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Sharon Tooney

MATHS PROGRAM : STAGE 0NE


Year Two
WEEKLY ROUTINE
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday


Whole Number 1
Terms 1-4

Number & Algebra
Terms 1 & 3: Addition and Subtraction 1 / Patterns and Algebra 1
Terms 2 & 4 : Multiplication & Division 1 / Fractions and Decimals 1



Statistics & Probability
Terms 1 & 3: Data 1
Terms 2 & 4 : Chance 1





Measurement & Geometry
Term 1: Length 1 / Time 1 / 2D 1
Term 2: Mass 1 / 3D 1 / Position 1
Term 3: Volume and Capacity 1 / Time 1 / 2D 1
Term 4: Area 1 / 3D1 / Position 1






Sharon Tooney

K-6 MATHEMATICS SCOPE AND SEQUENCE
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY STATISTICS &
PROBABILITY

TERM
Whole
Number
Addition &
Subtraction
Multiplication
& Division
Fractions &
Decimals
Patterns
& Algebra
Length Area Volume &
Capacity
Mass Time 3D 2D Angles Position Data Chance
K 1
2
3
4
Yr 1 1
2
3
4
Yr 2 1
2
3
4
Yr 3 1
2
3
4
Yr 4 1
2
3
4
Yr 5 1
2
3
4
Yr 6 1
2
3
4
NB: Where a content strand has a level 1 & 2, the 1 refers to the lower grade within the stage, eg. Whole Number 1 in S1 is for Yr 1, Whole Number 2 is for Yr 2.

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Whole Numbers 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore
mathematical problems MA1-2WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
applies place value, informally, to count, order, read and
represent two- and three-digit numbers MA1-4NA
Background Information
The learning needs of students are to be considered when
determining the appropriate range of two- and three-digit
numbers.
Students should be encouraged to develop different
counting strategies, eg if they are counting a large number of
items, they can count out groups of ten and then count the
groups.
They need to learn correct rounding of numbers based on
the convention of rounding up if the last digit is 5 or more
and rounding down if the last digit is 4 or less.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: count forwards, count backwards, number before,
number after, more than, less than, number line, number
chart, digit, zero, ones, groups of ten, tens, groups of one
hundred, hundreds, round to.
The word 'and' is used when reading a number or writing it
in words, eg five hundred and sixty three.
Develop confidence with number sequences from 100 by ones from any
starting point
count forwards or backwards by 1s, from a given 3-digit number
identify the numbers before & after a given 3-digit number
- describe the number before as 1 less than & the number after as 1 more
than a given number
Recognise, model, represent and order numbers to at least 1000
represent 3-digit numbers using objects, pictures, words & numerals
use the terms more than & less than to compare numbers
arrange numbers of up to 3 digits in ascending order
- use number lines & number charts beyond 100 to assist with counting &
ordering
- give reasons for placing a set of numbers in a particular order
Investigate number sequences, initially those increasing and decreasing by
twos, threes, fives and tens from any starting point, then moving to other
sequences
count forwards & backwards by 2s, 3s & 5s from any starting point
count forwards & backwards by 10s, on & off the decade, with 2 & 3 digit
numbers
identify number sequences on number charts
Group, partition and rearrange collections of up to 1000 in hundreds, tens
and ones to facilitate more efficient counting
apply an understanding of place value & the role of zero to read, write &
order 3 digit numbers
- form the largest & smallest number from 3 given digits
count & represent large sets of objects by systematically grouping in 10s &
100s
- use models such as base 10 material, interlocking cubes & bundles of sticks
to explain grouping
use & explain mental grouping to count & assist with estimating the
number of items in large groups
use place value to partition 3 digit
state the place value of digits in numbers of up to 3 digits
partition three-digit numbers in non-standard forms
round numbers to the nearest 100
estimate, to the nearest 100, the number of objects in a collection & check
by counting
Count and order small collections of Australian coins and notes according
to their value
use the face value of coins and notes to sort, order and count money
- compare Australian coins and notes with those from other countries
- determine whether there is enough money to buy a particular item
recognise that there are 100 cents in $1, 200 cents in $2,
identify equivalent values in collections of coins and in collections of notes

Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Develop
confidence with
number sequences
from 100 by ones
from any starting
point

Recognise, model,
represent and
order numbers to
at least 1000

Investigate
number
sequences,
initially those
increasing and
decreasing by
twos, threes, fives
and tens from any
starting point,
then moving to
other sequences

Group, partition
and rearrange
collections of up
to 1000 in
hundreds, tens
and ones to
facilitate more
efficient counting

Count and order
small collections
of Australian coins
and notes
according to their

