, Warning, and Caution are harzard alerts used in this manual and on the breaker
safety signs to identify hazards on or near the rockbreaker system.
Danger - Immediate hazards, which WILL result in severe personal injury or death if
the proper precautions are not taken.
Warning - Hazards or unsafe practices, which COULD result in personal injury or
death if the proper precautions are not taken.
Caution - Hazards or unsafe practices, which COULD result in product or property
damage if the proper precautions are not taken.
BTI cannot anticipate every possible circumstance that might involve a hazard. The haz-
ard alerts in this publication and on the product are therefore not all inclusive. If a tool,
procedure, work method or operating technique not specifically recommended by BTI is
used, you must satisfy yourself that it is safe for you and others. You should also ensure
that the breaker and carrier will not be damaged or made unsafe by the operation, main-
tenance or repair procedures you choose.
To avoid injury from flying chips of stone or concrete, be sure you and others stay well
away from the breaker when it is operating.
BTI Hydraulic Breakers and their components are heavy! Plan carefully how you will
handle them when removing, disassembling, or installing the breaker. Stand clear when
slinging the breaker off the ground.
Only trained mechanics should disassembly the breaker. However if you should disas-
semble the breaker be sure to all Nitrogen gas pressure from the cushion chamber. Refer
to the breaker disassembly (page 24) of this manual for instructions.
Stay clear of the tool when charging the cushion chamber with nitrogen gas. It may
jump against the retainer pins as the gas pressure forces the piston down.
16 Breaker Owner’s Manual
OPERATION
INITIAL STARTUP & COLD WEATHER STARTING:
Before operating the breaker you may need to warm the
carrier's hydraulic system. This cold starting technique is
useful if the breaker has been in extended storage, or the
ambient temperature is below 20
0
F. Warming up the sys-
tem to its operating temperature will prevent the breaker
misfiring.
First, cycle each boom function by extending and retracting
each cylinder through its full stroke. Hold the valve open
for 3 to 5 seconds at each end of the cylinder's travel. This
will push oil over the relief and generate heat. Repeat this
procedure until all booms operate smoothly.
Next, raise the breaker so the tool is not pressing onto any
material and fire the hammer. This is called 'idle firing'. In
this position the breaker does not normally run, but circu-
lates warm system oil through the control valve to the tank.
Hold the hammer fire on for 5 seconds, then release for 5
seconds. Repeat this procedure for 3 to 5 minutes depend-
ing on the ambient temperature. While idle-firing the piston
may move up and down, but should not hit the tool.
And finally, start breaking rock by operating the breaker in
short 3-second bursts. Continue operating with short bursts
until the carrier and breaker are at the operating tempera-
ture.
New breakers require a break-in period before full opera-
tion. For the first 30 minutes, operate in soft material or
compacted ground and do not fire the breaker continuously
for more than 20 seconds at a time.
For large rocks start at the edge and work toward the cen-
ter, breaking off small chunks each time. Breaking along
the rock's natural faults and seams also make for easier
breaking. (Fig. 9)
When breaking on a wall or steep incline use a combina-
tion of the carrier's stick cylinder and tilt cylinder to pro-
vide the necessary force to hold the breaker
against the material. Always work the tool 90 degrees to
the material being broken. (Fig. 10 & 11)
As you apply down-force to the breaker, the carrier will lift
slightly giving you a clue that the breaker is properly
pressed onto the material. Excessive down-force will not
make breaking easier, in fact the carrier will be lifted too
far off the ground, and this can damage your equipment.
Not enough down-force and the tool will bounce on the
material, blank-firing
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
17 Breaker Owner’s Manual
OPERATION
SUGGESTIONS FOR EFFICIENT OPERATION:
Do not operate the breaker continuously for more than 20 seconds. Excessive heat will
be generated and you may mushroom the end of the tool. If the rock or stone shows no
sign of breaking within 20 seconds, change its position or that of the breaker.
The breaker should not be fired when the carrier's boom cylinders are fully extended or
fully retracted. The cylinders may be damaged from the breaker's shock pulses.
If your carrier throttle has been set to run at a specific setting, do not deviate. This pro-
vides the proper flow to the breaker. But be careful, excess flow does not increase
breaking power. Your carrier's operating temperature may run too high, and actually
decrease breaking power. If the hydraulic oil temperature exceeds. 175oF (79oC),
stop breaking!
If you plan to operate the breaker underwater, ensure that it has been equipped with an
underwater kit. Refer to page 43.
Blank firing emits a distinct metallic ringing. Blank firing most often occurs in hard
rock, just as the rock shatters under the tool. With no material under the tool, the piston
smashes the tool and retainers too far into the front head, transfering the breaking force
back through the breaker and excavator.
To prevent blank-firing learn to anticipate when the material will break. Predicting this
moment is probably best done by listening to the sound of the hammer hitting the rock.
You will soon notice a change in the hammering sound as the stone is breaking, you are
now on your way to anticipating when a rock will break.
BLANK FIRING:
18 Breaker Owner’s Manual
OPERATION
Do not use the breaker to pry, pick, pound, or lift. This can cause serious damage to the
breaker as the tool side loads or binds in the bushing. The tool must always move freely
straight up and down in the bushing. But remember, your breaker sideplates are
designed to push and rake material for better positioning.
SUGGESTIONS FOR EFFICIENT OPERATION:
BENDING
IMPROPER BREAKER OPERATION
POUNDING PRYING
PUSHING LIFTING
PROPER BREAKER OPERATION
RAKING PUSHING
Figure 12
Figure 13
19 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TRENCHING & EXCAVATION WORK:
OPERATION
Before trenching, you will first need to remove all overburden material, exposing the
surface of the rock to be broken. To begin, penetrate the breaker tool deep into the mate-
rial, splitting and loosening the rock. Repeat this penetration several times within a
small area, excavating a hole. When excavating a deep trench it is more effective to use
steps or benches allowing a place for the rock to break out to. Keep maintaining the
benches as the trench advances. The sides of the trench must be sloped to accommodate
the width of the breaker. In other words, the larger the breaker and the deeper the trench,
the wider the opening at the top will need to be.
For most situations the excavator will sit off to the side of the trench allowing you to
keep steeper slopes. However the carrier swing function will not have the strength to
push broken rock away from the work area. In some cases the excavator will sit on top
of the trench and the broken material can be back filled under the excavator.
