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St.

Xavier’s College Kolkata


Logistics & Supply Chain Management

CONFIDENTIAL
ABOUT Presented by
THE COMPANY
Group- 1.
 Nokia Corporation is a Finnish multinational communications
corporation that is headquartered in Keilaniemi, Espoo, a city
neighboring Finland's capital Helsinki .
 Nokia is engaged in the manufacturing of mobile devices and
in converging Internet and communications industries, with
128,445 employees in 120 countries, sales in more than 150
countries and global annual revenue of EUR 50.7 billion and
operating profit of 5.0 billion as of 2008.
 It is the world's largest manufacturer of mobile telephones: its
global device market share was about 38% in Q3 2009, at the
Nirmalya
same Fadikar,
level as in Q3 Debargha
2008 and in Q2 2009. Mukherjee,
Souryodeep
Nokia has sites forChowdhury, Manash
research and development, Sinha, Sujoy
manufacture
and sales in many countries throughout the world. As of
Dey, Md. Sajjad
December 2008, Nokia had R&D presence in 16 countries and
& Md.
employed 39,350 people ImranandKhan
in research development,
representing approximately 31% of the group's total workforce. 2
FACTS
 Nokia is a public limited liability company listed on the
Helsinki, Frankfurt, and New York stock exchanges.
 Nokia increased Finland's GDP by more than 1.5% in 1999
alone. In 2004 Nokia's share of the Finnish GDP was 3.5%
and accounted for almost a quarter of Finland's exports in
2003.
 The Nokia brand, valued at $34.9 billion, is listed as the
fifth most valuable global brand in the Interbrand/
BusinessWeek Best Global Brands list of 2009 (first non-US
company).
 It is the number one brand in Asia (as of 2007)and Europe
(as of 2008),the 42nd most admirable company worldwide
in Fortune's World's Most Admired Companies list of 2009
and the world's 85th largest company as measured by
revenue in Fortune Global 500 list of 2009. 3
Financial…
• Revenue €50.722 bn (2008)

• Operating income €4.966 bn (2008)

• Net income €3.988 bn (2008)

• Total assets €39.582 bn (2008)

• Total equity €16.510 bn (2008)

• Employees 120,827 in 120 countries


(June 30, 2009) 4
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Production Unit :
Networks
Technology
China
Finland
India

Mobile Devices and


Enhancements

Brazil
China
Finland
Great Britain
Hungary
India
Mexico 6
Romania
South Korea
1. SUPPLIER TO 58 WCDMA NETWORKS.
2.NOKIA FOR BUSINESS MOBILIZES
ENTERPRISES GLOBALLY.
3. 10 PHONES MANUFACTURED EACH
SECOND.

Nokia Mobile Phones


net sales by region

Europe Americas
& Africa 35%
46%

Asia Pacific
18%

Net Sales 2009


NOKIA MARKET SHARE 52.38%
(NOVEMBER 2009)  

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BACKGROUND
 Finland, with a special language and culture, has
developed as a country in between the west (the
Nordic region and Europe) and the east (especially
its neighbor Russia). In the 1980s, a process
started of moving out of an investment-driven
economy into an innovation-driven one. With the
collapse of the Soviet Union around 1990, Finland
reached a crisis.
Obvious Question:
 How was Finland able to become a world-leading
nation in mobile communications? Why did this
cluster emerge rather than others?
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ANSWER
One distinctive reason why Finland could be a
world-leading nation in mobile communication is
because of the initial demand of such need.
Due to Finland’s geographical character, Finish
population is spread thinly across the country and
only few cities such as Helsinki, Espoo and Vantaa
is heavily populated.
For such reason, a wired communication was not
suitable in Finland and the need for wireless
communication grew, naturally developing mobile
communication technology.
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ORIGIN
 Nokia was founded in 1865 by Fredrik Idestam in Finland as a
paper manufacturing company. In 1920, Finnish Rubber Works
became a part of the company, and later on in 1922, Finnish
Cable Works joined them. All the three companies were merged
in 1967 to form the Nokia Group.
 The name of Nokia, originated from the river which flowed
through the town. The river itself, Nokianvirta, was named after
the archaic Finnish word originally meaning a small, dark-furred
animal that lived on the banks of the Nokianvirta river.
 In the late 1970s, Nokia started taking an active interest in the
power and electronics businesses and by 1987, consumer
electronics became Nokia's major business. Nokia created the
NMT mobile phone standard in 1981 and launched the first NMT
phone, Mobira Cityman, in 1987. The company delivered the first
GSM network to Radkilinia, a Finnish company in 1991, and in
1992, Nokia ion - a precursor for all Nokia's current GSM phones
- was introduced. 11
“ Nokia is world third richest
company ”