2
Celebrity head
Display a number line showing numbers from 1 to 100 so that all the students in the class can see
it. Place movable marker tabs at either end of the strip. One student wears a headpiece to which a
numeral card is attached. Ensure that the student does not see the number on the numeral card.
Ask the student to have the class help to identify the secret number. The class, however, can
respond only with a yes or no reply to each question. In response to the answers, the selected
student then moves the tabs along the number line to indicate the range within which the secret
number lies. Continue the process until the student is able to identify the number.
Variations
The price is right
Display a vertical numeral strip to the students. Ask one student to think of a number on the
numeral strip. The remainder of the class take turns to guess the number. After each guess, allow
the student to point to the nominated number on the number line. The student then states if the
guess is higher or lower than the number being thought of. Encourage the students to use the
responses from previous guesses when making the next guess.
Guess my number
Provide a calculator for each pair of students. Ask one student to enter a number into the
calculator and hide the screen. Instruct the partner to ask questions which will enable him or her
to guess the hidden number on the calculator.
This activity could be
modified by decreasing or
increasing the range of
numbers.

Number lines on tables to
refer to could also be
necessary for some students.
number line in the
range 1 to 100,
headband, numeral
cards, calculators

3
Grocery grab
Display a collection of grocery packages of varying weight up to 1 kilogram. Allow the students to
compare the weight of each item according to the number of grams indicated on each package.
Have the students record the weight of each item in grams. Instruct the students to then sequence
the items from lightest to heaviest.
Variation
Collect from catalogues pictures of items costing less than $1000 . Ensure the price of each item is
clearly indicated. Present the catalogue items to the students and ask them to sequence the items
in terms of cost.
Wipe out
Provide each student with a calculator. Ask the students to enter a specific three-digit number into
their calculators. Choose one of the digits from the number entered and ask the students to use an
arithmetical method to change the nominated digit to zero. For example, have the students enter
the numeral 268 in their calculator. Follow this by asking, How can you change the 6 to 0?
It may be necessary to
highlight and/or enlarge
weights on packages.

Number charts in the range 1
to 1000 maybe needed by
some students as a
reference.

Large button calculators may
be needed
grocery packages,
shop catalogues,
calculators, paper and
pencil

4
Skip counting
Lead the students in oral counting in unison by tens, up to 100, and then backwards from 100.
Support the oral counting by pointing to the location of these numbers on the one hundred chart.
Cover the multiples of ten on the hundred chart and have a student point to the position of each
number as the class counts forwards or backwards by ten. Vary the activity by using other counting
Individual charts as a
reference maybe needed.

Extend activity by counting
beyond 100
hundreds chart
Sharon Tooney

value













































patterns, such as counting by twos or counting by fives.

5
Straw javelin
Place masking tape on the floor to indicate a starting point. Organise the students into a line
behind the starting point. Have the students take turns to throw a straw as far as they can. Provide
the students with Unifix blocks which have been assembled into towers of ten, as well as single
blocks. The students then measure the distance the straw travelled by placing the Unifix blocks
along the floor from the starting point to the straw.
Variations
Change the activity from throwing a straw to other actions, such as taking a giant step from the
starting point and then measuring the distance of the steps using the Unifix blocks.
Organise the students into pairs. Provide each pair of students with lengths of string and ask
them to use the string to measure their arm span and their height. After the students have
completed measuring with the string, they place the string on the floor. Have the students use the
towers of ten Unifix blocks to record the length of the string.
Some students may require
one-on-one support to
complete this activity.

Measure using standard units
as an extension activity.
masking tape, straws,
unifix blocks, string,
paper and pencil

6
Three-dice game
Prepare a set of numeral cards for the numbers three to eighteen. Lay the cards face up in a line on
the desk or floor. Have the students take turns to roll three dice and add together the numbers
rolled, then take a corresponding numeral card. The game continues until all cards have been
taken. If the numeral card has already been taken, the players turn is forfeited.
Variations
Use a variety of dice, such as dot and numeral dice.
Provide each student with a set of numeral cards for the numbers three to eighteen. Have the
students take turns to roll three dice and find the total. Each time a student states the total of the
three dice, all students place a counter on the corresponding numeral card in their set. The game
continues until all numerals have been covered.
Adjust activity according to
student placement on the
numeracy continuum
dice, numeral cards

7
The beanstalk
This activity is best completed with a maximum of five students. Prepare Beanstalk base board
using the BLM and a pack of instruction cards. The instruction cards should state the direction in
which the student moves along the beanstalk, either up or down, and the number of spaces to
move, for example, go up three spaces. Commence the activity by instructing each student to
place a marker at position 10 on the beanstalk. In turns students take an instruction card, follow
the directions and move their marker accordingly along the beanstalk. The winner is the first
person to reach the castle at the top of the beanstalk. An option is to have the students record the
number sentences.
Adjust activity according to
student placement on the
numeracy continuum
beanstalk baseboard,
instruction cards,
counters

8
Coin Values
Students identify the face value of Australian coins and the combinations of smaller coins needed
to add up to larger coin values.
Eg. How much is this coin worth?