For best performance, apply the down force in line with the tool, repositioning every 10
to 15 seconds or when no penetration is evident. Keep the breaker well greased at all
times.
With practice and experience you will learn to determine the best place to begin break-
ing just by looking at the rock. You will want to position the tool on flat areas of the
rock, or look for a seam or crack, which may allow easier splitting. To fully absorb all
the breakers energy, the rock must be resting on a solid base.
Begin by penetrating the concrete several times in one area with the breaker tool. This
should loosen the concrete and separate the reinforcing steel. The reinforcing steel may
need to be cut, keeping the concrete pieces manageable for hauling away.
When breaking concrete floors, use the down force from the carrier's boom cylinder to
follow the tool through the concrete. Breaking vertical walls is more difficult, force
must be maintained using a combination of boom, stick, and tilt cylinders.
A fast blow rate gives the best performance in breaking concrete, so ensure your carrier
is providing the breaker with the maximum recommended oil flow.
Generally when breaking concrete, a chisel point gives the best splitting action.
However if you are breaking hard concrete with lots of reinforcing steel, a moil point
may be better. The moil tip allows the tool to deflect off the steel as it breaks through
the concrete.
If the grizzly is covered with rock, use the breaker sideplates to rake the material. This
will get most of the finer material through the bars and lets the larger pieces rest directly
on the grizzly.
Large pieces will break easier if they rest directly against the grizzly bars. This way all
the energy from the breaker is applied to the rock. Breaking energy will be absorbed if
there is too much material under the rock you are breaking.
If rocks are just hanging on the edge of the bars, use the breaker to hammer them
through with short bursts. Do not push them through with the force of the boom, this
can damage your breaker as the front head hits the grizzly bars.
BREAKING OVERSIZE MATERIAL:
BREAKING CONCRETE:
BREAKING ROCK ON A GRIZZLY:
MAINTENANCE
20 Breaker Owner’s Manual
To keep your breaker working in top operating condition, the following maintenance
must be performed. Keep in mind that lubrication is the single most important procedure
for sustaining the life of a breaker. To make this chore easier, we offer an auto
lubrication unit, call BTI for details
Lubricate the tool with BTI chisel paste or a moly-based grease every two hours of con-
tinuous operation and any time you have serviced the tool. Failure to lubricate regularly
reduces the life of the tool, tool bushings and front head. Never use ordinary grease,
because it melts and runs down the tool providing very poor lubrication.
For proper tool lubrication the breaker must be vertical with enough down-force applied
to push the tool into the breaker. This will prevent grease from entering the area above
the tool.
Check that the tool moves freely in the bushings.
Visually check the tool retainer pins. The round retainer pins rotate during normal oper-
ation. To confirm they are rotating, look at the ends of the pins for fresh radial marks in
the grease on the cross pin.
Every 100 hours the carrier's hydraulic filter must be checked. Inspect your filter or fil-
ter indicator and change as necessary. Clean oil is crucial for proper breaker perform-
ance and life.
Check all nuts and bolts for the correct torque. Improperly torqued bolts can damage the
breaker.
Remove and inspect the tool. See page 23.
Every 1,000 hours, check the breaker's hydraulic circuit pressure relief and flow settings
and adjust to the recommended levels.
Change the carrier hydraulic oil and the oil filter.
Replace all breaker seals and inspect all wear parts.
DAILY MAINTENANCE:
AFTER EVERY 100 HOURS:
AFTER EVERY 1000 HOURS:
MAINTENANCE
21 Breaker Owner’s Manual
GREASING THE BREAKER:
Failure to lubricate regularly will reduce the life of the tool, tool bushings, and the front
head. To properly lubricate the tool, the breaker must be in a vertical position, with
enough down pressure applied to force the tool up into the breaker housing. This will
prevent excessive grease entering the impact chamber which could cause the breaker to
lose power due to cushioning, or to stop operating altogether due to a hydraulic lock in
the impact chamber.
The breaker should be greased every two hours of use or when the tool appears shiny
where it rides inside the front head. The chart (page 51-53) shows the minimum amount
recommended for each breaker,and can be used as a guideline.
Preform a visual check when greasing to ensure the retainer pins rotate during normal
operation. By looking at the side of the front head, check the ends of the pins confirm-
ing they are rotating by the fresh grease marks.
Before greasing, down pressure must be
applied to push the tool up into the
breaker.
Grease until the grease oozes out around
the tool.
Grease the breaker every two hours.
Use only BTI Chisel Paste or a molybde-
num disulphide based grease.
RETAINER PINS:
Tool Retainer
Retainer Pin
Grease traces
leave radial marks
Figure 14
Figure 15
SERVICE
22 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BTI breakers are built using the highest quality materials and workmanship to ensure
long life and maximum efficiency. To keep a breaker in top operating condition, lubrica-
tion, inspection, and servicing all need to be conducted at regular intervals.
This overhauling should be scheduled to occur every year or after every 1,000 hours of
operation, whichever comes first. For units being operated on a continuous basis in very
hard rock, overhaul is advisable after every 500 hours.
Breakers operate in very dirty conditions. Their efficient operation relies on keeping that
dirt out of the close tolerance mechanism. It is important to maintain the breaker and
especially the seals in good condition by following proper operating and maintenance
procedures. Some breakers are used for overhead scaling which have special concerns,
consult your BTI dealer for more information.
Rockbreaker servicing must be carried out in a clean, dry area. Even a small amount of
dirt in the cylinder or control valve can cause premature failure.
To do a complete service you will require the following items; a suitable hoist, replace-
ment parts, lubricants, a torque multiplier, a nitrogen charging kit, and a pressure gauge.
The gauge is provided in the rockbreaker tool kit.
Always take proper safety precautions. You must wear safety glasses, work gloves, and
safety shoes. Use of a safety stand is recommended. Before servicing the breaker review
this technical manual and read all decals. Before lifting the breaker, refer to page 51 for
the approximate working weight of the breaker.
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS:
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
23 Breaker Owner’s Manual
REMOVING THE TOOL:
Once the breaker is removed from the boom, lay it down so that the control valve side of
the breaker is facing up.
Check the wear width between the tool and the tool bushing. Refer to the “Bushing Wear
Width” charts on pages 51-53 for the accepted clearance values.