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INVOLVEMENT IN GSM

 Nokia delivered its first GSM network to the Finnish operator


Radiolinja in 1989.The world's first commercial GSM call was made
on July 1, 1991 in Helsinki, Finland over a Nokia-supplied network, by
then Prime Minister of Finland Harri Holkeri, using a prototype Nokia
GSM phone.In 1992, the first GSM phone, the Nokia 1011, was
launched. The model number refers to its launch date, 10 November.
The Nokia 1011 did not yet employ Nokia's characteristic ringtone,
the Nokia tune. It was introduced as a ringtone in 1994 with the
Nokia 2100 series.
 In the 1990s, Nokia provided GSM services to 90 operators across the world.
Another significant move of the company during this period was the
divestment of its non-core operations like IT. The company focused on two
core businesses - mobile phones and telecommunications networks.
Between 1992 and 1996, the company exited from the rubber and cable
businesses. By 1994 it was in the technology and mobile communications
business and by 2000 it had just under 60,000 employees in over 50
countries with sales of 31 billion Euros.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 The control and management of Nokia is divided


among the shareholders at a general meeting and the
Group Executive Board under the direction of the
Board of Directors .The Chairman and the rest of the
Group Executive Board members are appointed by
the Board of Directors. Only the Chairman of the
Group Executive Board can belong to both, the Board
of Directors and the Group Executive Board. The
Board of Directors' committees consist of the Audit
Committee, the Personnel Committee and the
Corporate Governance and Nomination Committee.
 The operations of the company are managed within
the framework set by the Finnish Companies Act,
Nokia's Articles of Association and Corporate
Governance Guidelines, and related Board of
Directors adopted charters.
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LIST OF MAJOR ACQUISITIONS BY NOKIA
IT ALSO HAD TO MANAGE A GROWING NETWORK OF ALLIANCES
AND A NUMBER OF ACQUISITIONS, MOSTLY IN THE UNITED STATES.

•Nokia acquired Dopplr


• Nokia acquired Plum.
•Nokia acquired Cellity.
• Nokia invested in obopay.
• Nokia acquired Twango for $96.8M.
•Nokia invested in Zvents.
•Nokia acquired Bit-side
•Nokia acquired gate5.
•Nokia acquired OZ.
• Nokia acquired Navteq.
•Nokia acquired Plazes.
• Nokia acquired Enpocket.
•Nokia acquired TrollTech for $153M.
•Nokia acquired Symbian for $412M.
Nokia invested in Kyte.

In July 10, 2008, Nokia bought Navteq, a U.S.-based supplier


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for a price of $8.1 billion
SUBSIDIARIES

 Nokia has several subsidiaries, of which the two most


significant as of 2009 are Nokia Siemens Networks and
Navteq.
 Other notable subsidiaries include, but are not limited
to Vertu, a British-based manufacturer and retailer of
luxury mobile phones.
 Qt Software, a Norwegian-based software company,
and OZ Communications, a consumer e-mail and
instant messaging provider.
 Until 2009 Nokia was the major shareholder in
Symbian Limited, a software development and
licensing company that produced Symbian OS, a
smartphone operating system used by Nokia and other
manufacturers. In 2009 Nokia acquired Symbian Ltd
and, along with a number of other companies, created
the Symbian Foundation to distribute the 19
Symbian platform royalty free and as open source.
NOKIA BEYOND 2003: A MOBILE GATEKEEPE

