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Important Russian Art

Monday 24 November 2014

IFC2

PROPERTIES FROM

Property from The Conservatoire Russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff

Property from The Municipality of Ramat Gan sold to benefit The Ramat Gan Museums

Property from the Collection of Anthony Hail and Charles Posey

Property from The Descendants of Grand Duke George Mikhailovich

Property offered by The Descendants of Lieutenant-General Alexander Alexandrovich Leslie

Property from The Royal House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha

Important Russian Art

Monday 24 November 2014

AUCTION

Monday 24 November 2014 at 10.30 am (Lots 1-147) and 2.00 pm (Lots 201-477)

8 King Street, St. James’s London SW1Y 6QT

VIEWING

Friday

21 November

9.ooam - 4.30pm

Saturday

22 November

12 noon - 5.00pm

Sunday

23 November

12 noon - 5.00pm

AUCTIONEERS

James Bruce-Gardyne and James Hastie

AUCTION CODE AND NUMBER

In sending absentee bids or making enquiries, this sale should be referred

to as DOODLE-1571

AUCTION RESULTS

UK: +44 20 7839 9060 US: +1 212 703 8080

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CONDITIONS OF SALE

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Contents

2

Calendar of Auctions

3

Auction Information

6

Christie’s International Russian Department

7

Specialists and Services for this Auction

10

Property for Sale

320

Important Notices and Explanation of Cataloguing Practice

322

Buying at Christie’s

324

Storage and Collection

326

Conditions of Sale and Limited Warranty

320

Salerooms and Offices Worldwide

321

Christie’s Specialist Departments and Services

341

Absentee Bids Form

342

Catalogue Subscriptions

IBC

Index

front

cover :

Lot 15 (detail)

inside

Lot 412

page

Lot 38

page

Lot 373

opposite

front

one :

two

and

title

cover :

three :

page :

Lot 16 (detail)

opposite :

Lots 206-243

inside

back

Lot 34 (detail)

cover :

back

Lot 205

cover :

christies.com

InternatIonal r ussIan a rt D epartment

CO-CHAIRMAN

(Auction) Nicholas H. J. Hall Tel: +1 212 636 2122

CO-CHAIRMAN

(Private Sales) Richard Knight Tel: +44 20 7389 2159

INTERNATIONAL MANAGING DIRECTOR

Karl Hermanns Tel: +44 207 389 2425

WORLDWIDE SPECIALISTS

International Head of Department Alexis de Tiesenhausen Tel: +44 20 7389 2605

London Sarah Mansfeld Evelyn Heathcoat Amory Helen Culver Smith Aleksandra Babenko Margaryta Oganesian Tel: +44 20 7389 2210

New York Izabela Grocholski Mark Moehrke Tel: +1 212 468 7168

Paris Nicolas Kaenzig Tel: +33 1 40 76 84 03

CONSULTANTS

Anthony Phillips (International Consultant) Dr Valentin V. Skurlov (Fabergé Research Consultant) Sergey B. Patrikeev (Russian Militaria Consultant)

BUSINESS DIRECTORS

Private Sales Alexandra Baker Tel: +44 20 7389 2521

Americas Laryssa Zalisko Tel: +1 212 974 4469

London King Street Anthea Peers Tel: +44 20 7389 2124

InternatIonal r ussIan a rt a uctIons

24 NOVEMBER 2014 IMPORTANT RUSSIAN ART LONDON, KING STREET

Email. First initial followed by last name@christies.com (eg. Sarah Mansfield = smansfield@christies.com)

COPYRIGHT NOTICE No part of this catalogue may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Christie’s. © COPYRIGHT, CHRISTIE, MANSON & WOODS LTD. (2014)

13/10/14

Specialists and Services for this Auction

Специа листы и п р едст а вители отделов, п риним а ющих уча стие в то ргах

иним а ющих уч а стие в то рга х Alexis de Tiesenhausen Sarah Mansfeld Izabela
иним а ющих уч а стие в то рга х Alexis de Tiesenhausen Sarah Mansfeld Izabela
иним а ющих уч а стие в то рга х Alexis de Tiesenhausen Sarah Mansfeld Izabela
иним а ющих уч а стие в то рга х Alexis de Tiesenhausen Sarah Mansfeld Izabela

Alexis de Tiesenhausen

Sarah Mansfeld

Izabela Grocholski

Mark Moehrke

Алексей Тизенгаузен

С

ара М энсфилд

Из а белл а Гр охольски

Мар к М ер ке

International Director

Head of Department, London

Head of Department, New York

Director of Works of Art, London & New York

SPECIALISTS

London Alexis de Tiesenhausen Алексей Тизен гаузен Tel: +44 20 7389 2605

Sarah Mansfeld С ара М энсфилд Tel: +44 20 7389 2927

Evelyn Heathcoat Amory Ивелин Хитко ат Амо ри Tel: +44 20 7389 2130

Helen Culver Smith Хелен Кулвер -Смит Tel: +44 20 7389 2662

Aleksandra Babenko Алекс а нд ра Б а бенко Tel: +44 20 7389 2489

Margaryta Oganesian Маргарит а О га несян Tel: +44 20 7389 2783

ит а О га несян Tel: +44 20 7389 2783 Evelyn Heathcoat Amory Ивелин Хитко а

Evelyn Heathcoat Amory Ивелин Хиткоа т Амо р и Co-Head of Sale, London

Хитко а т Амо р и Co-Head of Sale, London Helen Culver Smith Хелен Кулве р

Helen Culver Smith Хелен Кулве р -Смит Co-Head of Sale, London

Кулве р -Смит Co-Head of Sale, London Nicolas Kaenzig Николя К а энзи г

Nicolas Kaenzig Николя К а энзи г Representative, Russian Art, Paris

К а энзи г Representative, Russian Art, Paris Aleksandra Babenko Алекс а нд ра Б а

Aleksandra Babenko Алекс а нд ра Ба бенко Junior Specialist, London

а нд ра Б а бенко Junior Specialist, London Margaryta Oganesian Маргар ит а О га

Margaryta Oganesian Маргар ит а Ога несян Cataloguer, London

ADMINISTRATOR

Tel: +44 20 7389 2210 Fax: +44 20 7389 2802

BUSINESS DIRECTOR

Anthea Peers Антея Пи р с Tel: +44 20 7389 2124

SERVICES

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Auction Results/ Результ аты то рг ов UK: +44 20 7839 9060 USA: +1 212 703 8080 Internet: www.christies.com

Catalogues Online/ Ви р ту а льные к ат а лог и Lotfnder Internet: www.christies.com

Client Services Tel: +44 20 7839 9060 Fax: +44 20 7389 2869 Email: info@christies.com

Payment/Оплат а Buyers Tel: +44 20 7839 9060 Fax: +44 20 7389 2869 Consignors Tel: +44 20 7389 2586 Fax: +44 20 7581 5295

Shipping/Тра нспо р тные услу ги Tel: +44 20 7389 2712 Fax: +44 20 7389 2869

Storage & Collection/Х ра нение и получение Tel: +44 (0)20 7839 9060 Fax: +44 (0)20 7389 2869

Email: First initial followed by last name@christies.com. Eg. Sarah Mansfeld = smansfeld@ christies.com. For general enquiries about this auction, emails should be addressed to the Auction Administrator.

SESSION I: RUSSIAN PICTURES MONDAY 24 NOVEMBER 2014 AT 10.30 AM (LOTS 1-147)

*1

MARIA IAKUNCHIKOVA (1870-1902)

A gate in Meudon

with date and number ‘1895/66’ (on the reverse) oil on canvas 20 x 13 æ in. (53 x 34.9 cm.)

$49,000-80,000

€38,000-63,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist. The property of a Lady; Christie’s, London, 30 November 2005, lot 68. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

£30,000-50,000

EXHIBITED:

Moscow, Maria Vasil’evna Iakunchikova’s posthumous exhibition, 1905,

no. 86.

Geneva, Musée Rath, L’exposition de quelques oeuvres de Marie Weber- Iakounchikoff et de Vera Woulff, 1910, no. 25.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Maria Vasil’evna Iakunchikova’s posthumous exhibition, Moscow, 1905, listed p. 8, no. 86. Exhibition catalogue, L’exposition de quelques oeuvres de Marie Weber- Iakounchikoff et de Vera Woulff, Geneva, 1910, listed p. [2], no. 25.

M.

Kiselev, Maria Iakunchikova, Moscow, 1979, listed p. 166.

M.

Kiselev, Maria Iakunchikova, Moscow, 2005, illustrated p. 73,

listed p. 143.

, Moscow, 2005, illustrated p. 73, listed p. 143. Meudon - it’s my favourite place near

Meudon

- it’s my favourite place near Paris, particularly in spring. All the fruit trees

are in blossom in this quiet haven with its old houses, a provincial drowsiness, the old church – even the cemetery is cheerful – the lilac, greenery, sunshine, sugary garlands

M. Iakunchikova, Letter written to E. Polenova, 28 May 1892

M. Iakunchikova, Letter written to E. Polenova, 28 May 1892 The present work on view at
M. Iakunchikova, Letter written to E. Polenova, 28 May 1892 The present work on view at

The present work on view at Iakunchikova’s posthumous exhibition, Moscow, 1905

work on view at Iakunchikova’s posthumous exhibition, Moscow, 1905 Listed in the accompanying exhibition catalogue 10

Listed in the accompanying exhibition catalogue

2 3 (part) PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTOR l 2 GEORGY LOUKOMSKI (1884-1954) Place

2

2 3 (part) PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTOR l 2 GEORGY LOUKOMSKI (1884-1954) Place de

3 (part)

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE ENGLISH COLLECTOR

l2

GEORGY LOUKOMSKI (1884-1954)

Place de la R0publique, Cassis

signed ‘Georges Loukomski’ (lower right) pencil, pastel and watercolour on paper 12æ x 18in. (32.4 x 48.2 cm.)

£5,000-7,000

$8,100-11,000

€6,400-8,800

PROVENANCE:

A

gift from the artist to the great-grandmother of the present owner

in

London in the circa 1930s.

PROPERTY FROM AN ENGLISH COLLECTION

l3

ALEXANDRE BENOIS (1870-1960)

Two costume designs for ‘Petrushka’: The stork and The goat

signed ‘Alexandre Benois’ (centre left) and inscribed with production details and costume notes overall The stork numbered ‘66’ (upper right); The goat numbered ‘67’ (upper right) pencil, ink and watercolour on paper

9Ω x 6 ¿ in. (24 x 15.6 cm.)

(2)

£3,000-5,000

$4,900-8,000

€3,800-6,300

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist. Anonymous sale; Sotheby’s, London, 17 July 1996, lot 207. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE NORTHEAST AMERICAN COLLECTOR

l*4

ALEXANDRE BENOIS (1870-1960)

Set design for ‘Faust’

signed and dated ‘Alexandre Benois 1948’ (lower left) pencil, ink and watercolour on paper 12 x 18 º in. (30.5 x 46.4 cm.)

£12,000-18,000

$20,000-29,000

€16,000-23,000

PROVENANCE:

Princess Sophie Troubetzkoy (1900-1982). By descent to the present owner.

The present work depicts one of Alexandre Benois’ set designs for Charles Gounod’s ‘Faust’. The scene is probably the opening of the second act, in which Faust and Mephistopheles arrive at a town fair to fnd themselves surrounded by a crowd of celebrating townspeople. Dated 1948 by the artist, this work is most likely his design for the 1949 La Scala production of the opera.

Dated 1948 by the artist, this work is most likely his design for the 1949 La

3 (part)

Dated 1948 by the artist, this work is most likely his design for the 1949 La

4

5 NIKOLAI DUBOVSKOI (1859-1918) Winter evening signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘N. Dubovskoi/1901-06.’ (lower right)

5

NIKOLAI DUBOVSKOI (1859-1918)

Winter evening

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘N. Dubovskoi/1901-06.’ (lower right) oil on canvas 20x 28 in. (53 x 71 cm.)

£60,000-80,000

$97,000-130,000

€76,000-100,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by the parents of the present owner prior to 1960.

*6 KONSTANTIN GORBATOV (1876-1945) Jerusalem signed ‘C. Gorbatoff’ (lower right); further signed and inscribed with

*6

KONSTANTIN GORBATOV (1876-1945)

Jerusalem

signed ‘C. Gorbatoff’ (lower right); further signed and inscribed with title ‘C. Gorbatoff’ (on the reverse) oil on canvas 28 x 31Ω in. (71.1 x 80 cm.)

£60,000-80,000

$97,000-130,000

€76,000-100,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired from the artist in London in the 1930s by the great uncle of David Copely (1952-2012) of La Jolla, California, USA. Acquired from the estate of David Copely by the present owner.

(part)
(part)

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE FRENCH COLLECTION

l7

DMITRY STELLETSKY (1875-1947)

Four sketch-books of 153 pages, 125 pages, 24 pages and 100 pages

one signed and inscribed ‘Stelletsky/”Le Toit”/La Napoule’ (on the inside cover) each album containing pencil studies, three containing watercolour and gouache studies 8¬ x 6in. (22 x 17.5 cm.) and smaller

£10,000-15,000

$17,000-24,000

€13,000-19,000

PROVENANCE:

A gift from the artist to the mother of the present owner in France in the 1940s.

€13,000-19,000 PROVENANCE: A gift from the artist to the mother of the present owner in France
(part)
(part)

(part)

(part)
PROPERTY FROM A GERMAN COLLECTION 8 SERGEI SUDEIKIN (1882-1946) Stage design for ‘Sadko’:The riverVolkhova in

PROPERTY FROM A GERMAN COLLECTION

8

SERGEI SUDEIKIN (1882-1946)

Stage design for ‘Sadko’:The riverVolkhova in food

signed ‘Soudeikine’ (lower left) pencil, tempera and gouache on board 20Ω x 39 in. (52 x 99 cm.) Painted in 1929-1930

£30,000-50,000

$49,000-80,000

€38,000-63,000

PROVENANCE:

Anonymous sale; Sotheby’s, London, 17 July 1996, lot 164. Roy Miles Gallery, London. Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1997.

PROPERTY FROM THE CONSERVATOIRE RUSSE DE PARIS SERGE RACHMANINOFF (LOTS 9-11)

CONSERVATOIRE RUSSE DE PARIS SERGE RACHMANINOFF (LOTS 9-11) Sergei Rachmaninoff The large Russian community that

Sergei Rachmaninoff

The large Russian community that gathered in Paris after the 1917 revolution were inevitably compelled to recreate the strong cultural context that formed part of their DNA. With music at the heart of Russian culture, the foundation of the ‘Conservatoire russe de Paris’ in 1923, which boasted many teachers formerly of Russia’s Imperial academies, seemed an ideal way of realising this instinct. Among its founders were Feodor Chaliapin (1873-1938), Alexander Glazunov (1865-1936), Alexander Gretchaninov (1864-1956) and Serge Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). In 1932, the Conservatory became part of the recently founded Parisian Russian Musical Society, tasked with continuing the work of its St Petersburg predecessor, which had been founded in 1859 and disbanded in 1917. The new conservatory was named after its frst honorary chairman, Serge Rachmaninoff, a powerful symbol of Russian music in exile. Concerts by Vladimir Horowitz (1903-1989), Nathan Milstein (1904-1992), Gregor Piatigorsky (1903-1976), Alexander Borovsky (1889- 1968) and many others contributed to its lustre and reputation.

The Conservatory became a symbol that the Russian community was both proud of and generous towards. Today, Count Pierre Cheremetiev, a fervent promoter of Russian musical culture, presides over it. New constraints and regulations require the Conservatory to undergo signifcant renovation. As such, the decision has been made to sell three masterpieces from the collection to allow the Conservatory to continue in its mission of musical education and to endure as a symbol of the Russian soul in Paris. Soudbinine’s impressive marble bust of Sobinov is a magnifcent portrayal of the famous tenor by an extraordinary artist, executed at the time of the Diaghilev’s frst Russian season in Paris. The large Stelletsky, Les Radeaux, is a vibrant expression of the vital determination of the Russians to preserve their culture and territorial unity, while Young girl with doll, full of freshness and charm, is a master pastel drawing by Zichy without parallel on the market in recent history. The Conservatory is not a museum and most of its artworks are not on view to the public; these three magnifcent works will enter a new stage in their history while remaining a precious testimony to the Russian soul in either the museums or important private collections they go on to grace.

a precious testimony to the Russian soul in either the museums or important private collections they
a precious testimony to the Russian soul in either the museums or important private collections they
a precious testimony to the Russian soul in either the museums or important private collections they

PROPERTY FROM THE CONSERVATOIRE RUSSE DE PARIS SERGE RACHMANINOFF (LOTS 9-11)

l9

DMITRY STELLETSKY (1875-1947)

Les Radeaux

signed in Cyrillic ‘Stelletskii’ (lower centre) oil on canvas 53¬ x 35 º in. (136.2 x 89.4 cm.)