To remove the tool, drive out the retainer pin and stopper plug using the drift supplied in
the tool kit.
Carefully roll the breaker onto its side with the locked sideplate bolts facing the ground
and drive out the two tool retainers from the side opposite the control valve.
Inspect the tool retainers for cracks or deformities. BTI's new 'O' series oval tool retain-
ers should be examined for wear along the edge of the retainer that rests against the tool.
The 'E' series breakers have round retainer pins that will show radial grease marks con-
firming they have been rotating properly. Also look for wear at the top of the tool retain-
er, where the tool hits it.
Stopper Plug
Retainer Pin
Drift
Hammer Tool Retainer
Drift
Applicable on
Breaker “E” Series
Models:
TB125, TB135, TB225,
TB235, TB275, TB285,
TB325, TB335, TB425,
TB625, TB725, TB825,
TB925, TB975,
TB1025, TB1425,
TB1675, TB1825,
TB2075, TB2225,
TB2575.
Applicable on
Breaker “O” Series
Models:
TB830, TB980,
TB1280, TB1430,
TB1680, TB2080,
TB2580.
Wear
Width
Tool Retainer
Stopper Plug
Retainer Pin
Drift
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
“E” Series
“O” Series
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
24 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Remove the tool and inspect the top for pitting and mushrooming. Also, check for chip-
ping of the impact face, which may indicate excessive tool bushing wear. Any of these
conditions may suggest a need for more frequent servicing, because of extreme operating
conditions or because the tool is being incorrectly operated. Refer to page 10.
Inspect the retainer pin contact area on the tool for deformation and scoring. In normal
use, this wear will be minimal. If tool wear seems extreme, it may indicate frequent blank
firing. If the retainer pin contact areas on the tool cannot be repaired, the tool must be
replaced to avoid premature failure of the retainers.
Also, inspect the tool bushing area for wear. Excessive wear here may also indicate that
more frequent greasing is needed, and if this area cannot be repaired, the tool must be
replaced to avoid damaging the new bushings.
Make any necessary repairs to the tool before putting it back into the refurbished
front head.
If your breaker has a top or side mount bracket, remove it now.
With the breaker on its side, use a torque multiplier to remove the sideplate nuts. Now
lift the sideplate off the breaker with the lifting eyes provided in your tool kit.
Remove the breaker from the lower sideplate and lie it down in a clean work area.
Inspect the sideplates for cracks, worn bolt holes, and damaged threads in nuts and on
bolts. Any defects should be corrected before the sideplates are reinstalled. Pay particu-
lar attention to the shear blocks and make sure they are not worn so they will fit closely
with the key groove in the breaker body.
Thoroughly clean the outside of the breaker before disassembly. During this cleaning,
look for signs of physical damage, especially around the key groove area. Any damage
should be repaired while the breaker is disassembled.
The cushion chamber in the rear head contains nitrogen gas under pressure. Do
not remove the tie rod nuts or gas valve until this pressure is relieved.
To relieve this pressure, remove the gas valve plug and press firmly on the disc in the
gas valve with a blunt object. Be sure to protect yourself adequately from the escaping
jet of gas.
BLEEDING THE NITROGEN GAS:
REMOVING THE MOUNTING BRACKET & SIDEPLATES:
25 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
REMOVING THE CONTROL VALVE (“E” and “O” SERIES ONLY):
While the breaker is securely held, remove the control valve. Use only hand tools to
loosen the tie rod nuts and control valve bolts, since they thread into special hardened-
steel inserts that can be damaged by impact tools. The recommended methods for loosen-
ing the nuts and bolts are the sledge wrench method and the torque multiplier method.
Remove the control valve bolts and lock washers and lift the control valve from the cylin-
der. Place the control valve on clean protective material.
Figure 19
Insert lifting eyes into the rear head and stand the breaker onto the safety stand.
Back off the tie rod nuts a couple of turns, this can be done using a torque multiplier if the
breaker is standing up. If the breaker is lying down, use the sledge-wrench method. Then
using the hoist, jerk the assembly upwards, which should loosen the rear head from the
cylinder.
If the rear head is stuck, it may be necessary to tap the cylinder cover on alternate sides,
with a soft-faced mallet. Remove the nuts from the four tie rods. Remove the plastic tie
rod washers and remove the rear head from the cylinder, using the lifting eyes. In some
cases, the nuts may be seized onto the tie rods and the nut and tie rod may come out as a
unit.
Place the rear head on a clean protective surface.
REMOVING THE REAR HEAD FROM THE CYLINDER:
Tie Rod Nut
Tie Rod Washer
Cylinder Cover
Figure 20
Install a lifting eye into the top of the piston, and lift the piston straight up and out of the
cylinder to avoid scratching its polished surface. Tapping the cylinder with a soft-faced
mallet may ease the removal of the piston. The seal bushing will come out with
the piston.
Place the piston on a clean protective surface.
26 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
REMOVING THE PISTON:
Piston
Upper Seal
Bushing
Figure 21
27 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
REMOVING THE CYLINDER & TIE RODS:
Use hand tools to loosen the tie rods; impact tools will damage the thread inserts in
the front head.
To loosen the tie rods it may be necessary to secure the front head to prevent it from
rotating.
Loosen the tie rods by rotating them counter-clockwise. Use an adjustable wrench and a
soft-faced mallet or a sledge wrench on the tie rod flats to loosen the tie rods.
Removing the cylinder involves installing two lifting eyes into the threaded holes in the
top of the cylinder and lifting the cylinder straight up off the tie rods.
The cylinder should slip easily out of the front head. If not, tap the front head with a
soft-faced, until the cylinder and front head come apart.
Place the cylinder on clean protective material.
Remove the four tie rods. Place the tie rods on clean protective material.
While the front head is still on the safety stand, remove the air valve assembly and
grease fitting to avoid accidental damage during bushing replacement. Put them in a
safe place for reuse later.
REMOVING FRONT HEAD GREASE FITTING & AIR VALVE:
Cylinder
Figure 22
Figure 23
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
28 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Do not gouge out the bushings with a torch.
The tool bushings are held in position by four retainer pins. Remove these pins by driv-
ing them out with a drift, from the side opposite the stopper plugs.
The tool bushings need to be shrunk to remove them from the front head.