How many ways can I represent this amount using smaller coin denominations?
Adjust according to ability to
recognise and count money
coins
Sharon Tooney








9
Count Money Up to $1
Students investigate adding coins to find a total, to purchase an item, etc
Eg. How much money is there?

Adjust according to ability to
recognise and count money
coins

10
Revision
Assessment



ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW
















Sharon Tooney

Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Addition and Subtraction 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore
mathematical problems MA1-2WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
uses a range of strategies and informal recording methods
for addition and subtraction involving one- and two-digit
numbers MA1-5NA
Background Information
It is appropriate for students in Stage 1 to use concrete
materials to model and solve problems, for exploration and
for concept building. Concrete materials may also help in
explanations of how solutions were obtained.
Addition and subtraction should move from counting and
combining perceptual objects, to using numbers as
replacements for completed counts with mental strategies,
to recordings that support mental strategies (such as jump,
split, partitioning and compensation).
Subtraction typically covers two different situations: 'taking
away' from a group, and 'comparison' (ie determining how
many more or less when comparing two groups). In
performing a subtraction, students could use 'counting on or
back' from one number to find the difference. The 'counting
on or back' type of subtraction is more difficult for students
to grasp than the 'taking away' type. Nevertheless, it is
important to encourage students to use 'counting on or back'
as a method of solving comparison problems once they are
confident with the 'taking away' type.
In Stage 1, students develop a range of strategies to aid quick
recall of number facts and to solve addition and subtraction
problems. They should be encouraged to explain their
strategies and to invent ways of recording their actions. It is
also important to discuss the merits of various strategies in
terms of practicality and efficiency.
Jump strategy on a number line an addition or subtraction
strategy in which the student places the first number on an
empty number line and then counts forward or backwards,
first by tens and then by ones, to perform a calculation. (The
number of jumps will reduce with increased understanding.)
Jump strategy method: eg 46 + 33

Jump strategy method: eg 79 33
Explore the connection between addition and subtraction
use concrete materials to model how addition and
subtraction are inverse operations
use related addition and subtraction number facts to at
least 20, eg 15 + 3 = 18, so 18 3 = 15 and 18 15 = 3
Solve simple addition and subtraction problems using a
range of efficient mental and written strategies
use and record a range of mental strategies to solve
addition and subtraction problems involving two-digit
numbers, including:
the jump strategy on an empty number line
the split strategy, eg record how the answer to 37 + 45 was
obtained using the split strategy
an inverse strategy to change a subtraction into an
addition, eg 54 38: start at 38, adding 2 makes 40, then
adding 10 makes 50, then adding 4 makes 54, and so the
answer is 2 + 10 + 4 = 16
select and use a variety of strategies to solve addition and
subtraction problems involving one- and two-digit numbers
- perform simple calculations with money, eg buying items
from a class shop and giving change (Problem Solving)
- check solutions using a different strategy (Problem Solving)
- recognise which strategies are more efficient and explain
why (Communicating, Reasoning)
- explain or demonstrate how an answer was obtained for
addition and subtraction problems, eg show how the answer
to 15 + 8 was obtained using a jump strategy on an empty
number line

Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


Split strategy an addition or subtraction strategy in which
the student separates the tens from the units and adds or
subtracts each separately before combining to obtain the
final answer.
Split strategy method: eg 46 + 33

Inverse strategy a subtraction strategy in which the student
adds forward from the smaller number to obtain the larger
number, and so obtains the answer to the subtraction
calculation.
Inverse strategy method: eg 65 37
start at 37
add 3 to make 40
then add 20 to make 60
then add 5 to make 65
and so the answer is 3 + 20 + 5 = 28
An inverse operation is an operation that reverses the effect
of the original operation. Addition and subtraction are
inverse operations; multiplication and division are inverse
operations.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: plus, add, take away, minus, the difference
between, equals, is equal to, empty number line, strategy.
Some students may need assistance when two tenses are
used within the one problem, eg 'I had six beans and took
away four. So, how many do I have now?'
The word 'left' can be confusing for students, eg 'There were
five children in the room. Three went to lunch. How many
are left?' Is the question asking how many children are
remaining in the room, or how many children went to lunch?




Sharon Tooney

CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Explore the
connection
between addition
and subtraction

Solve simple
addition and
subtraction
problems using a
range of efficient
mental and
written strategies






























2
Related Addition Facts
Students identify and write related addition facts for given algorithms.
Eg. 13 + 1 = 14, students need to recognise that 1 + 13 = 14 is the related addition fact
Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


3
Related Subtraction Facts
Students identify and write related subtraction facts for given algorithms.
Eg. 20 - 5 = 15, students need to recognise that 20 - 15 = 5 is the related subtraction fact
Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


4
Fact Families
Students are encouraged to see the relationship between addition and subtraction by identifying
the fact families that apply to given set of algorithms, by identifying the missing fact, for example:
What fact is missing from this fact family?

Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


5
Review - Add One-Digit Numbers - Sums to 10
Revise addition facts to ten, using friends of 10 where appropriate. Provide algorithms with and
without pictorial representations (concrete materials)
Eg.

Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


6
Review - Ways to Make a Number - Sums to 10
Students use their knowledge of numbers to 10, to identify what they know about friends of ten
and how to identify correct and incorrect addition problems.
Eg.

Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


7
Adding Doubles
Students investigate doubles and near doubles to complete addition problems.
Eg.
5 + 5 = , 2+ 2 = , 9 + 9 = etc
Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum


8
Add One Digit Numbers
Students investigate addition problems using one digit numbers. Problems include both one and
two digit answers. Algorithms should be presented by vertically and horizontally to demonstrate
that the orientation doesnt affect the outcome.
Eg. Add:

Adjust according to student
placement on the numeracy
continuum

Sharon Tooney


4 + 8 = , 5
+ 7
9 Revision

10 Assessment


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW


























Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
NUMBER AND ALGEBRA
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Patterns and Algebra 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore
mathematical problems MA1-2WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
creates, represents and continues a variety of patterns with
numbers and objects MA1-8NA
Background Information
In Stage 1, describing number relationships and making
generalisations should be encouraged when appropriate.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: pattern, missing number, number sentence.
Describe patterns with numbers and identify missing
elements
describe a number pattern in words, eg 'It goes up by
threes'
determine a missing number in a number pattern, eg 3, 7,
11, __, 19, 23, 27
- describe how the missing number in a number pattern was
determined (Communicating, Reasoning)
- check solutions when determining missing numbers in
number patterns by repeating the process (Reasoning)
Solve problems by using number sentences for addition or
subtraction
complete number sentences involving one operation of
addition or subtraction by calculating the missing number, eg
find so that or
- make connections between addition and related
subtraction facts to at least 20 (Reasoning)
- describe how a missing number in a number sentence was
calculated (Communicating, Reasoning)
solve problems involving addition or subtraction by using
number sentences
- represent a word problem as a number sentence
(Communicating, Problem Solving)
- pose a word problem to represent a number sentence
(Communicating, Problem Solving)
Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney





CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Describe patterns
with numbers and
identify missing
elements

Solve problems by
using number
sentences for
addition or
subtraction
























2
Skip Counting
Show different groups of items and ask students how many; telling them to count by 2s, 5s, 10s
etc.
Eg. How many combs are there? Count by tens.

Adjust the number of items
according to ability
groups of items or
pictorial
representations of
groups

3
Skip Counting Sequences
Provide students with a variety of number sequences with missing elements. Have them
determine and record the missing number by skip counting.
Eg. Write the missing number in this sequence:
45, 50, 55, 60, , 70
Provide 100s chart as a
reference.
number sequences

4
Counting Patterns Up to 100
Provide students with skip counting sequences to 100. Given the first number in a counting
sequence, students are to complete the number sequence, using the skip counting strategy
suggested.
Eg. Count forward by tens from 20.
20, , , , ,
Count forward by twos from 36
36, , , , ,
Provide 100s chart as a
reference.
counting sequences

5
Counting Patterns Up to 1000
Provide students with skip counting sequences to 1000. Given the first number in a counting
sequence, students are to complete the number sequence, using the skip counting strategy
suggested.
Eg. Count forward by twos from 62.
62, , , ,
Count forward by twos from 8.
8, , , ,
Provide 1000s chart as a
reference.
counting sequences

6
Number Lines Up to 100
Identify where numbers come in the number sequence by locating given numbers on a number
line.
Eg. Which number comes just after 81?
Provide 100s chart as a
reference.
number lines
Sharon Tooney
































Identifying the missing number in a number sequence to 100, using a number line.
Eg. What is the missing number?


7
Hundreds Chart
Students use skip counting strategies to locate and identify a number from the information
presented by the teacher using a 100s chart.
Eg. What number is 10 less than 96?

100s charts

8
Number Lines Up to 1000
Identify where numbers come in the number sequence by locating given numbers on a number
line.
Eg. Which number comes between 979 and 981?

