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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH


(A Unit of Sri Sringeri Sharada Peetham, Sringeri)
Plot No. 7, Phase – II, Institutional Area, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi – 110 070
Phone: 26124090 / 26124091: Fax No. 26124092
E-mail: administration@srisim.org; Website: www.srisim.org.

PROJECT

ON

CUSTOMER SERVICES PROVIDED BY BIG BAZAAR

SUBMITTED TO SUBMITTED BY
Prof. (Dr.) Deepak Dogra Satendra Kumar
Roll No.:- 20080174
Section:- B
PGDM (2008-10)

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Many People contribute to the successful development of this project, would like to
take the opportunity to acknowledgement their assistance. Their suggestion
constructive criticism and expert guidance helped invaluably in the successful
completion of the project.

I should start thanks with Mr. (Dr.) Deepak Dogra (Group Head of the Institute) who
defined different milestones for the development of the project and issued deadline to
reach the milestones, which lead to the fruitful completion of the project in time.

I would like to thank Prof. Sartaj Khera for her expert guidance and constructive
criticism all time during the project, which leads the project to its current shape. She
pacified me during tense moment with her creative ideas reinforcing my interest, for
her valuable guidance to solve critical problems & for her moral support and
encouragement.

Satendra Kumar

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Contents

TOPIC PAGE NO.

OBJECTIVE 04

ABOUT THE PRESENT STUDY 05

LIMITATION 06

INTRODUCTION 07-22

REVIEW OF LITERATURE 23-27

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 28

QUESTIONNAIRE 29

DATA ANALYSIS 30-44

SUMMARY 45

RECOMMENDATION 46

REFERENCES 47

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Objectives

 To find out the factors that affect the buyers decision in Big Bazaar

 To evaluate the strength of these factors in buying decision of the customers.

 To understand customer’s level of satisfaction with Big Bazaar outlet.

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About the Present Study


The present study is undertaken to understand the impact of customer services
provided by Big Bazaar. The study will be helpful in finding out the profile, perception
and satisfaction level of the customers who visit the outlet of Big Bazaar at Vasant
Square Mall, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi.

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Limitations

 The Project is limited primarily to the single outlet of Big Bazaar and hence
does not capture the essence of the entire outlet of Big Bazaar.

 The components of variations in store choice with accordance to profession


have not been studied.

 The project shows a picture of outlet of Big Bazaar only in the Vasant Kunj,
New Delhi.

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Introduction

The Retail Industry in India

India's vast middle class and its almost untapped retail industry are key attractions
for global retail giants wanting to enter newer markets. Driven by changing lifestyles,
strong income growth and favorable demographic patterns, Indian retail is expected
to grow 25 per cent annually.

Modern retail in India could be worth US$ 175-200 billion by 2016. With the economy
booming, competition in the marketplace is fierce. According to 'Retail in India
Getting Organized to Drive Growth', a report by AT Kearney and the Confederation of
Indian Industry, retail is one of India's fastest growing industries with a 5 per cent
compounded annual growth rate and expected revenues of US$ 320 billion in 2007.
Rising incomes, increasing consumerism in urban areas and an upswing in rural
consumption will fuel this growth to around 7-8 per cent. KSA-Technopak, a retail
consulting and research agency, predicts that by 2010, organized retailing in India
will cross the US$ 21.5-billion mark from the current size of US$ 7.5 billion.

Retail space

Retailers in India are the most aggressive in Asia in expanding their businesses, thus
creating a huge demand for real estate. Their preferred means of expansion is to
increase the number of their outlets in a city, and also expand to other regions,
revealed the Jones Lang LaSalle third annual Retailer Sentiment Survey-Asia.

Deutsche Bank's research report on 'Building up India' says India's burgeoning


middle class will drive up nominal retail sales through 2010 by 10 per cent per
annum. The country may have 600 new shopping centers by 2010.

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Food retail

Food dominates the shopping basket in India. The US$ 6.1 billion Indian foods
industry, which forms 44 per cent of the entire FMCG sales, is growing at 9 per cent
and has set the growth agenda for modern trade formats. Since nearly 60 per cent of
the average Indian grocery basket comprises non-branded items, the branded food
industry is homing in on converting Indian consumers to branded food.