The recommended method of shrinking the bushings is to use an arc welder, using a
very hot weld, laying crescent-shaped beads completely covering the inside of the bush-
ing. Depending on the breaker bushing size this could take from one-half to three hours.
Allow the bushing to cool, without quenching, for about one-half hour to allow the weld
to contract and shrink the bushing. This time will be less for smaller breakers. Knock
the bushing out with a bar from the top end of the front head.
Remove the lower bushing first, and then repeat the procedure for the upper bushing. If
you plan to install the new bushings immediately after removing the old ones, place the
new bushings in dry ice before you start the removal procedure. Dry ice can take up to 4
hours to achieve the desired results. Then the bushings will be fully chilled and the front
head will still be hot enough from welding, to receive them. If you are using liquid
nitrogen to shrink the bushings, it can take as little as 15 minutes to properly chill them.
REMOVING THE TOOL BUSHINGS:
Front Head
Upper Tool
Bushing
Lower Tool
Bushing
Tool Bushing
Alignment Slot
and Retainer Pin
Figure 24
29 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE TOOL BUSHING:
Check the inside of the front head for damage, and repair or replace as required.
Extreme care must be taken when installing the tool bushings in the front head. Because
the bushings are a shrink fit, the front head must be heated, so that it will expand, and
the bushings placed in liquid nitrogen, so they contract. As the pieces return to room
temperature, they become tightly fitted together. If the bushings are not installed proper-
ly before this point is reached, they must be taken out and replaced with new ones. With
liquid nitrogen you have about one minute to align the retainers.
Clean the inside of the front head thoroughly, and use a wire rotary brush to clean and
smooth the surfaces in the areas where the bushings seat. If the front head has cooled, it
must be heated with a torch to 300
o
F, (150
o
C). This will expand the housing a small
amount. Then line up the slots in the bushing with the retainer holes.
When fully inserted, the upper tool bushing will seat against a step in the bore of the
front head. Care must be taken to ensure that the grooves in the tool bushings line up
with the retainer-pin holes in the front head. Do not install the stopper plugs until the
front head has cooled to room temperature.
Apply a coat of Never-seize to the two retaining pins, and fully insert them into the
retaining pin holes. Repeat the procedure for the lower bushing.
The upper and lower tool bushings are installed from the tool side of the front head on
most models of BTI breakers.
30 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
INSPECTING THE SEAL BUSHING:
Start by cleaning, and inspecting the cylinder seal bushing.
The seal bushing carries several specially designed seals. Careful attention should be
paid to the condition and orientation of the old seals as they are removed. This may help
to identify any operating problems that the breaker had before it was disassembled.
All parts should be thoroughly washed in clean solvent and dried with compressed air.
Once the seal bushing is clean and dry, protect it from dirt and set it aside.
Upper Seal
Bushing
Gas Seal*
Oil Seal*
P
i
s
t
o
n
C
y
l
i
n
d
e
r
Oil Seal*
Dust Seal*
Slide Ring with
Square Ring
(Models TB725X
and up)
Slide Ring
with O-ring
(Model TB925X
and up have 2
as shown)
* When inserting
seals, make sure
direction is as
shown.
Figure 25
31 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
INSPECTING THE PISTON:
The piston should be carefully cleaned and inspected for corrosion, cavitation, pitting,
and scoring.
Check the grooves in the piston for metal that has been pulled in due to galling. If this
has occurred clean the grooves. Small marks can be removed with an oilstone or fine
emery cloth and oil.
Look for pitting and deformation of the impact face. They may indicate that the tool has
been operated with too much wear in the tool bushings. If the face is dished, carefully
measure the amount and refer to the service manual to see that this amount is allowable
for the model you are servicing. Refer to “Maximum Allowable Piston Deformation” on
the charts on pages 51-53 of this manual.
Thoroughly dry the piston, protect it from dirt, and set it aside.
If the piston is not going to be installed immediately, coat it with oil and store it protect-
ed, in a clean dry place.
Piston
Impact
Face
Deformation
Scoring
Figure 26
Figure 27
32 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
INSPECTING THE CYLINDER:
Thoroughly clean the cylinder bore, and remove the dust seal, oil seal, and slide ring.
The TB625 and smaller breakers do not have a slide ring in the cylinder. Check the seals
for signs of excessive wear conditions.
Thoroughly inspect the inside walls of the cylinder for corrosion, cavitation, or scoring.
Check grooves above seal area for small pieces of metal, due to galling. If these are not
cleaned out they will chip off and go between the piston and cylinder, and galling will
occur again.
Also inspect the main inlet and outlet adapter threads for damage. Always replace the
seals and ensure that the adapters are not interchanged if they are removed. The cylinder
is marked with a "P" beside the pressure adapter and a "T" beside the tank adapter. The
Pressure adapter has a smaller hole than the tank adapter.
Check for any damage to the threaded inserts that hold the control valve, and repair or
replace as necessary to ensure secure control valve mounting.
Thoroughly dry the cylinder and protect it from dirt.
33 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER DISASSEMBLY
DISASSEMBLING THE CONTROL VALVE (“E” & “O” SERIES ONLY):
The control valve controls the flow of oil through the breaker, which causes the piston
to move in the cylinder.
Prepare the control valve for disassembly by washing it thoroughly and clamp it in a
vise.
Remove the hex bolts holding the valve cap, then remove the cap by threading the
puller bolts provided in the toolbox into the two threaded holes in the cap. Gradually
tighten the bolts, alternating from one to the other, until the cap is pulled from the con-
trol valve.
The control valve spool should move smoothly in the bore, and can usually be easily
removed. A sliding hammer puller can assist in removing a seized spool.
REMOVING THE CONTROL VALVE SPOOL (“M” SERIES ONLY):
Insert lifting eyes into the rear head and stand the breaker onto the safety stand.
Back off the tie rod nuts a couple of turns, this can be done using a torque multiplier if
the breaker is standing up. If the breaker is lying down, use the sledge-wrench method.
Then using the hoist, jerk the assembly upwards, which should loosen the rear head from
the cylinder.
If the rear head is stuck, it may be necessary to tap the cylinder cover on alternating sides,
with a soft-faced mallet. Remove the nuts from the four tie rods. Remove the plastic tie
rod washers and remove the rear head from the cylinder, using the lifting eyes. In some
cases, the nuts may be seized onto the tie rods and the nut and tie rod may come out as a
unit. Place the rear head on a clean protective surface.