Order given numbers to 1000, using a number line to assist
Provide 1000s chart as a
reference.
number lines

9
Revision


10
Assessment


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW














Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Length 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
measures, records, compares and estimates lengths and
distances using uniform informal units, metres and
centimetres MA1-9MG
Background Information
Students should be given opportunities to apply their
understanding of measurement, gained through experiences
with the use of uniform informal units, to experiences with
the use of the centimetre and metre. They could make a
measuring device using uniform informal units before using a
ruler, eg using a length of 10 connecting cubes. This would
assist students in understanding that the distances between
marks on a ruler represent unit lengths and that the marks
indicate the endpoints of each unit.
When recording measurements, a space should be left
between the number and the abbreviated unit, eg 3 cm, not
3cm.
Refer also to background information in Length 1.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: length, distance, straight line, curved line, metre,
centimetre, measure, estimate.
Compare and order several shapes and objects based on
length, using appropriate uniform informal units
relate the term 'length' to the longest dimension when
referring to an object
make and use a tape measure calibrated in uniform informal
units, eg calibrate a paper strip using footprints as a repeated
unit
- use computer software to draw a line and use a simple graphic
as a uniform informal unit to measure its length
compare and order two or more shapes or objects according
to their lengths using an appropriate uniform informal unit
- compare the lengths of two or more objects that cannot be
moved or aligned
record length comparisons informally using drawings,
numerals and words, 7 by referring to the uniform informal
unit used
Recognise and use formal units to measure the lengths of
objects
recognise the need for formal units to measure lengths and
distances
use the metre as a unit to measure lengths and distances to
the nearest metre or half-metre
- explain and model, using concrete materials, that a metre-
length can be a straight line or a curved line
record lengths and distances using the abbreviation for metres
(m)
estimate lengths and distances to the nearest metre and check
by measuring
recognise the need for a formal unit smaller than the metre
recognise that there are 100 centimetres in one metre, ie 100
centimetres = 1 metre
use the centimetre as a unit to measure lengths to the nearest
centimetre, using a device with 1 cm markings, eg use a paper
strip of length 10 cm
record lengths and distances using the abbreviation for
centimetres (cm)
estimate lengths and distances to the nearest centimetre and
check by measuring
Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Compare and order
several shapes and
objects based on
length, using
appropriate
uniform informal
units

Recognise and use
formal units to
measure the
lengths of objects























2 Measure With One Unit
Students are given one specific unit (eg. One popstick, streamer or 1m ruler). Measure and
compare objects in the classroom or playground, such as the circumference of the tree.
Student support where
necessary
units: rods, straws,
posticks, streamers,
etc

3
Who Wins?
One beetle walks around two sides of a desk or book, and her friend walks diagonally across the
book. Which beetle will walk the furthest? Vary this activity by choosing different routes.
Student support where
necessary
units: paper clips,
match sticks, etc,
paper and pencil

4
Make a Ruler
Students make their own rulers based on an informal unit (teddy bear, paperclip) or a body part
(foot, hand span). Students should align units, especially teddy bears or paperclips, end to end.
Mark the scale on the ruler and use it to measure objects. (This may need 2 lessons; one to make
the ruler and another to measure)
Student support where
necessary
units: paperclips,
teddy bears, match
sticks, cardboard,
strips, pencil and
paper

5
Make a Decimetre
Students work in pairs and make a ruler using 1cm grid on light card. Cut out a 10cm strip and
colour one long edge as the measuring edge. Label the centimetre end points from 1 to 10.
Find and record objects which measure longer than 10cm, less than 10cm or longer than 100cm
Student support where
necessary
1cm grid on light card,
scissors, coloured
pencils, pencils, paper

6
Straw Toss
Who can throw a straw the furthest; how much further is it than the next best throw? Measure
and record the distance thrown, using a 10cm strip. Find the difference between the longest and
shortest throw.
Student support where
necessary
straws, 10cm strips,
pencils, paper

7
Whats the Difference
Students use different units to measure the same object and are asked to explain why the
measurements are different (eg. Athena measured the book as 5 rods but Alex measured it as 15
paperclips). Alternatively a 1m ruler or a 10cm strip could be used.
Student support where
necessary
paper, pencils, items
for use as units of
measure (10cm strips,
20cm strips, blocks,
Cuisenaire rods,
paperclips, popsticks,
etc)
8

Body Parts
Students work in groups of three or four use a body length (or hand span or the length of an arm
or leg) as the unit of measure to find the width of the classroom. Students record their results and
then explain why the measurements from several groups may be different. During a class
discussion, students predict how many more or fewer units will be needed when the measurement
is expressed in a different unit.
Student support where
necessary
paper strips or
streamers for a
measuring unit,
pencils and paper for
recording
9 Towering Metres
Build a tower that is one metre high. Check height with a metre ruler. Record how the estimate
was made, and measure the result.
Ready, Set, Go!
Students work in small groups to estimate, then measure and record the process.
- How long does it take to write and measure a legible sentence 1 metre long?
Student support where
necessary
building objects for tower,
metre ruler, paper and
pencils, watch sticks,
modelling dough
Sharon Tooney


- How long does it take to make and measure a line of pens (posticks, matchsticks) one metre
long?
- How long does it take to make and measure a modelling dough snake one metre long?

