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Unit: Poetry: America Speaks (32 Instructional Days)

Grade: 7
Subject: ELA
Duration: 32 Instructional Days
Designer: Scholastic Codex II, Modified by Emily Giblin, Francesca Lathourakis, Mary Beth Morrison & Rebecca Krauss
Unit Question: How can we identify, analyze and explain figurative language?
Rationale: In social studies, students will learn that the country is blooming. It is on the verge of a war with England and soon the concepts of
America as a free nation and Americans as its people will spark a question in people: What does it mean to be American? Students will
explore this theme in poetry. Figurative language is most obvious in poetry but carries over into literature and some non-fiction. In an effort to
better equip students with the critical thinking skills to decipher those texts, students will have an in depth study of different kinds of figurative
language and how to analyze that language.
Stage 1 Desired Results:
Established Goals
Transfer Goals
Common Core
Students will be able to independently use their learning to
Learning
Standards
ELA
Paraphrase and explain key concepts in writing and speaking
CCLS
Cite specific details from the text
1. Cite several pieces of textual
Begin annotating a piece of nonfiction using underlining, note taking and questioning
evidence to support analysis of
Begin closed reading by summarizing on demand with a focus on central idea
what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from
Begin participating in reciprocal reading
the text.
2. Determine a theme or central
idea of a text and analyze its
development over the course of
the text; provide an objective
summary of the text.
3. Analyze how particular
elements of a story or drama
interact (e.g., how setting
shapes the characters or plot).
4. Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they are
used in a text, including
figurative and connotative

WORD GEN
Use academic language in writing and oral response
UNDERSTANDINGS:
Students will understand that
1.

2.

7.1 The physical environment and natural


resources of North America influenced the
development of the first human settlements and
the culture of Native Americans. Native American
societies varied across North America.
7.2 COLONIAL DEVELOPMENTS: European

Meaning
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Students will be considering

How did the environment impact the Native Americans?

Why did Europeans travel to the New World?

How did Native American groups compare and differ?

How did Native American groups decline?

How did technology impact colonization?

meanings; analyze the impact


of rhymes and other repetitions
of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on
a specific verse or stanza of a
poem or section of a story or
drama.
5. Analyze how a dramas or
poems form or structure (e.g.,
soliloquy, sonnet) contributes
to its meaning.

3.

6. Analyze how an author


develops and contrasts the
points of view of different
characters or narrators in a text.

4.
5.
6.

10. By the end of the year,


read and comprehend literature,
including stories, dramas, and
poems, in the grades 68 text
complexity band proficiently,
with scaffolding as needed at
the high end of the range

7.
8.

exploration of the New World resulted in various


interactions with Native Americans and in
colonization. The American colonies were
established for a variety of reasons and developed
differently based on economic, social, and
geographic factors. Colonial America had a variety
of social structures under which not all people
were treated equally.
That citing textual evidence is pulling direct
information from a text
That information can be both explicit and implicit
A claim is a stance that is informed and proven by
evidence
A central idea is what the text is mainly about and
how to find it (paragraph for closed reading or
whole text)
How to summarize and explain key details
How to analyze documents using APPARTS & RATS

1. Write arguments to support


claims with clear reasons and
relevant evidence.

4. Produce clear and coherent


writing in which the
development, organization and
style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience.
5. With some guidance and

How did slavery develop in the New World?

How did different settlements grow and overcome obstacles?

How do we create a claim?

How do we support a claim?

How do we annotate a text?

How do we develop a summary?

How do we determine a central idea?

How do we determine the difference between explicit and


implicit?

How can we explain a concept by citing information and


explaining in our own words?

How can we locate and use relevant information?

How can we cite evidence to support critical thinking questions?

How can we use questioning and summarizing to better


understand a text?

NYSCCLS: English Language


Arts 6-12, NYS: 7th Grade,
Writing

2. Write
informative/explanatory texts
to examine a topic and convey
ideas, concepts, and
information through the
selection, organization, and
analysis of relevant content.