Using the lifting eye remove the control spool guide plug (Fig. 33B) and place it on a
clean protective surface.
Next, slide the control spool out of the cylinder (Fig. 33C). The spool should slide easily
out of the cylinder, without the use of tools. If the spool is stuck or seized a mechanical
puller may have to be used.
Tie Rod Nut
Tie Rod
Washer
Cylinder
Cover
Figure 33
Figure 33B Figure 33C
34 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
Inspect the control valve spool for any signs of scoring, binding and cavitation. Pay par-
ticular attention to the spool holes. Small scratches and marks may be removed with a
fine oilstone or fine emery cloth and oil. Also check the control valve cap and valve
body for marks or scratches, and remove them if they are not too severe. If the score
marks are too deep or large, the complete control valve assembly must be replaced.
Examine the control valve ports for cavitation and erosion. Check all the oil passage
holes in the control valve and be sure they are not plugged. Clean them with a fine wire
if necessary to remove any dirt particles.
Clean all parts of the control valve in clean solvent and dry them with compressed air.
Holding the control valve body in the vice, oil the valve spool and the valve body and
then install the spool.
Before placing the o-ring and backup ring on the valve cap, lubricate the o-ring grooves
with oil to prevent damage to the o-ring.
Install the valve cap into the valve body, and snug the four-valve cover bolts diagonally
and uniformly to prevent binding.
Use only hand tools when tightening the bolts; impact tools will damage the helisert
inserts.
Tighten the cap bolts to the torque specified in the service manual for the model of
breaker you are servicing.
Protect the control valve assembly from dirt and set it aside
INSPECTING THE CONTROL VALVE:
REASSEMBLING THE CONTROL VALVE (“E” & “O” SERIES ONLY):
Valve Body
Spool
Valve Cap
Figure 28
35 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
Remove the gas valve plug and the gas valve from the rear head. Thoroughly clean the
cover and valve and inspect them for damage. Cover the gas valve threads with a good
quality thread sealer. Reinstall the gas valve and seal, and tighten the valve to 61½ foot-
pounds. Insert the gas valve plug and just hand tighten it for now.
When the front head has cooled sufficiently, clean and inspect the previously removed
grease fitting and air valve for damage and reinstall or replace as necessary.
The air valve maintains a positive pressure in the strike chamber to help exclude dirt,
oil, and other contaminants. Remember to reapply loctite or thread tape to the air valve
whenever it is removed and insert the spring before the check ball, for proper operation.
INSPECTING THE GAS VALVE:
INSTALLING THE FRONT HEAD GREASE FITTING & AIR VALVE:
Figure 29
36 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE TIE RODS:
Inspect the tie rod threads. If they are damaged beyond repair, the tie rods
must be replaced.
Lubricate the tie rods thoroughly using a moly-based grease or Never Seize.
The tie rods should turn smoothly and easily until they bottom out in the holes. If they
do not bottom out, or there is excessive resistance, the threads on the tie rods or the
helisert inserts may be damaged.
Remove damaged heliserts and restore the front head threads with conventional thread
chasers and taps. Insert new heliserts with the appropriate tool.
Torque tie rods to the specifications on page 47-49.
Liberally oil the inside surface of the cylinder and the new seals, and install the seals
and rings into the grooves at the lower end of the cylinder. Pay close attention to the
correct placement and orientation of the seals. Improper seal installation will cause pre-
mature leakage and premature wear.
Apply some grease to the rubber pieces on the tie rods so the cylinder will slide on easi-
ly. Lower the cylinder carefully onto the tie rods. The control valve mounting holes on
the cylinder should face the same direction as the grease fitting on the front head.
Oil the seal bushing and seals, and install the seals and rings in the correct positions and
orientations.
INSTALLING THE CYLINDER:
RE-SEALING THE SEAL BUSHING:
Upper
Seal
Bushing
Gas Seal*
Oil Seal*
P
i
s
t
o
n
C
y
l
i
n
d
e
r
Dust Seal*
Slide Ring with
Square Ring
(Models TB725X
and up)
Slide Ring with
O-ring
(Model TB925X and
up have 2 as shown)
* When insert-
ing seals,
make sure
direction is
as shown.
Oil Seal*
Figure 30
Figure 31
37 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE PISTON:
Replace the o-ring in the top of the cylinder. Lubricate the top end of the piston, and
slide the seal bushing into place, with the chamfer or step towards the center
of the piston.
Lift the piston with the lifting eye, lubricate it thoroughly, and lower it carefully into the
cylinder. It may need a tap to push it through the lower seals.
When the piston is all the way into the cylinder bore, use a soft mallet to tap the seal
bushing into position in the cylinder. The bushing will stop when it reaches the support
flange inside the cylinder bore.
Replace the o-rings and backup rings on the top of the cylinder where the rear head
makes contact.
The cushion chamber in the rear head needs a small amount of oil for proper operation.
Just before you install the rear head, make a circular grease dam on the top of the pis-
ton, just high enough to contain the required amount of oil. The amount of oil needed
can be obtained from the chart on page 51-53.
Lower the rear head over the tie rods. The gas valve should face the same direction as
the control valve bolt holes on the cylinder.
Install new tie rod washers. Lubricate the tie rod nuts with Never Seize, and tighten
them in a crossing pattern to draw the breaker components together evenly. Finish tight-
ening the nuts to the correct torque in four stages, using the same crossing pattern.
INSTALLING THE REAR HEAD:
Piston
Upper Seal
Bushing
Figure 32
1 4
2 3
Tie Rod Nut
Tie Rod
Washer
Cylinder
Cover
Figure 33
Figure 34
38 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE CONTROL VALVE (“E” AND “O” SERIES ONLY):
Lightly grease the control valve o-rings and backup ring and install them in the under-
side of the control valve.
Carefully fasten the control valve to the side of the cylinder using the bolts and washers
removed earlier. The control valve cap must face toward the tool. Tighten the bolts
evenly in a crossing pattern until they contact the valve. See torque specifications on
pages 47-49.
Ensure the control valve spool is clean and insert it back into the cylinder body. (Fig.