10
Assessment


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

































Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Time 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore
mathematical problems MA1-2WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
describes, compares and orders durations of events, and
reads half- and quarter-hour time MA1-13MG
Background Information
Refer to background information in Time 1.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: calendar, week, days, date, month, time, clock,
analog, digital, hour hand, minute hand, clockwise, numeral,
hour, minute, second, o'clock, half past, quarter past,
quarter to.
Refer also to language in Time 1.
Describe duration using months, weeks, days and hours
use a calendar to calculate the number of months, weeks
or days until an upcoming event
estimate & measure the duration of an event using a
repeated informal unit, eg the number of times you can clap
your hands while the teacher writes your name
- solve simple everyday problems about time & duration
- recognise that some cultures use informal units of time, eg
the use of tidal change in Aboriginal communities
compare & order the duration of events measured using a
repeated informal unit, eg It takes me 10 claps to write my
name but only 2 claps to say my name
use the terms hour, minute & second
experience & recognise activities that have a duration of 1
hour, half an hour or a quarter of an hour, 1 minute, & a few
seconds
- indicate when it is thought that an activity has continued
for 1 hour, 1 minute or 1 second
- compare & discuss the relationship between time units, eg
an hour is a longer time than a minute
- make predictions about the duration of time remaining
until a particular school activity starts or finishes
Tell time to the quarter-hour using the language of past &
to
read analog & digital clocks to the quarter-hour using the
terms past & to, eg It is a quarter past 3, It is a quarter to 4
describe the position of the hands on a clock for quarter
past & quarter to
- describe the hands on a clock as turning in a 'clockwise'
direction
- associate the numerals 3, 6 & 9 with 15, 30 & 45 minutes &
with terms quarter past, half past & quarter to, respectively
identify which hour has just passed when the hour hand is
not pointing to a numeral
record quarter-past & quarter-to time on analog & digital
clocks
Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Describe duration
using months,
weeks, days and
hours

Tell time to the
quarter-hour
using the
language of past
& to






















7
Reading Clocks
Students revise telling time on an analog clock, writing time as numbers separated by a colon eg.

Student support where
necessary
clocks, paper and
pencil

8
Seasons
Students examine and revise seasons. Identifying the months that each season covers and the
order in which the seasons occur (months should be accurately ordered). Eg.

Students describe seasons using appropriate words and images to accurately depict the
differences between seasons. Eg. Seasons posters, books, pamphlets
Student support where
necessary
season charts,
calendars, magazines,
scissors, glue, paper
and pencil

9
Read a Calendar
Students use a calendar to identify and mark familiar dates, eg.
- Their birthday
- Special days (ie. Christmas, Easter, etc)
- Significant school dates (ie. School photo day, sports carnival, Anzac day assembly, etc)
- Beginning and end of the school term
Students use calendars to identify given dates and to determine dates before and after a given
date on a calendar. Eg.

Student support where
necessary
calendar templates,
paper and pencils

10
Revision
Assessment






Sharon Tooney

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW






























Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
MEASUREMENT AND GEOMETRY
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: 2D 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
manipulates, sorts, represents, describes and explores two-
dimensional shapes, including quadrilaterals, pentagons,
hexagons and octagons MA1-15MG
Background Information
In Stage 1, students need to have experiences involving
directions and turning. Discussions about what represents a
'full-turn', a 'half-turn' and a 'quarter-turn' will be necessary.
Relating this information to students physically may be
helpful, eg by playing games such as 'Simon Says' with Simon
saying to make turns.
Digital technologies such as computer drawing tools may use
the terms 'move', 'rotate' and 'flip horizontal', or various
other terms, to describe transformations. The icons for these
functions may assist students in locating the required
transformations.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: shape, twodimensional shape (2D shape), circle,
triangle, quadrilateral, square, rectangle, pentagon, hexagon,
octagon, orientation, features, symmetry, slide, flip, turn,
full-turn, half-turn, quarter-turn, clockwise, anti-clockwise.
In Stage 1, students refer to the transformations of shapes
using the terms 'slide', 'flip' and 'turn'. While in Stage 2,
students are expected to use the terms 'translate', 'reflect'
and 'rotate', respectively.
Linking the vocabulary of half-turns and quarter-turns to
students' experiences with clocks may be of benefit.
A shape is said to have line symmetry if matching parts are
produced when it is folded along a line of symmetry. Each
part represents the 'mirror image' of the other.
Describe and draw two-dimensional shapes, with and without the
use of digital technologies
use term 'two-dimensional' to describe plane (flat) shapes
make representations of 2D shapes in different orientations using
concrete materials
- combine & split single shapes & arrangements of shapes to form
new shapes, eg create a hexagon from six triangles
draw & name 2D shapes in different orientations, with & without
the use of digital technologies
- recognise that the name of a shape does not change if its size or
orientation in space is changed
Investigate the effect of one-step slides and flips, with and without
the use of digital technologies
identify a 1-step slide or flip of a single shape & use the terms
slide & flip to describe the movement of the shape
perform a 1-step slide or flip with a single shape
- recognise that sliding or flipping a shape does not change its size
or features
- describe the result of a 1-step slide or flip of a shape
record the result of performing 1-step slides & flips, with &
without the use of digital technologies
- copy & manipulate a shape using the computer functions for slide
& flip
make designs with line symmetry using paper-folding, pattern
blocks, drawings & paintings
- recognise connection between line symmetry & performing a flip
Identify and describe half-turns and quarter-turns
identify full, & -turns of a single shape & use the terms turn,
full-turn, turn & turn to describe the movement of the shape
identify & describe amounts of turn using terms anti/clockwise
perform full, & -turns with a single shape
- recognise that turning a shape does not change its size or features
- describe the result of a turn of a shape
record the result of performing full, & -turns of a shape, with
& without the use of digital technologies
- copy & manipulate a shape using the computer function for turn
determine the number of -turns required for a full-turn & the
number of -turns required for a full-turn
- connect the use of & -turns to the turn of the minute hand on
a clock for the passing of & -hours
Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Describe and draw
two-dimensional
shapes, with and
without the use of
digital technologies