 In 2003, Nokia was the dominant maker of cell phones around the world.
It had more than twice the global handset market share of its closest
competitor, Motorola. While in a position of strength in 2003, the
company faced large challenges in the immediate future.
 For example, the so-called third generation (3G) of mobile technology was
experiencing a slow arrival and uncertain consumer reception. In addition,
there was uncertainty about which type of 3G technology would
dominate. Perhaps a larger strategic issue for Nokia, however, was its
plan for its operating system. In the past, other handset makers were
willing to adopt Nokia's popular handset operating system.
 By 2003, however, Microsoft has entered the market with its own mobile
operating system. As mobile devices become more robust, e.g.,
incorporating Web-enabled phones with PDAs, the importance of mobile
operating systems increases. How can Nokia contend with the entry of
the extremely well-funded Microsoft into its core market?

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ANALYSIS ON GLOBAL TOP 5
VENDORS AND 2007
FORECAST

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NOKIA WITH 40% MARKET SHARE IN THE
FOURTH QUARTER OF 2007

 Nokia announced that it had achieved a 40%


market share in the fourth quarter of 2007.
This lead in the global handset business was
achieved by Nokia while also becoming more
profitable. Nokia increased profit in the
fourth quarter of 2007 by 44%, to $2.68
billion, on sales of $23 billion. Increasing
sales in emerging markets, coupled with
growth in high-end phones were two
important factors responsible for the boost
in profits. Nokia plans to increase its market
share further in 2008. 24
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Gartner Says Worldwide Mobile Phone Sales Declined 8.6% and
Smartphones Grew 12.7% In First Quarter of 2009

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APPLE, RIM EAT INTO NOKIA'S
MARKET SHARE

 While Nokia is still the overwhelming leader


in the smartphone market, it's feeling
increased pressure from high-end devices
like the iPhone and the BlackBerry.
 Nokia is still the leader in the smartphone
market, but rivals Apple and Research In
Motion are steadily increasing market share,
according to a report by Gartner.

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STANDING TALL

 The report, titled "Market Share: Smartphones, Worldwide,


4Q08 And 2008," said Nokia shipped 60.9 million
smartphones last year for a total market share of 43.7%.
While this was more than twice the market share of the
nearest competitor, it was a drop from 49.4% market share
in 2007. The world's largest cell phone manufacturer is
facing increased competition in the high-end department,
and its paltry presence in the U.S. market could continue to
hurt it as smartphone sales increase.
 Nokia also continued to lead the mobile phone market, but
its share dropped to 36.2 percent from 39.1 percent in
the first quarter of 2008. Samsung retained second place
and improved its market share as its sales totalled 51.4
million units. After dropping to the fifth position in the fourth
quarter of 2008, Motorola overtook Sony Ericsson to
regain fourth place.

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Current Market Share Comparison

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MARKETING STRATEGIES NOKIA…
 Focused on Handset Manufacture only
 Enhance Product Portfolio

 Increase Distribution Channels

 Adjust Preferences for specific markets

 Customer Satisfaction

 Focused on Replacement

 Increase Commitment to Emerging Market

 Improve Collaboration on Designs

 Ensure Accountability and Quality

 Aggressive Pricing
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Macro Enviroment of NOKIA
POLITICAL FACTOR:

Nokia reported spending $5.4 million on lobbying


in the U.S. in 2007 and $2 million on lobbying in
2008.

ECONOMIC FACTOR:
Nokia had to change its functions from single
market to global market due to collapse of
Russian Federation.

SOCIAL FACTOR:
Nokia has been a member of the 32
United Nations Global Compact since
2001
SEGMENTATION STRATEGY
 
 Geographic:

o Nokia immediate geographic target is


rural India.
o The total targeted population is
estimated at 100 million.

