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Personal Educational Philosophy

Personal Educational Philosophy Research Paper


Travis Pate
October 14, 2014
EDUC 250
Ivy Tech Community College

Personal Educational Philosophy

So, what is the purpose of education? Is it solely to prepare students for the next level of
education and then for the work force? Or is it to give students a deeper understanding of
developing who they are and what their beliefs are? Perhaps it is both of these. The purpose of
education to me is to promote individual learning and thinking, but also to help students figure
out whom they are and help them form their own personal opinions. To get to this point, there are
10 model core teaching standards to the InTASC (Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support
Consortium) that give an outline of how to get there effectively.
In Standard #1: Learner Development, The teacher understands how learners grow and
develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and
across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and
implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences (INTASC, 2011).
Every student has a different pace of learning and it takes patience to accommodate for it (Smith,
2009). Being a patient person will not be an issue for me to take time for everyones different
paces and I will build off their strengths in the classroom to help them with their pace. I will
incorporate the students families and other teachers feedback to design a challenging, but
flexible lesson plan for all.
In Standard #2: Learning Differences, The teacher uses understanding of individual
differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that
enable each learner to meet high standards (INTASC, 2011). Respect in the classroom and the
value of your students opinions will build trust (Eisenman & Thornton, 1999). Once respect is
established in the classroom with the students, they will appreciate what is done for them such as

Personal Educational Philosophy

having more than one approach and setting aside time to help those who need it or may have a
learning disability.
In Standard #3: Learning Environments, The teacher works with others to create
environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive
social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation (INTASC, 2011). Remain
calm at all times. Once a teacher loses it with a class or student, it takes a long time to rebuild
that feeling of safety and trust within those four walls. Step right outside the door and take a few
breaths. It's worth it (Eisenman & Thornton, 1999). Being approachable is key in a great learning
environment. It is also important to make the environment feel safe, fun, and exciting.
Displaying achievements such as posters, drawings, etc. can cause a good vibe.
In Standard #4: Content Knowledge, The teacher understands the central concepts, tools
of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences
that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery
of the content (INTASC, 2011). Studentsappreciatewhenweshowourhumanity.Saying"I'm
notreallysure,doesanyoneelseknowormighttheyliketolookthatupforus?"ispowerful
stuff(Alber,n.n.).For me, knowing my subject I will be teaching is crucial, but the fact is I am
not going to know every answer. I love history and own books and movies that keep me up to
date.
In Standard #5: Application of Content, The teacher understands how to connect concepts
and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative
problem solving related to authentic local and global issues (INTASC, 2011). As a future
educator, I need to put aside all biases I have about the subject at hand and teach both sides.
Knowing all perspectives allows for a deeper discussion and leads to more critical thinking.

Personal Educational Philosophy

In Standard #6: Assessment, The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of
assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the
teachers and learners decision making (INTASC, 2011). I will utilize different methods of
assessment to get a more accurate read on my students and their work. Hnads-on work, class
participation, tests and quizzes, and homework with open ended questions and multiple-choice
will give everyone a chance at finding what works best for them.
In Standard #7: Planning for Instruction, The teacher plans instruction that supports every
student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas,
curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the
community context (INTASC, 2011). By planning for instruction, I know what I can focus more
on and less of in the classroom so I am not wasting time. This can help me to allow for time at
the end of class for questions and for me not to rush a lesson plan.
In Standard #8: Instructional Strategies, The teacher understands and uses a variety of
instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and
their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways (INTASC, 2011).
Using Powerpoints, movies, the internet, guest speakers, and other methods alike are a great way
to build connections with my students. When I have demonstrations and discussions, I will ask
questions, give praise, and give recognition for effort and good work.
In Standard #9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice, The teacher engages in
ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice,
particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other
professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner
(INTASC, 2011). I will personally attend seminars in my own time, take new courses and old

Personal Educational Philosophy

courses for a refresher in my subject area, and most importantly keep up to date with technology.
Technology today is constantly changing and it would be a disservice to our students to not use it
in the classroom.
In Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration, The teacher seeks appropriate leadership
roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners,
families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner
growth, and to advance the profession (INTASC, 2011). As a former coach and youth leader, I
know what it takes to show leadership qualities. Forming after school programs, be it athletics,
volunteer work, chess, or honor society, will show the community that we are trying to help our
students in more than just one way.
In conclusion, I believe as a future educator if I follow the 10 standards of InTASC as
mentioned above, I will be able to succeed in this profession. It may not be a fool proof model
that automatically qualifies students to become teachers, but it is a great guide to better prepare
current and future educators in the classroom. There is a lot that I can relate to from the standards
and that I will incorporate into my career path of becoming a high school level teacher. These
standards allow me and anyone else to be the best role model and teacher possible if the passion
and commitment is there.

References
Alber, R. (n.d.). 20 Tips for Creating a Safe Learning Environment. Retrieved October 11, 2014,
from http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-tips-create-safe-learning-environment-rebeccaalber

Personal Educational Philosophy

Eisenman, G., & Thornton, H. (1999). Telementoring: Helping new teachers through the first
year. T H E Journal, 26(9), 79.
INTASC Developing Standards for Beginning Teachers. (1999). Teaching Music, 7(2), 25.
Moss, Glenda & Lee, Cheu-jey George. A Critical Analysis of Philosophies of
Education and
INTASC Standards in Teacher Preparation. [Greensboro, North Carolina]. UNT
Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc109696/. Accessed
October 14, 2014.
Ormond, J. (2013). Educational Psychology (8th ed.). Pearson. Resources. (n.d.). Retrieved
October 7, 2014, from
http://www.ccsso.org/Resources/Publications/InTASC_Model_Core_Teaching_Standards
_and_Learning_Progressions_for_Teachers_10.html
Rinaldo, V. J., Denig, S. J., Sheeran, T. J., Cramer-Benjamin, R., Vermette, P. J., Foote, C. J., &
Smith, R. (2009). DEVELOPING THE INTANGIBLE QUALITIES OF GOOD TEACHING: A
SELF-STUDY. Education, 130(1), 42-52.