Investigate the effect
of one-step slides and
flips, with and without
the use of digital
technologies

Identify and describe
half-turns and quarter-
turns






















2
Naming Shapes
Identify and name 2D shapes, including quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons and octagons.
Ensure that students understand that these shapes are grouped under the term two-
dimensional
Students should be encouraged to draw shapes on dot paper; identifying the number of sides and
corners of each shape.
Create a shape house; draw a large square and triangle, so you have the basis for a house shape.
Students then, trace pattern blocks, filling in the square section with smaller squares, the triangle
roof with triangles (facing upwards and downwards in order that the roof is filled) rectangle for
the door, hexagons/pentagons/circles/squares etc for the windows, a circle for a sunshine and a
rectangle chimney. Students then name the shapes that they used to complete their house.
Shape charts as a reference
for naming and spelling
2D shapes, dot paper,
pencils, paper

3
Classifying Shapes
Students work in small groups. Provide each group with a range of 2D shapes. Each group must
name each of the shapes that they have and decide upon a way of classifying them into groups.
Each group needs to report back to the class; explaining how they classified their shapes and
which shapes they placed in each group.
Shape charts as a reference
for naming and spelling
2D shapes, paper and
pencil

4
Sliding and Flipping
Define the term slide:

Define the term flip:

Collect a variety of transparent coloured plastic 2D shapes, such as rectangles, squares,
rhombuses, parallelograms, hexagons and trapeziums. The teacher demonstrates and describes
what happens to a shape when it is flipped across a line (flip needs to be demonstrated with a
solid shape or a picture on an overhead). The teacher repeats to demonstrate what happens to a
shape it is slid.

In pairs, students choose a shape and practise flipping and sliding the shape. Students identify
Slide and flip reference
charts on desks as needed
paper and pencil,
shapes
Sharon Tooney
































how the shape was moved and draw what happens after the shapes crossed the dotted line.
Students hypothesise about what given shapes would look like if they were flipped across a line,
then draw what they believe the shape will look like.

5
Sliding and Flipping Again
Teacher provides students with a series of 2D pictures; each one in its original orientation and
then either flipped or slid. Students must identify the way in which the shape has been moved
from its original orientation.
Play concentration with shape and word cards demonstrating flips and slides. Students must
match a picture and word card correctly to keep the cards. The player with the most correct
matches wins.
Slide and flip reference
charts on desks as needed
concentration cards

6
Turning
Define the term turn:

Teacher demonstrates what happens to a shape when it is turned (half turn, quarter turn, full
turn):

Students use pattern blocks to trace and demonstrate a half turn, quarter turn, full turn; labelling
each appropriately.
Turn reference charts on
desks as needed.
pattern blocks, paper
and pencil

7
Turning Again
Teacher defines and demonstrates the terms clockwise and anticlockwise, in relation to turning
a shape. Have students stand in a circle and walk clockwise and anticlockwise on command.
Have students trace, turn and trace shapes again, in both a clockwise and anticlockwise direction.
Have students label their drawings using arrows to indicate the direction in which the turn was
made.
A clock as a reference point
may be helpful for this
activity

Turn reference charts on
desks as needed.
clock, pattern blocks,
paper and pencil

10
Revision
Assessment











Sharon Tooney


ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW































Sharon Tooney

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM PROFORMA
STAGE: Yr 2
ES1 S1 S2 S3