How can we analyze a document using the APPARTS strategy?

How do we create a short response using the RATS strategy?

How can understanding our data and developing self-assessment


make us stronger learners?

KNOWLEDGE:
Students will know that

How do we begin generating inferences based on annotations?

How do we edit for ourselves and for others?

How do we publish our work?

Acquisition of Knowledge
SKILLS:
Students will be skilled at

support from peers and adults,


develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning,
revising, editing, rewriting, or
trying a new approach,
focusing on how well purpose
and audience have been
addressed.
6. Use technology, including
the Internet, to produce and
publish writing and link to and
cite sources as well as to
interact and collaborate with
others, including linking to and
citing sources.
9. Draw evidence from literary
or informational texts to
support analysis, reflection, and
research.
10. Write routinely over
extended time frames (time for
research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time
frames (a single sitting or a day
or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks,
purposes, and audiences
NYSCCLS: English Language
Arts 6-12, NYS: 7th Grade,
Language
1. Demonstrate command of
the conventions of standard
English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
2. Demonstrate command of
the conventions of standard
English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when
writing
4. Determine or clarify the
meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 7
reading and content, choosing

flexibly from a range of


strategies.
5. Demonstrate understanding
of figurative language, word
relationships, and nuances in
word meanings.
6. Acquire and use accurately
grade-appropriate general
academic and domain-specific
words and phrases; gather
vocabulary knowledge when
considering a word or phrase
important to comprehension or
expression.
NYSCCSLS: English
Language Arts 6-12, NYS: 7th
Grade, Speaking & Listening
1. Engage effectively in a range
of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on
grade 7 topics, texts, and issues,
building on others ideas and
expressing their own clearly.

2. Analyze the main ideas and


supporting details presented in
diverse media and formats
(e.g., visually, quantitatively,
orally) and explain how the
ideas clarify a topic, text, or
issue under study
5. Include multimedia
components and visual displays
in presentations to clarify
claims and findings and
emphasize salient points.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of
contexts and tasks,
demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated
or appropriate. (See grade 7
Language standards 1 and 3 on
page 66 for specific

expectations.)

Stage 2 Evidence:
Evaluative Criteria
Coding

Students will show learning by


CULMINATING TASKS:

M/T
After analyzing different pieces of American literature, students will create a piece of compare and contrast writing regarding authors ideas
of what it means to be an American.
T
Extensions & Modifications:
Below level students will be supported with level appropriate texts to analyze and scaffolds to aid in the creation of their writing piece.
Students may use graphic organizers and sentence starters to support their writing.
Students may write their own vision of what it means to be American using current events and current lyrics/ poetry.
PERFORMANCE TASKS:
-

Closed reading & short response to one of the American poems: How does the author feel about being American?
Creation of own poems using a similar style as one of the selected poets

1.

Discussion Prompts

2.

Word Gen Activities

3.

Exit Slips Students will answer literal, inferential and analytical questions based on class reading.

4.

Daily Do Now Students will respond to writing prompts that preview, review or ask critical thinking questions.

5.

Double Entry Journals Students will practice writing observations and reactions

6.

The Writing Process Students will be monitored and graded for their class work based on their brainstorming, research, drafts
and final assessments

Formative Assessments:
7.
8.

Closed Reading of the poems I Hear America Singing, I, too and I,Too, Sing America
Closed reading of a passage from Kira-Kira:

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

Discussion on what it means to be American


Poem analysis practice with various poems
Creation of a poem using different literary devices and figurative language
Analysis of compare and contrast statements/ sentence starters
Use of Hochman Quick Outline to organize Compare and Contrast Writing
Use of Hochman Multiple Paragraph Outline to organize Culminating Task
In class Poetry Slam with feedback and listeners rubric/ reflection
Exquisite Corpse writing game using figurative language
Tone analysis using lyrics and poetry
Connotation/ Denotation using lyrics and poetry
Stage 3 Learning Plan:
Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction
PRE-ASSESSMENT:

Coding
M
M/T
A

DRP
Reading Comprehension
Word Gen
Previous Performance Tasks
LEARNING EVENTS

Introduce Essential Questions as well as the final task and rubrics.