Future Group

Pantaloon Retail is the flagship enterprise of the Future Group, which is positioned to
cater to the entire Indian consumption space. The Future Group operates through six
verticals: Future Retail (encompassing all retail businesses), Future Capital (financial
products and services), and Future Brands (management of all brands owned or
managed by group companies), Future Space (management of retail real estate),
Future Logistics (management of supply chain and distribution) and Future Media
(development and management of retail media). Future Capital Holdings, the group's
financial arm, focuses on asset management and consumer finance. It manages two
real estate investment funds (Horizon and Kshitij) and consumer-related private
equity fund, In division. It also plans to get into insurance, consumer credit and other
consumer-related financial products and services in the near future. Future Group's
vision is to, "Deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time to Every Indian Consumer in
the most profitable manner." One of the core values at Future Group is, 'Indianess'
and its corporate credo are - Rewrite rules, Retain values

Future Group Manifesto

“Future” – the word which signifies optimism, growth, achievement, strength, beauty,
rewards and perfection. Future encourages us to explore areas yet unexplored,

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write rules yet unwritten; create new opportunities and new successes. To strive for
a glorious future brings to us our strength, our ability to learn, unlearn and re-learn
our ability to evolve.

We, in Future Group, will not wait for the Future to unfold itself but create future
scenarios in the consumer space and facilitate consumption because consumption
is development. Thereby, we will effect socio-economic development for our
customers, employees, shareholders, associates and partners.

Our customers will not just get what they need,

But also get them where, how and when they need.

We will not just post satisfactory results, we will write success


stories.

We will not just operate efficiently in the Indian economy, we will


evolve it.

We will not just spot trends; we will set trends by marrying our
understanding of the Indian consumer to their needs of tomorrow.

It is this understanding that has helped us succeed. And it is this that will help us
succeed in the Future. We shall keep relearning. And in this process, do just one
thing.

Rewrite Rules. Retain Values.

Group Vision
Future Group shall deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time for Every Indian
Consumer in the most profitable manner.

Group Mission
We share the vision and belief that our customers and stakeholders shall be
served only by creating and executing future scenarios in the consumption
space leading to economic development.

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We will be the trendsetters in evolving delivery formats, creating retail realty, making
consumption affordable for all customer segments – for classes and for masses.

We shall infuse Indian brands with confidence and renewed ambition.

We shall be efficient, cost- conscious and committed to quality in whatever we do.

We shall ensure that our positive attitude, sincerity, humility and united
determination shall be the driving force to make us successful.

Core Values
Indian ness: confidence in ourselves.

Leadership: to be a leader, both in thought and business.

Respect & Humility: to respect every individual and be humble in our conduct.

Introspection: leading to purposeful thinking.

Openness: to be open and receptive to new ideas, knowledge and information.

Valuing and Nurturing Relationships: to build long term relationships.

Simplicity & Positivity: Simplicity and positivity in our thought, business and action.

Adaptability: to be flexible and adaptable, to meet challenges.

Flow: to respect and understand the universal laws of nature.

Big Bazaar - Isse sasta aur accha kahin nahi

Big Bazaar, one of the biggest retail format of Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited, has
democratized shopping in India and is much more than a hypermarket. Here, one
finds over 170,000 products under one roof that cater to every need of a family,
making Big Bazaar India’s favorite shopping destination. Where Big Bazaar scores

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over other stores is its value for money proposition for the Indian customers. Spread
across 45000 sq.ft. With the ever increasing array of private labels, it has opened the
doors into the world of fashion and general merchandise including home furnishings,
utensils, crockery, cutlery, sports goods and much more at surprisingly low prices. In
recent years, Big Bazaar has adopted value pricing in which they win loyal customers
by charging a fairly low price for a high – quality offering. However, consistent low
price for the products is not only the universally desired characteristic; it is also a
surrogate for different offers provided by these stores at different intervals of time.

The variety of product range in Big Bazaar :

This large format store comprise of almost everything required by people from
different income groups. It varies from clothing and accessories for all genders like
men, women and children, playthings, stationary and toys, footwear, plastics, home
utility products, cosmetics, crockery, home textiles, luggage gift items, other
novelties, and also food products and grocery. The added advantage for the
customers shopping in Big Bazaar is that there are all time discounts and
promotional offers going on in the Big Bazaar on its salable products.

The significant features of Big Bazaar:

Shopping in the Big Bazaar is a great experience as one can find almost everything
under the same roof. It has different features which caters all the needs of the
shoppers. Some of the significant features of Big Bazaar are:

• The Food Bazaar or the grocery store with the department selling fruits and
vegetables
• There is a zone specially meant for the amusement of the kids
• Furniture Bazaar or a large section dealing with furniture
• Electronics Bazaar or the section concerned with electronic goods and
cellular phones

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• FutureBazaar.com or the online shopping portal which makes shopping


easier as one can shop many products of Big Bazaar at the same price from
home
• Well regulated customer care telecalling services