34B)
Lubricate the seals on the control spool guide, ensuring that the guide is clean and insert
it into the cylinder body. The guide should slide easily but if tools are required make
sure the guide is squarely in the cylinder body and tap it into position using a soft-faced
mallet. (Fig. 34C)
Figure 34
INSTALLING THE CONTROL VALVE SPOOL (“M” SERIES ONLY):
Figure 34B
Figure 34C
39 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
RECHARGING THE CUSHION CHAMBER:
This gas is stored under high pressure. Caution is advised when handling.
Remove the gas valve plug from the gas valve. Attach one end of the charging hose to
the gas regulator and attach the charging adapter to the other end of the hose.
With the charging adapter inserted into the gas valve and the nitrogen tank valve open,
adjust the regulator handle slowly to build the pressure to the value specified in the
service manual. If the piston is not at the bottom of its stroke the pressure will move it
down to rest on the inside of the front head. Be aware that if the tool is installed at this
stage, it may accelerate dangerously out of the cylinder when the cushion chamber is
being pressurized.
To check the cushion chamber pressure, remove the charging adapter from the end of
the hose and put it on the pressure gauge. Insert the adapter into the gas valve and
observe the pressure reading. If the reading is too high, bleed off a small amount of gas
to make the final adjustment, and test again. If the pressure is too low, reinsert the
charging adapter, and build pressure to the required value.
When the pressure is at the correct value, (refer to the “Cushion Chamber” Pressure on
the General Specification Chart on page 55), install the gas valve plug, using a new o-
ring, and tighten to 8.7 foot-pounds torque. Take care not to cut the o-ring.
C
B
A
Pressure
Gauge
N
2
GAS
TANK
Regulator
Figure 35
40 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
SIDEPLATES & MOUNTING BRACKET INSTALLATION:
Mounted to the sideplates on larger breakers (TB725 and up) are anti-vibration rubbers.
Inspect these for damage and replace as necessary.
Insert the sideplate bolts and washers into the hex retainers on the sideplate and lay the
sideplate on a flat surface, with the retainers facing down and the bolts sticking up.
Some of BTI's breakers only require one washer under the bolt head. Now slip the spac-
er tubes onto the appropriate bolts.
Carefully lower the breaker body onto the sideplate. Be sure to align the shear block on
the sideplate with the key groove in the breaker body. You must also make sure that the
hydraulic ports on the breaker align with the access cutouts in the sideplates.
Next lower the other sideplate into place over the bolts, again taking care to align the
shear block with the key groove.
To prevent galling the threads on the side plate bolts, apply Never Seize or equivalent to
the threads before installing the nuts, and then put a washer and nut on each bolt.
Make sure the bolt heads are seated into the locking collars on the lower side plate.
With a hand wrench, tighten all the sideplate nuts until the plates are seated against the
breaker. This will prevent movement between the sideplates and the breaker during final
tightening.
Now using the torque multiplier tighten the bolts to 60 percent of the torque specified
on pages 47-49. Follow the pattern shown here to distribute the load evenly. When all
bolts have been tightened to 60 percent of their full torque value, tighten to 80 percent,
then 90 percent and finally to 100 percent of the torque value for your breaker.
Install the mounting bracket in the correct position, which depends on the intended
application.
1
6
5 3
4
2
8
7 9
10
Figure 36
41 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE TOOL:
First grease the inside of the lower bushing, then when the tool is inserted it will take
the grease with it.
Cover the sides of the tool's top section with grease, and insert the tool into the
front head.
Grease and insert the tool retainers and then grease and insert the retainer pins and stop-
per plug. The stopper plug should be flush with the front head.
If storing your breaker for an extended period of time, refer to “Removal & Storage” on
page 42 for storage instructions.
Apply Grease
Tool
Retainers
Retainer Pin
Stopper Plug
Apply
Grease
Tool Retainer
“O” Series Breakers
“E” Series Breakers
Figure 38
Figure 37
Stopper Plug
Retainer Pin
42 Breaker Owner’s Manual
BREAKER REMOVAL & STORAGE
BREAKER REMOVAL & STORAGE:
At the end of the day if the breaker is not to be removed from the carrier, it should be
left resting in a vertical position. When it's time to remove and store your breaker, fol-
low one of these steps.
Storing your breaker for up to a week, is considered short term storage. This is how to
store the breaker.
Using your excavator lay the breaker on wooden blocks, the breaker mounting end
should lie higher than the tool end. Now remove the pins to disconnect the breaker from
the boom. Remove the tool and ensure the retaining pins, bushings and piston bottom
are all well greased. Then reinstall the tool and cover the breaker with a tarp.
If you plan to store the breaker longer than a week, use one of the following two proce-
dures depending on whether you are standing the breaker up or laying it down.
For long term storage in which you are laying down the breaker, first release the cush-
ion chamber gas pressure. Then remove the tool. Liberally grease the piston bottom,
retaining pins and inside the front head. Next, push the piston up inside the breaker and
reinstall the tool. Finally, with the breakers mounting end elevated, cover the breaker
with a tarp.
For long term storage where you are standing the breaker up, the breaker must be stored
in a safety stand. Allow the breaker's weight to push the tool up into the breaker. You do
not need to release the cushion chamber gas pressure.
The piston will not slide into the cylinder with a pressure of 114 psi.
SHORT TERM STORAGE:
LONG TERM STORAGE - STANDING UP:
LONG TERM STORAGE - LYING DOWN:
43 Breaker Owner’s Manual
UNDERWATER APPLICATIONS
SETUP:
To adapt the BTI Breaker for underwater use, compressed air must be fed into the
breaker front head area, creating a positive air pressure that will keep the water out. If
water does enter the front head and the breaker is fired, it could force water and debris
up inside, resulting in seal damage.
An 18 cfm compressor is recommended at 21 psi. For depths exceeding 15 ft, increase
to 26 psi. For TB125 to TB425, remove the grease fitting and tie the line in here. For
TB725 and up, remove the check valve to plumb the line in.
Start supplying air to the breaker before placing it underwater, and continue supplying
air until the breaker is removed from the water. Continue to operate the breaker out of
the water for approximately 10 minutes, then grease the tool and front head with the
tool pressed in.
UNDERWATER OPERATION:
Figure 39
44 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
OIL LEAKAGE:
If oil leakage develops, it may not be necessary to replace parts. Check the fol-
lowing points in the chart below before calling your BTI representative. A slight
amount of oil seepage around the breaker connecting parts is normal during the
first 200 hours of operation.
Area of Leakage Condition Corrections
A. The space between Large amounts of Damaged seals.
the tool and bushing oil coming out. Re-seal as
necessary.
B. Oil over the surface Possible loose hoses Check condition
of the breaker. or adapter fittings. of hoses and
fittings, tighten
as necessary.
C. Control valve cap Oil ooze after Normal oozing of
bolts. overhaul of unit. assembly
lubricants.
D. Between control Oil ooze after Normal oozing of
valve and surface of breaker overhaul assembly
cylinder. lubricants.
E. Joining surface of Oil oozing Loose tie rod
cylinder and rear New oil leaking nut, re-tighten
head. Damaged O-ring,
replace.
F. Joining surface of New oil leaking Loose plugs on
cylinder and front face of cylinder,
head. retighten.
Damaged seals in
the cylinder, replace
as necessary.
B
D
C
A
F
E
Figure 40
45 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
POOR BREAKER PERFORMANCE:
CONDITION CAUSE CORRECTION
Does not hammer Base carrier selector valve does not Check connection from cab
operate properly. controls to the selector valve.
Poor performance of the hydraulic pump. Check pump output.
Repair or replace.
Pressure relief valve set too low. Check relief settings and adjust.
Clogged or restricted hoses. Clean or replace.
Cushion chamber fills with oil. Replace seals.
Seizure of breaker. Overhaul and replace
worn parts.
Erratic Hammering Hyd. oil temperature too high. Oil temperature must not exceed
170 deg.F (77 deg. C).
Insufficient oil flow and/or pressure. Check base carrier hydraulic
system.
Clogged or restricted hoses, or pipes. Clean or replace.
Not enough down force on the tool. Increase the down pressure
acting on the tool.
Pressure too high in cushion chamber. Adjust pressure.
Too much grease in the impact chamber. Remove tool from front head
and clean out excess grease.
Follow proper greasing
instructions.
Excessive clearance between tool and Check clearance and replace
tool bushing. worn parts.
Excess wear at top of tool. Remove and inspect the tool.
Replace if necessary.
Foreign matter in the breaker control valve. Disassemble and clean.
Seizure of piston and cylinder. Overhaul the breaker.
46 Breaker Owner’s Manual
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
POOR BREAKER PERFORMANCE CONTINUED:
CONDITION CAUSE CORRECTION
Lack of Power Insufficient oil flow or oil pressure. Check hydraulics of the
base carrier.
Broken tool Replace tool, check
piston for damage.
Cushion chamber gas pressure is too low. Check and adjust.
Breaking of Tool Abuse of tool and prying with tool. Apply down force in
the direction of tool
only. Check for excess
play in arms, links, and
pins.
Mushrooming of Tool Continuous hammering in one place. Use short bursts.
Re-position breaker
every 30 seconds.
Rapid increase in Oil Insufficient oil cooling. Check oil cooler.
Temperature Insufficient oil flow. Check pump output.
Incorrect oil pressure. Check relief valve
setting.
Emulsification of Oil Oil contaminated with water. Locate source of water
and repair. Replace oil
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS
47 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Small Breaker Torque Chart (TB125-TB425)
kg-m 18 18 18 28 28 45 45
ft-lbs 130 130 130 202 202 325 325
kg-m 18 18 18 28 28 45 45
ft-lbs 130 130 130 202 202 325 325
kg-m 12 12 12 12 15 15 20 20 20 25 25
ft-lbs 87 87 87 87 108 108 145 145 145 181 181
kg-m 45 45 45 45 55 55 65 65 65 100 100
ft-lbs 325 325 325 325 398 398 470 470 470 723 723
kg-m 40 40 40 40 50 50 70 70 70 120 120
ft-lbs 290 290 290 290 362 362 506 506 506 868 868
kg-m 22 45
ft-lbs 159 325
kg-m 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
ft-lbs 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61
kg-m 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
ft-lbs 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
kg-m 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 55 55
ft-lbs 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 325 398 398
kg-m 5 5 5 5 10 10 20 20 20 20 20
ft-lbs 36 36 36 36 72 72 145 145 145 145 145
N/A
N/A N/A N/A
N/A N/A N/A
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
T
B
2
8
5
M
E
/
Q
A
T
B
3
2
5
C
M
/
M
E
/
Q
A
T
B
3
2
5
X
T
B
3
3
5
M
E
/
Q
A
T
B
4
2
5
C
M
/
M
E
/
Q
A
T
B
4
2
5
X
T
B
2
3
5
M
E
T
B
2
7
5
C
M
/
M
E
T
B
1
3
5
M
E
T
B
2
2
5
C
M
/
M
E
Hose Adaptor
Choke Plug
N/A
Control Valve
Cover Bolt
Side Plate
Bracket Nut
Top Mount
Bracket Bolt
Gas Valve Body
Gas Valve Plug
Control Valve
Body Bolt
T
B
1
2
5
C
M
/
M
E
Tie Rod Bolt
Tie Rod Nut
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS
48 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Medium Breaker Torque Chart (TB625-TB830)
kg-m 45 45 45 45 75 75
ft-lbs 325 325 325 325 542 542
kg-m 45 45 45 45 75 75
ft-lbs 325 325 325 325 542 542
kg-m 30 30 50 50 50 50
ft-lbs 217 217 362 362 362 362
kg-m 130 130 200 200 200 200
ft-lbs 940 940 1447 1447 1447 1447
kg-m 120 120 150 150 150 150
ft-lbs 868 868 1085 1085 1085 1085
kg-m 22 22 22 22
ft-lbs 159 159 159 159
kg-m 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
ft-lbs 61 61 61 61 61 61
kg-m 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
ft-lbs 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
kg-m 55 55 55 55 55 55
ft-lbs 398 398 398 398 398 398
kg-m 20 20 20 20 30 30
ft-lbs 145 145 145 145 217 217
N/A N/A
T
B
6
2
5
C
M
/
Q
A
T
B
6
2
5
X
T
B
7
2
5
C
M
/
Q
A
T
B
7
2
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
8
3
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
8
2
5
X
/
X
S
Control Valve
Body Bolt
Tie Rod Bolt
Control Valve
Cover Bolt
Hose Adaptor
Choke Plug
Gas Valve Body
Gas Valve Plug
Tie Rod Nut
Side Plate
Bracket Nut
Top Mount
Bracket Bolt
TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS
49 Breaker Owner’s Manual
Large Breaker Torque Chart (TB925 - TB2580)
kg-m 75 75 75 90 90 90 90 90 90 130 130 130 130 130 130
ft-lbs 542 542 542 651 651 651 651 651 651 940 940 940 940 940 940
kg-m 75 75 75 90 90 90 90 90 90 130 130 130 130 130 130
ft-lbs 542 542 542 651 651 651 651 651 651 940 940 940 940 940 940
kg-m 60 60 60 60 80 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 120 120 120