Review and develop note taking strategies for annotation

Practice finding central idea

Look up unfamiliar vocabulary and show all word forms


Guided reading of articles
Use technology to research
Use organizers to organize evidence and generate claims
Four corners debates
Use RATS to draft body paragraphs
Use APPARTS to analyze documents
Begin discussing creating counterclaims
In class debate using an archeological arguments
Reflection and feedback on unit of study
Daily discussion prompts
Performance tasks (short response, brochure, debate etc.)
Word Gen lessons

PROGRESS MONITORING:

Teacher will circulate the room to check for


understanding during small group
discussions.
Teacher will ask for exit slips that will
generate a spreadsheet that checks for
understanding.
Teacher will analyze progress with writing
prompts.
Students will receive a rubric when the
end-of-the-unit projects are introduced and
use those to guide their writing and
reflecting.
Teacher will listen during small group and
large group debates and discussions for
understanding.
Teacher will ask probing questions to

Annotate poems for central idea, summarizing, questioning, explic


it/implicit information, authors purpose, inferencing
Creation of poems
Gallery walk of finished pieces
Compare/contrast writing piece
Poetry Slam
Daily Do Now Students will respond to writing prompts that pre
view, review or ask critical thinking questions.
Double Entry Journals Students will practice writing observatio
ns and reactions
The Writing Process Students will be monitored and graded for t
heir class work based on their brainstorming, research, drafts and
final assessments
Closed Reading of the poems I Hear America Singing, I, too and
I,Too, Sing America
Closed reading of a passage from Kira-Kira:
Discussion on what it means to be American
Poem analysis practice with various poems
Creation of a poem using different literary devices and figurative lang
uage
Analysis of compare and contrast statements/ sentence starters
Use of Hochman Quick Outline to organize Compare and Contrast Wr
iting
Use of Hochman Multiple Paragraph Outline to organize Culminating
Task
Exquisite Corpse writing game using figurative language
Tone analysis using lyrics and poetry
Connotation/ Denotation using lyrics and poetry

assess understanding
Teacher will ask students to self assess
using the rubric
Teacher will conference with students and
provide feedback

Modifications

Extended time requirements


Assign peer buddies
Google translate/Bilingual dictionaries for ELL students
Use individual/small group instruction to target needs
Provide writing prompts for daily writing entries
Use graphic organizers for brainstorming and drafting
Unit specific/High frequency word wall
Use of technology for kinesthetic and visual learners
Differentiated, creative assessment
Leveled Argumentative Essay assignment
Differentiated articles on readiness
Differentiated graphic organizers based on skill
Strategic groupings based on skill gaps
Discussion strategies for ELL learners

PACING CALENDAR
Day

EQ

Objective

AIM

Task

ELA: How can


understanding our data
and developing selfassessment make us
stronger learners?

ELA: SWBAT
measure their
application of
reading skills by
taking a reading
preassessment.

ELA: How can assess our


reading skill abilities so
that we can improve them
throughout the year?

ELA: Students will


complete preassessment of
their reading skills.

SS: SWBAT create a


short response
about the origins of
their families by
using a graphic
organizer and
question prompts.

SS: Why do people move


from their lands of origin?

ELA: SWBAT
measure their
application of
writing skills by
taking a reading
preassessment.

ELA: How can assess our


writing skill abilities so that
we can improve them
throughout the year?

SS: Why did Europeans


travel to the new
world?

ELA: How can


understanding our data
and developing selfassessment make us
stronger learners?
SS: How did the
environment impact
the Native Americans?

ELA: How can


understanding our data
and developing selfassessment make us
stronger learners?

SS: How did Native


American groups
compare and differ?