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The Great Exchange Offer

Big Bazaar announced The Great Exchange Offer with a “Bring anything old and
take anything new” concept which started from the 16th of Feb 2008 at the Landmark
store. The offer was valid till the 16th of March 2008 at the store. Under the
exchange offer, old garments, utensils, furniture, plastic ware, newspapers or just
about anything was weighed and valued and customers were given exchange
coupons. The customer could redeem the coupons before the due date on the
condition that he/she shops four times the value of the coupon. There were also
direct exchanges on mobiles and electronic goods during the period with attractive
discounts on new purchases. The prices fixed by Big Bazaar were: clothes (Rs 200
per kg), newspaper (Rs 25 per kg), plastics/utensils/leather goods (Rs. 75 per kg),
footwear/luggage (Rs. 100 per kg), Pet/beer bottles (Rs 15 per kg), tyres (Rs 50 per
kg), furniture (Rs 75 per kg) and others (Rs 20 per kg). These exchange values were

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found to be almost 4 to 5 times higher than the road side “kabari wala”. For the
consumer, this offer aimed at helping the housewife clean out the junk while getting a
good value for it. The coupons availed by the customer were equivalent to a 25%
discount on products that could be purchased under this offer. For Big Bazaar, this
promotion campaign helped boosting sales during the period of February and March
as it has been noticed that these months are dull months for consumer buying. Big
Bazaar undertook the following ways to promote The Great Exchange Offer: Below
the line activities for The Great Exchange Offer involved:

• Sufficient visual merchandizing within the store that included danglers, signages,
standees, distribution of pamphlets, which gave details of the offer.

• Frequent announcements made by the staff inside the store at regular intervals.

Above the line activities for The Great Exchange Offer involved:

• TVC on popular entertainment channels like Star Plus, Sony, Set Max, Star One.

• Road shows carried out by the Big Bazaar staff with announcements about the offer
to make people aware.

• Newspaper ads in almost all the local dailies like Sakal, The Times of India, on
different days during the period of the offer.

Wednesday Bazaar – Hafte ka sabse sasta din

In January 2007, Big Bazaar introduced a Wednesday Bazaar concept called “Hafte
Ka Sabse Sasta Din” with the aim to give homemakers the power to save the most
on this day of the week. Wednesday Bazaar offers clothes, accessories and fashion
jewellery and personal care products on greater discounts. In the hypermarkets or
supermarkets business, it is noted that the highest footfalls generated by these
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stores are mostly on the weekends or on national holidays. Therefore, it becomes


very important for the retailer to plan certain offers in such a manner that it can
attract people on the weekdays too. For the customers, Wednesday Bazaar is the
“Hafte Ka Sabse Sasta Din” which the customers leverage on and for Big Bazaar;
Wednesday Bazaar is an opportunity to maintain footfalls to its standards on
weekdays too.

For Big Bazaar, Wednesday Bazaar is a concept, which it intends to run on a long-
term basis. For which the aim is to inculcate in the minds of customers that every
Wednesday is a day of greater savings at Big Bazaar. It is therefore, incumbent on
the brand to have the offer grow and create deep impact on the minds of the
customers. It has tried to do this in the following ways:

Below the line activities for Wednesday Bazaar involves:

• Visual merchandizing promoting the offer with the help of danglers, signages,
standees, etc.

• Frequent announcements made by the staff inside the store on a regular basis.

Above the line activities for Wednesday Bazaar involves:

• TVC on popular entertainment channels like Sony, Star Plus, Set Max, Star One.

• Newspaper ads on Wednesday in the local dailies, Sakal and Times of India.

• Hoardings at Swargate and Pune-Solapur Highway.

Sabse Saste Teen Din (Big days)

“26 Jan Republic Day a National Holiday”Big Bazaar Marketing Department gave a
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new thought on this day in 2006 they started a new shopping festival, i.e. Sabse
Saste Teen Din. None of the retail industry was aware about this surprise shopping
festival. Big Bazaar did it in its own way!! They showed this National holiday can be
celebrate in festival mode , while doing shopping Big bazaar throwed up to 65% of on
each & every products in the store for three days. So the promotion was called
Sabse Saste Teen Din.

Promotion

Promotion can be loosely classified as "above the line" and "below the line"
promotion. The promotional activities carried out through mass media like television,
radio, newspaper etc. is above the line promotion.

The terms 'below-the-line' promotion or communications, refers to forms of non-


media communication, even non-media advertising. Below-the-line promotions are
becoming increasingly important within the communications mix of many companies,
not only those involved in fmcg products, but also for industrial goods.
Some of the ways by which companies do BTL (below the line) promotions are by
exhibitions, sponsorship activities, public relations and sales promotions like giving
freebies with goods, trade discounts given to dealers and customers, reduced price
offers on products, giving coupons which can be redeemed later etc.

BELOW THE LINE SALES PROMOTION

Below the line sales promotions are short-term incentives, largely aimed at
consumers. With the increasing pressure on the marketing team to achieve
communication objectives more efficiently in a limited budget, there has been a need
to find out more effective and cost efficient ways to communicate with the target
markets. This has led to a shift from the regular media based advertising.

A definition of below-the-line sales promotion given by Hugh Davidson:

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'An immediate or delayed incentive to purchase, expressed in cash or in kind, and


having only a short term or temporary duration'.

Methods of below the line sales promotion

1. Price promotions

Price promotions are also commonly known as" price discounting". These can be
done in two ways:

• A discount to the normal selling price of a product, or


• More of the product at the normal price.
Price promotions however can also have a negative effect by spoiling the brand
reputation or just a temporary sales boost (during the discounts) followed by a lull
when the discount would be called off.

2. Coupons

Coupons are another, very versatile, way of offering a discount. Consider the
following examples of the use of coupons:

-On a pack to encourage repeat purchase

- In coupon books sent out in newspapers allowing customers to redeem the coupon
at a retailer

- A cut-out coupon as part of an advert

- On the back of till receipts

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The key objective with a coupon promotion is to maximize the redemption rate – this
is the proportion of customers actually using the coupon.

It must be ensured when a company uses coupons that the retailers must hold
sufficient stock to avoid customer disappointment.

Use of coupon promotions is often best for new products or perhaps to encourage
sales of existing products that are slowing down.

3. Gift with purchase

The "gift with purchase" is a very common promotional technique. In this scheme, the
customer gets something extra along with the normal good purchased. It works best
for

- Subscription-based products (e.g. magazines)

- Consumer luxuries (e.g. perfumes)

4. Competitions and prizes

This is an important tool to increase brand awareness amongst the target consumer.
It can be used to boost up sales for temporary period and ensure usage amongst first
time users.

5. Money refunds

Here, a customer receives a money refund after submitting a proof of purchase to the
manufacturer.

Customers often view these schemes with some suspicion – particularly if the
method of obtaining a refund looks unusual or onerous.

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6. Frequent user / loyalty incentives

Repeat purchases may be stimulated by frequent user incentives. Perhaps the best
examples of this are the many frequent flyer or user schemes used by airlines, train
companies, car hire companies etc.

7. Point-of-sale displays

Shopping habits are changing for the people living in metropolitan cities. People
prefer big retail outlets like Big Bazaar to local kirana stores. Most of the decisions of
buying are taken by the virtue of point-of-sale displays in these retail outlets.

SOME INTERSTING EXAMPLES OF BTL PROMOTION


Most of the big brands are following the suit of BTL promotion because of rising
prices of media based promotion, advertising clutter and increased impulse
purchasing.

Some of the interesting examples are:

Most of the educational institutes like career launcher, Time and PT are holding
informative workshops and free tests for students which give a direct interaction of
these institutes with the target customer and hence a suitable platform to sell
themselves.

Ring tones and music videos on cell phones are helping the entertainment industry to
promote for a music video or a movie for dirt-cheap rate as compared to media
promotion.

Various companies sponsor sport events to promote their brand, but nowadays

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media companies like Hindustan Times are holding weekly events through out the
country in which companies can put up their stalls, display banners and posters and
arrange for some fun activities. These events give the companies a platform at very
low price to promote their brand and increase visibility among target consumer.
These companies also give discount coupons to winners in the games, which in turn
boost the sales of the products and ensure that first time users try these products as
well.

Pepsi organized an inter school cricket event for 425 schools across 14 cities which
did wonders for the company by promoting the brand amongst the right target
customer for almost no cost.

Most of the pharmacy companies do BTL promotion by getting shelf space through
doctors to display their products or by giving away free calcium tablets again through
doctors, knowing that for a patient a personal advise from a doctor would hold more
value as compared to a commercial advertisement.

Another interesting BTL promotion was by NIKE, an athlete dressed up in Nike


sportswear could be seen jogging on an elevated treadmill for the whole day on
National Highway 8, Delhi.

BTL promotions are gaining popularity among all big companies nowadays
considering their effectiveness because of the "individual customer promotion" at a
price, which is much lesser than the normal media promotions.

• Low prices on Wednesday Low prices on Wednesday

• Concept of Big Day Concept of Big Day

• Promotional offers

School Jao Khushi Khushi

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Khushi Ki Barsaat

Happy Father’s Day

Big Bazaar's `junk' swap offer


Big Bazaar is launching a promotional offer from Saturday, with the slogan, "Bring
anything old and take something new".

A press release issued by the company says the customer can bring anything old,
such as newspaper, and get coupons issued in exchange of the junk. The customer
can redeem the coupons before the due date on the condition that he/she shops four
times the value of the coupon.

The prices fixed by Big Bazaar are: clothes (Rs 200 per kg), newspaper (Rs 25 per
kg), plastics/utensils/leather goods (Rs. 75 per kg), footwear/luggage (Rs. 100 per
kg), Pet/beer bottles (Rs 15 per kg), tyres (Rs 50 per kg), furniture (Rs 75 per kg) and
others (Rs 20 per kg).

"This offer will help the housewife clean out the junk while getting a good value for it,"
says Mr Sanjeev Agarwal, President (Marketing), Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

News related big bazaar

Future Group to hive off Big Bazaar

Kishore Biyani-led Future Group is considering hiving-off its hypermarket format Big
Bazaar into a separate company. “Managing a $1 billion business already is a
challenge”, Biyani said speaking to the reporters on Friday, referring to the big
Bazaar format, which is expected to generate revenue of $1 billion in the fiscal 2007-
08. Big Bazaar is a hypermarket format of the Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.
The Group expects to increase its revenues to $7-8 billion by 2011, of which Big
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Bazaar is expected to contribute a large chunk of around $4 billion. It has emerged


as the largest retail format of Future Group's retail division. Biyani said that the
proposal is at a very initial stage and has to be taken to the board. “Currently we
have more than 80 Big Bazaars and we are planning to scale it up to 160 by the year
end”, he said. Highlighting that the company was going to go very aggressive in
rolling out the Big Bazaar format, he said that the total floor area by 2011 would scale
up to 30 million square feet from the present figure of 10 million square feet.
Speaking on the other formats, Biyani said that the group was expecting a revenue of
Rs 1,300 crore from the Home Town stores which the company launched last year.

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Review of Literature

When countries grow, more people buy more things. More products become
available. They need more shelf space. The result: a retail revolution. That’s what’s
happening in India today. A new generation of retail outlets is emerging, which will
change the landscape of the country’s cities.

Introduction
“There is so much fish in the sea. The organized retail will see more segmentation in
the years to come and this will happen as Indians get more and more exposure to
the outside world.”
Kishore Biyani

“The need basket of an average Indian has changed sharply.”


Arvind Singhal
“ To change to the tune of the times one must have the entrepreneurial xing and
think new”
Ayaz Motiwala

Retailing has been defined as business activities involved in selling goods and
services to consumers for their personal, family or household use (Berman and
Evans, 2001).

Although retailing has been around for millennia, the 20th century witnessed a lot of
change in the retail sector, especially in the developed countries. Modern formats
such as department stores, discount stores, supermarkets, convenience stores, fast
food outlets, specialty stores, warehouse retailers and hypermarkets have emerged.

Retailing has become more organized and chain stores have been growing at the
expense of independent shops. The chains are utilizing sophisticated information

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technology and communication to manage their operations and ha ve grown rapidly


not only within their home countries like US, UK, France, Germany and Holland but
to other developed countries. Walmart Stores, the US retailer, was recognized as the
largest firm in terms of sales in 2002 in fortune magazine’s list of 500 largest global
firms. Modern retail formats have also spread beyond developed countries and are
becoming more important in the NICs and developing countries.

There was a study conducted by “Sales & Customer Service Department” of “Texas
Agricultural Extension Service Texas A&M University System College Station,
Texas”. According to this study the researchers find the tips to increase the impulsive
sales of the flowers. The findings of the study were:

Tips for Boosting Impulse Sales:


Creating variety in the department with frequent changes of display and movement of
regularly sold merchandise also entices customers. Recognizing items that typically
make a minimal contribution to sales and replacing them with items that create "sales
appeal" increases the likelihood of impulse sales. Displays that tie in with a national
slogan or storewide theme.

Generate interest, as do displays that highlight special products and services.

Tip 1: use color to create original, eye-catching displays.

Tip 2: use themes to create interest in unusual products and renew interest in
everyday items.

Tip 3: keep undecorated plants available to attract consumers who are buying for
themselves.

Tip 4: create displays that emphasize special products or services.

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Tip 5: change stock and displays often so consumers are drawn into the department
each week.

Tip 6: be flexible enough to change an item or arrangement that isn¹t selling.

Tip 7: have a person on hand to provide information and assistance at all times.

Tip 8: create a friendly, comfortable atmosphere with accessible displays that


encourage browsing.

Tip 9: offer only quality plants and floral arrangements.

Tip 10: situate the department so that customers know where it is and can see it from
most areas of the store.