 Demographic:

o Male and female.


o Ages 25-50, this is the segment that
makes up 80% of the Nokia mobile
phone market 33
CONSUMER SEGMENT

Higher Involvement
 Technology Leaders
 Technology Stylists
 Pragmatic Leaders
 Young Explorers
 Life Jugglers
 Life Builders
 Style Leaders

Rational Aspirational
 Mature Acceptors  Image Seekers
 Family Providers  Style Followers
 Simplicity Seekers
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Lower Involvement
TYPES OF CONSUMERS
 Live Consumers This Segment of
 Connect Consumers consumer look for
 Achieve Consumers design and style
 Explore Consumers leadership. they
follow trends and
fashion and have
active Life style

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TYPES OF CONSUMERS
 Live Consumers This set of
 Connect Consumers Consumers
 Achieve Consumers combine ease of
 Explore Consumers use and elegant
looks at the same
time like internet
connectivity,
Voice recording
etc.

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TYPES OF CONSUMERS
 Live Consumers Smart Business
 Connect Consumers people who look
 Achieve Consumers for the smartest
 Explore Consumers tools for
balancing their
work and life like
internet, calendar
and other value
added service.

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TYPES OF CONSUMERS
 Live Consumers
These set of
 Connect Consumers
consumers want
 Achieve Consumers
cutting edge
 Explore Consumers
technology for
their stylish
lifestyles.
e.g. all N Series
mobile

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THE MARKETING MANTRAS
 Being global through Local
 Build product & service
 Provide better customer service

Accessibility & Affordability


 Complex Segmentation Process

 End to end targeting of every consumer spectrum

 Product portfolio
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CHALLANGES
 In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the corporation ran into serious
financial problems, a major reason being its heavy losses by the
television manufacturing division and businesses that were just too
diverse.These problems, and a suspected total burnout, probably
contributed to Kairamo taking his own life in 1988. After Kairamo's
death, Simo Vuorilehto became Nokia's Chairman and CEO. In 1990–
1993, Finland underwent severe economic depression, which also
struck Nokia. Under Vuorilehto's management, Nokia was severely
overhauled. The company responded by streamlining its
telecommunications divisions, and by divesting itself of the television
and PC divisions.
 Probably the most important strategic change in Nokia's history was
made in 1992, however, when the new CEO Jorma Ollila made a
crucial strategic decision to concentrate solely on telecommunications.
Thus, during the rest of the 1990s, the rubber, cable and
consumer electronics divisions were gradually sold as Nokia
continued to divest itself of all of its non-telecommunications
businesses. 41
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NOKIA TELECOMMUNICATIONS:
REDESIGN OF INTERNATIONAL
LOGISTICS
 Nokia faces the challenge of implementing the global network model:
global R&D and production networks for global learning and control
combined with local sales and customer service for a local market
presence.
 As late as 1991, more than a quarter of Nokia's turnover still came
from sales in Finland. However, after the strategic change of 1992,
Nokia saw a huge increase in sales to North America, South America
and Asia. The exploding worldwide popularity of mobile telephones,
beyond even Nokia's most optimistic predictions, caused a logistics
crisis in the mid-1990s.
 This prompted Nokia to overhaul its entire logistics operation. It
launches an international logistics project to provide integrated
solutions delivery and after-sales service.
 By 1998, Nokia’s focus on telecommunications and its early
investment in GSM technologies had made the company the world's
largest mobile phone manufacturer. Between 1996 and 2001, Nokia’s
turnover increased almost fivefold from 6.5 billion euros to 31 billion
euros. Logistics continues to be one of Nokia's major advantages over
its rivals, along with greater economies of scale.
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The Supply Chain Process Of Nokia

With an extremely complex supply chain that handles 100 billion


components, 60 Strategic suppliers and 10 factories worldwide,
Nokia had to be extremely focused in their transformation efforts.
New product introductions and variations are also intense – 1 phone
can represent 170 handset variations and 250 sales package variants.
To support this complexity, the operations philosophy has been: think
globally, act locally, i.e. balancing localized decision-making
with global planning.
 Metals from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Tantalum from Brazil, Canada, Russia, China and a number of other countries
in Central Africa.
 Other materials
More recently the company has been working with suppliers of other minerals,
such as Cobalt and Tin, to improve transparency of the supply chain and
understand how standards can be promoted.
 Channels:
Nokia > Distributer >> Whole seller 47

>>> Retailer >>>> Customer


While looking for ways to reduce the environmental impact of
customer logistics Danzas works to improve its own environmental
performance. This includes careful planning of travel by personnel,
reduction of energy consumption and the evaluation of sources of
energy on environmental grounds, as well as minimizing and sorting
waste.