SS: SWBAT explain


how the
environment
impacted the lives
of Native
Americans through
discussion and
short response.
ELA: SWBAT assess
their learning style
by taking an
inventory and
reflecting on its
results and
indications.
SS: SWBAT
compare and
contrast different
Native American

SS: How does ones


environment impact his or
her life?

ELA: How can our different


characteristics impact our
learning?

SS: How do different Native


American tribes compare
and differ?

SS: Write a short response


on the origins of their
family.

ELA: Students will


complete preassessment of
their writing skills.
SS: Begin using reciprocal
reading strategies or
annotation strategies to
read and then discuss facts
on the Native Americans.

ELA: Students will


complete their multiple
intelligence surveys and
begin reading about the
Salem Witch Trials using
differentiated graphic
organizers.
SS: Begin using reciprocal
reading strategies or
annotation strategies to
read and then discuss facts

tribes by reading
information and
completing a
graphic organizer.
4

ELA: How do we
determine a central
idea?

SS: How did Native


American groups
decline?

ELA: SWBAT
explain the central
idea of a nonfiction
text by identifying
the texts most
important features.

on the Native Americans.

ELA: How can we explain


the central idea?

SS: Why did the Native


Americans decline?

SS: Cite evidence using


different strategies to
answer critical thinking
questions regarding Native
American decline.

SS: SWBAT explain


through discussion
and short response
the decline of
Native Americans
by citing evidence
in discussion.
5

ELA: How do we
determine a central
idea?
SS: How did technology
impact colonization?

ELA: SWBAT
explain the central
idea of a nonfiction
text by looking at
the most important
details and
analyzing the
authors message.

ELA: Students will begin


generating central ideas
based on nonfiction articles
by citing evidence and
filling out a graphic
organizer.

ELA: How can we find the


central idea by locating the
most important details?

SS: How did technology


impact colonization?

ELA: Students will begin


generating central ideas
based on nonfiction
articles.
SS: Cite evidence using
different strategies to
answer critical thinking
questions regarding
colonization.

SS: SWBAT explain


through discussion
and short response
the impact of
technology on
colonization.
6

ELA: How can we use


questioning and
summarizing to better
understand a text?
SS: How can we analyze
a document using the
APPARTS strategy?

ELA: SWBAT use


reciprocal reading
to generate
questions and
begin summarizing
nonfiction texts.

ELA: How can we use


reciprocal reading to better
understand a non-fiction
text?

SS: SWBAT analyze


a document by

SS: How can we analyze


documents by reflecting on
the details of the

ELA: Students will begin


using reciprocal reading
strategies to generate
questions and to begin
summarizing.
SS: Use APPARTS to
complete a document
analysis

ELA: How can we use


questioning and
summarizing to better
understand a text?
SS: How can we analyze
a document using the
APPARTS strategy

using the APPARTS


strategy and
focusing on the
details of the
document.

document?

ELA: SWBAT use


the reciprocal
reading strategy to
pose thoughtful
questions and
generate a
summary of the
text.

ELA: How can questions


and summaries deepen our
understanding of the text?

ELA: ELA: Students will


begin using reciprocal
reading strategies to
generate questions and to
begin summarizing.

SS: How can we use


APPARTS to determine the
authors purpose and
significance of a document?

SS: Use APPARTS to


complete a document
analysis

ELA: How can we create a


summary using a graphic
organizer?

ELA: Students will begin


using the Hochman
summarizing organizer to
begin summarizing facts on
the colonists.

SS: How can we use RATS


to create a short response
for our DBQs?

SS: Practice using RATS in a


short response using a
graphic organizer

ELA: How can we create a


summary using a graphic
organizer?

ELA: Students will begin


using the Hochman
summarizing organizer to
gather facts on the
colonists.

SS: How can we use RATS


to create a short response
for our DBQs?

SS: Complete a short


response using RATS based
on document analysis.

SS: SWBAT analyze


a document by
using APPARTS
and determining
the authors
purpose and
overall significance
of the document.
8

ELA: How do we
develop a summary?