£120,000-180,000

$200,000-290,000

€160,000-230,000

PROVENANCE:

Donated to the Conservatoire Russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff in the early 1930s.

EXHIBITED:

Paris, Galerie ‘La Renaissance’, Exposition d’art russe, 1932, no. 250.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Exposition d’art russe, Paris, 1932, listed p. 43, no. 250.

Stelletsky entered the St Petersburg Academy in 1896. He became fascinated with the iconographic tradition of Russia and developed the theme of Old Russia throughout his oeuvre. Stelletsky was often found in the library studying Russian history and was required to copy from early examples of native art as part of his academic training. He made several visits to cultural and historical sites and adapted the Russo-Byzantine tradition to modern pictorial evolution. Visiting monasteries, copying frescoes and icons, Stelletsky built his own style, drawing on Russian vernacular artistic form. He studied in Paris at the Académie Julian in 1904 and was represented in the Russian art section at the Salon d’Automne in 1906.

In 1914 he emigrated to France where he collaborated with Diaghilev. While in Paris he was commissioned to decorate churches and he also continued with his painting. Among his most important projects were the decoration of the interior of Saint-Serge in Paris, the interior decoration for the travelling church of the Society ‘Vitiazi’, and large icons for Russian Orthodox Churches in Paris, Marseilles, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. Closely linked to the artistic tradition of Russia, Stelletsky was also inspired by the epic poem The Tale of Igor’s Campaign, in which the Grand Prince of Kiev Igor Sviatoslavovich went into battle against his Polovtsian enemies in 1185. Stelletsky is recorded to have drawn series of illustrations to this greatest, but also most puzzling work of medieval Russian literature, in 218 verses. The present work might be an evocation of The Tale of Igor’s Campaign or an artistic vision of the 16th century Russo-Kazan wars as the expression to preserve Russian culture and territorial unity.

The present work, after its donation to the Conservatoire Russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff, used to hang in Rachmaninoff’s offce.

Serge Rachmaninoff, used to hang in Rachmaninoff’s offce. A sketch relating to the present work (part

A sketch relating to the present work (part of lot 7)

hang in Rachmaninoff’s offce. A sketch relating to the present work (part of lot 7) Dmitry

Dmitry Stelletsky in his studio

21

PROPERTY FROM THE CONSERVATOIRE RUSSE DE PARIS SERGE RACHMANINOFF (LOTS 9-11)

l10

SÉRAPHIN SOUDBININE(1870-1944)

Bust of Leonid Sobinov (1872-1934)

signed, inscribed and dated ‘Soudbinine Paris 1909’ (lower left) marble 25æ x 29Ω in. (65.5 x 75 cm.)

£80,000-120,000

$130,000-190,000

€110,000-150,000

PROVENANCE:

Donated to the Conservatoire Russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff in the 1930s.

EXHIBITED:

Paris, Grand Palais, Salon de la Soci0t0 Nationale des Beaux-Arts, 16 April-30 June 1911, no. 2025.

LITERATURE:

Catalogue des ouvrages de Peinture, Sculpture, Dessin, Gravure, Architecture, Arts d0coratifs expos0s au Grand Palais, Evreux, 1911, p. 295. ‘Salon du Grand Palais’, Le M0nestrel, Paris, 20 May 1911. RGALI [Russian state archive of literature and art], 1910s, f. 2741, op. 1, ed. kh. 3, l. 21, illustrated. J. M. Lhôte, ‘Séraphin Soudbinine’, Revue c0ramique et verre, July-August 1994, p. 28, no. 77.

Soudbinine’, Revue c0ramique et verre , July-August 1994, p. 28, no. 77. Séraphin Soudbinine in his

Séraphin Soudbinine in his studio

One of the most fascinating fgures of the art world in his time, Séraphin Soudbinine led an adventurous life determined by his passions. After spending time as a sailor on the Volga, he became an accomplished actor at the Moscow Art Theatre. Constantin Stanislavski (1863-1938) became a great friend to the point that Soudbinine’s little house became his headquarters. The company met with great success and Soudbinine became a popular actor playing important roles in Alexei Tolstoy’s drama Tsar Feodor Ioannovich and Maxim Gorky’s best known play The Lower Depths.

On a trip to Paris Soudbinine met Auguste Rodin (1840-1917), whom he greatly impressed with his charismatic personality and physical strength. Enthused by Europe’s cultural mecca and his new acquaintance, Soudbinine wound up his affairs in Russia and became a practitioner in Rodin’s studio, rapidly becoming one of his favourite students. Rodin only sculpted in terracotta and needed practitioners to realise his creations in marble.

Soudbinine settled in France in 1904, quickly gaining an international reputation, exhibiting at the Salon d’Automne from 1905 and the Salon of the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts from 1910. He made portraits of various talented artists and art patrons including Rodin himself, his master in sculpture, Stanislavski, his master in theatre, the opera singers Leonid Sobinov (1872-1934), Dmitri Smirnov (1882-1944), Feodor Chaliapin (1873-1938), the writer Maxim Gorky (1868- 1936), the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova (1881-1931), the composer and pianist Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915) and the American art patrons Andrew Mellon (1855-1937) and Solomon R. Guggenheim (1861-1949).

In 1909 Leonid Sobinov, the celebrated Russian tenor, embarked on a triumphal tour of Europe which included performances at La Scala in Milan and the Paris Opera. He participated in the frst 'Saison Russe' presented by Sergei Diaghilev that same year in Paris, which overwhelmed audiences and immediately became the symbol of a Russian cultural renaissance.

Soudbinine sculpted the present bust of Sobinov that same year. The bust was exhibited at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts (Grand Palais, Paris) in 1911 together with his marble portrait of Rodin now held in the Rodin Museum.

This impressive and monumental sculpture is an expression of life; a strong muscular body wriggling out of a raw block of marble. With this contrast of the fnished and unfnished, the tenor looks particularly alive and we can feel the air infating his broad chest just before he begins to sing. Soudbinine was clearly infuenced by Michelangelo’s 'Non fnito' works, particularly the Florentine master's Slaves, which he was able to admire in the Louvre. These sculptures also made a deep impression on Rodin, whose life's work owed much to Michelangelo. The muscular bodies of the Slaves emerge with all of their might from the marble blocks, growing out of prima materia. In this way, the sculptor, as a demiurge seems to give life.

Admired for his extraordinary talent, in 1913, Soudbinine modelled the superstar ballerina Anna Pavlova by order of the Tsar for the Imperial Porcelain factory. Soudbinine was the frst to introduce Diaghilev’s Ballet to the factory;

he began creating statuettes vividly portraying the participants of the 'Saisons Russes', which brought him much fame. Some of the statuettes are on view at the State Hermitage Museum, such as Anna Pavlova in the role of Giselle. Some were later edited in bronze, for example, fve fgurines of Pavlova and Tamara Karsavina (1885-1978) now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Decorative Arts (Legion of Honor). Leonid Sobinov was also the subject of another small bronze sculpture by Soudbinine, Sobinov in the role of Romeo (sold Christie’s, London, 26 November 2012, lot 429).

Following the Revolutions of 1917 Leonid Sobinov, the star tenor of the Bolshoi Theatre (a soloist since 1898) and the Mariinsky Theatre (a soloist since 1901), requested permission to emigrate, but was refused. He went on to become the frst elected director of the Bolshoi Theatre. In recognition of his status as the most famous tenor of his time, both the Sèvres Manufactory and the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St Petersburg created smaller variations of Soudbinine’s original marble bust in biscuit porcelain. Sobinov’s bust was also cast in bronze by the Rudier foundry, one version of which is located in the Memorial-House Museum of Leonid V. Sobinov in Yaroslavl.

Séraphin Soudbinine’s collaborative work with Rodin would continue for a number of years; it was Soudbinine who was responsible for sculpting in marble Rodin’s last monumental piece, The Hand of God (1916-1918), which now graces the Rodin Museum in Paris.

Later in his career Soudbinine worked with the lacquerer Jean Dunan (1877- 1922) to produce sculptures and decorative panels, including a pair of large screens made in 1925-1926 for his aforementioned Guggenheim patrons, which are now held in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

While in New York in 1923, Soudbinine discovered the beauty of oriental ceramics, fne examples of which he was able to view in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Aged nearly sixty, these works were a revelation to Soudbinine and prompted him to bravely abandon his successful career as a sculptor and begin again as a self-taught ceramist, advised by Paul Beyer (1873- 1945) and Emile Decoeur (1876-1953). He built his own oven and learned how to make both the earthenware materials and enamels he required. Once again Soudbinine’s unique combination of strength and poetry, robustness and fnish, roughness and sophistication resulted in unparalleled creations, to the extent that he was frequently named the fnest art deco ceramist by major collectors, such as Karl Lagerfeld.

Major works by Séraphin Soudbinine are extremely rare on the market. Christie's is honoured to offer the present work, this magnifcent bust of Leonid Sobinov, the frst large marble to appear at auction.

We are grateful to Dr. Ekaterina Khmelnitskaya, Curator of Russian Porcelain at The State Hermitage, St Petersburg, for her assistance with researching this work.

The State Hermitage, St Petersburg, for her assistance with researching this work. Detail of signature Leonid

Detail of signature

The State Hermitage, St Petersburg, for her assistance with researching this work. Detail of signature Leonid

Leonid Sobinov

Cover of The Sketch, 23 July 1913: Anna Pavlova sitting for Séraphin Soudbinine
Cover of The Sketch, 23 July 1913: Anna Pavlova sitting for Séraphin Soudbinine

PROPERTY FROM THE CONSERVATOIRE RUSSE DE PARIS SERGE RACHMANINOFF (LOTS 9-11)

11

MIKHAIL ZICHY (1827-1906)

Child with doll

signed, inscribed and dated ‘Zichy. Paris 1875’ (lower left) charcoal and watercolour, heightened with white, on paper 43¬ x 32 ¿ in. (110.8 x 81.5 cm.)

£50,000-70,000

$81,000-110,000

€64,000-88,000

PROVENANCE:

Donated to the Conservatoire Russe de Paris Serge Rachmaninoff.

The favourite portrait artist of both Nicholas I (1796-1855) and Alexander

II (1818-1881), Mikhail Zichy was born in 1827 in Zala, Hungary. He frst travelled to Russia in 1847 on the invitation of Grand Duchess Elena

Pavlovna (1807-1873) who engaged the artist to instruct her daughter, Ekaterina Mikhailovna (1827-1894) in painting and drawing. After completing a number of studies depicting the coronation of Alexander

II, Zichy was duly awarded the title of Academician by the St Petersburg

Academy in 1856; he was named Court Painter in 1859 and remained so until 1873. Zichy settled in Paris from 1874 until 1881. Free from the restrictions of Imperial patronage and portraiture, he became acquainted with Gustave Doré (1832-1883) who was introduced to him on his frst visit to Paris in 1862 by Théophile Gautier (1811-1872), one of the most prominent Romantic French writers.

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR

*12

ABRAM ARKHIPOV (1862-1930)

Peasant woman in a green sarafan

signed in Cyrillic ‘A. Arkh oil on canvas 47º x 31 º in. (120 x 79.5 cm.)

’ (lower right)

£350,000-550,000

$570,000-880,000

€450,000-690,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by the father of the present owner in the 1930s.

€450,000-690,000 PROVENANCE: Acquired by the father of the present owner in the 1930s. Abram Arkhipov 28

Abram Arkhipov

fg. 1. A. Arkhipov (1862-1930), The girl with a jug , State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

fg. 1. A. Arkhipov (1862-1930), The girl with a jug, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

The girl with a jug , State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow fg. 2 Arkhipov’s peasant women are

fg. 2

Arkhipov’s peasant women are spiritual totems; corporeal superheroes of titanic strength whose racy charm exudes from his canvasses. With arms thick from physical labour and ruddy, weathered complexions, their bodies speak of their lives of toil; and yet their formidable strength of spirit is seemingly irrepressible as they threaten to escape the canvas weave and stalk into the exhibition space.

In Russian Art, the name Arkhipov is synonymous with compassionate and evocative portrayals of peasant life devoid of saccharine sentimentality. The monolithic fgures in his work are undoubtedly largely drawn from childhood recollections, for Arkhipov was born into a peasant family in the province of Ryazan. Having shown great artistic promise at a young age, Arkhipov studied intermittently at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture from 1877 to 1888 under the Russian masters of 19th Century painting: Vasilii Perov, Aleksei Savrasov and Vasilii Polenov. Although he was also a student at the St Petersburg Academy of the Arts between 1884 and 1886, Arkhipov soon became dissatisfed with the Academy’s system of teaching and returned to Moscow, where he himself would later teach at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture.

From 1890, Arkhipov was an active member of the Peredvizhniki [the Itinerants], an exhibiting society of Russian artists committed to art’s potential to serve a higher social function, and in 1924 exhibited with the Union of Russian Artists and the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia (AKhRR). Fusing the Russian traditions of genre and lyrical landscape painting, Arkhipov rarely depicted dynamic scenes of action, on the contrary, some of his most famous works capture a labourer’s moment of rest and refection, emphasising the subject’s psychological and spiritual life. From the early 1900s, Arkhipov embarked on a series of portraits of peasant women from his native province of Ryazan and the Nizhny Novgorod region. Wrapped in heavily embroidered folk dress and resplendent in vibrantly-coloured headscarves, his sitters were animated by Arkhipov’s free and expansive brushstrokes and his saturated palette of scorching reds and hot pinks (fg. 1); the antithesis of usual critical realist fare, typically high on poignant social commentary and bleached of colour.

Peasant woman in a green sarafan is an impressive example from this series and appears on the art market for the frst time in its history. The work successfully demonstrates a number of Arkhipov’s compositional devices, employed to transform his models into rural deities. The tightly cropped composition effectively enlarges the subject and propels her forward, giving the impression that the woman is testing the boundaries of the canvas and even the strength of the stretcher itself. This lends the work a modern aspect, recalling Robert Capa’s photo-journalism in 1940s Ukraine (fg. 2). The foreshortened perspective forces the viewer to look up to her face, almost in worship. Light streaming in from the window in the background further elevates her fgure; effectively leaving the viewer in awe at the hems of her voluminous underskirts. The familiar peasant garb becomes, in some ways, multilayered ceremonial dress, deepening the impression that Arkhipov’s archetypal peasant woman is a paean to the heroic qualities of the Russian peasant, the ‘Daria’ of Nikolai Nekrasov’s famous poem Moroz, Krasnyi Nos [Grandfather Frost, Red Nose] (1863-1864).

Lot 13 No Lot

fg. 1 V. Surikov (1848-1916), Yermak’s Conquest of Siberia in 1582 , 1895, State Russian
fg. 1 V. Surikov (1848-1916), Yermak’s Conquest of Siberia in 1582 , 1895, State Russian

fg. 1 V. Surikov (1848-1916), Yermak’s Conquest of Siberia in 1582, 1895, State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION

*14

VASILII SURIKOV (1848-1916)

Two studies for ‘Siberia’s conquest byYermak’

signed in Cyrillic ‘V. Surikov’ (upper right) oil on canvas the frst 14 ¿ x 10 º cm. (36.2 x 26 cm.); the second 13 x 10 ¬ in. (33 x 27 cm.)

(2)

£70,000-90,000

$120,000-140,000

€89,000-110,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by the present owner in the 1980s.

Surikov was familiar with the legend of Yermak’s conquest of Siberia from his youth. His family were from Krasnoyarsk and traced their genealogy back to the Don Cossacks who joined Yermak, allowing Surikov to draw on both folklore and the recollections of his family to inform his work Yermak’s Conquest of Siberia in 1582 (fg. 1).