STRAND:
STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY
TERM:
1 2 3 3
WEEK:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SUBSTRAND: Data 2 KEY CONSIDERATIONS OVERVIEW
OUTCOMES
A student:
describes mathematical situations and methods using
everyday and some mathematical language, actions,
materials, diagrams and symbols MA1-1WM
uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore
mathematical problems MA1-2WM
supports conclusions by explaining or demonstrating how
answers were obtained MA1-3WM
gathers and organises data, displays data in lists, tables and
picture graphs, and interprets the results MA1-17SP
Background Information
Categorical variables can be separated into distinct groups or
categories, eg the different colours of smarties in a box, the
types of favourite fruit of class members.
A key indicating one-to-one correspondence in a picture
graph uses one symbol to represent one response/item,
eg = 1 flower.

Language
Students should be able to communicate using the following
language: information, data, collect, gather, category,
display, symbol, tally mark, picture graph, list, table, equal
spacing, key, baseline
Identify a question of interest based on one categorical
variable and gather data relevant to the question
pose suitable questions that will elicit categorical answers
& gather the data, eg 'Which school sport is the most
popular with our class members?', 'How did each student in
our class get to school today?'
- predict the likely responses within data to be collected
- determine what data to gather in order to investigate a
question of interest, eg colour, gender, type of animal, sport
Collect, check and classify data
collect data on familiar topics through questioning, eg 'How
many students are in our class each day this week?'
- use tally marks to assist with data collection
identify categories of data & use them to sort data, eg sort
data collected on attendance by day of the week & into boys
& girls present
Create displays of data using lists, tables and picture graphs
and interpret them
represent data in a picture graph using a baseline, equal
spacing, same-sized symbols & a key indicating 1-to-1
correspondence
- identify misleading representations of data in a picture
graph, eg where the symbol used to represent 1 item is
shown in different sizes or where symbols are not equally
spaced
- use digital technologies to create picture graphs
display data using lists & tables
-use displays to communicate information gathered in other
learning areas, eg data gathered in a unit on families or local
places
interpret information presented in lists, tables & picture
graphs
- describe data displayed in simple tables & picture graphs
found in books & created by other students
record observations based on tables & picture graphs
developed from collected data
Learning Across The Curriculum
Cross-curriculum priorities

Aboriginal &Torres Strait Islander histories & cultures
Asia & Australias engagement with Asia
Sustainability

General capabilities

Critical & creative thinking
Ethical understanding
Information & communication technology capability
Intercultural understanding
Literacy
Numeracy
Personal & social capability

Other learning across the curriculum areas

Civics & citizenship
Difference & diversity
Work & enterprise
Sharon Tooney


CONTENT WEEK TEACHING, LEARNING and ASSESSMENT

ADJUSTMENTS RESOURCES
Identify a question
of interest based
on one categorical
variable and
gather data
relevant to the
question

Collect, check and
classify data


Create displays of
data using lists,
tables and picture
graphs and
interpret them



















2
Posing the Question
Discuss with the students possible topics that would be suitable and interesting to collecting data
for to graph, for example, student names. Ask the students what sort of data could be collected
about the names of students in the class and have them pose suitable questions, for example, How
many letters does each persons name have?
Brainstorm as many interest topics as possible that the students would like to collect information
about. Discuss the appropriateness of topics with regard to ability to collect data and create a
shortlist of the most popular topics.
In groups have students pose a question for each chosen topic area. Groups share these with the
class, the teacher recording each suggested question. After all groups have shared, as a class
decide on which question is the best/most suitable for each topic.
Student support where
necessary
paper and pencil

3
Collecting Data
Using the topics and questions decided upon in the previous lesson, divide students into groups,
giving each an equal number of questions to collect data on.
Revise the use of tally marks.

Have students collect the data for the questions that their group has been given, using tally marks.
Student support where
necessary
paper and pencil,
questions from
previous lesson

4
Picture Graphs
Define picture graphs:

Using the above example, provide representations of the same graph where the pictures are not
the same size or equally spaced. Discuss with the students the implications of misleading data
presentation. Devise a set of rules for creating a picture graph.
Using the results from the previous lesson, have the students create their own picture graph for
one of the topic areas that they collected data for. Symbols used by students should represent
one-to-one correspondence of data collected.
Student support where
necessary
paper and pencil,
picture graphs, data
from previous lesson

5
Picture Graphs Online
Use online picture graph maker sites to collect data and create a picture graph online. The teacher
should demonstrate how to use the online format first. Suitable online sites include:
http://mathsclass.net/comments/online-picture-graphs
Student support where
necessary
computers
Sharon Tooney


http://www.softschools.com/math/data_analysis/pictograph/make_your_own_pictograph/
http://primaryschoolict.com/pictograph/

10
Revision
Assessment




ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW