Sie sind auf Seite 1von 8

Group Members:

[NAME]
[NAME]

Growth Race
Look at the diagram of the Demographic Transition Model. Countries in Stage 1 have little to no
population growth. Why is this true? Looking at Stage 2, we see high birth rates and falling death
rates, leading to population growth. What might cause a countrys death rate to decrease?
In Stage 1 of the demographic transition model, birth rates and death rates are both high and therefore, there is no
growth. Death rates may decrease because of advances in medicine and technology, access to better nutrition and
improved sanitation.

Look at Stage 3 of the Demographic Transition model. What is happening to birth rates? What might
explain this?
Birth rates in Stage 3 are falling. As death rates fall (due to medical, technological or social advances), so do infant
mortality rates -- children live longer as well. When babies are more likely to survive infancy, couples feel more
comfortable having fewer children. Also, as countries industrialize and urbanize, fewer children are needed to work on
family farms.

In 2005, about what percent of the current population was under moderate water shortage? What
percent was under extreme water shortage? Why might an increasing population lead to a higher
percentage of our global population facing chronic water shortage?
About 35% of the population lived under moderate water shortage. About 10% lived under extreme water shortage.
An increasing population will need more water for domestic uses and for use in agriculture and industry.

Look at the graph titled, Energy Use Uneven Across the Globe. What trends do you notice? How
much more energy does the average North American consume versus an average Bangladeshi?
High income countries historically use a disproportionate amount of energy and continue to do so today. There has
been a slight increase in the amount of energy used by middle income countries since 1974. A North American uses 40
times more energy than a Bangladeshi, on average.

Look at the graph titled, Womens Education and Fertility. What can you tell about the
relationship between womens education level and fertility rates? What might be the reason for
this?
Countries with highly educated women have lower fertility rates and countries with less educated women have higher
fertility rates. More educated women tend to stay in school longer, and get married later, thus having fewer children
over the course of their lifetimes.

Look at the graph for Improving Child Health in Low Income Countries. In recent years, we have
seen the most gains in child health through an increase in vaccinations, while advancements in basic
sanitation and access to clean water have only been modest. Do you think that there is a reason for
this?
Vaccinations are easier to supply, require less infrastructure development, and perhaps receive more publicity than
sanitation and water issues.

Visit the Population Reference Bureau World Population Data Sheet 2014. In the Human
Population Growth Race visual ranking exercise, you ranked
food, medicine, sanitation, agriculture, energy, and technology
in the order of their impact on global population growth. For this summative assessment activity,
you and your partner will research the United States to represent a developed nation and India to
represent a developing nation. You will rank these categories independently for each country. It
is up to you to decide how you will divide the work. Choose a picture to represent each topic.
Cite statistics from the website in the link (or other websites) and describe why each ranking
belongs where it is. You will investigate three other topics of your choice for those countries, and
summarize and cite what you find most important/interesting/disturbing.

Here are some links for research on the United States:


Computer and Internet Use in the United States: 2013

This link takes you to a search on the Population Reference Bureau website for results about
India. These are some of the results you will see. Choose what you find to be the most useful
pages among these and others from the search results.
2011 Census Shows How 1.3 Billion People Live in India
Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Malnutrition in India
Improving Safe Childbirth in India
Countries Vary in Progress Toward Reducing Still-High Maternal Mortality
Also, you may refer to this document
Indias Population

1) Food

United States

[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

2) Medicine
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

3) Sanitation
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

4) Agriculture
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

5) Energy
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

6) Technology
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

Three other topics of your choice about the United States

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]

India

1) Agriculture
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[summary]

2) Medicine
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

3) Energy
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

4) Technology
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

5) Food
[Statistic]
[Statistic]
[Summary]

6) Sanitation
For India, the issue is not a lack of food, but rather a lack of toilets for its
populationone-half of India's population, at least 620 million people, defecates
outside (http://www.prb.org/Publications/Articles/2014/india-sanitationmalnutrition.aspx).
The World Health Organization estimates that 50 percent of malnutrition is
associated with repeated diarrhea or intestinal worm infections from unsafe
water or poor sanitation or hygiene
(http://www.prb.org/Publications/Articles/2014/india-sanitationmalnutrition.aspx).
Poor sanitation compromises the health of the people. Not enough toilets are
accessable, and that leads to frequent contamination of water sources. This is a
major setback for India that needs much attention.

Three other topics of your choice about India

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]

[Topic]
[Statistics]
[Summary]