33

PROPERTY FROM THE MUNICIPALITY OF RAMAT GAN SOLD TO BENEFIT

THE RAMAT GAN MUSEUMS

*15

VALENTIN SEROV (1865-1911)

Portrait of Maria Zetlin (1882-1976)

signed with Cyrillic initials and dated ‘V S/910’ (centre left) tempera and oil on board 41x 28in. (107 x 73.4 cm.) Painted in October-November 1910

£1,500,000-2,500,000

$2,500,000-4,000,000

€1,900,000-3,200,000

PROVENANCE:

The collection of Maria & Mikhail Zetlin. Donated by Maria Zetlin to the Municipality of Ramat Gan in 1959.

EXHIBITED:

Rome, Padiglione Russo, Esposizione Internazionale di Belle Arti, 1911, no. 394. St Petersburg, Mir iskusstva [The World of Art], 1912, no. 282. St Petersburg, The Imperial Academy of Fine Arts, Posmertnoi vystavki proizvedenii V. A. Serova [Posthumous exhibition of the work of V. A. Serov], 4 January 1914, no. 280. Moscow, Bol’shaya Dmitrovka 11, Posmertnoi vystavki proizvedenii V. A. Serova [Posthumous exhibition of the work of V. A. Serov],1914, no. 313. Malmö, The Malmö Art Museum, Baltiska utst3llningen [The Baltic exhibition], 15 May-4 October 1914, no. 3222. Brussels, Exposition d’Art Russe Ancien et Moderne, Le Palais des Beaux- Arts de Bruxelles, May-June 1928, no. 841. London, 1 Belgrave Square, Exhibition of Russian Art, 4 June- 13 July 1935, no. 385. Prague, Slovansky Ústav, RetrospektivnE vystavy Rusk0ho malErstvE XVIII.-XX. stol. [Retrospective exhibition of Russian paintings 18th-20th centuries], 1935, no. 151 (label on the reverse). Ramat Gan, The Municipal Library, 1966-1996, loaned by the Ramat Gan Municipality. Tel Aviv, The Tel Aviv Museum, 1994, loaned by the Ramat Gan Municipality. Moscow, State Tretyakov Gallery, The Maria and Mikhail Zetlin Art Collection, June-July 2003, no. 59. Ramat Gan, The Maria and Mikhail Zetlin Museum of Russian Art,

1996-2014.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Esposizione internazionale di Roma, Bergamo, 1911, listed p. 294, no. 394.

Apollon, St Petersburg, 1912, p. [80], illustrated, listed p. 32. Exhibition catalogue, Baltiska utst3llningen [The Baltic Exhibition], Malmö, 1914, listed p. 231, no. 3222.

I. Grabar’, Valentin Aleksandrovich Serov - Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo

[Serov - Life and Works], Moscow, 1914, pp. 201, 298, illustrated p. 225, listed p. 294. Exhibition catalogue, Posmertnaia vystavka proizvedenii V. A. Serova [Posthumous exhibition of the work of V. A. Serov], St Petersburg, 1914, listed p. 21, no. 280.

Exhibition catalogue, Posmertnaia vystavka proizvedenii V. A. Serova [Posthumous exhibition of the work of V. A. Serov], Moscow, 1914, listed p. 26, no. 313.

V.

Dmitriev, Valentin Serov, Petrograd, 1917, illustrated.

S.

Ernst, V. A. Serov, Petersburg, 1921, p. 73.

Exhibition catalogue, Exposition d’Art Russe Ancien et Moderne, Brussels, 1928, listed p. 79, no. 841, illustrated.

Commemorative catalogue, Art Russe, Brussels, 1930, illustrated

pl. XXVI and listed.

Exhibition catalogue, Exhibition of Russian Art, London, 1935, listed

p. 84, no. 385.

Exhibition catalogue, RetrospektivnE vystavy Rusk0ho malErstvE XVIII.-

XX. stol. [Retrospective exhibition of 18th-20th century Russian painting], Prague, 1935, listed p. 35, no. 151.

N. Simonovich-Efmova, Vospominaniia o Valentine Aleksandroviche

Serove [Memories of Valentin Serov], Leningrad, 1964, pp. 119-121, 172.

I. Grabar’, Valentin Aleksandrovich Serov - Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo 1865-1911 [Serov - Life and Works], Moscow, 1965, p. 224, listed p. 341.

I. Zil’bershtein & V. Samkov, Valentin Serov v vospominaniiakh,

dnevnikakh i perepiske sovremennikov [Valentin Serov in the memories, diaries and correspondence of his contemporaries], vol. I and II, Leningrad,

1971, vol. I pp. 9, 12, 15, 82, 83, 303, 456; vol. II pp. 110, 175, 256, 257, 353-358.

V. Leniashin, Portretnaia zhivopis’ V. A. Serova 1900-x godov

[V. A. Serov’s portraits of the 1900s], Leningrad, 1980, pp. [253, 256], illustrated pp. [194] and 248.

D. Sarabyanov, Valentin Serov, Paintings, Graphic Works, Scenography,

Leningrad, 1982, listed p. 357, no. 584.

I. Zil’bershtein & V. Samkov, Valentin Serov v perepiske, dokumentakh

i interv’iu [Valentin Serov in the correspondence, documents and interviews], vol. I and II, Leningrad, 1989, vol. I pp. 7-9, 21, 23; vol. II pp. 238, 240, 246, 253, 254, 256, 265, 266, 270, 271, 274, 275, 277, 278, 282, 303, 306, 307, 309-311, 315-317, 319-321, 323, 325.

V. Lapshin, Valentin Serov - Poslednii god zhizni [Serov - The last year],

Moscow, 1995, p. 51, illustrated p. 50, listed p. 523.

E. Zhukova & S. Shalit, The Maria and Mikhail Zetlin Art Collection,

Israel, 2003, p. 127, no. 59, illustrated pp. 14 & 45.

G. Romanov, Mir iskusstva [The World of Art]1898-1927, St Petersburg,

2010, illustrated p. 909.

The cover of Apollon , 1912 The present work illustrated A peerless fgure in the

The cover of Apollon, 1912

The cover of Apollon , 1912 The present work illustrated A peerless fgure in the history

The present work illustrated

A peerless fgure in the history of Russian art, Valentin Serov’s

commissioned portraits and independent compositions are characterised by their vivacity. His subjects are alive, captured in a split second: Vera Mamontova (Girl with peaches, 1887, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow) is soon to colour under the scrutiny of the artist’s gaze; Princess Olga Orlova (1911, State Russian Museum, St Petersburg) about to raise an already- scornful eyebrow a fraction higher; Maria Zetlin on the verge of walking away from the window in the present work.

The most exquisite Serov ever offered at Christie’s, the sale of Portrait of Maria Zetlin (1882-1976) to beneft the museums of Ramat Gan is truly a monumental event. Painted in 1910, in the tense period between

the 1905 revolution and its more notorious 1917 sister, Serov’s portraits

of this time poignantly capture moments from a society dancing into

shadow, a Russia about to disappear forever. Theoretically captured for eternity, viewed through the prism of time, Serov’s sitters nevertheless have a temporal quality. Boris Kustodiev’s concurrent and slightly later depictions of village fairs, rotund coachmen and buxom merchants’ wives swathed in furs are also affecting in their way – scenes suffused with the lighter side of life, with sheer pleasure – yet their excesses (plump fushed faces, tables laden with goods) can seem indecent in a country where so many went without. Serov’s society beauties may be draped in silk and accompanied by lapdogs but it is diffcult not to lament the end

of an era encapsulated by Mir Iskusstva [The World of Art] group and

Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes; a time when intellectual gatherings shaped the development of Russian poetry, art, music and literature, when artistic sensation was privileged and beauty ruled supreme.

How Serov came to paint Maria Zetlin (née Tumarkina) is captured for posterity thanks to Ilya Silberstein’s (1905-1988) request that the sitter recall and record the circumstances. Around 1906 Osip Sergeevich Zetlin, Maria’s future father-in-law, encountered the esteemed Russian portrait

painter in the Parisian restaurant Prunier. After learning that Serov, whose clients included Nicholas II and the cream of Russian society, commanded 5,000 roubles per picture regardless of the number of sitters therein, Osip Sergeevich offered him three times that amount to paint a family portrait of himself, his wife and his son Mikhail (1882-1945). Serov duly agreed to consider his proposal and the two parted company. Three or four years later Serov and the Zetlins, accompanied on this instance by the young and beautiful Maria Tumarkina, again coincided at Prunier. This time it was Serov who approached the table, requesting permission

to paint Maria and promising to paint the entire Zetlin family without

charge if Maria would agree to sit for him, an incident rendered the more extraordinary by the knowledge of Serov’s increasingly straightened fnancial circumstances. He had stopped teaching and as such was dependent on portrait commissions to support his family of six. Osip Sergeevich agreed to put the request to Maria’s father but warned Serov that he would likely not consider it appropriate. Four months later Maria married one Mikhail Osipovich, and wrote to Serov shortly afterwards to

request that the portrait be undertaken.

Serov came to Biarritz in mid-October 1910. On arrival at the Zetlin’s villa Les Mouettes, the artist immediately requested his hostess put on each

of her dresses so that one might be chosen for the portrait, before

eventually selecting the plain black dress Maria had worn to greet him at the train station, accompanied by a single string of pearls. It is unlikely Maria would have been naïve to the impression she would make on Serov

as he arrived, particularly after captivating him so effectively at their

frst meeting. Her success in determining his vision of her is an elegant

illustration of the interaction between artist and subject. The portrait took four or fve weeks to complete. Maria would pose while her husband read poetry and prose aloud, much to Serov’s delight. The trio would take long drives together, and the wind-whipped Basque country, with

its vistas of rough seas and craggy rocks, had a signifcant effect on

Serov, informing not only this portrait but much of his work for the remaining year of his life.

The present work on view at Serov’s posthumous exhibition, Moscow, 1914

The present work on view at Serov’s posthumous exhibition, Moscow, 1914

fg. 1. V. Serov (1865–1911), Portrait of Ida Lvovna Rubinstein (1880–1960) , State Russian Museum,

fg. 1. V. Serov (1865–1911), Portrait of Ida Lvovna Rubinstein (1880–1960), State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

(1880–1960) , State Russian Museum, St Petersburg The cover of the exhibition catalogue Slovansky Ústav,

The cover of the exhibition catalogue Slovansky Ústav, Retrospektivní vystavy Ruského malirstvi XVIII.-XX. stol. [Retrospective exhibition of Russian paintings 18th–20th centuries], 1935

of Russian paintings 18th–20th centuries ], 1935 The associated exhibition label on the reverse of the

The associated exhibition label on the reverse of the present work

Maria Zetlin, bright and beautiful, was one of the frst women in Europe to receive a PhD (she held a doctorate in Philosophy). Together with her second husband Mikhail Osipovich, she created a gathering place for artists, writers and poets to meet and discuss the issues of the day wherever she went. Their home in Paris welcomed the poets Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926) and Ilya Ehrenburg (1891-1967) alongside Picasso, Braque, Goncharova and Larionov. Erenburg recalled how on their return to Moscow in 1917, a move powered by enthusiasm for the Revolution, they sought to do the same:

‘In the winter of 1917/1918 in Moscow the Zetlins gathered poets at their house, gave them food and drink, it was a diffcult time but everyone came from Vyachaslav Ivanov to Mayakovsky. (I. Erenburg, Sobranie sochinenii v 9-ti tomakh [A collection of essays in 9 volumes], Moscow, 1966, vol. VII,

p. 119). When the revolution failed to fulfl its promise, the Zetlins left for Turkey before returning to France and eventually emigrating to America following the Nazi invasion. Maria remained in close contact with artists throughout her life and was painted and drawn by Alexandre Iacovleff (1887-1938), Sergei Chekhonin (1878-1936) and Diego Rivera (1886-1957) among others. Having published poetry under the pseudonym ‘Amari’, Mikhail Zetlin also edited the poetry section of the magazine Sovremennye Zapiski [Contemporary notes] in the 1920s and 1930s and later founded

a new literary and political magazine, Novy Zhurnal [The New Review],

dedicated to the writers, poets and philosophers of Russia’s Silver Age. By the late 1920s, the Zetlins had formed an important collection of Russian Art, comprising works by some of the most signifcant Russian artists including: Natalia Goncharova, Léon Bakst, Boris Grigoriev, Petr Konchalovsky, Dmitry Stelletsky, Mikhail Larionov, Alexandre Benois as well as Valentin Serov. In 1941, in the midst of World War II, the Zetlins fed to New York and were only reunited with their collection after the war. The majority of the collection remained in the family until 1959 when it was donated to the Municipality of Ramat Gan.

Quite apart from her indisputable beauty, there is something mesmerising about Zetlin as captured by Serov, her pensive expression partly in shadow, her long elegant body framed by the window. With modern portraiture freed from stark reality in the wake of Manet and the advent of photography, the

signifers of the subject’s societal position and mind-set are more subtle. There

is little to help us pinpoint the portrait’s location. Where Maria understood

the rock in view as a device to unify the colour of the sea and the sky, her brother Roman Samoilovich interpreted the mass as a malevolent creature, an unnerving forbearer of woes to come. Maria pushes back a curtain, three fngers clinging to the material, but has turned her back on the world she has revealed. Is the rock a land abandoned, the Russia she left in 1908?

Described by Nikolai Benois as an ‘almost monochrome portrait of unique tonal beauty’ (quoted in Valentin Serov in the memories, diaries and

correspondence of his contemporaries, Leningrad, 1972, p. 412), Portrait of Maria Zetlin (1882-1976) confrms a signifcant and important development

in Serov’s work, a change already evident in his portrait of Ida Rubinstein

of the same year (fg. 1). Elena Zhukova notes his success in combining the monumental with decorative, the white spots of foam evoking his The rape of Europa (1910, The Museum of Avant-Garde Mastery) while a recent infuential visit to Greece is refected in the classical pose of Maria’s raised hand and lowered gaze. By October 1910 Serov was very conscious of his poor health. Earlier that year he had suffered the premature death of two close friends: Mikhail Vrubel (1856-1910) and Sergei Botkin (1859-1910). His decision to stop teaching resulted in an unforgiving travel schedule. Confronted with his mortality, Serov began to aggressively pursue his new and distinct style resulting in some of the fnest works of his career including the present work and the aforementioned Portrait of Ida Rubinstein and The rape of Europa. Serov’s own satisfaction with Portrait of Maria Zetlin (1882- 1976) is testifed to by his subsequent correspondence with the Zetlins; his letters to them in the short year before his death are littered with requests to borrow the painting for exhibitions in Europe and in Russia. The Zetlins magnanimously agreed without hesitation, their obvious fondness and esteem for Serov expressed by the name they bestowed upon their new son, born shortly after Serov’s tragically early death: Valentin.

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT EUROPEAN COLLECTOR

16

ALEKSANDR GOLOVIN (1863-1930)

Set design for ‘Elektra’:Agamemnon’s Palace in Mykonos

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘.A. Golovin/1913’ (lower left) pencil, watercolour and gouache on paper, laid down on board 27x 39 ¬ in. (71 x 100.6 cm.)

£200,000-300,000

$330,000-480,000

€260,000-380,000

PROVENANCE:

Aleksei Bakhrushin (1865-1929). Acquired from the above by the grandfather of the present owner.

EXHIBITED:

Malmö, The Malmö Art Museum, Baltiska utst3llningen [The Baltic Exhibition], 1914, no. 3133. Stockholm, Sveriges Allmnna Konstfrening [Swedish General Art Association], Utst3llning af Rysk Konst [Exhibition of Russian Art], 21 February-9 March 1919, no. 16.

of Russian Art ], 21 February-9 March 1919, no. 16. Title page of the exhibition catalogue:
of Russian Art ], 21 February-9 March 1919, no. 16. Title page of the exhibition catalogue:

Title page of the exhibition catalogue: The Baltic Exhibition, 1914 Lot 16 listed p. 224

The Baltic Exhibition , 1914 Lot 16 listed p. 224 Title page of the exhibition catalogue:
The Baltic Exhibition , 1914 Lot 16 listed p. 224 Title page of the exhibition catalogue:

Title page of the exhibition catalogue: Utställning af Rysk Konst [Exhibition of Russian Art], 1919 Lot 16 listed p. 11

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Baltiska utst3llningen [The Baltic Exhibition], Malmö, 1914, listed p. 224, no. 3133. Exhibition catalogue, Utst3llning af Rysk Konst [Exhibition of Russian Art], Stockholm, 1919, listed p. 11, no. 16. A. Dmitrieva & M. Lipatova, ‘Aleksandr Golovin’s Work for the Theatre and Alexei Bakhrushin’, The Tretyakov Gallery Magazine, æ4.

Golovin designed the set of Agamemnon’s Palace in Mykonos for Richard Strauss’ (1864-1949) one-act opera ‘Elektra’ based on new archaeological fndings by Arthur Jones Evans (1851-1941) in Crete. Golovin’s preparation for the creation of any new performance always included a search for new materials and a thorough and comprehensive exploration of their possibilities. The artist stated: ‘More than anything, knowledge is necessary to allow oneself complete freedom of fantasy’; knowledge of this sort was critical to Golovin in his work on ‘Elektra’.

The opera’s author, the composer Richard Strauss, took a lively interest in the staging of ‘Elektra’ at the Mariinsky Theatre. On 16 January 1913, he visited the Director of the Imperial Theatres, Vladimir Telyakovskii (1860- 1924) and on 26 January led a rehearsal of the opera himself. As a result, according to Golovin’s recollections, the ‘author of ‘Elektra’ was very pleased with the staging and said that he would like to take it to Berlin

’ (A. Golovin, Vstrechi i vpechatleniia. Pis’ma. Vospominaniia o Golovine

[Meetings and Impressions. Letters. Memories of Golovin], Leningrad, 1960, p. 127). The staging was ‘sinfully in love with archaeology’ in the words of Telyakovskii but the designs were ‘marvellously executed and very interesting’ (quoted in M. Pozharskaia, Aleksandr Golovin: Put’ khudozhnika. Khudozhnik i vremia [The artist’s path. The artist and his time], Moscow, 1990, p. 227).

Golovin wrote in his memoirs: ‘In 1913, Richard Strauss’ opera ‘Elektra’ was staged. My preparatory work on this performance coincided with Evan’s archaeological research in Crete, where they found most interesting monuments of the Minoan era; primary sources of art from this period are lost in the depths of time; according to some archaeologists, they are associated with the semi-mythical Atlantis. Evans assistant professor Bogaevsky [Boris Bogaevsky (1882-1942)] acquainted me with the results of the excavation and with a plan of the palace. This information proved useful to me as a source for the production, which has turned out to be very complex and to many strange and incomprehensible, due to the archaic form. I think that the majority of the audience simply did not understand ‘Elektra’É’

Prince Sergei Shcherbatov described Golovin as ‘a Russian at heart, he had a quality distinct to the Russian people (that spoken of by Dostoevsky):

the ability to comprehend the spirit and culture of other countries to the point of a spiritual transformation of some kind’ (Khudozhnik v ushedshei Rossii [The artist in a forgotten Russia], Moscow, 2000, p. 138). This transformation is evident in many works by the artist, in his designs for ‘Carmen’ by Georges Bizet (1908), ‘Orpheus and Euridice’ by Gluck (1911), ‘The Stone Guest’ by A. Dargomyzhskii (1917), (all for the Mariinsky Theatre) and in his Portrait of Chaliapin in the role of Holofernes (1908, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow) as well as many others.

This spiritual transformation distinguishes Golovin’s designs for ‘Elektra’. The present work is marked by the artist’s deep penetration into the art and culture of the Mycenaean period of the XII-XIII centuries BC in Ancient Greece and is at the same time full of the tragic gloomy passions of the Greek legend referred to by Homer and expressed in Strauss’s opera with Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s libretto based on Sophocle’s ‘Electra’.

We are grateful to Dr Eleonora Paston of the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow for providing this note.

17 PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED COLLECTION, EUROPE 17 VASILII PEREPLETCHIKOV (1863-1918) On the river signed

17

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED COLLECTION, EUROPE

17

VASILII PEREPLETCHIKOV (1863-1918)

On the river

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘P. Perepletchikov/97’ (lower left) oil on board 4æ x 7in. (12 x 20 cm.) Painted in 1897

£1,500-2,000

$2,500-3,200

€1,900-2,500

PROVENANCE:

The collection of the artist Jacques Milkine

(1877-1944).

By descent in the family to the present owner.

(1877-1944). By descent in the family to the present owner. PROPERTY FROM A GERMAN COLLECTION 18

PROPERTY FROM A GERMAN COLLECTION

18

ALEKSEI SAVRASOV (1830-1897)

Village landscape

signed in Cyrillic ‘A. Savraso oil on panel 7Ω x 12 ¿ in. (19 x 31 cm.)

’ (lower right)

£30,000-50,000

$49,000-80,000

€38,000-63,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by the present owner in Moscow in 1994.

The present study appears to relate to Savrasov’s 1867 oil Farm view (State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow).

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION *19 ALEKSEI SAVRASOV (1830-1897) Losiny ostrov signed in Cyrillic and

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION

*19

ALEKSEI SAVRASOV (1830-1897)

Losiny ostrov

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘1881. A. Savrasov’ (lower right) oil on canvas 21 x 17in. (53.2 x 45.4 cm.)

£120,000-180,000

$200,000-290,000

€160,000-230,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by the present owner in the 1990s.

Located in Moscow, Losiny ostrov was one of the frst Russian national parks and is captured in a number of works by Savrasov, the most famous example of which is Losiny Ostrov in Sokolniki (1869, State Tretyakov Gallery).

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION *20 NIKOLAI DUBOVSKOI (1859-1918) The Mediterranean signed in Cyrillic, dated
PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION
*20
NIKOLAI DUBOVSKOI (1859-1918)
The Mediterranean
signed in Cyrillic, dated and numbered ‘N. 741/N. Dubovskoi/95.’
(on the reverse)
oil on canvas
10º x 6√ in. (26 x 17.6 cm.)
Painted in 1895
£8,000-12,000
$13,000-19,000
€11,000-15,000
PROVENANCE:
S. N. Dubovskoi, the son of the artist.
LITERATURE:
Unpublished list of Nikolai Dubovskoi’s works compiled by his heirs,
listed no. 741.
PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION
*21
VASILII POLENOV (1844-1927)
Ferry at sunset
signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘VPolenov 89.’ (lower left)
oil on canvas
7¿ x 11 æ in. (17.9 x 28.8 cm.)
Painted in 1889
£20,000-30,000
$33,000-48,000
20
€26,000-38,000
PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTOR *22 VLADIMIR ORLOVSKY (1842-1914) Preparing the nets signed in

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTOR

*22

VLADIMIR ORLOVSKY (1842-1914)

Preparing the nets

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘Orlovskii.1892’ (lower left) oil on canvas 33¡ x 55 in. (85 x 140 cm.)

£40,000-60,000

$65,000-96,000

€51,000-76,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by Ambassador Jan Papanek (1896-1991) circa 1918. A gift from the above to the present owner in New York in 1990.

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AUSTRALIAN COLLECTION *23 KONSTANTIN KRYZHITSKY (1858-1911) Early morning in the felds

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE AUSTRALIAN COLLECTION

*23

KONSTANTIN KRYZHITSKY (1858-1911)

Early morning in the felds

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘K. Kryzhitskii./97.’ (lower right) oil on canvas 34¿ x 55º in. (86.5 x 140.5 cm.) Painted in 1897

£100,000-150,000

$170,000-240,000

€130,000-190,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by Tatiana Brussilowsky (1897-1969). By descent in the family to the present owner.

A leading member of a number of societies, including Obshchestvo russkikh

akvarelistov [The Society of Russian Watercolourists] and the Kuindzhi Society, of which he was also President (1909-1911), Kryzhitsky was later commemorated by two signifcant solo exhibitions comprising around 600 works; the frst in St Petersburg in 1911 and the second in Moscow in 1913.

Kryzhitsky was famed for his large-scale compositions, skillfully drawing together the varied land, dramatic skies and expansive vistas of his native land. Depicting the provinces of Russia, Ukraine and the Baltic States, Kryzhitsky’s work is evocative as well as well-observed; in Early morning in the fields Kryzhitsky captures the beauty of an unbesmirched rural Russia, far removed from over-crowded cities scarred by industry. Kryzhitsky uses farm work – or here the scythe-wielding labourers themselves – to humanize the terrain, intimating the profound connection between Man and Nature and, moreover, the harmonious, even spiritual relationship between the two.

 

A

native of St Petersburg, Tatiana Brussilowsky studied at the Sorbonne

Born in Kiev in 1858, Konstantin Kryzhitsky perfected his nascent talent at

in

Paris where she met her future husband, Michel Dubrowsky. Following

the Academy of Fine Arts in St Petersburg from 1877 to 1884. Studying

their marriage, the couple settled in Kharkov, Ukraine, before eventually

landscape painting under Mikhail Klodt, a founding member of the

immigrating to France with their young daughter, Irene. Tatiana was active

Peredvizhniki [Itinerants], Kryzhitsky achieved the rank of Artist of the First

in

the French Resistance during World War II, before embarking on a new

Class. He was subsequently made an Academician in 1889. From 1879 onwards, Kryzhitsky frequently exhibited at the Academy, but also abroad, most notably at the International Exhibition in Munich in 1909 where he was awarded a gold medal for his composition Frosty morning.

adventure and boarding the Volendam to start a new life in Australia in 1949. According to family lore, this large and impressive Kryzhitsky is the last remaining work from a collection of fve paintings that Tatiana Brussilowsky brought with her when she emigrated from France.

24 *24 ALEXANDER VOLKOV (1886-1957) Tchaikhana signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘A. Volkov 1921.’ (upper

24

*24

ALEXANDER VOLKOV (1886-1957)

Tchaikhana

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘A. Volkov 1921.’ (upper right) pencil, watercolour and gouache, heightened with silver, on paper 9 x 9 º in. (23 x 23.5 cm.)

£40,000-60,000

$65,000-96,000

€51,000-76,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired from the artist’s family circa 1994.

EXHIBITED:

Moscow, The State Museum of Oriental Art, Volkov i evo uchenniki [Volkov and his students], 1987. Washington, Gregory Gallery, The Volkov’s Dynasty, August-September 1994. New York, Gregory Gallery, The Volkov’s Dynasty, December 1995-January 1996.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Volkov i evo uchenniki [Volkov and his students], Moscow 1987, illustrated pl. 3, listed p. 45. Exhibition catalogue, The Volkov’s Dynasty, Washington and New York, 1994, illustrated p. 3, listed p. 30, no. 4.

catalogue, The Volkov’s Dynasty , Washington and New York, 1994, illustrated p. 3, listed p. 30,

25

26 PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR *25 NICHOLAS ROERICH (1874-1947) Castles of Gessar Khan

26

PROPERTY OF A NEW YORK COLLECTOR

*25

NICHOLAS ROERICH (1874-1947)

Castles of Gessar Khan

signed with artist’s monogram (lower right); inscribed in Russian ‘Cas[tles] of Ges[sar] Khan, N. 2, 1928-1929’ (on the reverse) gouache on board 8º x 10 æ in. (21 x 27.3 cm.) Painted in Tibet in 1928

£30,000-50,000

$49,000-80,000

€38,000-63,000

PROVENANCE:

Roerich, Museum, New York. Louis and Nettie Horch. Sponder Collection. Anonymous sale, Christie’s, New York, 24 October 2002, lot 28. Anonymous sale, Tajan, Paris, 26 June 2003, lot 104. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

LITERATURE:

Roerich Museum catalogue, New York, 1930, numbered between

917-926.

We are grateful to Gvido Trepša, Senior Researcher at the Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York for his assistance in cataloguing this work.

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

*26

ALEXANDER VOLKOV (1886-1957)

Red tree trunks

oil on canvas 5 æ x 15 ¬ in. (14.4 x 39.6 cm.) Painted in 1914

£60,000-90,000

$97,000-140,000

€76,000-110,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist.

EXHIBITED:

Moscow, State Tretyakov Gallery, Alexander Volkov: Sun and Caravan, March-April 2007, no. 6. London, Christie’s, Alexander Volkov: Of Sand and Silk, 4-21 September 2012, no. 9.

LITERATURE:

M. Zemskaia, Alexander Volkov. Master Granatovoi chaikhany

[The Master of the pomegranate teahouse], Moscow, 1975, listed p. 127. Exhibition catalogue, V. Volkov, A. Volkov and A. Volkov (eds.), Alexander Volkov: Sun and Caravan, Moscow, 2007, illustrated p. 59,

no. 6.

L. Denisova, ‘Alexander Volkov. ‘Dni kochev’ia’ [‘The Nomad Days’], Decorativnoe iskusstvo [The decorative arts], June 2007, illustrated p. 107. Exhibition catalogue, M. Kalieva and A. Volkov (eds.), Alexander Volkov: Of Sand and Silk, London, 2012, illustrated pp. 38-39, listed p. 172 and 186, no. 9.

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW YORK

*27

NICHOLAS ROERICH (1874-1947)

Confagration

signed with artist’s monogram and inscribed ‘1914’ (lower left); further inscribed ‘cultura/pax’ (upper right) tempera, pastel, ink and collage on board 10 x 15 in. (25.4 x 38.1 cm.) Executed in 1931

£150,000-200,000

$250,000-320,000

€190,000-250,000

PROVENANCE:

Roerich Museum 1931-1935. Louis and Nettie Horch, New York. Acquired from the above by Dr and Mrs Carlos Giro, New York. A gift from the above to the present owner in the 1980s.

EXHIBITED:

Roerich Museum, permanent exhibition, 1931–1935.

LITERATURE:

Roerich Museum Bulletin, March 1932, vol. II, no. 3, illustrated on the cover. V. Ivanov and E. Gollerbach, Roerich, Riga, 1939, illustrated p. 36.

and E. Gollerbach, Roerich , Riga, 1939, illustrated p. 36. Nicholas Roerich The present lot is

Nicholas Roerich

The present lot is a variant of Nicholas Roerich’s 1914 painting of the same title (Private collection). The artist explains its iconography in his 1935 article on King Albert:

‘In March of 1914 I completed a painting Conflagration. Upon the background of a Belgian castle, near a sculpture of a Belgian lion, a knight in full armour stands on guard. The entire sky is fooded with bloody, red fre. Upon the towers and windows of the old castle, fery hieroglyphics are already faring up. Yet the noble knight stands vigilant on his unchangeable watch. Of course, four months later the whole world knew that this noble knight was King Albert himself, who safeguarded the dignity of the Belgian lion.’

‘Four months later’ refers to the outbreak of war. King Albert of Belgium refused to give in to the demands of Germany to surrender, took personal command of the Belgian army, and spent the next four years defending his country in the trenches.

The Conflagration of 1914 was part of a series of paintings in which Roerich’s symbolism anticipated the awful scale of World War I. After the war broke out, critics were unanimous in declaring his work ‘prophetic.’

Seventeen years later, the same acute perception of another global catastrophe compelled Roerich to repeat the subject. This time, he gave it more graphic, poster-like qualities. The outlines of the clouds, castle and warrior are distinct and sharp. Roerich put the year 1914 – the start of World War I – in the left lower corner as a clear reminder of the tragedy that brought such destruction on the world. What concerned Roerich the most was the destruction of culture, whether it be the principles of peaceful coexistence or humanity’s cultural heritage. Already in tsarist Russia he advocated constantly for the need to preserve artifacts and monuments of the past. During the 1920s, he started working on a treaty with the assistance of international legal experts. The treaty came to be known as the Roerich Pact. The symbol of the Pact – The Banner of Peace, designated by three red dots in a circle – together with its motto pax cultura is pasted onto the upper right-hand corner of the painting. In a sense, Conflagration of 1931 serves as a reminder of the war and a symbol of hope. After completing Conflagration, Roerich sent it from Naggar, India, where he lived, to Paris, where it was reproduced as a postcard. It was used extensively from 1931-35 to promote the Roerich Pact during international events and conferences in the USA, Europe and South America. Eventually the Roerich Pact took the shape of a treaty signed on April 15, 1935 in the White House, in the presence of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and all members of the Pan-American Union.

The Roerich Pact stipulated that, among other things, ‘the historic monuments, museums, scientifc, artistic, educational and cultural institutions shall be considered as neutral and as such respected and protected by belligerents. The same respect and protection shall be due to the personnel of the institutions mentioned above. The same respect and protection shall be accorded to the historic monuments, museums, scientifc, artistic, educational and cultural institutions in time of peace as well as in war.’

During World War II and the years that preceded it, Roerich continued to promote the ideas of the Roerich Pact. Conflagration was widely used as part of this initiative. It was produced in both Russian and English editions of the monograph Roerich. In 1945, he remarked in a letter: ‘the South Indian publication Krishna Pushkaram has reproduced Oriflamma, Protectrix and Conflagration – thus the sign of the Banner of Peace is repeated three times.’ All three of these paintings incorporated the Banner of Peace.

We are grateful to Gvido Trepša, Senior Researcher at the Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York for providing this catalogue note and for his assistance in cataloguing this work.

28 *28 MARTIROS SARIAN (1880-1972) Lake Sevan signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘M./Sarian/1953’ (lower right);

28

*28

MARTIROS SARIAN (1880-1972)

Lake Sevan

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘M./Sarian/1953’ (lower right); further signed in Cyrillic and Armenian, inscribed in Russian with title, dated and numbered ‘Martiros Sarian/1953/580’ (on the reverse) oil on canvas 21º x 28 æ in. (54 x 73 cm.)

£65,000-85,000

$110,000-140,000

€82,000-110,000

PROVENANCE:

A gift from the artist to the House of Medical Practitioners, Baku.

A gift to the great-grandfather of the present owner in Baku in the

1960s.

LITERATURE:

Unpublished list of Martiros Sarian’s works compiled by the artist, listed no. 580.

We are grateful to Rouzan Sarian, Director of the Martiros Sarian House Museum, Yerevan for her assistance in cataloguing this work.

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, NEW YORK

*29

NICOLAS ROERICH (1874-1947)

Brahmaputra (Tsang)

signed with artist’s monogram, inscribed with title, dated and numbered ‘N 84. 1928’ (on the reverse) tempera on canvas laid down on board 12 x 16Ω in. (30.5 x 42 cm.)

£40,000-60,000

$65,000-96,000

€51,000-76,000

PROVENANCE:

Roerich Museum 1928-1935. Louis and Nettie Horch, New York. Acquired from the above by Dr and Mrs Carlos Giro, New York. A gift from the above to the present owner in the 1980s.

EXHIBITED:

Roerich Museum, permanent exhibition, 1929-1935.

LITERATURE:

Roerich Museum Catalogue, Eight Edition, New York, 1930, listed p. 35, no. 907.

29 The present work was executed in Darjeeling, India, where Nicholas Roerich and his expedition

29

The present work was executed in Darjeeling, India, where Nicholas Roerich and his expedition party arrived at the end of May, 1928. He had just completed the last leg of his Central Asian expedition, which took him from Urga, then the capital of Mongolia, across the Gobi and the great Tibetan upland and over the Himalayas. The journey took a whole year to accomplish. Towards the end of the expedition, he followed the left bank of the Tsangpo, the name of Brahmaputra in Tibet, for a couple of days before fnally crossing it on April 30th, 1928.

The artist’s son, George Roerich, describes this moment:

‘After four miles we reached the ferry, which belonged to the Nying-ma Monastery, situated on the river bank. The ferry was manned by eight lamas from the monastery. It consisted of a large, square, wooden boat, with a wooden horse head on the prow. Such boats are commonly called in Tibet shing-ta or ‘wooden horses.’ The whole traffc across the river had been closed for others, and the boat was placed at our disposal. É There were several ferries on the Tsang-po but many of them were in bad condition and we had to use this one. The boat took eight horses and a considerable amount of baggage piled up on the prow. The current was swift and the boatmen had a hard time steering. The boat is steered with the help of two big oars fxed to the fore part, one from each side. Each oar is worked by two men. One pulls the oar by the handle, the other helps him by pulling a rope attached to the middle of the oar. The camels

were transported without unloading them. Two camels were taken at a time and brought safely across the river. They were the frst camels to cross the Tsang-po at this place.’ (G. Roerich, Trails to Inmost Asia, New Haven, 1931, p. 462).

In Darjeeling, where he spent half a year resting after the expedition, Roerich retraced his epic crossing of Mongolia and Tibet in nearly one hundred paintings. This body of work constitutes a distinct and easily recognisable period in his artistic career, marked by landscapes devoid of the grand narratives and spiritual context that dominate his other work. He depicts the Tsangpo, the legendary river named after the son of Lord Brahma, as a stream of water fanked by fat earth and mountains. Even the boat appears to be part of the natural scenery rather than a human construct. Here, Roerich is a nameless nomad rather than a lofty story- teller, recording what he sees without embellishment or commentary. After the hardships of the expedition Roerich is able to step back and convey the complex beauty of what he saw. His approach is detached, almost Zen-like, and yet he paints his own experiences and memories into every brushstroke.

We are grateful to Gvido Trepš a, Senior Researcher at the Nicholas Roerich Museum, New York for providing this catalogue note and for his assistance in cataloguing this work.

PROPERTY OF A GEORGIAN COLLECTOR

*30

KIRILL ZDANEVICH (1892-1969)

Portrait of Elena Shengelaia (1900-1983)

signed with Georgian initials ‘K. Z.’ (lower right) oil on canvas 40¡ x 26 æ in. (102.5 x 67.8 cm.) Painted between 1918 and 1922

£400,000-600,000

$650,000-960,000

€510,000-760,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the sitter.

EXHIBITED:

Tbilisi-Paris, probably The Art Museum of Georgia and The Fond D'Iliazd, Kirill Zdanevich. Ilia Zdanevich, 1989.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Kirill Zdanevich. Ilia Zdanevich, 1989, listed p. 46 & 54.

LITERATURE: Exhibition catalogue, Kirill Zdanevich. Ilia Zdanevich, 1989, listed p. 46 & 54. Elena Shengelaia 54

Elena Shengelaia

Georgian painting has historically been heavily influenced by Eastern culture and Byzantine traditions due to the country’s geographical location. Set at the crossroads of Asia and Europe, the country has often been a disputed territory for Arabs, Mongols and Turks, frequently invaded by tribes eager to impose their culture on the conquered land. The adoption of Christianity however, in the early 4th century, ensured the predominance of Byzantine art, which was widely used in frescoes and the exterior decoration of ancient churches. Simultaneously, the second pillar of Georgian art, that of the miniature, remained largely under the influence of Persian craftsmanship while Georgian works of art frequently derive their structure from the dominating floral motifs commonplace in Arab culture.

The Russian Empire’s annexation of Georgia at the beginning of the 19th century shifted the direction of the development of Georgian culture. Georgian literature was enriched by the influence of the Russian titans such as Pushkin, Dostoevsky and Gogol. The dominant Russian art movement of the late 19th century however, the Peredvizhniki movement, did not have such a great impact. Faced with the loss of their national identity, Georgian artists were compelled to develop their own artistic tradition, distinct from the Western canon or that of the Russian Peredvizhniki. It was during this period of transition that the self-taught artist Niko Pirosmani emerged and translated Georgia’s artistic heritage into an innovative and distinct national artistic language. He developed the primitive and naïve style in Georgian art, in a similar way to the proclaimed Muscovites Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. Pirosmani’s artistic oeuvre inspired an array of prominent Georgian 20th century artists including Lado Gudiashvili, David Kakabadze and Kirill Zdanevich among others. All those artists, together with a generation of young progressive poets, ensured that Tiflis at the end of the 1910s was a centre for new movements in art and a platform for Futurist experimentation.

Kirill Zdanevich was born in Kojori near Tbilisi and studied at the 1st Tiflis gymnasium prior to his enrolment into the Imperial Academy of Arts in St Petersburg. The artist rapidly became acquainted with representatives of the progressive artistic youth movement: Mikhail Le Dantue, Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. Together with them he participated in the Neoprimitivist exhibition Oslinyi khvost [Donkey’s tail] in 1912 and Mishen [Target] in 1913 as well as many other Avant-Garde exhibitions in Moscow and Tbilisi.

[ Target ] in 1913 as well as many other Avant-Garde exhibitions in Moscow and Tbilisi.

Kirill Zdanevich, 1921, Tiflio

Verses by Ilia Zdanevich (Iliazd) from an album of poems and Cubo-Futurist drawings belonging to

Verses by Ilia Zdanevich (Iliazd) from an album of poems and Cubo-Futurist drawings belonging to the family of the sitter, sold Christie’s, London, 22 June 1999, lot 342.

After serving in the army Zdanevich travelled to Paris in 1913 where he encountered the latest developments in European art. During his stay he was inspired by his visits to Matisse and Picasso’s studios and exhibited his works in Archipenko’s atelier. On his return he re-enlisted in the army, but continued to pursue his artistic career. On the completion of his service in 1917 Zdanevich returned to Tbilisi and, together with Aleksei Kruchenykh, Igor Terentiev, Vasily Kamensky and others, became actively engaged in the Futurists’ artistic activities. He organised an exhibition of 122 works from 1912 which immediately brought him recognition as a cubo-futurist artist and became a member of Sindikat futuristov [The Futurist syndicate], from which emerged the proclaimed 41’ group.

Zdanevich continued to work across various genres; he painted murals in Tifis’s cafes-clubs, worked as a book illustrator and designed the interior of Ladia argonavtov [The Argonaut], where he staged his performances. The 1920s were successful years in Zdanevich’s artistic career. He again travelled to Paris where he learned further diverse styles of artistic expression, namely Cubism, Expressionism and Abstraction. Here he met his fellow artists Larionov, Goncharova, Gudiashvili and Kakabadze as well as his brother Ilia, whom he would only meet again after a gap of 45 years, a period coloured by both artistic achievements and troubled years of repression.

Zdanevich greeted the installation of the Bolshevik regime in Georgia in 1921 with great enthusiasm, considering it also to be an artistic revolution. During this time he began to work as an artist in the Rustaveli National Theatre and Tbilisi Opera and Ballet Theatre. He frequented social gatherings of Georgian intellectuals. One of these events was a salon hosted by Elena Shengelaia, the subject of the present painting, and her husband.

Elena is depicted against the ornamental background of a richly weaved traditional Georgian koshma carpet. The simplicity of her plain white blouse, painted in fuid brushstrokes, intensifes the exuberant blues and reds of the carpet. At the same time, the three quarter turn of her head, gracious pose and detached gaze recalls an image of Tamar the Great, one of the most poeticized queens of Georgia, whose beauty was captured in a large number of 13th century Georgian frescoes.

Elena Shengelaia was born in 1900 in an Obudzhi village of the Kutaisi Governorate. Her parents Ekaterina Dzhordzhikiia and Mikhail Shengelaia were both of noble origin. Elena had four brothers, one of which, Nikolai Shengelaia, was a futurist poet in his youth, and later became a well-known flm director, creating some of the classics of Soviet cinema.

Thanks to her cheerfulness and beauty, Elena Shengelaia enjoyed the attention of her peers from an early age. It is known that Konstantin Balmont, a known poet of the Silver Age, was captivated by her beauty and grace. During his trip to Georgia, on one of his meetings with the Kutaisi society, he dedicated a few impromptu lines to her, writing them straight on to the schoolgirl’s white uniform: ‘fowers are blossoming, you blossom as well’.

At the age of 17 Elena Shengelaia got married and moved from Kutaisi to Tbilisi. She became the wife of a well-known lawyer, poet, translator, writer, public fgure, traveller, collector and philanthropist – Aleksandr (Sandro) Kancheli. Between 1918 and 1925, the so-called ‘Thursdays’ hosted by the young and charming wife of Sandro Kancheli were highly in vogue in Tbilisi society. Their artistic salon was frequented by the Georgian cultural milieu, including famous writers, artists, actors and scientists of the 20th century. Elena Shengelaia enjoyed the admiration of those participating in the ‘Thursdays’. Poets dedicated verses to her and artists painted her portrait, presenting their creations to their charming hostess.

Among others, the Zdanevich brothers were very close friends of Sandro Kancheli and Elena Shengelaia. Ilia Zdanevich, known as Iliazd, dedicated various illustrated futurist poems to the couple while Kirill Zdanevich painted this striking portrait of Elena as well as a drawing a few pencil portraits.

In 1999 Christie’s successfully sold an album of poems and futurist works dedicated to Elena Shengelaia with text and drawings provided by Ilia Zdanevich, Kirill Zdanevich, Sandro Kancheli, Shalva Amiredzhibi, Kolau Cherniavskii, Simon Chikovani and Aleksei Kruchenykh.

PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR, UNITED STATES

*31

VLADIMIR BARANOFF-ROSSINÉ (1888-1944)

Reclining nude

signed Rossin0 (lower right) oil on canvas 51º x 37 æ in. (130 x 96 cm.) Painted circa 1925

£250,000-350,000

$410,000-560,000

€320,000-440,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist. Anonymous sale; Sotheby’s, London 31 May 2006, lot 155. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

EXHIBITED:

Paris, Galerie Verneuil Saints Peres, Retrospective de Baranoff-Rossin0, 1984, no. 40. Moscow, State Tretyakov Gallery, Vladimir Baranoff-Rossin0, 2002, no. 103.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Retrospective de Baranoff-Rossin0, Paris, 1984, illustrated p. 32, no. 40. Exhibition catalogue, Vladimir Baranoff-Rossin0, Moscow, 2002, pp. 182-183, no. 103.

Baranoff-Rossin0 , Moscow, 2002, pp. 182-183, no. 103. Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné

Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné

Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné received his earliest artistic training at the Odessan Academy of Art (1903-1908). The academy was well-known for its liberal atmosphere, and it was where the young artist initially became acquainted with contemporary innovations in European painting. Between 1907 and 1909 he would take part in important exhibitions of the Russian Avant-Garde in Moscow, Kiev and St Petersburg, and he briefy studied at the Academy of Arts in St Petersburg between 1909-1910 before departing for Paris in search of new inspiration. The artist reached the French capital in 1910, having changed his Ukrainian birth-name of Shulim Wolf Baranoff to Daniel Rossiné. He participated in the annual Salon des Independents, exhibiting works such as his momentous The Rhythm (Adam and Eve) (Christie’s London, 24 June 2008, lot 64).

Having come in contact with numerous artists and dominating artistic movements in Europe at the time, he elaborated a unique experimental style that was infuenced by Cubism and the colour theories of Robert and Sonia Delaunay, named Orphism by the poet Guillaume Appollinaire. Baranoff-Rossiné followed the principles of Orphism, striving to communicate meaning with his works through colour harmonies. Baranoff- Rossiné believed in the Orphist’s theories on the ‘simultaneity’ of sensations and insisted ‘not on consecutive but on simultaneous chromatic, geometric and kinetic perception. Colours should not be used to reproduce the colour of an object but on a self-contained basis’ (V. Baranoff-Rossiné, quoted in J. C. Marcadé et al., Baranoff-Rossiné, Moscow, 2002).

Following the February Revolution of 1917 the artist returned to Russia, took on the double-barrelled name of Baranoff-Rossiné and opened a studio at Svomas, in the former St Petersburg Academy of Arts. For the next few years, the artist continued his experimentation with colour, incorporating synaesthetic theories that were also being championed by Kandinsky at the time. Baranoff-Rossiné’s dreams of achieving perfect harmony of sound, light and colour, culminated in the creation of an instrument known as the ‘optophonic piano’, in which the action of the keys controlled the projection of colours and moving forms. He frst demonstrated the instrument in Moscow at the Bolshoi Theatre, and then further developed his theories in Paris, where he would return with his wife and son in 1925. With the poet Andre Breton’s (1896-1966) ‘Manifesto of Surrealism’ having been published a year before, Baranoff-Rossiné’s return to France coincided with the height of the Surrealist movement. This all- pervasive movement decidedly infuenced the work of Baranoff-Rossiné for the remainder of his career, which he would attempt to combine with his deep commitment to chromatic research.

Reclining Nude is a studied composition of blended and overlapping colour felds, accented with continuous, curving lines drawn by a seemingly uninhibited mind that result in an uncanny image of a languorous nude. Refecting Cubist roots and the lyrical abstraction that Baranoff-Rossiné had been developing since his early years, coupled with stylised Surrealist techniques, this impressive painting is paradigmatic of the artist’s work in the latter half of the 1920s.