SS: How do we create a


short response using
the RATS strategy?

ELA: SWBAT create


a summary by
using the Hochman
summary graphic
organizer after
reading a
nonfiction text.
SS:

ELA: How do we
develop a summary?

SS: How do we create a


short response using
the RATS strategy?

ELA: SWBAT create


a summary by
using the Hochman
summary graphic
organizer after
reading a
nonfiction text.

SS: SWBAT create a


short response by
using the RATS

strategy after
analyzing a
document.
10

ELA: How can we begin


generating inferences
based on annotations?

SS: How can


understanding our data
and developing selfassessment make us
stronger learners?

11

ELA: How can we begin


generating inferences
based on annotations?

SS: How can


understanding our data
and developing selfassessment make us
stronger learners?

12

ELA: How can we begin


generating inferences
based on annotations?

SS: How can we begin


generating inferences
based on annotations?

13

ELA: How do we
explain authors

ELA: SWBAT create


an inference by
first identifying the
relevant
information and
prior knowledge.

SS: SWBAT their


apply their
understandings of
Social Studies t
complete a Pre
Assessment.
ELA: SWBAT create
an inference by
combining prior
knowledge and
textual evidence.

SS: SWBAT their


apply their
understandings of
Social Studies t
complete a MoSL.
ELA: SWBAT create
an inference by
combining prior
knowledge and
textual evidence.

SS: SWBAT create


an inference by
combining prior
knowledge and
textual evidence.
ELA: SWBAT
explain authors

ELA: How can we


determine what evidence is
relevant and what is
irrelevant?

SS: How can we apply our


knowledge of social studies
to complete our Pre
Assessment?

ELA: How can we use prior


knowledge and textual
evidence to create an
inference?

ELA: Students will begin


identifying and explaining
inferences based on textual
evidence through
annotation.

SS: How can we apply our


knowledge of social studies
to complete our MoSL?

ELA: How can we use prior


knowledge and textual
evidence to create an
inference?

ELA: Students will begin


identifying and explaining
inferences based on textual
evidence through
annotation.

SS: How can we use prior


knowledge and textual
evidence to create an
inference?

ELA: How do a texts


features and structures

ELA: Students will begin


identifying and explaining

purpose using
annotations?

purpose by
examining the
features and
structure of a text.

SS: How do we
annotate a text?

indicate the authors


purpose?

authors point of view


based on textual evidence
through annotation.

SS: How can we annotate by


asking ourselves questions?
SS: SWBAT
annotate a
nonfiction text
posing thought
questions while
they read.

14
15

Students will explain and


practice identifying
relevant pieces of
information from a text.

16

Students will practice


citations by answering
critical thinking questions
about a particular poem.

17

Students will organize their


analytical essay by using a
graphic organizer to isolate
relevant pieces of
information.

18

Students will outline their


analytical essay using
various graphic organizers.

19

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on body
paragraphs.

20

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on body
paragraphs.

21

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on body
paragraphs.

22

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on body
paragraphs.

23

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on
introductory paragraphs.

24

Students will draft their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
with a focus on concluding
paragraphs.

25

Students will revise their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems.

26

Students will revise each


others analytical essays on
America Speaks poems.

27

Students will edit their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems
using checklists.

28

Students will publish their


analytical essays on the
America Speaks poems.

29

Students will create their


own poems using selected
literary devices.

30

Students will create their


own poems using selected

literary devices.
31

Students will create their


own American Speaks
poem.

32

Students will participate in


a poetry slam where they
will recite their poems
about what it means to be
an American and their
poets choice poem.

Legend:
EQ: A question to consider over time that leads to deeper understandings.
Objective: The heart of the lesson; what students will do and how they will do it. (SEE TLaC 4 Ms)
It should be measureable, manageable, made first and most important.
Aim: What you want students to answer by the end of the lesson
Task: What you want students to accomplish and complete by the end of the lesson (should build
toward culminating task).