 Ellinor Nordenström says this involves going beyond


averages to establish the actual multi-modal split, that
is, the distribution of emissions among the different
modes of transportation.

 Air and sea freight is the responsibility of


environmental and quality manager Jouni Sormunen,
who works for Danzas AEI Intercontinental Oy at the
Helsinki airport.
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 Land-based transport is the responsibility of
environmental manager Arja Huotari, who works for
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But Present
AMR RESEARCH Scenario
RANKS NOKIA'S
GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN NUMBER SIX
IN THE WORLD.

 Nokia makes money at the low end because of its


superefficient supply-chain and manufacturing systems. It
also keeps costs and complexity under control by sharing
components among devices and designing phones that
have fewer parts than competing models. Such practices
pushed Nokia to the No. 1 spot this year in Boston
consultancy AMR Research’s annual survey of top supply-
chain operators, ahead of logistics champions such as
Toyota and Wal-Mart. (Motorola was a respectable No. 12
in the ranking, which was based in part on a poll of
supply-chain executives.) Analysts say even low-cost
Chinese producers such as Huawei Technologies can’t
match the efficiency of Nokia, which operates its own
factories in Vietnam, India, and other low-wage countries.
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NOKIA'S STRATEGY IN THE EMERGING MARKETS
EXAMPLE- INDIA

In the emerging markets, Nokia's business


strategy is to:
 Increase mobile usage in rural areas.

 Reduce the mobile phone ownership and operating


costs.

 Bring the benefits of mobile telephony to people in


emerging markets.

 Bring the power of the Internet to these markets.

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CREATING ASPIRATION
 Bottom to top End of Pyramid
Marketing
 Competitive Analysis

Reaching out Far & Wide


 700 Priority dealers and 11000 Authorized Leaders.
Nokia had also established a formidable distribution network that reached over
25,000 dealers
 Nokia has slowly converted the mobile into FMCG
In the infrastructure business, Nokia Networks had become a key supplier to
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all five GSM operators in the country; Bharti, BSNL, BPL,
Hutchison(Vodafone), and IDEA.
AN END-TO-END PLAYER WITH A
PRODUCT FOR EVERYONE

 Nokia caters to the mass-market and also the high-


end market and has a product for everyone. The
company's focus would continue to be driving
demand and foster brand aspiration.
 In November 2008, in India, Nokia introduced
handsets (prices ranging from €25 to €90 - Nokia's
lowest cost handset to date at €25) and a range of
services (available from first-half of 2009). The
services will be expanded to other countries in Asia
and Africa later.
 Nokia's Market Positioning: Different price
points and value propositions
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INDIA NOW NOKIA'S SECOND
MARKET

 Mobile phone maker Nokia says India has


overtaken the US to become its second
largest market in terms of sales.
 Growing market
 "Out of 185 million mobile phone users in India,
85 million use Nokia phones," the managing
director at Nokia's India unit added.
 More than half of the 49 million mobile users in
India carried a Nokia handset. Six out of every 10
people who bought a mobile phone in India
picked up a Nokia. Many of them had made their
first ever-mobile call on a Nokia phone over a
Nokia network. The 1100, the phone which was
'Made for India', had become Nokia's largest 64
selling model globally.
Lifecycle …
• Globally Nokia’s market is at maturity,
where
as in India it is still in the Growth stage.
Globally Placed
Here
In India
Rs. Placed here

Time
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Product life cycle


SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE COMPANY:
NOKIA

Strengths of Nokia

 Strength of the corporate brand.


 Complexity improves its Competitive position
 Design, the branding and the technology
 Backwards compatibility - protection from a
Japanese onslaught
 Lending personality to its products (fashion
statement)
 Effective advertisement and market
communication
 Not only a tool for business but being an item
of everyday convenience
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Weakness:

1. Price of the product offered by the company.

2. Not concern about the lower class of the


society.