*32 KUZMA PETROV-VODKIN (1878-1939) Head studies signed with the artist’s monogram (lower right); further signed

*32

KUZMA PETROV-VODKIN (1878-1939)

Head studies

signed with the artist’s monogram (lower right); further signed in Cyrillic, inscribed in Russian with title, further inscribed, dated and numbered ‘Album/1924-25-26/drawing No. 13/Shuvalovo’ (on the reverse) ink on paper 9 x 13 ¿ in. (25.2 x 33 cm.) Executed in 1926

£50,000-70,000

$81,000-110,000

€64,000-88,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist. Acquired from the above by Sergei Lipshits, Leningrad (1905-1983). By descent to the previous owners.

LITERATURE:

Unpublished list of Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin’s works compiled by the artist’s widow, listed. V. Kostin, Petrov-Vodkin, Moscow, 1966, illustrated p. 134.

Head studies was drawn in Shuvalovo, not far from St Petersburg where the Petrov-Vodkin family rented a dacha from the end of summer 1925 until December 1927. The inscription on the reverse is in the artist’s hand; the title indicates that the drawing was in an album the artist began while still in France in 1924 and continued in Shuvalovo after returning from his annual visit to Paris in August 1925. The size of drawings executed in Paris

is very close to Head studies. The present work was held in the collection

of the artist’s family after his death in 1939 and appears on the typewritten list of the artist’s works compiled by his wife and held at the Petrov-Vodkin Memorial Museum. The list records the works remaining in the apartment on Kirov Avenue after Petrov-Vodkin’s death and is organised by year with stated medium and size. In V. I. Kostin’s frst monograph (Moscow, 1966), the drawing is reproduced on p. 134 but Kostin has mistakenly dated the work to 1928, probably mistaking the ‘6’ on the reverse for an ‘8’; Petrov- Vodkin left Shuvalovo for Tsarskoe Selo at the end of 1927. The artist’s wife correctly lists the work under 1926. The work is listed in Kostin’s book as being held in a private collection in Leningrad.

Young man looking out of the window harmoniously combines formal compositional and colouristic aspects with the unique physical characteristics and emotional state of his model in a manner typical of the artist. The artist began working with diluted ink and brush in 1913, periodically returning to this technique, particularly in the 1920s when he produced a large number of works. In January 1922 Petrov-Vodkin painted

several self-portraits in ink on coloured paper of a very similar size to lot 33.

It is not known whether Petrov-Vodkin drew this work from nature or from

his imagination as with the pencil drawing Night Fantasy (State Russian

Museum, St Petersburg) which was executed in December 1921 shortly before this work. In the Russian Archives of Literature and Art there is also

a sketch of the same young boy’s head (pencil on paper, 21 x 17 cm.).

Unfortunately, it has not been possible to establish the identity of the boy, although he

Unfortunately, it has not been possible to establish the identity of the boy, although he may have been one of Petrov-Vodkin’s pupils. However he is also depicted in both lot 33 and Night Fantasy.

Petrov-Vodkin’s emphasis on the vertical aspect of the window frame and the architectural landscape outside the window creates a feeling of suspense, anxiety and alarm. The work was executed on 16 January; at this time, ffteen years after getting married, Petrov-Vodkin was awaiting the birth of his frst child. It is possible that Young man looking out of the window left Russia with Petrov-Vodkin in the summer of 1924 when the family went to Paris for a year so that the artist might study in France and his wife could recover from the trials of childbirth. He did not manage to generate as much income as he had hoped in the frst half of the year and sold 28 drawings on the theme of the gospel to a French publisher the autumn after his arrival. It is also possible that Christian Brinton acquired Young man looking out of the window when he visited Petrov-Vodkin at Tsarskoe Selo in the spring of 1928.

We would like to thank Valentina Borodina, Director of the Petrov-Vodkin Memorial Museum, for providing this note and for her assistance in cataloguing lots 32 and 33. For extended versions of the catalogue notes for lots 32 and 33, visit christies.com.

THE COLLECTION OF ANTHONY HAIL AND CHARLES POSEY

*33

KUZMA PETROV-VODKIN (1878-1939)

Young man looking out of the window

signed with Cyrillic initials and dated ‘16/1 1922/KPV’ (lower right) ink on paper 15 x 12 ¡ in. (38.1 x 31.4 cm).

£50,000-70,000

$81,000-110,000

€64,000-88,000

PROVENANCE:

Acquired by Anthony Hail in the 1970s.

PROPERTY FROM AN AMERICAN COLLECTION

*34

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Rasseia

signed and dated ‘Boris Grigoriew 920’ (lower right) oil on canvas 16º x 36 º in. (41.4 x 92 cm.) Painted in 1920

£600,000-900,000

$970,000-1,400,000

€760,000-1,100,000

PROVENANCE:

Mr Citron, Berlin. Acquired by the present owner in the late 1990s.

LITERATURE:

B.

Grigoriev, The artist’s unpublished archive, illustrated.

B.

Grigoriev, Rasseja, Potsdam, 1921, illustrated.

B.

Grigoriev, Rasseia, St Petersburg, 1922, illustrated.

Photograph of the present work from the artist’s unpublished archive
Photograph of the present work from the artist’s unpublished archive

The painting Rasseia relates to Boris Grigoriev’s short but remarkable period in Berlin, where he settled in October 1919 after leaving Finland. It is part of a series of paintings and drawings known by this title which he began in Russia in 1917 and completed in 1920 in emigration. Appearing in the wake of Revolution, this cycle largely determined the artist’s subsequent development, resulting in thirty years or so of signifcant renown in Russia and the West.

The paintings and drawings from this cycle published by Iasnii in St Petersburg in 1918 in a dedicated work entitled Rasseia provoked a storm of controversy. In the depiction of the calm, severe, reticent

peasants, people saw ‘Scythian barbarity’, archaic rudeness, ‘beastly, deep cruelty’, ‘the ancient, eternal peasant underground’. They

simultaneously noted the ‘miraculous essence of art, [

ripened wheat, northern greens rendered with transparency, with lots of scarlet, lightness, gentleness’ (A. Tolstoy).

] the colours of

Grigoriev depicted remote corners of the Petrograd and Olonetsk provinces, places where ancient traditions were still preserved, where the air was saturated with the poetry of patriarchal antiquity. He was not interested in genre scenes or the ethnographic features of the Russian village; his concern was the modern Russian man and all its different types and characters.

The watercolour Harvest (Private collection) executed in the summer of 1916 provides the basis for the present work as do numerous pencil sketches of peasant fgures, astutely and incredibly accurately drawn in 1917 and 1918 in the surrounding environs of Petrograd. While working on Rasseia, these studies from life were utilised to create an aggregate image, depicting real people, free from any artifcial elements.

A brilliant draftsman, Grigoriev uses here a narrow, elongated horizontal format, common to other works including Rasseia (1917, Dnepropetrovsk Art Museum) and Peasant land (1918, State Russian Museum, St Petersburg). This allows him to present all the characters simultaneously in a state of silent anticipation. Frozen, the cubistic, highly developed faces of the men, women and children recall the severe iconography of saints. The background meanwhile is dominated by the mesmerising rhythm of peasant life, laborious work executed with the steady confdence of the peasants who have been thus occupied for centuries. In the eternal cycle of life, people, animals, plants are all included, with the earth itself serving as the foundation for it all. The shapes of the bodies, objects, buildings, their volume and structure, recall, as the German critic O. Bi aptly put it, the multifaceted crystals of the earth. In this painting, real and symbolic aspects are paradoxically combined, the concrete aspect of a specifc historical moment versus the eternity of human life.

combined, the concrete aspect of a specifc historical moment versus the eternity of human life. Boris

Boris Grigoriev

The six months Grigoriev spent in Germany’s capital are a distinct stage in his biography. By November he was participating in the 37th

exhibition of the Berlin Secession, of which he was subsequently made

a

permanent member.

In

February 1920, the Berlin gallery Neumann put on a solo exhibition of

Grigoriev’s works. 23 paintings were shown and 150 drawings, including works from the Rasseia series. It is possible that the present work, the 1920 Rasseia was also included in this exhibition, which served as an introduction for this famous Russian artist so recently arrived from Soviet Russia. German critics who were sympathetic to the new Russian art, such as Pavel Barkhan who had lived in St Petersburg for a long time and was familiar with it, perceived Grigoriev’s work as an expression of ‘Russia’s young creative force’ and an insight into the true and tempestuous face of Mother Russia. The expressive character of Grigoriev’s work was analogous to that of German art at this time.

Grigoriev was among the Russian artists who managed to attract the attention of the Berlin public and its critics. In a short time he managed to establish lively contact with Russian and German colleagues, galleries, magazines and publishing houses.

In the spring of 1920 Grigoriev moved to Paris but remained an active

participant in Berlin’s art scene for the following decade. He often visited the city on publishing business and kept in touch with the friends he had made there. He also had pupils in Berlin, most notably Max Band (1901- 1974), in whose landscapes and portraits the strong influence of his teacher’s expressionism are evident.

The 1920 painting and the drawings on which it is based are published

in B. Grigoriew, Rasseja, Potsdam, 1921 and B. Grigoriev, Rasseia,

St Petersburg, 1922.

We are grateful to Dr Tamara Galeeva, Senior Lecturer at the Ural State University, Ekaterinburg, for providing this catalogue note.

University, Ekaterinburg, for providing this catalogue note. The cover of Rasseja , 1921 B. Grigoriev (1886-1939),

The cover of Rasseja, 1921

providing this catalogue note. The cover of Rasseja , 1921 B. Grigoriev (1886-1939), End of the

B. Grigoriev (1886-1939), End of the Harvest (Faces of Russia), 1923, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia

35 AFTER JEAN-MARC NATTIER Portrait of Peter the Great (1672-1725), three-quarter-length, in armour, his right

35

AFTER JEAN-MARC NATTIER

Portrait of Peter the Great (1672-1725), three-quarter-length, in armour, his right hand holding a baton and resting on a helmet, his left hand resting on the hilt of a sword

oil on canvas 58Ω x 45 º in. (148.5 x 115 cm.)

£20,000-30,000

$33,000-48,000

€26,000-38,000

PROVENANCE:

Possibly a gift from Emperor Paul I of Russia (1754-1801) to Baron Ludwig Heinrich Nicolay, Monrepos, Vyborg, circa 1801 to 1820. By descent in the Nicolay family until 1920. Count Nicolas von der Pahlen, Monrepos, Vyborg, 1920-1943. Count Nicolas von der Pahlen, Helsinki, 1943-63. By descent to the present owner.

For the catalogue note for lot 35, visit christies.com.

to the present owner. For the catalogue note for lot 35, visit christies.com. The present work

The present work in situ circa 1935

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

*36

PAVEL FILONOV (1883-1941)

Untitled

ink and collage on paper 7 x 8 in. (17.7 x 20.3 cm.)

£50,000-70,000

$81,000-110,000

€64,000-88,000

PROVENANCE:

The artist’s sister, Evdokia Glebova (1888-1980). Galerie Gmurzynska, Cologne (label on the backboard). Acquired from the above by the previous owner in the 1990s. Anonymous sale; Sotheby’s, London, 12 June 2007, lot 123. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

EXHIBITED:

Cologne, Galerie Gmurzynska, Die Physiologie der Malerei; Pawel Filonow in den 1920er Jahren, April-May 1992, no. 6. Zurich, Art Focus, Russische Kunst, 28 May-31 October 2003, no. 15 (label on the frame).

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Die Physiologie der Malerei; Pawel Filonow in den 1920er Jahren, Cologne, 1992, illustrated p. 51, listed p. 50, no. 6. Exhibition catalogue, Russische Kunst, Zurich, 2003, illustrated p. 52, listed p. 121, no. 15.

Pavel Filonov actively rejected the tenets of Picasso and Braque’s Cubism on the basis that these artists and those who followed them saw the world in the all too limited terms of colour and form with an overemphasis on the mechanical. Strongly opposed to Urbanisation, Filonov consistently placed Nature, and by extension Man, at the centre of his work. This distinct approach explains to a large extent the pervasive presence of the human form in his compositions (heads in the case of the present work and in that of Filonov’s frst serious painting completed in the winter of 1910–1911) even as his work became progressively more abstract.

Born in Moscow, a precocious child who drew from the age of three or four, Filonov gained admission into the St Petersburg Academy of Arts on his fourth attempt in 1908, only to be expelled two years into his studies for his refusal to accept the establishment’s conservative approach. From 1910–1913 Filonov developed his theory of ‘sdelannost’, a neologism meaning ‘handcrafted’ or ‘madeness’, which placed emphasis on craftsmanship and the composition of every item. The meticulous detail and blocky, carving-like outline of the heads in Untitled exemplify this approach.

On the basis of comparison to similar compositions, it has been suggested that the present work likely dates to between 1922–1925. The combination of Filonov’s premature death on 3 December 1941 during the blockade of Leningrad and his determination to retain his works in order to establish a Museum of Analytical Art makes the appearance of Untitled on the market a rare and signifcant event.

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

37

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Mon jardinier

signed ‘Boris Grigoriev’ (upper left) oil on canvas 25¡ x 21 in. (64.3 x 53.5 cm.) Painted in 1934

£180,000-220,000

$290,000-350,000

€230,000-280,000

PROVENANCE:

Gaston Neuhut, Long Island in 1935.

EXHIBITED:

Milan, Galleria Pesaro, Mostra Individuale dei pittori Boris Grigorieff & Gaston Balande, 1926, no. 16. New York, Academy of Allied Arts, Boris Grigoriev 1920-1935, 1935, no. 19. Nizhny Novgorod, Chelyabinsk, Yekaterinburg, Russkaia zhivopis i grafka iz sobraniia Stolichnogo banka sberezhenii [Russian paintings from the collection of Stolichnyi bank sberezhenii], 1996-1997. St Petersburg, The State Russian Museum, Boris Grigoriev, 2011, no. 155.

LITERATURE:

B. Grigoriev, The artist’s unpublished archive, illustrated. Exhibition catalogue, Mostra Individuale dei pittori Boris Grigorieff & Gaston Balande, Milan, 1926, p. [22]. Exhibition catalogue, Boris Grigoriev 1920-1935, New York, 1935, no. 19. ‘15 Years of Grigoriev’s Art Is on View’, The Art Digest, 1 December 1935, p. 12.

Art Is on View’, The Art Digest , 1 December 1935, p. 12. Photograph of the

Photograph of the present work from the artist’s unpublished archive

Russkii portret. Iz sobraniia SBS-Agro [The Russian portrait. From the collection of SBS-Agro], Moscow, 1997, p. 25, illustrated p. 55. T. Galeeva, Boris Dmitrievich Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2007, illustrated no. 174, listed pp. 467 and 478. Exhibition catalogue, A. Nizamutdinova, Boris Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2011, illustrated p. 165, no. 155.

During the summers of 1921–1926 Grigoriev frequently escaped Paris for the distant villages of Normandy and Brittany. His Breton cycle encompasses different genres; however, it is best exemplifed by the portraits of distinct national types. Brittany, with its strict adherence to tradition and a careful preservation of national identity, enchanted the artist. The province, irrigated by the ocean and enriched by picturesque landscapes, served the artist as a summer getaway from bustling Paris in the 1920s. In the summer of 1923 he wrote to A. K. Shervashidze from Brittany: ‘There is much antiquity in the villages. And some historic quality in their residents fascinates me. In the summer I worked relentlessly, producing seven portraits and 40 drawings’ (quoted in T. Galeeva, Boris Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2007, p. 138).

The artist skilfully captured the essence of local types in his portraits of fshermen and Breton girls in their national costumes. In this cycle, Grigoriev conveys his compassion for the hard-working local people, living in such austere weather conditions and draws some parallels to the hardship of the Russian peasantry, so vividly captured in his memories. Mon jardinier is one of the fnest examples of the Breton portrait series to appear on the market. This local character, with his grizzled beard, steady wistful gaze and a hat, so casually protecting his head during daily labour, recalls that of Van Gogh’s portrait of Patience Escalier (fg. 1). Where the latter appears on a background lit by the fery rays of the Arles sun, Grigoriev retains a restrained palette, which perfectly conveys the Breton mood. Despite their humble origins, both gardeners are depicted in a pensive pose, full of inherent dignity beftting their age.

a pensive pose, full of inherent dignity beftting their age. fg. 1. V. van Gogh (1853-1890),

fg. 1. V. van Gogh (1853-1890), Portrait of Patience Escalier, 1888, Private collection

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

l*38

YURI ANNENKOV (1889-1974)

Portrait of AleksandrTikhonov (1880-1956)

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘Iu. Annenkov./1922.’ (lower left) oil, collage, glass, bell-push and plaster on canvas 26¡ x 22in. (67 x 58 cm.)

£2,500,000-4,500,000

$4,100,000-7,200,000

€3,200,000-5,700,000

PROVENANCE:

The sitter. By descent to his daughter, Nina Tikhonova (1910-1995). By repute, Drouot Auction House, Paris, circa 1980s. The Property of a Gentleman; Christie’s, London, 5 October 1989, lot 424. Acquired at the above sale by the previous owner. The property of an important European collector; Christie’s, London, 28 November 2007, lot 379. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

EXHIBITED:

Petrograd, The Anichkov Palace, Mir Iskusstva [The World of Art], 8 May-2 June 1922, no. 12. Venice, USSR Pavilion, XIV International Biennale Exhibition, 1924.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Mir Iskusstva [The World of Art], 1922, no. 12, listed p. 1, no. 12.

E. Zamyatin, M. Kuzmin and M. Babenchikov, Iurii Annenkov.

Portrety [Portraits], St Petersburg, 1922, listed p. 153.

U. Nebbia, La Quattordicesima esposizione d’arte a Venezia-1924,

Bergamo, 1924, visible in the photograph p. 160, p. 163.

A. Lunacharskii (ed.), Krasnaia [Red] Niva, Moscow, 17 August 1924,

no. 33, p. 790, illustrated p. 790, no. 33.

V. Endicott Barnett, ‘The Russian Presence in the 1924 Venice

Biennale’, The Great Utopia. The Russian and Soviet Avant-Garde, 1915–1932, New York, 1992, visible in a photograph p. 471, p. 469.

G. Romanov, Mir Iskusstva [The World of Art], St Petersburg-

Moscow, 2010, listed p. 47.

Iskusstva [ The World of Art ] , St Petersburg- Moscow, 2010, listed p. 47. Aleksandr

Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956) (centre)

Yuri Annenkov’s Portrait of Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956) is an audacious paradigm of the Russian Avant-Garde that melds textures, patterns and perspectives, absorbing the jostling infuences of Russian folk art, Cubo- Futurism and Expressionism to embody the artist’s New Synthetism.

Painter, graphic artist and designer for stage and screen, Annenkov was

both creator and chronicler. His career ran parallel to the seismic events of the 20th century, spanning almost 70 years, traversing two continents and creating links between the Silver Age, post-revolutionary Russia and post- war Europe. Throughout the 1920s he participated in some of the decade’s most signifcant international exhibitions, including those in Berlin (1922), Venice (1924) and Paris (1925), and capped his scenographic career in 1954 with an Academy Award nomination for best costume design for his work

on Max Ophüls’s (1902–1957), ‘The Earrings of Madame de

’.

Born in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky where his father had been exiled for anti-tsarist activities, Annenkov returned to St Petersburg with his family in the early 1890s where he later attempted to complete a law degree while simultaneously pursuing his artistic education. Unsurprisingly, Annenkov’s pretensions to a legal career were swiftly superseded by his nascent talent and artistic ambition.

Although the infuence of Ilya Repin (1844–1930) still loomed large in Russian artistic life, Annenkov was drawn to the new and experimental, the Avant-Garde. Following an initial period of study at the studios of Savely Zeidenberg (1908–1909) with fellow pupil Marc Chagall (1887–1985), and Jan Tsionglinsky (1909–1911), Annenkov embarked on a new and exciting stage of his development when he moved to Paris to study at L’ Académie de la Grande Chaumière and La Palette in 1911.

With a studio on rue Campagne-Première in Montparnasse, Annenkov found himself at the centre of artistic life in Paris. His training was completed as much under Maurice Denis (1870–1943) and Félix Vallotton (1865–1925) as it was alongside the artists who frequented La Rotonde and La Coupole, where he imbibed the infuences of Cézanne, Braque and Picasso.

Like many of his Russian contemporaries who also worked in Paris during this dynamic period in art history, including Natan Altman (1889–1970), Varvara Stepanova (1894–1958), Lyubov Popova (1889–1924) and Nadezhda Udaltsova (1886–1961), Annenkov was profoundly infuenced by Parisian Cubism, with its geometric stylisation, emphasis on line and fractured planes. Following his debut at the Société des Artistes Indépendants in 1913, when he exhibited alongside Robert Delauney (1885–1941), Albert Gleizes

alongside Robert Delauney (1885–1941), Albert Gleizes The present work on view at the 1924 XIV International

The present work on view at the 1924 XIV International Biennale Exhibition in Venice

Title page of the 1922 Mir Iskusstvo [ The World of Art ] catalogue (1881–1953),

Title page of the 1922 Mir Iskusstvo [The World of Art] catalogue

(1881–1953), Jean Metzinger (1883–1956) and Francis Picabia (1879–1953) among others, Annenkov returned to Russia full of enthusiasm for the latest developments in art and eager to explore his own permutations across a broad range of artistic disciplines.

Back in St Petersburg against the stormy backdrop of World War I and revolution, Annenkov became heavily involved in theatre, experimenting with directing and scenography, as shown by his early collaboration with Nikolai Evreinov (1879–1953) on the production of Homo Sapiens at the Krivoe zerkalo [Curved mirror] theatre. Annenkov also concentrated on graphic work, his sharp line equally matched to his acute political sense, providing illustrations for books and satirical journals, such as Satirikon, Solntse Rossii [Russia’s sun], Lukomor’e [The Cove] and Argus. With the advent of revolution, Annenkov’s creative energies were mirrored by the radical fervour of the time, symbolised by his illustrations for Alexander Blok’s (1880–1921) 1918 publication of his Dvenadtsat’ [The Twelve], a hugely controversial poetic rumination on the October Revolution. His signifcant contribution to the realisation of Evreinov’s 1920 Vziatie Zimnego Dvortsa [The Taking of the Winter Palace], the last and most ambitious of the mass spectacles conceived along

and most ambitious of the mass spectacles conceived along The present work listed p. 1, no.
and most ambitious of the mass spectacles conceived along The present work listed p. 1, no.

The present work listed p. 1, no. 12

Marxist-Leninist lines to educate the masses, showcased Annenkov’s propensity to capture the spirit of the time through aesthetic means, mythologising the subject while popularising it. A cast of approximately 8,000, the vast majority of whom were amateurs, were masterfully choreographed to reenact the frst moments of revolution, in front of a reported audience of 100,000 that at times was interspersed with the cast. Annenkov’s role in creating the visual impact of this embryonic and politicised example of immersive theatre, simultaneously creating whilst recording history, echoes the import of his momentous series of portraits completed during the period 1916–1923.

Annenkov was the only Russian artist to complete a portrait gallery of the most powerful and infuential political fgures of the time, including Vladimir Lenin (1870–1924), Leon Trotsky (1879–1940), Anatoly Lunacharsky (1875–1933), Vladimir Antonov-Ovseyenko (1883–1938) and Grigory Zinoviev (1883–1936), as well as a visual line-up of the brightest literary and artistic talents, including Maxim Gorky (1868–1936), Vsevolod Meyerhold (1874–1940), Anna Akhmatova (1889–1966), Boris Pasternak (1890–1960), Alexandre Benois (1870–1960) and Miron Sherling (1880–1958). In his introduction to Portrety [Portraits], published in 1922, Annenkov reveals that although he did not conceive of his portraits as a

These portraits are extracts from faces, from people, from every one of us; each is

These portraits are extracts from faces, from people, from every one of us; each is the biography of a person and an epoch

Evgeny Zamyatin, 1922

people, from every one of us; each is the biography of a person and an epoch
people, from every one of us; each is the biography of a person and an epoch

Yuri Annenkow, 1924

cycle, assembled they held an unexpected greater signifcance, that of

a historical record: While some of my subjects impressed themselves on

the bedrock of our era’s history and others are lost to anonymity, they are all without exception marked with one and the same symbol – that of Revolution. Each will act as living remembrances to me of those tragedies and hopes, falls and upsurges, according to which we were fated to march onwards together, side by side, friends and enemies

alike

(Y. Annenkov, Portrety [Portraits], Petrograd, 1922, p. 11).

If Annenkov captured the most signifcant personalities in the Arts,

Aleksandr Tikhonov was undoubtedly the convener, the person who drew the illustrious characters together. An author and literary personage, Tikhonov dedicated his life to literature; frst, as a writer under the pseudonym A. Serebrov, then as a critic, editor and publisher. Among his numerous credits, Tikhonov edited the journal Letopis’ [The chronicle] published in Paris 1915–17 and the newspaper Novaia Zhizn’ [The New Life] in 1917–18, managed the publishing house Vsemirnaia Literatura [World Literature] between 1918 and 1924 and later edited Soviet publications ‘Vostok [The East]’, ‘Russkii Sovremenik [Russian Contemporary]’ and ‘Sovremennyi Zapad [The Contemporary West]’. However, Tikhonov’s most important contribution to the intellectual artistic life of Petrograd was his role, along with Gorky and Korney Chukovsky (1882-1969), as a founder of the famous literary society Dom Iskusstv [The House of Arts], a gathering place for writers and artists active during the chaos and social dislocation of the years 1919–1922. Annenkov was a regular and met there many of the people who inspired him to create the gallery of his contemporaries, such as Anna Akhmatova, Boris Pasternak, H. G. Wells (1886–1946) and Vladimir Pyast (1886–1940).

Painted in 1922, Portrait of Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956) was selected for exhibition at the 1924 XIVth International Biennale in Venice together with portraits of Leon Trotsky and the journalist and historian, Vyacheslav Polonskii (1886–1932). An extraordinary example of Annenkov’s unique ability to capture a likeness with gravitas and wit, Portrait of Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956) combines exceptional draughtsmanship with artisanal spirit, suggested by the sculptural additions that reference early Cubist experiments with collage as well as folk art, championed by Russian Primitivists. The bold palette and multifaceted treatment of the subject is reminiscent of Natan Altman’s unforgettable depiction of Akhmatova from 1914, yet Annenkov’s portrait is more complex, combining Constructivist and even Dadaist elements, such as the bell-push, to enliven the surface and further integrate the two- and three-dimensional planes.

Remarkably, despite the range of infuences, there are no jarring elements; Portrait of Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956) demonstrates Annenkov’s overarching aesthetic sense and ability to synthesise –isms into an original, harmonious whole. While some of his contemporaries moved towards abstraction, Annenkov honed his distinctive neo-realist approach, an elegant confection of line and ornament.

None of Annenkov’s calligraphic line is lost in oil, nor is the effectiveness of his technique to create energy and movement by contrasting textures with patterns. The stiff stray lock of hair that creates a shadow over Tikhonov’s forehead is juxtaposed with the spiky bristles of his manicured moustache; the vibrant blue tie, trapped by a stiff white collar and framed by a fecked jacket, is perforated by neat rows of white dots; and the smooth, angular pocket square juts out from the canvas

in stark contrast to the crumpled sleeves and lapels of the jacket. The

overall effect creates an ‘oscillating atmosphere’, Mikhail Kuzmin (1872– 1936) wrote, ‘that stream of life which emanates from static matter

(both animate and inanimate). This is the main secret of [Annenkov’s] portraits.’ (M. Kuzmin, ‘Kolebanie zhiznennykh tokov [The oscillations of life’s current]’ in Portrety [Portraits], Petrograd, 1922, p. 48).

Above all, however, the work is a striking and successful portrait that

conveys the status and quality of the sitter. The character of Tikhonov

is silhouetted against a background of artistic play; his serious, stoic

expression is accentuated by the worked surfaces that reveal his features,

accentuated by the worked surfaces that reveal his features, and by extent, his personality in relief.

and by extent, his personality in relief. This effect is heightened by the inclusion of the print after Johann Georg Meyer von Bremen’s (1813– 1886) Schicksalsgenossen (roughly translated as ‘Partners in Destiny’), painted in 1855, perhaps an allusion to Tikhonov’s solidarity with his peers and resilience during the turbulence of civil war, famine and social and political upheaval.

Annenkov’s Portrait of Aleksandr Tikhonov (1880–1956), a work of immense cultural import, is without question one of the most important Russian paintings ever to appear at Christie’s. In the same way that Annenkov’s Dnevnik moikh vstrech [Journal of my meetings] published in 1966 served as a collective memoir of the period, his portraits are historical artefacts that were hailed as such at the time of their execution. To quote Kuzmin once more: ‘If the atmosphere of modernity is made from the breath of living people, then perhaps more than anyone it is Annenkov who has been granted the ability to convey the spirit of our days. Aside from their artistic value, his series of portraits will forever serve as a refection of the contradictory and hostile undercurrents, the brutality and heroism, the soaring fights and incurable simplicity of domestic life, which came to a head at the end of the frst quarter of the 20th century.’ (M. Kuzmin, Ibid. p. 51).

We would like to thank René Guerra for his assistance in cataloguing the present work.

Guerra for his assistance in cataloguing the present work. fg. 1 Y. Annenkov (1889-1974), Portrait of

fg. 1 Y. Annenkov (1889-1974), Portrait of M.A. Sherling, Artist and Photographer, 1918 State Russian Museum, St Petersburg

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

*39

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Portrait of the actor Nikolai Podgorny as Peter Trofmov in ‘The Cherry Orchard’ by Anton Chekov

oil on canvas 23æ x 28 æ in. (60.3 x 72.8 cm.) Painted in 1923

£250,000-350,000

$410,000-560,000

€320,000-440,000

PROVENANCE:

Grosvenor Gallery (label on the stretcher).

EXHIBITED:

New York, The New Gallery, Paintings & Drawings by Boris Grigoriev,

19 November-15 December 1923, no. 6.

Worcester, Worcester Art Museum, Exhibition of paintings by

Boris Grigoriev, 4 January-3 February 1924, no. 21. Prague, Manes, Boris D. Grigorjev, 29 May-20 June 1926, no. 9. Milan, Galleria Pesaro, Mostra Individuale dei pittori Boris Grigorieff

& Gaston Balande, 1926, no. 21.

Philadelphia, Gimbel Galleries, Boris Grigories. Paintings,

16 March-4 April, 1927, no. 22.

St Petersburg, The Russian Museum, Boris Grigoriev, 2011, no. 28.

LITERATURE:

B.

Grigoriev, The artist’s unpublished archive, illustrated.

L.

Reau, A. Levinson, A. Antoine, C. Sheridan, and B. Grigorieff,

Visages de Russie, Paris, 1923, illustrated.

Exhibition catalogue, Paintings & Drawings by Boris Grigoriev, New York, 1923, listed p. [3], no. 6. Exhibition catalogue, Exhibition of paintings by Boris Grigoriev, Worcester, 1924, listed p. [5], no. 21. Exhibition catalogue, Boris D. Grigorjev, Prague, 1926, listed no. 9. Exhibition catalogue, Mostra Individuale dei pittori Boris Grigorieff

& Gaston Balande, Milan, 1926, listed p. [22], no. 21.

Exhibition catalogue, Boris Grigories. Paintings, Philadelphia, 1927,

listed p. [1], no. 22.

G. Pospelov, ‘Liki Rossii’ Borisa Grigorieva [Boris Grigoriev’s

‘Faces of Russia’], Moscow, 1999, illustrated p. 145, no. 123, listed pp. 187 and 190.

T. Galeeva, Boris Dmitrievich Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2007, illustrated

no. 155, listed pp. 466 and 478, no. 155. Exhibition catalogue, A. Nizamutdinova, Boris Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2011, illustrated p. 33, no. 28.

A Muscovite by birth, Boris Grigoriev spent most of his life abroad. Having

conceived one of his major cycles, Rasseia, as revolution surged through the country, Grigoriev went on to develop and explore its theme of the Russian peasantry in many other series throughout his artistic career. The artist’s distance from his motherland resulted in a preoccupation with this theme. While he enjoyed signifcant recognition abroad, his paintings were seen by his contemporaries in the Soviet Union as a grotesque parody of Russian

village life. As such, from the 1930s to the 1960s Grigoriev’s works were removed from display in Soviet museums and reproduction of his works

banned. It was only in 1989 that Grigoriev’s frst solo show took place in Russia and the signifcance of this artist’s contribution to the development

of Russian art was acknowledged.

