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MENINGITIES

Jaya Lingam

I N T RO D U C T I O N M E N I N G I T I S
Awareness
Review Evidence Based Research
Enhance Nursing Care

S U M M A RY O F T H E P R E S E N TAT I O N
Describe Meningitis
Summarize Research
TRUEPIC care plan
Collaboration and Advocate

WHAT IS MENINGITIS
Types of Meningitis
Bacterial, Viral, Fungal, Parasitic, &
Non-Infectious Meningitis.

Signs & Symptoms

E V I D E N C E BA S E D R E S E A RC H
Meningococcal meningitis prevention programs for college Students
A Review of the literature
Nursing theory-- Dorothea Orem's Self-Care Theory

R E S E A R C H M E T H O D S & R E S U LT S
A review of the literature

Studies could not be

Systematic reviews

compared

electronic database and hand

Study had lack of detail

searched for articles

Different in health care

Inclusion and exclusion

structure in the United Kingdom

criteria

Interventions and outcomes

Data extraction and syntheses

were not clearly identified.

LIMITATION & CRITIQUE


Health care difference in the

Worldviews on evidence

United Kingdom

based nursing

Potential bias in the review

Review of the literature

Limited publications on

Further research

prevention programs

C O L L A B O R A T I O N O F PA T I E N T C A R E

Nurse
Patient
Family
Interdisciplinary team
Public Health Department
Health department in college/universities

TRUEPIC

A 19-year-old female freshman college student, lives in the dorm. presents to


the emergency department with a 24-hour history of chills and a stiff neck. On
clinical examination, she is afebrile and has normal mental status. she can flex
her neck although s she complains of pain over her cervical spine when doing so
and also has severe headache, nausea and vomiting. Kernig and Brudzinski signs
are absent. Pt has no hx of previous illness

1. IDENTIFY

2. RELATE

19 year old female


24 hr. hx of chills and stiff neck.
Pt is Afebrile, normal mental status.
Pt has nausea vomiting and severe
headache. Kernig and Brudzinski
sign are absent

Primary Proposition: Patient has risk factors


associated with bacterial meningitis
Possible Assumptions: Patient is aware of
her condition.
Possible confounding Variables: Patient will
be given immediate treatment and education
due about treatment plan and about bacterial
meningitis.

TRUEPIC
3. UNDERSTAND
Primary: since the patient is
aware of her condition which will
aid in speeding up her treatment.
Assumptions: if the patient is
unaware of the effects of meningitis,
she will unintentionally slow the
treatment process which will lead to
possible negative patient outcomes.
Confounding Variables: Patient
is aware of her condition and is
ready for treatment. .

CONTINUED

4. EXPLAIN

Proposition: Explain to the patient that the


test results and treatments. Appropriately
begin patient education of risk factors for
meningitis medication and rehabilitation
therapies if needed .
Assumptions: Explain the benefits of
treatment and recovery time. explain that the
benefits of the treatment should help
prevent another meningitis attack from
occurring.
Confounding Variables: Explain to the
patient that you will be providing care and
meet all her needs during treatment.

TRUEPIC
5. PREDICT

CONTINUED

6. INFLUENCE

Proposition: educate the patient the importance of


Proposition: the patient is
treatment and taking medication. Include family
understands the disease and is
member in treatment and education on meningitis
ready for treatment.
Assumptions: make sure that the patient
Assumptions: with
understands the treatment and risk factors associated
patients understanding about
with the disease.
the disease the treatment plan
Confounding Variables: the patient understands
will be carried on with delay .
the treatment plan and the risk factors associated
Confounding Variables:
with the disease
the patient understand her risk
7. CONTROL
and the disease process
Patient will understand her diagnosis, prognosis, and treatments
or therapies before discharge

N URSIN G D IAG N OSIS A N D A DVOCACY

Acute Pain related to nuchal


rigidity, muscle aches, immobility

Advocate

and increased sensitivity to external

Quality care

stimuli secondary to infectious

Individualized care

process

Improving positive outcomes

Anxiety related to treatment and

risk of death

Educate

REFERENCES
Butler, K. M (2006). Meningococcal meningitis prevention program for college
students: A review of the literature. Worldviews on Evidence- Base Nursing, fourth
quarter, 185-193.

Current Nursing (2012). Nursing Theories: Florence NightingaleEnvironmental


Theory
http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/theories_community_health_nursing.html
Watkins, J. (2012). Recognizing the signs and symptoms of meningitis. British

Journal Of School Nursing, 7(10), 481-483.