Since the origin of organized retail itself is very ne win India, there is not enough
literature, which studies the factors that govern consumer choice of retail outlets and
their relative positions. However, studies in the west have found out that though
consumers buy products from the same supermarket in multiple occasions, they are
not 100% loyal i.e., they buy similar products form other outlets in different occasions
(Keng and Ehrenberg, 1984). Although most literature has found out that consumer
choice of retail outlets follow a non-hierarchical process, there are studies
(Fotheringham, 1988) which show that consumer choice may follow a hierarchical
model at times. Most studies have focused on the relation between store choice and
price formats.

Price formats have an impact on store choice. There have been studies which found
out that store choice is also related to perceive ed shopping utility which may depend
on Service Quality (Parking space, friendliness of employees, billing time),
Assortment of products (popular brands), Purchase Flexibility etc. (Tang, Bell and
Ho, 2001) Lastly, unplanned time spend in store and unplanned purchases have

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been found to be linked with factors like perceived quality, variety, specials and value
for money.

Let us now focus on the image of a retail stores and the various methods used for its
measurement. Various definitions about a retail store image have been given by
scholars form time to time. The oldest and most basic one can be credited to
Martineau (1958) who defined a store’s personality as:

“…. the way in which the store is defined in the shopper’s mind; partly by its
functional qualities and partly by an aura of psychological attributes.”

Later on, Oxenfeldt (1974) defined it as:

“…. an image is more than the sum of its parts…..it represents interaction among
characteristics and excludes extraneous elements… It has some emotional
contents… a combination of factual and emotional material.”

A more recent definition is given by Dichter 91985) who also emphasized on the
image being something complete.

“It describes not individual traits or qualities, but the total impression an entity makes
on the minds of others… an image is not anchored in just objective e data and
details. It is the configuration of the whole field of the object.”

All over the world there has been a considerable amount of research to find out retail
store image. However, most of the studies can be divided into three different
categories based on the methodology used which are semantic differential scales,
multidimensional scaling and qualitative techniques.

Most of the research on controllable cues has focused on price, brand name, store
name and level of advertising (Dodds et al., 1991; Rao and Monroe, 1989). However,
the focus has been almost exclusive ely on the perceived price-quality relationship,

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even though it has been demonstrated that the availability of other cues typically
reduces the importance of price as a cue (Bonner and Nelson, 1985; Dodds et al.,
1991). Based on Monroe and Krishnan (1985), a positive relation between the
perceived price and perceived quality can be price-sensitive, it is expected that price
play a very important role in determining the quality of the merchandise. In order to
avoid confounding the price and value constructs, price perceptions were
operationalized as perception of price within the range of known prices of equivalent
products in the product category. Hence it can be posited that: “There exist a positive
relationship between relative price and goods quality.”

Satisfaction with the relationship is regarded as an important outcome of buyer0seller


relationships (Smith and Barclay, 1997). We define relationship satisfaction as “a
consumer’s affective state resulting from an overall appraisal of his relationship with
a retailer” (Anderson and Narus, 1984). In business as well as consumer markets
customers tend to be more satisfied with sellers who make deliberate efforts towards
them. Consequently, we posit the following hypothesis:
“A higher level of customer retention orientation of the retailer leads to a higher level
of relationship satisfaction.”

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

Methodology

A structured questionnaire was used to collect primary data. Convenient random


sample of 33 respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire consisting of closed
ended questions. Respondents were randomly intercepted in the Big Bazaar. Five
point Likert scale was used to record and measure the satisfaction level. Secondary
data has been collected from journals, magazines, internet and other documented
material. Primary data was analyzed using simple percentages, and inferences were
drawn.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

QUESTIONNAIRE
Respected Sir/Madam,
We are the student of Sri SIIM, Vasant Kunj, New Delhi doing a survey on customer services
provided by Big Bazaar, Shanti Kunj, New Delhi.
This Questionnaire is a part of a survey being conducted to understand the services provided by
Big Bazaar to their customers.

Name : Age :
Gender : Male Female
Marital Status : Married Single

Strongly Somewhat Neutral Somewhat


Strongly
Disagree Disagree Agree
Agree
1. This store has modern-looking equipment
and fixtures.

2. Materials associated with this store's


service (such as shopping bags, catalogs,
or statements) are visually appealing.

3. The store layout at this store makes it easy


for customers to find what they need.

4. The store layout at this store makes it easy


for customers to move around the store.

5. This store provides plenty of convenient


parking for customers.

6. Employees in this store have the knowledge


to answer customers' questions.

7. The behavior of employees in this store


instills confidence in customers.

8. Customers feel safe in their transactions


with this store.

9. Employees in this store give prompt


service to customers.