Grigoriev received his early artistic training at the Stroganov College of Art and Design (1903–1907) followed by the Imperial Academy of Art in St Petersburg, which he attended until his expulsion in 1913. A four-month sojourn in Paris that year proved to be a critical moment; while studying at

the Académie de la Grande Chaumière, Grigoriev was exposed to the most progressive artistic movements in existence. The following year he undertook further travel abroad, visiting Italy, Switzerland and other countries. These journeys undoubtedly broadened the artist’s horizons and increased his familiarity with Western pictorial language.

In October 1919 Grigoriev and his family left Petrograd, frst for Berlin and then for Paris, the undisputed capital of the artistic world, heaving with young ambitious artists longing to break free from the strict regulations of classical art. The Russian artistic diaspora in Paris was diverse, its artists often exploring radically different movements. Grigoriev remained indifferent to the doctrines of the Russian Avant-Garde and chose instead to join Mir Iskusstva [The World of Art] group which had recently reformed in France. Alongside Vasily Shukhaev (1887–1972) and Alexander Iacovleff (1887–1938), Grigoriev was soon regarded as one of the new generation of Mir Iskusstva.

Despite the hardship of his early émigré years in Paris, the 1920s brought Grigoriev international recognition which stretched far beyond Europe to the USA. This success rapidly translated into tremendous commercial prosperity as Grigoriev began to exhibit his paintings frequently; his works were accepted for high-profle exhibitions such as the Venice Biennale and the Parisian Salon d’Automne. While in Paris, as a continuation of the Raseya series which had been inspired by the artist’s visits to the villages of the Petrograd and Olonests provinces, Grigoriev began work on his Visages de Russie series. In this series the artist does not concentrate exclusively on a depiction of rural life, rather, his interests also encompass the lives of the cultural milieu in contemporary Russia. From 1922 onwards Grigoriev painted a number of portraits depicting actors from the Moscow Art Theatre touring in Paris, choosing to portray them in character in renowned pre-revolutionary productions. One such canvass is the portrait of an actor, Nikolai Podgorny, also known for his roles in Soviet cinema in the later stage of his career. Grigoriev depicts Podgorny as Peter Trofmov in Chekhov’s ‘The Cherry Orchard’. An ‘eternal’ student, Trofmov is shown fully immersed in his philosophical musings on the future of Russia and the new type of people this land could produce if it were only liberated from the tsarist regime. Trofmov offers no practical solutions but is happy to delight his audience with his utopian vision.

Enchanted by Grigoriev’s Visages de Russie series, N. Mogilianskii wrote

‘Boris Grigoriev is a thoughtful, talented artist. It is essential to look at his series Faces of Russia slowly and attentively and if possible to study it even

more carefully

It is hard to turn away from his faces.’

(quoted in T. Galeeva, Boris Grigoriev, St Petersburg, 2007, p. 123).

but also in his technical approach

Here is a painter of vibrant reality, not only in his themes

Here is a painter of vibrant reality, not only in his themes Nikolai Podgorny and Maria

Nikolai Podgorny and Maria Zhdanova playing the roles of Anya and Peter Trofmov in Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, 1912

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

l40

ALEXANDRA EXTER (1882-1949)

Stage design for ‘Romeo and Juliet’

pencil and gouache, heightened with gold, on two joined sheets of paper 24¿ x 17 ¡ in. (61.3 x 44 cm.) Executed in 1921

£100,000-120,000

$170,000-190,000

€130,000-150,000

PROVENANCE:

Anonymous sale; Drouot-Richelieu, Paris, 30 May 2001, lot 36 (stamp on the reverse). Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

LITERATURE:

J. Chauvelin and N. Filatoff, Alexandra Exter, Paris, 2003, illustrated p. 182, no. 158.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ was Alexandra Exter’s third and last collaborative project with Aleksandr Tairov’s Kamerny theatre in Moscow. The Kamerny was the centre of Tairov’s experimental synthetic theatre, which differed from the naturalist theatre championed by Konstantin Stanislavsky. Tairov founded the Kamerny in 1914, its intimate setting allowed for a more intense and all-encompassing theatrical experience, which was essential to Tairov’s vision. He advocated an emotionally charged, dynamic theatre in which all elements involving the stage and the audience were unifed in the action of the performance. He was particularly interested in deconstructing the traditional methods of stage design, where the sets and costumes were not separate entities but inherent parts of the actors’ characters and movements, as well as direct emotional communicators.

In 1916 Tairov invited Alexandra Exter to work together with him on the production of ‘Famira Kifared’, the bacchic drama by Russian poet Innokentii Annensky (1855–1909). This was Exter’s frst experience working with the theatre. Having recently developed her own unique aesthetic

synthesising Cubist, Futurist and Constructivist styles, Exter’s innovations with the stage corresponded to Tairov’s goals. Exter’s designs allowed for

a break from conventional visual perceptions of the stage, which relied on

a vanishing point and where forms were distinct from their surrounding

space. She did this by creating an overall feld of interacting forms, which distinguished themselves only in their relationship with one another.

In the revolutionary fervour of its day, ‘Famira Kifared’ was received with great enthusiasm by critics and audiences, given its radical innovations, who were impressed with the ‘organic connection between the moving actors and objects at rest’, as noted by the critic Yakov Tugenkhold (J. Bowlt, ‘The Construction of Caprice: The Russian Avant-Garde Onstage’ in Theatre in revolution: Russian Avant-Garde Stage Design 1913–1935, New York, 1991, p. 64), and continues to be considered as the birth of a new kind of theatricality.

Exter continued to work successfully with Tairov, producing celebrated productions of ‘Salome’ (1917), and ‘Romeo and Juliet’, which premiered at the Kamerny on May 17, 1921. For ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Exter built a vertical set that flled the entire space of the stage, with multilevel platforms that defed spatial limitations and created a monumental environment capable of shifting in shape and colour. Similarly Exter constructed the actors’ costumes with a variety of bright colours and shapes that interacted with the architectural surroundings. Exter’s designs for ‘Romeo and Juliet’ are a culmination of her earlier remarkable experiments with the stage, and are wonderfully represented in this particular stage design.

This fne work is a comprehensive summary of Exter’s concepts for the stage in ‘Romeo and Juliet’, as well as a good representation of the artist’s style at the height of her career. As in her paintings, here Exter constructed a scene of intersecting geometric planes and vivid colours. Exter thus transformed the structure and space of the stage into a system of rhythmic forms, remaining aware of key motifs in Shakespeare’s story, yet still managing to circumvent overtly literal interpretations. Exter’s towering, staggered structures and selected colour scheme of blues, deep reds and velvety blacks, heightened with white and gold conveyed the beauty of Verona and its architecture and the opulence of the Capulets and Montagues, but these mechanisms were also meant to work as vehicles to transmit the varied and tumultuous emotions felt throughout the drama. Alexandra Exter’s techniques contributed signifcantly to the evolution of theatre design, and continue to be very infuential among contemporary scenographers. This beautiful work is a perfect representation of those contributions.

work is a perfect representation of those contributions. Scene from ‘Romeo and Juliet’ , The Kamerny

Scene from ‘Romeo and Juliet’, The Kamerny Theatre, Moscow, 1921

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 41 SERGEI SUDEIKIN (1882-1946) Costume design for muzhiki signed
PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 41 SERGEI SUDEIKIN (1882-1946) Costume design for muzhiki signed

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

41

SERGEI SUDEIKIN (1882-1946)

Costume design for muzhiki

signed ‘S Soudeikine’ (lower right) pencil, watercolour and gouache on paper 8 x 10 ¡ in. (21.8 x 26.2 cm.)

£7,000-9,000

$12,000-14,000

€8,900-11,000

The present work was likely executed in the 1940s and may relate to an unrealised Chauve-Souris production at the Royale Theatre, New York in 1943.

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 42 BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939) Upper Savoy signed ‘Boris Grigoriev’
PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 42 BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939) Upper Savoy signed ‘Boris Grigoriev’

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

42

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Upper Savoy

signed ‘Boris Grigoriev’ (lower left) oil on canvas 21¿ x 29 ¿ in. (53.6 x 74 cm.) Painted circa 1927

£40,000-60,000

$65,000-96,000

€51,000-76,000

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

43

PETR KONCHALOVSKY (1876-1956)

At the barn

signed, dated and numbered ‘1921/Kontchalovsky/396’ (on the reverse) oil on canvas 24º x 28Ω in. (61.6 x 72.5 cm.)

£150,000-200,000

$250,000-320,000

€190,000-250,000

PROVENANCE:

The family of the artist. Acquired from the above by the present owner.

LITERATURE:

K. Frolova, Konchalovskii. Khudozhestvennoe nasledie [Artistic legacy], Moscow, 1964, listed p. 105.

nasledie [ Artistic legacy ], Moscow, 1964, listed p. 105. fg. 1. P. Cézanne (1839–1906), The

fg. 1. P. Cézanne (1839–1906), The Aqueduct, circa 1885-1887, The Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

The most popular artist in Russia during his lifetime, the signifcance of Petr Konchalovsky’s work was widely recognised both by his peers and subsequent generations: his frst solo exhibition was held at the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, in 1922; by 1923 his biography had been published; while more recently, in 2010, a seminal exhibition of the artist’s work was held frst at the State Russian Museum, St Petersburg, and subsequently at the State Tretyakov Gallery. While undeniably a central fgure of the Russian Avant-Garde (he was a founding member of Bubnovyi valet [The Jack of Diamonds] and from 1909 onwards exhibited regularly with Zolotoe runo [The Golden Fleece], Mir iskusstva [The World of Art] and Novoe soobshchestvo khudozhnikov [The New Society of Artists]), Konchalovsky’s reverence for the Old Masters and of course for Cézanne imbues his work with a timeless beauty.

Passionately interested in the work of his contemporaries, Konchalovsky frst visited Paris in 1896 and remained there until 1898 studying at the Académie Julian. Konchalovsky exchanged letters with Matisse and met with Picasso but it was Cézanne, above all others, who was his most important inspiration. In his memoirs, Konchalovsky recalls how ‘Cézanne’s methods of understanding nature were dear to me. I followed in his footsteps even later, in my more mature years, because it was Cézanne’s methods which allowed me to see nature in a new way and I wish always to be true to it. Even in those years I felt instinctively that without new methods there would be no salvation, no way to fnd a path to true art. That’s why I grasped at Cézanne like a drowning man at a straw.’ (quoted in V. Nikolsky, Petr Petrovich Konchalovsky, Moscow, 1936, p. 38). Emile Bernard, Cézanne’s great friend and champion, described Konchalovsky as ‘one of the few artists who didn’t merely imitate Cézanne but developed his principles on Russian soil’. We are reminded of Cézanne’s instruction to Emile Bernard to ‘treat nature by the cylinder, the sphere, the cone’ by The Aquaduct (fg. 1) where Cézanne expresses the forces of nature in a vibrant example of his art. Konchalovsky’s present work clearly heeds Cézanne’s words with its vivid colours, the geometrical design of the trees, and famboyant brush strokes.

The present composition reveals the mastery of Konchalovsky’s sweeping strokes of pure colour, building the perspective only with tone, without the help of design to create the illusion of depth. During the period 1919–1922, Konchalovsky focused his attention on landscape painting, often returning to Abramtsevo to capture its green spaces. This period is often associated with a national style focusing on folk art. The present work, painted in 1921, is an interesting mix of Konchalovsky’s research into Russian nature and an homage to one of the artists who inspired him the most, Paul Cézanne.

fg. 1. Boris Grigoriev in Paris, 1922 PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 44 BORIS
fg. 1. Boris Grigoriev in Paris, 1922 PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 44 BORIS
fg. 1. Boris Grigoriev in Paris, 1922 PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 44 BORIS

fg. 1. Boris Grigoriev in Paris, 1922

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

44

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Self-portrait

signed ‘Boris Grigoriev’ (lower right) and dated ‘1931’ (lower left) gouache, with scratching out, on paper 16x 11 ¡ in. (42.9 x 29 cm.)

£40,000-60,000

$65,000-96,000

€51,000-76,000

Self-portraits appear in Grigoriev’s oeuvre from an early stage. As early as 1907 the artist drew

a number of self-portraits. As Tamara Galeeva mentions in her monograph (Boris Grigoriev, St

Petersburg, 2007, p. 83), the well-known 1914 pencil self-portrait, drawn in Brittany, displays the openness and disturbing tensions of the author. Possibly, that is how Grigoriev’s contemporaries conceived of the artist. The present portrait was painted in 1931 and appears to relate to a photograph (fg. 1) taken almost a decade earlier. In 1931 Grigoriev had already permanently settled

in Cagnes-sur-Mer and opened a school of drawing and painting in his own studio. Perhaps the artist

missed his time in Paris, the city where he achieved international recognition and created a visual

reference of himself in memory.

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION 45 BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939) Peasant boy and a cow

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

45

BORIS GRIGORIEV (1886-1939)

Peasant boy and a cow

signed and dated ‘Boris Grigoriev 35’ (lower left) pencil, watercolour and gouache on paper 17x 12 ¿ in. (45.4 x 30.8 cm.) Executed in 1935

17 √ x 12 ¿ in. (45.4 x 30.8 cm.) Executed in 1935 £50,000-70,000 $81,000-110,000 €64,000-88,000

£50,000-70,000

$81,000-110,000

€64,000-88,000

PROVENANCE:

The artist’s son, Kirill Grigoriev (1915-2001), Cagnes-sur-Mer. Acquired from the above by the previous owner in 1970. Anonymous sale; Artcurial-Briest, Poulain, F. Tajan, Paris, 8 June 2006, lot 254. Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE AMERICAN COLLECTION

*46

NICOLAI FECHIN (1881-1955)

Portrait of Mademoiselle Kitaeva

signed in Cyrillic and dated ‘N. Feshin/1912.’ (upper left) oil on canvas 35Ω x 30 in. (90.2 x 76.2 cm.)

£400,000-600,000

$650,000-960,000

€510,000-760,000

cm.) £400,000-600,000 $650,000-960,000 €510,000-760,000 Title page of the exhibition catalogue: Catalogue of the
cm.) £400,000-600,000 $650,000-960,000 €510,000-760,000 Title page of the exhibition catalogue: Catalogue of the

Title page of the exhibition catalogue: Catalogue of the Inaugural Exhibition, 1915 Lot 46 listed p. 37

PROVENANCE:

Mrs Charles Cranston Bovey, Minneapolis (1874-1964). Mitchell Brown Fine Art, Inc., Santa Fe (label on the reverse). Acquired from the above by Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe circa 2000 (label on the reverse). The Dr and Mrs Charles R. Briggs Collection.

EXHIBITED:

Moscow, 41 vystavka kartin Tovarishchestva Peredvizhnykh Khudozhestvennykh Vystavok [41st Exhibition of paintings of the Society for Traveling Art Exhibitions], 1912, no. 262. Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute, The Seventeenth Annual Exhibition, April 24–June 30, 1913 no. 87. Minneapolis, Institute of Arts, on extended loan 1914-1919, inventory no. L14.207 (partial label on the reverse). Minneapolis, Institute of Arts, Inaugural Exhibition, January-February 1915, no. 182. Seattle, Frye Art Museum, Nicolai Fechin, February 9-May 19, 2013.

LITERATURE:

Exhibition catalogue, Katalog XLI-i Peredvizhnoi Vystavki Kartin [Catalogue of the XlI Itinerant Exhibition of Paintings], Moscow, 1913, no. 262. Exhibition catalogue, The Catalogue of the Seventeenth Annual Exhibition at the Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1913, no. 87. ‘Works sold at Pittsburg’, American Art News, Vol. 11 no. 35, 19 July 1913, p. 7. Exhibition catalogue, Catalogue of the Inaugural Exhibition, Minneapolis, 1915, no. 182, p. 37.

P.

Dulsky, N. Feshin, Kazan, 1921, pp. 17 and 30.

G.

Burova and O. Rumiantseva, Tovarishchestvo Peredvizhnykh

Khudozhestvennykh Vystavok [Exhibitions of the Society of Itinerant Artists], Moscow, 1952, vol. I, p. 363.

S. Kaplanova, Ocherki po istorii russkogo portreta kontsa XIX-nachala

[Observations on the history of the Russian Portrait at the end of the 19th/

start of the 20th century], Moscow, 1964, p. 455.

E. Kluchevskaya and V. Tsoy, N. Feshin. Katalog proizvedeniy do 1923

goda [Catalogue of works prior to 1923], Kazan, 1992, listed p. 49, no. 28.

G. Romanov,