3. The service centers in India are very few


so after sales service is not good.

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Opportunity:
1.With the wide range in products, features and
different price range for different people, it has
an advantage over the competitors around.

2. ‘Telecom penetration in India’ being at the


peak time.

3. As the standard of living in India has increased


the purchasing power of the people as increased
as well, so Nokia has to target right customer at 68

right time to gain the most out of the situation.


THREATS
 China Mobile made Copy Of NOKIA
Sets.

 Looking mainly at the competition


that are taking away Nokia’s market
share.

 Orange, Vodafone and O2 and


many other operators are globally
selling their own brands of phone.

 Higher import charges. 69


BCG Matrix of NOKIA

N-Series Premium Series

Entry
Level N-Gage

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 Nokia uses a pricing strategy that best
suits the product.
 Market Penetration- Nokia 1100.
 Market Skimming- N-95.
 Hence, The Strategy which was used
for N-Series & E-Series was Market
Skimming.

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ESTIMATING COST – EXPERIENCE
CURVE THEORY :

P1

P2
Price
/Cost P3

Experience Curve

T1 T2 T 72
3

Time Period / Units Produced


Nokia has opened its retail outlet ‘Nokia Priority’ as well as many authorized

dealers at various places.

Consumer

Manufacturer Dealer

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 AIDA in Nokia – :
 A – Attention : attract the attention of the
customer.

 I – Interest : raise customer interest by


demonstrating features, advantages, and
benefits.

 D – Desire : convince customers that they


want and desire the product or service and that
it will satisfy their needs.

 A – Action : lead customers towards taking 74


action and/or purchasing.
Product Promotion…
Advertising: Through TV, Sign boards, Bill
boards, Radio, Newspaper, Broachers, Posters,
Dummies
and display stands
 Discounts are provided to online
Nokia purchasers through Nokia
discount coupons or coupon codes

 Commission is also provided to


retailers on the sale of every Nokia
cell phones and accessories.
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Public Relations ( PR )…
Nokia has strong PR. They keep on doing some or the other
new events, programmes and publicity, so as to keep up
with the brilliant image of the company and also to
enhance the brand equity.

Direct Marketing :
• Nokia does not perform Direct Sales
activities on its official website
www.nokia.com.
• Nokia use DEMO style of Direct
Marketing.
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• Nokia does not use Direct Mail or
Telemarketing styles of Direct
Packaging…
Packaging is important because it protects products
as they make their way from factory to customers.
 Attractive, Good & Secure Packing.
 During 2007, 15,000 ton packaging material
has been saved by using smaller packaging.
 Nokia have reduced the amount of printed
material inside the box.
 In 2007 Nokia began to increase the level
 of recycled content.

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Branding…
Nokia built its brand with high-end multimedia
handsets for upscale buyers and low-priced
phones for emerging countries.
 Branding Decisions :

 Nokia follows Umbrella branding “N


Series” & “E Series”
 Logo shows their brand personality
 Nokia focused on building customer,
relationship and trust
 Building friendship and trust is the
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heart Nokia brand
Quality…
Quality is at the heart of Nokia’s brand promise, very
human technology.

 Nokia’s key quality targets are:

 For Nokia to be number one in customer


and consumer loyalty.

 For Nokia to be number one in product


leadership.

 For Nokia to be number one in 79


operational excellence.
MAJOR JOINT VENTURE…
 On June 19, 2006, Nokia and Siemens AG
announced the companies would merge their
mobile and fixed-line phone network equipment
businesses to create one of the world's largest
network firms, Nokia Siemens Networks.
 Each company has a 50% stake in the
infrastructure company, and it is headquartered
in Espoo.
 Nokia Siemens Networks (previously Nokia
Networks) provides wireless and wired network
infrastructure, communications and networks
service platforms, as well as professional
services to operators and service providers.
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EMERGING SUPERPOWER
 Nokia Siemens Networks focuses in GSM, EDGE, 3G/W-CDMA and
WiMAX radio access networks; core networks with increasing IP
and multi access capabilities; and services.
 Nokia Siemens Networks services division is based in INDIA.
 Nokia Siemens Networks has operations in some 150 countries.
 The companies predicted annual sales of €16 bn and cost
savings of €1.5 bn a year by 2010.
 Beijing INDSERVE Communication System Integration Co., Ltd
(INDSERVE), a leading third and forth party vendor managed
supply support company, jointly announced with
Nokia Siemens Networks that they are forging a global supply
chain partnership.