10. When a customer has a problem, this store


shows a sincere interest in solving it.

11. This store gives customers individual


attention.

12. Employees in this store are consistently


courteous with customers.

13. Employees of this store are able to


handle customer complaints directly
and immediately.

14. This store offers high quality merchandise.

15. This store accepts most major credit cards.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

Data Analysis

1 This store has modern-looking equipment


and fixtures.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
6.06 9.09
Disagree
Neutral 3.03 12.12
Somewhat
24.24 36.36
Agree
Strongly Agree 63.64 100
100

Interpretation:

As per the concern about the above chart it is clear that more than 4/5th part of the
respondent are strongly agree or somewhat agree that this store has modern-looking
equipment and fixtures. And approximately half of the one part are neutral or
disagree about the fact that this store has modern-looking equipment and fixture.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

2. Materials associated with this store's


service (such as shopping bags, catalogs,
or statements) are visually appealing.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
0 0
Disagree
Somewhat
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Neutral 33.33 36.36
Somewhat
39.4 75.76
Agree
Strongly Agree 24.24 100
100

Interpretation:

This pie chart shows that more than 3/5th part of the respondent are strongly agree or
somewhat agree that material associated with this store’s service (such as shopping
bags, catalogs, or statements) are visually appealing. And 2/5 th part of the
respondent has neutral or negative thought.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

3. The store layout at this store makes it easy


for customers to find what they need.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
9.09 12.12
Disagree
Neutral 6.06 18.18
Somewhat
51.52 69.7
Agree
Strongly Agree 30.3 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that maximum no. of customers (more than 4/5th) are satisfied with
the store layout and they find it according to their need but there are very few
customers who are not satisfied with the store layout at this store.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

4 The store layout at this store makes it easy


for customers to move around the store.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
9.09 12.12
Disagree
Neutral 3.03 15.15
Somewhat
63.64 78.79
Agree
Strongly Agree 21.21 100
100

Interpretation:

According to above pie chart this is clear that maximum no. of customers who find
proper space in this store to move around but not so much. But some of them find
that the particular outlet has enough space to move around and they can find every
product easily.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

5 This store provides plenty of convenient


parking for customers.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
12.12 12.12
Disagree
Somewhat
27.28 39.4
Disagree
Neutral 9.09 48.49
Somewhat
21.21 69.7
Agree
Strongly Agree 30.3 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that more than there are maximum no. of customer who are
satisfied with the fact that this store provides plenty of convenient parking for
customers and approximately half of the respondent has neutral or negative think
about it.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

6. Employees in this store have the knowledge


to answer customers' questions.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
6.06 6.06
Disagree
Somewhat
6.06 12.12
Disagree
Neutral 24.24 36.36
Somewhat
54.55 90.91
Agree
Strongly Agree 9.09 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that there are more than 60% respondent who are agree that
employees in this store have knowledge to give answer to the customer’s questions.
And about 1/3rd of the respondent are disagree or has neutral thought.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

7. The behavior of employees in this store


instills confidence in customers.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
0 0
Disagree
Somewhat
15.15 15.15
Disagree
Neutral 9.09 24.24
Somewhat
45.46 69.7
Agree
Strongly Agree 30.3 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that there is maximum no. of customers who are happy with the
behavior of the employees of the store but not so much as sometimes the response
of the employees doesn’t come according to their expectation. There are some
customers who are happy with the behavior of employees in the store.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

8. Customers feel safe in their transactions


with this store.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
3.03 6.06
Disagree
Neutral 3.03 9.09
Somewhat
27.27 36.36
Agree
Strongly Agree 63.64 100
100

Interpretation:

According to the above pie chart it is very clear that the customers who visit the store
they feel safe in transaction. There are some customers who feel safe but sometimes
they don’t feel safe. Thus the customer who are approaching this particular are
satisfied with the financial transactions which the people coming out to this particular
store feels comfortable.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

9. Employees in this store give prompt


service to customers.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
9.09 12.12
Disagree
Neutral 6.06 18.18
Somewhat
48.48 66.66
Agree
Strongly Agree 33.34 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that most of the customers are satisfied with the services which
are provided by the employees of this store immediately what they want but
sometimes they don’t get the service on time due to the lack of availability of the
products or some other reasons. But many of the customers always get the service
on time according to their need.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

10. When a customer has a problem, this store


shows a sincere interest in solving it.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
0 0
Disagree
Somewhat
30.3 30.3
Disagree
Neutral 12.12 42.42
Somewhat
36.37 78.79
Agree
Strongly Agree 21.21 100
100

Interpretation:

