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Fall 2014

Introduction
Welcome to English 101! This course helps you acquire writing and critical
thinking skills so that you might do well in the intellectual environment of the
university and beyond. To that end, we will read and think deeply about a range of
texts from across the disciplines. We will workshop essays and other kinds of
writing that employ various academic conventions. These activities along with
student-instructor conferences, peer work, and class discussions will demonstrate
the social nature of writing and signal our entry into scholarly discourse.
Professor: Holly Batty
Email: Hollybatty@gmail.com
Class Website: http://English101Fall14.weebly.com
Ofce Hours: TBD
Meeting Place: H 104 / LARC 229
Day/Time: Friday 8:00 a.m. - 11:10 a.m.
Course Description
Prerequisite: Appropriate skill level demonstrated through the English placement
process or satisfactory completion of English 28 or English 363 with a grade of C or
better. Cannot be taken for Pass/No Pass.
Student Learning Outcomes
As a result of completing this course, students will be able to do the following:
1. Write focused, coherently organized, well-developed texts, appropriate to the
transfer level, that effectively integrate, synthesize, and document sources.
2. Demonstrate critical reading, thinking, and research skills through analysis,
synthesis, and evaluation of important ideas encompassing multiple points of view.
Course Theme
Social Institutions and Identity Formations
This semester we will focus our reading and writing around the theme of social
institutions and identity formations. Social institutions are the agents of
socialization that help us to form our identities. According to sociologists, there are
ve primary types of institutions that appear in every human culture and
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civilization: family, government, economy, education, and religion. There are other
institutions that may fall under one or more of these categories, such as the media,
which we will also consider. We will explore how these institutions shape who we
are and how we identify ourselves.
Required Texts
They Say I Say: with Readings 2nd ed., by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and
Russel Durst
Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe
Required Materials
A notebook dedicated to this class for your Reading Journal.
Access to internet
Participation
Class participation includes discussions, student-instructor conferences, workshop
activities, and in-class freewrites. Note that each student is required to have at least
one conference during my ofce hours or another agreed upon time. Everyone has
something to contribute to our class, and there is always an opportunity to learn
from one another. If you do not feel comfortable speaking in class you may
participate in other ways. Although participation grades will not be distributed, I
will be happy to discuss any questions you have about your progress. Remember
that if you do not come to class, your participation grade will be greatly affected. I
grade on participation holistically.
Attendance
Success in this class requires your presence and participation. Your experience of
the semester (that is, your nal grade and the knowledge and skills you will gain)
are closely related to your attendance. As we move through the semester, please
keep the following in mind:
We do work in class every day that is worth points. When students miss class, they
miss work that cannot be made up.
Absences will impact students grades negatively because they are missing
material that is designed to help improve their performance in the class.
Students who miss four or more classes will be in jeopardy of failing the course.
Class begins promptly at 8:00 a.m. We will do warm-up activities or quizzes
beginning at 8:00. Students who arrive after 8:05 a.m. will not be allowed to
participate in these activities.
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The good news: Students who achieve perfect attendance in both sections of this
course (no absences, tardies, or leaving early for the entire semester) will earn 20
extra credit points.
Assignments:
3 Essays (100 pts each): 300 pts
9 Progression assignments (3 per essay, 20 pts each): 180 pts
In-class Final: 50 pts
Reading Journal: (50 pts each check x three checks): 150 pts
Participation: 150 pts
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Total = 830
Grades :
100-90=A| 89-80 =B|79-70 =C| 69-60 =D|Below 60=F
Late Work Policy
I will deduct 10% from your grade for every day that an assignment is late, no
matter what the reason is that you are turning it in late, unless we have made prior
arrangements. I understand that sometimes life happens, so please talk to me
BEFORE an assignment is due if you are having a problem getting it nished.
A Note on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism
From page 164 of LAVC Schedule of Classes: Student Conduct and Disciplinary
Actions:
Plagiarism is the representation of expression of ideas from either published or
unpublished work(s) as students own. LAVC encourages students to always cite
sources to avoid the appearance of plagiarism. Using text from internet sources
without proper citation is considered to be plagiarism.
Consequences of Cheating
At the time of the violation, penalties for academic dishonesty determined by the
instructor can result in a zero score for the exam or item in question. In addition,
the Vice President of Student Services, or designee, may impose other penalties for
violations of the Student Code of Conduct.
Special Circumstances
If you require special course adaptation or accommodations because of a disability,
or if you have emergency medical information that I should be aware of, or if you
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need special arrangements in case of a building evacuation, please let me know as
soon as possible.
Writing Center
For any writing questions for any courses, visit the Writing Center for one-to-one
assistance. The phone number is 818-947-2810, and its located in LARC 229. For
online tutoring and other helpful resources, visit the website at www.lavc.edu/
writingcenter.