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NOKIA'S MASTER PLAN FOR 2010
AND BEYOND (CAPITAL MARKETS
DAY)

Highlights from the targets and forecasts:


 Nokia expects industry mobile device volumes to be up
approximately 10% in 2010, compared to 2009.
 Nokia targets its mobile device volume market share to
be flat in 2010, compared to 2009.
 Nokia targets to increase its mobile device value market
share slightly in 2010, compared to 2009.
 Nokia continues to target Services net sales of EUR 2
billion or more in 2011.
 Nokia continues to target to have 300 million active
users for its services by the end of 2011.

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TARGETS, NOKIA ALSO OUTLINED KEY
'DEVICES & SERVICES' OPERATIONAL
PRIORITIES FOR 2010. THESE ARE:

 Improve user experience .


 Re-engineer our Symbian user interface; deliver a major
product milestone before mid-year 2010, and another
major product milestone before the end of 2010 .
 Deliver our first Maemo 6-powered mobile computer,
with an iconic user experience, in the second half of 2010
 Significantly increase the proportion of touch and/or
QWERTY devices in our smartphone portfolio .
 Scale up our Services business by expanding geographically
and in partnership with more operators
 Provide third party developers with better tools to create
applications and content for our Ovi ecosystem .
 Continue to build on our affordable and localized services
offerings for emerging market consumers" .
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NOKIA RESEARCH CENTER
 Nokia Research Center (NRC) is chartered with exploring new frontiers for mobility,
solving scientific challenges to transform the converging Internet and communications
industries.
 Nokia Research Centre is actively engaging in Open Innovation through selective and
deep research collaborations with world-leading institutions. By sharing resources,
leveraging ideas, and tapping each other’s expertise we are able to create vibrant
innovation ecosystems, multiply our efforts, enhance innovation speed and efficiency,
and derive more value for our organizations and ultimately for our end-customers.
 Major Collaborations are :
BUPT (Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications)
Helsinki University of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Stanford University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Cambridge

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ONGOING RESEARCH
o Handwriting Calculator
A showcase of Nokia’s new handwriting recognition
technology, it allows you to calculate handwritten math
expressions with a touch-screen Nokia device.
o Nokia Mixed Reality
Mixed Reality represents a spectrum of
applications that blend digital and real world
information, allowing users to interact with their
environment in liberating new ways.

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THE FUTURE

 Nanoscience and the Mobile Device


Nanoscience is not science fiction. Nokia is pursuing its
vision of a future where nanotechnologies transform
mobile devices in powerful and surprising ways.
 Sensing the World with Mobile Devices
With their ability to hear, see and detect the
environment around them, mobile devices are moving
far beyond basic voice and data communications.
 Location, Context, and Mobile Services
Nokia envisions a world where mobile devices are
intelligent and context aware. Where you are and
what's around you can enable services and features
that are both empowering and liberating. 86
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CONCEPT PHONES…
 Nokia is working on future of
mobile with their new concept
Nokia "Scentsory".
 This new mobile device uses the
sense of smell, sight, hearing,
and touch to create a
multiscensory environment for
the caller.
 Scentsory would be able to
detect smells as well as radiate
colors, lighting, and temperature
of the caller with Dual screens 90

and hidden camera


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REFERENCES

 www.nokia.com
 www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com

 www.forbes.com

 www. hbr.harvardbusiness.org

 www. en.wikipedia.org

 www. economictimes.indiatimes.com

 Supply Chain Transformation, Supply Chain


Management Summit by Jean Francois Baril,
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Senior Vice President Sourcing &
Procurement ,Nokia Corporation.
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