This pie chart shows that many of the customers get the answers of their problems
quickly but sometimes they don’t get the answers properly as the employees don’t
show high interest in solving their problems due to more no. of customers. There are
also some customers who are not often satisfied with their problem’s solutions.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

11. This store gives customers individual


attention.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
12.12 12.12
Disagree
Somewhat
24.24 36.36
Disagree
Neutral 18.18 44.44
Somewhat
36.37 80.81
Agree
Strongly Agree 9.09 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that the employees of the store give attention to the customers
individually and most of the customers are satisfied with the behavior and attention of
the employees of the store to, but sometimes it becomes impossible for employees
to give attention to every individual customer and some of them customers are not
satisfied with the service delivered by the employees. Thus one should give the
customer the required attention.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

12. Employees in this store are consistently


courteous with customers.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
0 0
Disagree
Somewhat
18.18 18.18
Disagree
Neutral 12.12 30.3
Somewhat
54.55 84.85
Agree
Strongly Agree 15.15 100
100

Interpretation:

The above pie chart shows that most of the customers feel that the employees in this
store are consistently involved with them but not much. Some customers are not
satisfied to some extent but there are some customers who visit the store whenever
they find that the employees are not courteous with them and they are not satisfied
with the employees of the store. Thus we can say that the employees in this store
are courteous as required in the store to prosper.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

13. Employees of this store are able to


handle customer complaints directly
and immediately.
Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
24.24 27.27
Disagree
Neutral 12.12 39.39
Somewhat
18.18 57.57
Agree
Strongly Agree 42.43 100
100

Interpretation:

This graph shows that maximum customers who visit the store they always get the
solution of their problems directly and immediately by the employees in the store, but
there are some customers who visit the store they don’t get the solution of their
problems according to their expectation.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

14. This store offers high quality merchandise.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
0 0
Disagree
Somewhat
9.09 9.09
Disagree
Neutral 6.06 15.15
Somewhat
30.3 45.45
Agree
Strongly Agree 54.55 100
100

Interpretation:

The above pie chart shows that maximum no. of customer are satisfied with the
merchandising of the particular store as they find every product of every brand
offering a high end quality merchandise. The effect of this merchandise had created
a important impact on the stores efficiency.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

15. This store accepts most major credit cards.

Cumulative
Percentage
Percentage
Strongly
3.03 3.03
Disagree
Somewhat
0 3.03
Disagree
Neutral 24.24 27.27
Somewhat
9.09 36.36
Agree
Strongly Agree 63.64 100
100

Interpretation:

The above graph shows that maximum no. of customers use their credit cards in this
store for transaction to get the services. But there are some customers who don’t use
credit cards, as they get the service in the store by cash so they have no knowledge
or interest.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

CONCLUSION

 There are many who are satisfied with the modern looking equipments and
fixtures but there are 1/4th customers who are not much satisfied .There are
many customers who agree with the materials provided by outlet.
 There are 2/4th customers who don’t find everything in the particular outlet
always but more than 1/4th customers always find everything in the store.
 There are many customers who find the proper space in the outlet to move
and most of the customers are satisfied with the parking facility.
 There are many customers who are satisfied with the answers of the
employees regarding their problems and there are not much satisfied with the
behavior of employees.
 There are maximum customers who are highly satisfied with their transaction
in the store but sometimes they find some faults. There are customers who
agree that employees in the store give prompt services but there are many
customers who are not happy with the services provided by the store.
 There are many customers who find the individual attention of the employees
but sometimes they are not satisfied with the services and the behavior of the
employees in the store.
 There are maximum customers who are satisfied with the merchandising of
the store and they find every product of brand every b in each category and
shelf according to their choices.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

RECOMMENDATIONS
• The materials like shopping bags, catalogues etc. are appealing to attract
the customers but some others materials as new offers ,free samples of
new products should be added this series to attract the customers.
• The store should increase its product line and for this it should contact to
many distributors so they can provide a huge amount of products so that
they can find every product according to their need.
• The space should be increased in the store for the customers to move to
find every products of their choice. The employees should be trained in this
way so that they can answer the questions of the customers regarding
their problems in services efficiently.

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SRI SHARADA INSTITUTE OF INDIAN MANAGEMENT-RESEARCH

REFERENCES
http://www.managementparadise.com/forum/index1.php/t-42178.html

http://www.managementparadise.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-25624.html

http://www.scribd.com/doc/5994975/consumer-behaviour-on-impulse-buying?
autodown=pdf

http://www.scribd.com/doc/4905033/A-project-on-Store-Operation-of-Big-Bazaar?
autodown=pdf

The Icfai Journal of Marketing Management, Vol. VI, No. 1, Feb 2007

The Icfai Journal of Services Management, Vol. IV, No. 1, March 2007

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