ft-lbs 434 434 434 434 579 651 651 651 651 651 651 651 868 868 868
kg-m 230 230 230 230 290 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 580 580 580
ft-lbs 1664 1664 1664 1664 2098 2604 2604 2604 2604 2604 2604 2604 4195 4195 4195
kg-m 180 180 180 180 165 300 300 300 300 300 300 300 500 500 500
ft-lbs 1302 1302 1302 1302 1193 2170 2170 2170 2170 2170 2170 2170 3617 3617 3617
kg-m 70 70 70 120 120 120 120 120 120 180 180 180 180 180 180
ft-lbs 506 506 506 868 868 868 868 868 868 1302 1302 1302 1302 1302 1302
kg-m 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
ft-lbs 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61
kg-m 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
ft-lbs 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5
kg-m 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 65 65 65 65 65 65
ft-lbs 434 434 434 434 434 434 434 434 434 470 470 470 470 470 470
kg-m 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 40 40 40 40 40 40
ft-lbs 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 290 290 290 290 290 290
T
B
2
5
7
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
2
5
8
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
0
2
5
X
T
B
2
0
8
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
2
2
2
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
2
0
7
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
6
8
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
8
2
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
4
3
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
6
7
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
1
2
8
0
X
T
B
1
4
2
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
9
2
5
X
/
X
S
T
B
9
8
0
X
/
X
S
T
B
9
7
5
X
/
X
S
Gas Valve Body
Control Valve
Cover Bolt
Control Valve
Body Bolt
Gas Valve Plug
Hose Adaptor
Choke Plug
Tie Rod Bolt
Tie Rod Nut
Side Plate
Bracket Nut
Top Mount
Bracket Bolt
SERIAL NUMBER LOCATION
50 Breaker Owner’s Manual
SERIAL NUMBERS / MODEL NUMBERS:
It is important to know the correct breaker model number when researching spec-
ifications or data from this manual. The actual breaker model number can be con-
firmed by checking the serial number of your breaker and cross referencing it to
the chart below. The breaker serial number is located on the pressure and return
port side of the breaker on the cylinder body as shown.
(EXAMPLE: A typical serial number for a TB725X would be 7E-2277)
Serial
Number
GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS
51 Breaker Owner’s Manual
52 Breaker Owner’s Manual
GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS
53 Breaker Owner’s Manual
GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS
WARRANTY
54 Breaker Owner’s Manual
1. BREAKER TECHNOLOGY INC. Company (hereinafter referred to as "BTI")
warrants this product against defects in materials and workmanship for a period
of twelve (12) months or 2000 hours from the date of installation, or 18 months
from the date of shipment, whichever comes first. This warranty will become
void if, (a) replacement parts not manufactured by BTI are used, and (b) non-
standard length tools are used. This warranty does not cover o-rings, seals, fit-
tings, hoses, breaker tools or other items considered normal wear items. These
are covered by the LimitedWarranty period of thirty (30) days. Warranty for pro-
priety items such as valves, filters, installation kits, and componentry that are
not manufactured by BTI, will be governed by the warranty terms of their manu-
facturer. This warranty is void if BTI's standard installation specifications and
procedures are not adhered to.
2. BTI will authorize return of any defective components or sufficient evidence of
such defect to a BTI warehouse. Such components or such evidence must
clearly show that the defect was caused by faulty material or poor workman-
ship.Warranty claim will be accepted only if it is submitted on a proper claims
form with proof of purchase and received within sixty (60) days from the date of
discovery of the defect.Warranty claims will be considered only if the
"Installation Notice" has been duly filled in and returned to BTI's within thirty (30)
days from the date of installation.
3. BTI will at it's option, repair or refurbish the defective part(s) without charge to
the initial user or may elect to issue full or partial credit toward the purchase of a
new part(s). The extent of credit issued, which will be in the form of a "Credit
Memo", will be determined by pro-rating against the normal life of the part(s) in
question
.
4. BTI is not responsible for mileage, travel time, travel expenses, overtime
labor, and any freight expenses required to facilitate the repair.
5. This warranty does not apply if the product has been damaged by accident,
abuse, misuse, misapplication or neglect, or as a result of service, disassembly
or modification, without BTI's express authorization.
6. BTI assumes no liability beyond the replacement of defective parts or materi-
als and/or the correction of such defective parts or materials.
7. BTI neither assumes nor authorizes any other person to assume for it any lia-
bility in connection with the sale of its products other than that specifically stated
herein.
8. THISWARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ANYAND ALL OTHERWAR-
RANTIES. EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY SET FORTH HEREIN, BTI MAKES NO
REPRESENTATION ORWARRANTY, STATUTORY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
WITH RESPECT TO THE PRODUCTS MANUFACTURED AND/OR SUPPLIED
BY BTI, WHETHER AS TO MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICU-
LAR PURPOSE OR ANY OTHER MATTER. IN NO EVENT, INCLUDING IN
THE CASE OF A CLAIM OF NEGLIGENCE, SHALL BTI BE LIABLE FOR INCI-
DENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES.
NOTES
55 Breaker Owner’s Manual
SOLON FACILITY RIVERSIDE FACILITY THORNBURY FACILITY
30625 Solon Industrial Drive, 3464 DURAHART ST. 35 ELGIN ST.,
SOLON OHIO, RIVERSIDE,CALIF. THORNBURY,ONT.
44139 U.S.A. 92507 U.S.A. N0H 2P0 CANADA
PH. 440-542-3720 PH. 909-369-0878 PH. 519-599-2015
FAX. 440-542-3721 FAX. 909-369-8281 FAX. 519-599-6803