Tentative Schedule
(Schedule is subject to change)
Week Friday
1 9/5
Agenda: Discuss syllabus and class website; discuss classroom and
email etiquette; discuss reading process and reading journals;
discuss class theme: socialization.
Break
Introduce Progression A; discuss types of essays (especially
narrative); discuss proposal/abstract writing.
2 9/12
Due: Assignment 1A
Agenda: Discuss How to Tame a Wild Tongue by Gloria Anzalda
and Mother Tongue by Amy Tan
Break
Discuss rhetorical situation and rhetorical appeals; discuss I Just
Wanna Be Average by Mike Rose.
To prepare for this class: Read How to Tame a Wild Tongue by
Gloria Anzalda, Mother Tongue by Amy Tan, and I Just Wanna
Be Average by Mike Rose (all posted on class website); read any
supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
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3 9/19
Due: Assignment 2A and Journal Check #1
Agenda: Discuss summary; discuss Kenyon Commencement
Speech by David Foster Wallace
Break
Discuss writing process.
To prepare for this class: Read pages 30-41 in TSIS; read Kenyon
Commencement Speech by David Foster Wallace (in TSIS
textbook); read any supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for
this day.
4 9/26
Due: Assignment 3A and Essay A draft
Agenda: Discuss writing descriptively; discuss MLA formatting.
Break
Peer review.
To prepare for this class: Work on Progression A assignments; read
any supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
5 10/3
Due: Essay A
Agenda: Introduce Progression B; discuss expository essays;
introduce Things Fall Apart.
Break
Discuss thesis statements; discuss pages 1-51 (chapters 1-6) of
Things Fall Apart.
To prepare for this class: Read pages 1-51 (through chapter 6) of
Things Fall Apart; read any supplemental links or uploaded texts
posted for this day.
6 10/10
Due: Assignment 1B
Agenda: Discuss pages 52-109 (chapters 7-11) of Things Fall Apart;
discuss essay beginnings and endings.
Break
Discuss pages 110-161 (chapters 12-18) of Things Fall Apart; discuss
essay structure (including topic sentences).
To prepare for this class: Read pages 52-109 (chapters 7-11) and
pages 110-161 (chapters 12-18) of Things Fall Apart; read any
supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
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7 10/17
Due Assignment 2B
Agenda: Discuss pages 162-209 (chapters 19-25) of Things Fall
Apart; discuss integrating sources.
Break
Catch up
To prepare for this class: Read pages 42-51 of TSIS; read pages
162-209 (chapters 19-25) of Things Fall Apart; read any supplemental
links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
8 10/24
Due: Assignment 3B and Journal check #2
Agenda: Discuss analyzing literature.
Break
Discuss professional writing.
To prepare for this class: Read any supplemental links or uploaded
texts posted for this day.
9 10/31
Due: Essay B Draft
Agenda: Peer Review
Break
Introduce Progression C; discuss internet and library research.
To prepare for this class: work on progression B draft; read any
supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
10 11/7
Due: Essay B
Agenda: Discuss joining the conversation.
Break
Discuss counterargument, discuss transitions.
To prepare for this class: Read pages pages 1-15 and 55-67 of
TSIS; read pages 78-101 of TSIS; read pages 105-120 of TSIS; read
any supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
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11 11/14
Due: Assignment 1C
Agenda: Discuss Watching TV Makes You Smarter by Steven
Johnson; discuss annotated bibliography.
Break
Discuss Having It His Way: The Construction of Masculinity in
Fast-Food TV Advertising by Carrie Packwood Freeman and Debra
Merskin
To prepare for this class: Read Watching TV Makes You Smarter
by Steven Johnson and Having It His Way: The Construction of
Masculinity in Fast-Food TV Advertising by Carrie Packwood
Freeman and Debra Merskin (both in TSIS); read any supplemental
links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
12 11/21
Due: Assignment 2C and 3C
Agenda: Discuss We, the Public, Place the Best Athletes on
Pedestals by William Moller; discuss so what / who cares from
TSIS
Break
Discuss creating a website; discuss metacommentary.
To prepare for this class: Read pages 92-101 of TSIS; read pages
129-138 of TSIS; read We, the Public, Place the Best Athletes on
Pedestals by William Moller (in TSIS); read any supplemental links
or uploaded texts posted for this day.
13 11/28: No Class: Thanksgiving break
14 12/5
Due: Draft of Essay/website C, Journal Check #3
Agenda: Peer review Essay/website C
Break
Discuss timed writing
To prepare for this class: Work on progression C Essay/website;
read any supplemental links or uploaded texts posted for this day.
15 12/12
Due: Essay/Website C
Agenda: In-class Final Exam
To prepare for this class: Bring a blue book
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